P. 1
Propagation Sample Lesson

Propagation Sample Lesson

|Views: 1,173|Likes:
Published by missus1

More info:

Published by: missus1 on Jul 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/11/2013

pdf

text

original

Seed storage has two functions.  One is to keep seed from one growing season to
another.  The other is to permit the seed to overcome any dormancy condition.

In lesson 2, an overview of seed storage techniques was described. The basic
approaches are:
· temperature

Provide conditions that will slow the seed’s natural respiration rate.  Often
low temperatures result in seed remaining viable for the longest time.  Avoid
temperature fluctuations.

· moisture

Keep desiccant­tolerant seeds dry.  Because seeds are hygroscopic, even
moist air is sufficient to affect the moisture content of seeds.  Wet seeds often
rot.  For this reason, keep the dried seeds in an airtight container and
maintain the dryness of the air within the container through the use of silica
gel.

Only store recalcitrant seeds in suitable (moist) conditions.  These seeds, in
general, do not store for long.

· gases

Seeds continue to respire even in storage.  For seeds stored dry, there is
little respiration (this has been limited by both temperature and moisture
levels), so exposure to oxygen has little effect on storage.

Recalcitrant seeds (those stored in a moist condition) will require oxygen in
storage.

Storage of seeds may influence:
· viability (the number of seeds that will germinate when ideal conditions are
provided),
· vitality (the rate that the seeds germinate – that is, the speed of the
germination and the vitality of the seedling that results)

· dormancy

Some seeds overcome dormancy during storage.  Other seeds will develop
dormancy during storage.  The seeds of Baptisia australis (Wild Indigo)
develop seed coat dormancy when the seed coat dries.

For the home gardener, avoid keeping seeds in the kitchen drawer (the temperature
fluctuations will cause premature aging of the seeds), garden shed or greenhouse
(the seeds may become damp in these conditions).

Commercial seed companies often seal their seeds in foil packets to keep the
moisture away from the seeds and to reduce the amount of oxygen that the seeds
are exposed to.  When only some of these seeds have been sown, use sticky tape to
reseal the remainder in the foil packet in which they were purchased.

Some seeds require a period of storage before they will germinate.  Usually these
seeds are exhibiting a type dormancy of within the seed, involving the embryo.  The
embryo may be dormant or may not be completely formed.  Warm, dry storage may
be the only step required to overcome this dormancy (for example, the seeds of

ãHCC/RHS LVL 2/L3/450

48

Calendula) or may be the first step required to overcome this dormancy.

The two main points of seed storage are:

· When saving dry seeds, use glassine envelopes, paper bags or envelopes, or
cloth bags.  Avoid using polythene bags, because these trap moisture (should the
seeds not be completely dry) and the seeds may rot.

· Know what conditions are necessary for the specific species of seed is being
collected – some tolerate or require dry storage to remain viable, others are not
tolerant of drying (these seeds are often called recalcitrant seeds) and must be
collected when moist and stored in moist conditions.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->