STRESS MANAGEMENT By ………………….. (Registration No: ……………….

) Of
……………………….

A project report submitted to FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCES In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ANNA UNIVERSITY APRI !""#

$ERTIFI$ATE
This is to certify that the project report on the %…………………………& is a bonafide project work done by Ms………………… a full time student of the !epartment of Management "tudies ……………………………….. in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Business #dministration of the #nna $ni%ersity during the year …………………

………………. ………………. &roject 'uide

…………………….. (ead of the !epartment Of Management "tudies &rincipal

Internal )*aminer )*ternal )*aminer

+

DE$ ARATION I ………………… hereby declare that the report on all fulfillments of the requirements for the award of the degree in Masters in Business #dministration is a record of original work done by me during the period of study +,,-.+,,/ under the guidance and super%ision of …………………

……………………… "ignature of the 0aculty 'uide

…………………….. "ignature of the 1andidate

2

A$'NO( ED)EMENT I cordially thank #nna $ni%ersity for gi%ing me the opportunity to undergo my project work. I thank the chairman ………………………….and the principal

……………. ………. for their full fledged support for ha%ing gi%en me the opportunity to study in this Institution. I thank Mr. ……………………… (ead of the !epartment of Management "tudies for his inspiration and pro%iding me all the facilities to do my project work. I would also like to thank our faculty guide ………………………… who guided me through out the project. "incere thanks are also to all the staff members of MB# department for their %aluable guidance and support. I would also like to thank …………………. !eputy 'eneral Manager &ersonnel !epartment for permitting me to pursue the project in their esteemed concern and …………………… #sst. Manager work and also to all the employees of #%tar "teels.
3

&ersonnel

!epartment for sparing his %aluable time to guide me during the project

4ast but not the least I would like to thank the almighty my family members and friends for supporting me in hundred little ways that means a lot.

TAB E OF $ONTENTS
S.NO $ONTENTS
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TAB E NO.
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TIT E
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ABSTAR$T
The flagship company of #%tar "teel was a humble yet pioneering beginning made by its founder and chairman Mr . B. B. +INDA in the year 9??-. (e is %ery well supported by his two sons Mr. AMIT +INDA and Mr. SUMIT +INDA and with the team of professionals who are e*pert in their respecti%e fields =ith his courage of con%iction and his undeterred pursuits for growth and e*cellence the company has assumed its present siDe and credence of global significance. # strange new disease has found its way into li%es of people of this industrialiDed nation of the world. The most common disease is headache. :ot only is this but diseases like heart attack high Blood &ressure stomach disorders and skin diseases %ery common to the people in the present world. These ha%e become the effects of stress and ha%e become most common in many of the organiDations now.a.days. "tress is an all per%ading modern phenomenon that takes a hea%y toll of human life. !ifferent situations and circumstances in our personal life and in our job produce stress. =e shall di%ide them into factors related to the organiDation or job factors related to the person which include his e*perience or personality traits.

99

9+

,. INTRODU$TION IMPORTAN$E OF T*E STUDY +,T( century has been regarded as the period of incredible change in human history. &hilosophers and scientists ha%e been %arious names to this period. &eter !rucker has called it EThe #ge of !iscontinuityF >ohn 'albraith has called it EThe #ge of 0uture "hockF and (ari #lbrecht called it EThe #ge of #n*ietyF. "tress has become the +9 century buDD word from the high per%ading corporate echelons to the bassinets of teaching infantsG nurseries we find this world liberally used. "tress is part of modern life. 7arious e%ents in life cause stress starting with the birth of a child and enduring with the death of a dear one. $rbaniDation industrialiDation and the increase scale of operations in society are some of the reasons for rising stress. It is an ine%itable consequence of socio.economic comple*ity and to some e*tent its stimulant as well. &eople e*perience stress as they can no longer ha%e complete control o%er what happen in their li%es. The telephone goes out of order power is shut down water supply is disrupted children perform poorly at school etc we feel frustrated and then stressed. The word stress is deri%ed from a 4atin word E stringereF meaning to draw tight. 0rom the %iew point of physical sciences the phenomena of stress are e%ident in all materials when they are subjected to Eforce pressure strain or strong.frontF. )%ery material steel rock or wood has its own limit up to which it can withstand stress without being damaged. "imilarly human beings can tolerate certain le%el of stress. "tress is highly indi%idualistic in nature. "ome people ha%e high le%els of stress tolerance for stress and thri%e %ery well in the face of se%eral stressors in the en%ironment. In fact some indi%iduals will not perform well unless they e*perience a le%el of stress which acti%ates and energiDes then to put forth their best results. 0or e%ery indi%idual there is an optimum le%el of stress under which he or she will perform to full capacity. If the stress e*perience is below the optimum le%el then the indi%idual gets bored the moti%ational le%el of work reaches a low point and it results to careless mistakes forgetting to do things and thinking of things other than work during work hours and also leads to absenteeism which may ultimately lead to turno%er. If on the other hand stress e*perience is abo%e the optimum le%el it leads to too many conflicts

92

with the super%isor or leads to increase of errors bad decisions and the indi%idual may e*perience insomnia stomach problems and psychosomatic illness. The present world is fast changing and there are lots of pressures and demands at work. These pressures at work lead to physical disorders. "tress refers to indi%idualGs reaction to a disturbing factor in the en%ironment. It is an adapti%e response to certain e*ternal factor or situation or what can be called en%ironmental stimuli as reflected in an opportunity constraint or demand the outcome of which is uncertain but important. In short stress is a response to an e*ternal factor that results in physical emotional beha%ioral de%iations in a person. "tress is an all per%ading modern phenomenon that takes a hea%y toll of human life. !ifferent situations and circumstances in our personal life and in our job produce stress. Those can be di%ided into factors related to the organiDation and factors related to the person which include his e*perience and personality traits. >ob related factors are work o%erload time pressures poor quality of super%ision insecure political climate role conflict and ambiguity difference between company %alues and employee %alues. &erson related factors are death of spouse or of a close friend family problems change to a different line of work prolonged illness in the family change in social acti%ities eating habits etc. &ersonality traits are HType #G personality. They are impatient ambitious competiti%e aggressi%e and hardworking. They set high goals and demands of themsel%es and others. #nd they are particularly prone to stress inducing anticipatory emotions such as an*iety.

93

REMEDIES TO REDU$E STRESS There are two major approaches to reduce stress. They are • • Indi%idual approaches OrganiDational approaches #n employee can take indi%idual responsibility to reduce hisIher stress le%el. Indi%idual strategies that ha%e pro%en effecti%e include implementing time management techniques increasing physical e*ercise rela*ation training and e*panding the social support network.  Ti-e -anage-ent Many people manage their time %ery poorly. "ome of well known time management principles include o Making daily list of acti%ities to be accomplished o "cheduling acti%ities according to the priorities set o &rioritiDing acti%ities by importance and urgency o Bnowing your daily cycle and handling the most demanding parts of your job.  P./si0a1 e2er0ise &racticing non.competiti%e physical e*ercises like aerobics race walking jogging swimming and riding a bi.cycle.  Re1a2ation training 5ela*ation techniques such as meditation hypnosis and bio.feedback. The objecti%e is to reach in state of deep rela*ation where one feels physically rela*ed somewhat from detached from the immediate en%ironment. 0ifteen or twenty minutes a day of deep rela*ation releases tension and pro%ides a person with a pronounced sense of peacefulness.  So0ia1 s344ort (a%ing families friends or work colleagues to talk pro%ides an outlet when stress le%els become e*cessi%e. "o e*pand your social support network that helps you with someone to hear your problems. 9<

INDIVIDUA APPROA$*ES

OR)ANI5ATIONA APPROA$*ES "e%eral of the factors that cause stress particularly task and role demands and organiDations structure are controlled by management. #s such they can be modified or changed. "ome of the strategies that management want to consider include impro%ed personal self section and job placement use of realistic goal setting redesigning of jobs impro%ed organiDational communication and establishment of corporate wellness programmes. 1ertain jobs are more stressful than others. Indi%idual with little e*perience or an e*ternal lower of control tend to be more pro%en to stress. "election and placement decisions should take these facts into consideration. 'oal setting helps to reduce stress. It also pro%ides moti%ation. !esigning jobs to gi%e employees more responsibility more meaningful work more autonomy and increased feedback can reduce stress because these factors gi%e the employee greater control o%er work acti%ities and lessen dependence on others. Increasingly formal organiDational communication with employees reduces uncertainly by lessency role ambiguity and role conflict. =ellness program say employee counseling form on the employeeGs total physical and mental condition. They typically proud work ships to help people quit smoking control alcohol usage eat better and de%elop a regular e*ercise program. #nother remedy for reducing stress is 0ogniti6e restr30t3ring. It in%ol%es two step procedures. 0irst irrational or maladapti%e thought processes that create stress are identified. 0or e*ample Type # indi%iduals may belie%e that they must be successful at e%erything they do. The second step consists of replacing these irrational thoughts with more rational or reasonable ones. One important remedy to reduce stress is the maintenance of good sleep. 5esearch conducted on laboratory specimen to ha%e met with startling disco%eries. "leep star%ed rats ha%e de%eloped stress syndrome. The amount of sleep one requires %aries from person to person and is dependent on oneGs lifestyle. The #merican :ational "leep 0oundation claims that a minimum of eight hours of sleep is essential for good health. 'enerally studies shows that young adults can manage with about ;./ hours. #fter the age of 2< si* hours of sleep is sufficient whereas people o%er -< years may just need three or four hours.

9-

9;

!. INDUSTRY PROFI E
Stee1 In73str/ Because of the critical role played by steel in infrastructural and o%erall economic de%elopment the steel industry is often considered to be an indicator of economic progress. The economic boom in 1hina and India has caused a massi%e increase in the demand for steel in recent years. Between +,,, and +,,< world steel demand increased by -J. "ince +,,, se%eral Indian and 1hinese steel firms ha%e risen to prominence like Tata "teel Kwhich bought 1orus 'roup in +,,;L "hanghai Baosteel 'roup 1orporation and "hagang 'roup. #rcelorMittal is howe%er the worldMs largest steel producer. The British 'eological "ur%ey reports that in +,,< 1hina was the top producer of steel with about one.third world share followed by >apan 5ussia and the $"#. In +,,/ steel started to be traded as a commodity in the 4ondon Metal )*change. #t the end of +,,/ the steel industry faced a sharp downturn that led to many cut.backs "teel is the most widely recycled material in the $nited "tates. The steel industry has been acti%ely recycling for more than 9<, years in large part because it is economically ad%antageous to do so. It is cheaper to recycle steel than to mine iron ore and manipulate it through the production process to form MnewM steel. "teel does not lose any of its inherent physical properties during the recycling process and has drastically reduced energy and material requirements compared with refinement from iron ore. The energy sa%ed by recycling reduces the annual energy consumption of the industry by about ;<J which is enough to power eighteen million homes for one year. 5ecycling one ton of steel sa%es 9 9,, kilograms of iron ore -2, kilograms of coal and << kilograms of limestone. ;- million tons of steel were recycled in +,,<.

9/

# pile of steel scrap in Brussels waiting to be recycled. In recent years about three quarters of the steel produced annually has been recycled. (owe%er the numbers are much higher for certain types of products. 0or e*ample in both +,,3 and +,,< ?;.<J of structural steel beams and plates were recycled. Other steel construction elements such as reinforcement bars are recycled at a rate of about -<J. Indeed structural steel typically contains around ?<J recycled steel content whereas lighter gauge flat rolled steel contains about 2,J reused material. Because steel beams are manufactured to standardiDed dimensions there is often %ery little waste produced during construction and any waste that is produced may be recycled. 0or a typical + ,,,.square.foot K+,, m+L two.story house a steel frame is equi%alent to about si* recycled cars while a comparable wooden frame house may require as many as 3,N<, trees. 'lobal demand for steel continues to grow and though there are large amounts of steel e*isting much of it is acti%ely in use. #s such recycled steel must be augmented by some first.use metal deri%ed from raw materials. 1ommonly recycled steel products include cans automobiles appliances and debris from demolished buildings. # typical appliance is about -<J steel by weight and automobiles are about --J steel and iron. =hile some recycling takes place through the integrated steel mills and the basic o*ygen process most of the recycled steel is melted electrically either using an electric arc furnace Kfor production of low.carbon steelL or an induction furnace Kfor production of some highly.alloyed ferrous productsL. Modern steels are made with %arying combinations of alloy metals to fulfill many purposes. 1arbon steel composed simply of iron and carbon accounts for ?,J of steel production.O9P (igh strength low alloy steel has small additions Kusually Q +J by weightL of other elements typically 9.<J manganese to pro%ide additional strength for a modest price increase. 4ow alloy steel is alloyed with other elements usually molybdenum manganese chromium or nickel in amounts of up to 9,J by weight to impro%e the harden ability of thick sections. "tainless steels and surgical stainless steels contain a minimum of 9,J chromium often combined with nickel to resist corrosion KrustL. "ome stainless steels are magnetic while others are nonmagnetic. 9?

"ome more modern steels include tool steels which are alloyed with large amounts of tungsten and cobalt or other elements to ma*imiDe solution hardening. This also allows the use of precipitation hardening and impro%es the alloyMs temperature resistance. Tool steel is generally used in a*es drills and other de%ices that need a sharp long.lasting cutting edge. Other special.purpose alloys include weathering steels such as 1or.ten which weather by acquiring a stable rusted surface and so can be used un. painted. Many other high.strength alloys e*ist such as dual.phase steel which is heat treated to contain both a ferritic and martensitic microstructure for e*tra strength. Transformation Induced &lasticity KT5I&L steel in%ol%es special alloying and heat treatments to stabiliDe amounts of austentite at room temperature in normally austentite. free low.alloy ferritic steels. By applying strain to the metal the austentite undergoes a phase transition to martensite without the addition of heat. Maraging steel is alloyed with nickel and other elements but unlike most steel contains almost no carbon at all. This creates a %ery strong but still malleable metal. Twinning Induced &lasticity KT=I&L steel uses a specific type of strain to increase the effecti%eness of work hardening on the alloy. )glin "teel uses a combination of o%er a doDen different elements in %arying amounts to create a relati%ely low.cost metal for use in bunker buster weapons. (adfield steel Kafter "ir 5obert (adfieldL or manganese steel contains 9+N93J manganese which when abraded forms an incredibly hard skin which resists wearing. )*amples include tank tracks bulldoDer blade edges and cutting blades on the jaws of life. # special class of high.strength alloy the superalloys retain their mechanical properties at e*treme temperatures while minimiDing creep. These are commonly used in applications such as jet engine blades where temperatures can reach le%els at which most other alloys would become weak. Most of the more commonly used steel alloys are categoriDed into %arious grades by standards organiDations. 0or e*ample the "ociety of #utomoti%e )ngineers has a series of grades defining many types of steel. The #merican "ociety for Testing and +,

Materials has a separate set of standards which define alloys such as #2- steel the most commonly used structural steel in the $nited "tates. Though not an alloy gal%aniDed steel is a commonly used %ariety of steel which has been hot.dipped or electroplated in Dinc for protection against corrosion Ministr/ o8 Stee1 (In7ia) The Ministry of "teel a branch of 'o%ernment of India is the ape* body for formulating all policies regarding steel production distribution and pricing in India. #ll steel companies e*cept Tata "teel are under the administrati%e control of the 'o%ernment of India. #s of May +,,/ The Ministry is headed by a Minister of 1abinet rank 5am 7ilas &aswan and is assisted by a Minister of "tate #khilesh !as

Stee1 in73str/ re8or-s 9 4arti031ar1/ in ,::, an7 ,::! 9 .a6e 1e7 to strong an7 s3staina;1e gro<t. in In7ia=s stee1 in73str/. "ince its independence India has e*perienced steady growth in the steel industry thanks in part to the successi%e go%ernments that ha%e supported the industry and pushed for its robust de%elopment. 0urther illustrating this plan is the fact that a number of steel plants were established in India with technological assistance and in%estments by foreign countries. In 9??9 a substantial number of economic reforms were introduced by the Indian go%ernment. These reforms boosted the de%elopment process of a number of industries N the steel industry in India in particular N which has subsequently de%eloped quite rapidly. India continually posts phenomenal growth records in steel production. In 9??+ India produced 93.22 million tones of finished carbon steels and 9.<? million tones of pig iron. 0urthermore the steel production capacity of the country has increased rapidly since +9

9??9 N in +,,/ India produced nearly 3-.<;< million tones of finished steels and 3.2?2 million tones of pig iron. Both primary and secondary producers contributed their share to this phenomenal de%elopment while these increases ha%e pushed up the demand for finished steel at a %ery stable rate. In 9??+ the total consumption of finished steel was 93./3 million tones. In +,,/ the total amount of domestic steel consumption was 32.?+< million tones. =ith the increased demand in the national market a huge part of the international market is also ser%ed by this industry. Today India is in se%enth position among all the crude steel producing countries.

The 9??9 reforms allowed for no licenses to be required for capacity creation e*cept for some locations. #lso once IndiaGs steel industry was mo%ed from the listing of the industries that were reser%ed e*clusi%ely for the public sector huge foreign in%estments were made in this industry. 8et another reform for IndiaGs steel industry came in 9??+ when e%ery type of control o%er the pricing and distribution system was remo%ed making the modern Indian "teel Industry e*tremely efficient as well as competiti%e. #dditionally a number of other go%ernment measures ha%e stimulated the growth of the steel industry coming in the form of an unrestricted e*ternal trade low import duties and an easy ta* structure.

++

STEE PRODU$TION BY $OUNTRY

$o3ntries 1(I:# >#&#: $:IT)! "T#T)" 5$""I# ')5M#:8 $B5#I:)

Pro730tion 2?3.? Mton 99+.< Mton ?3.? Mton

$o3ntries 05#:1) T#I=#: "&#I:

Pro730tion 9?.< Mton 9/.- Mton 9;./ Mton

--.9 Mton 33.< Mton 2/.- Mton

M)6I1O 1#:#!# $B B)4'I$M

9-.+ Mton 9<.2 Mton 92.+ Mton 9,.3 Mton

"O$T( BO5)# 3;./ Mton

S(OT ANA YSIS  Strengt.   (uge fund "killed employees Monopoly

+2

 (ea>ness O44ort3nities T.reats      

e*pansion red tape rules and regulation ModerniDation =orld class standard 4egal issues "ecurity issues

A6tar Stee1s 4ro4osition Through its large pool of professional e*perts in %aried disciplines of ci%il a%iation it offers consultancy ser%ices in following fields. 9. 0easibility study and master planning +. )conomic impact study. 2. )n%ironment impact study. 3. 1onstruction and operations steels terminals. <. 1ommunication and na%igation -. (5 department ;. 1ommercial e*ploitation /. 5@!

*UMAN RESOUR$ES OF AVTAR STEE S #%tar "teels comprises of highly professional moti%ated and trained man power which helped it emerge as a professional organiDation on the horiDon of a%iation sector. (igh morale of employees continues to boost smooth operation of its steelss towards accomplishing the objecti%e of customer satisfaction. The authority has successfully used the (uman 5esource Tools like >ob 5otation 5edeployment etc to sustain employeeMs interest in their job. #%tar "teels has a strength of about +9 ,,, employees both e*ecuti%es and non. e*ecuti%es the management of #7T#5 "T))4" firmly belie%es that through this in%aluable assets of human resources alone it can achie%e its goals utmost care is taken in the employees welfare and %arious schemes ha%e been introduced for the enlistment and better li%ing standards of the #7T#5 "T))4" 0raternity. +3

*IERAR$*Y OF STAFF AT AVTAR STEE S (IAD)

9

9. '5O$& H#G +. '5O$& HBR 2. '5O$& H1G 3. '5O$& H!G

+

4e%els of Management

2 3

CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES

EXECUTIVES

NON-EXECUTIVES

Group “A”

Group “B”

Group “C”

Group “D”

E e! Director Ge"! #$"$%er D&! G# Asst! G# Sr! #$"$%er #$"$%er

Asst! #$"$%er 'u"ior E ecuti(e Sr! Spdt!

Superi"te"de"t Super(isor Sr! Assist$"t Assist$"t 'r! Assist$"t

Sr! Atte"d$"t Atte"d$"t 'r! Atte"d$"t

+<

#7T#5 "T))4" has a professional 0ons31tan0/ 7i6ision comprising of competent designers planners architects computer analysts and research engineers. The 0onstr30tion 7i6ision undertakes e*ecution of projects strictly according to schedule with the use of latest project management techniques and high.tech construction equipment. AVTAR STEE S MANA)EMENT: In addition to technical ser%ices #7T#5 "T))4" pro%ides e*pertise in steels management. #7T#5 "T))4" offers know.how and ser%ices in the fields of steels and other industries .and financial management. $USTOMER SATISFA$TION AND SAFETY 1ustomer satisfaction and safety are the core priorities of #7T#5 "T))4". In its endea%or to pro%ide world class passenger amenities and ser%ices the authority is de%eloping mo%e international steelss in the country and impro%ing facilities in !omestic steelss +-

AVTAR STEE S IS RE)ISTERED (IT* • • • • • • • International Bank of reconstruction and de%elopment Kworld BankL International ci%il a%iation organiDation #frican de%elopment bank #sian de%elopment bank Buwait fund for #rab de%elopment 'o%ernment of Cambia 5epublic of Iraq

FOREI)N PRO+E$TS E?E$UTED BY AVTAR STEE S #7T#5 "T))4" has undertaken assignments like steels feasibility studies steels design project implementation @ project super%ision manpower training "teels mgt and operation on turnkey basics pro%iding manpower for steels operation including air traffic ser%ices ground na%igation I sur%eillance facilities etc. The #7T#5 "T))4" has undertaken consultancy projects in 4ibya #lgeria 8emen Maldi%es :auru #fghanistan Iraq :epal :igeria Cambia etc. STEE S $ ASSIFI$ATION Internationa1 stee1s There are declared as international steels and are a%ailable for scheduled international operations by Indian and foreign carriers. &resently Mumbai !elhi 1hennai 1alcutta and Tri%andrum are in this category. Do-esti0 stee1ss  1ustoms steelss with limited international operations K4imited international operationsL +;

Model steelss.runway.;<,, feet and terminal capacity is 3,, and abo%e 2+, type of air craft. Other domestic steelss .;9 1i%il encla%es in defense steels.+/
$ ASSIFI$ATION OF STEE SS

 

)EO)RAP*I$A     

:orthern region "outhern region )astern region =estern region :orth eastern region

+/

+?

2. $OMPANY PROFI E AVTAR STEE S@ $*ENNAI DIVISION@

A6tar Stee1 t7. is a conglomerate of companies dealing in manufacturing and e*ports ofa di%erse range of "tainless "teelGs I:'OT" (OT 5O44)! 04#T" 5O44)! 5O$:!" 0O5')! 5O$:!" B5I'(T B#5" as well as #44O8 "T))4" also. =ith two of the companies being established houses N recogniDed by the go%ernment of India as &%t. 4td 0irms being reputed (igh &rofile Independent 8et Interlinked $nits the picture of a professionally managed and growth oriented industrial empire is complete. The flagship company of #%tar "teel was a humble yet pioneering beginning made by its founder and chairman Mr . B. B. +INDA in the year 9??-. (e is %ery well supported by his two sons Mr. AMIT +INDA and Mr. SUMIT +INDA and with the team of professionals who are e*pert in their respecti%e fields =ith his courage of con%iction and his undeterred pursuits for growth and e*cellence the company has assumed its present siDe and credence of global significance. The journey has been tedious and tiring the efforts N (erculean The e*pectations of its &atrons.:er%e =recking and the ne%er receding competition in the global markets N Mind Boggling. 8et success at #%tar "teel has ne%er been an end in itself rather a moti%ation to outperform its pre%ious accolades. #nd all through this long Tedious and soul and body wrecking process of e%olution the beautiful melody of the words of learned !a%id 0rost has been its constant companionS

AUA ITY PO I$Y ETo pro%ide our passengers a safe smooth and enjoyable transit through 1hennai steels. #lso to pro%ide secured and speedy mo%ement of international steels through 1hennai steels

2,

MISSION To deli%er superior %alue to our customers employees and society at large. =e will follow this principle in e%aluating and guiding our business acti%ities. =e will to set an e*ample of quality works and intend to contribute to build a flourishing economy. =e will achie%e this by offering our clients a comprehensi%e portfolio of commercially %iable products coupled with the e*pertise and ser%ices required. =e will endea%our to create high quality products that enable the growth of our organiDation. #t #%tar "teel 4td. the well.trained staff will achie%e job satisfaction through security moti%ation VISION =e recogniDe that e%ery organiDation is different with its own unique business objecti%es commercial approach and culture. That is why we ha%e created fle*ibility and pragmatism with in our ser%ice options enabling us to tailor ser%ices to meet specific objecti%es Our customers are our biggest asset and customer satisfaction ranks first on our business priorities. O%er the years we ha%e grown to di%ersify into %arious fields but ne%er ha%e we let go off our roots. =e lay stress on workerGs training sensitiDation orientation and updating their skills for o%er all e*posure as well as growth VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS IN AVTAR STEE S $*ENNAI 9. (uman 5esource department +. !epartment of finance and #ccounts 2. !epartment of "ales 3. !epartment of operations <. !epartment of commercial -. !epartment of 4egal ;. !epartment of project 29 and harmonious work en%ironments.

,) *UMAN RESOUR$E DEPARTMENT IN AVTAR STEE S $*ENNAI #s like any other organiDation Main 83n0tions    It identifies and meets the man power requirements of 1hennai steels. It recruits and selects the 'roup H1G and H!G positions It implements welfare measures and carries out performance appraisal techniques.   It conducts training and de%elopment programmes (5 department at ##9 also takes the responsibility in maintaining its employeeMs welfare as well as its policy.

It ensures discipline and maintains industrial relations. STEELS DIRECTOR A3a1it/ 4o1i0/ o8 t.e *R De4art-ent T"elect the right personnel for the 5ight job and pro%ide him with the right working atT. Man4o<er 4osition at $.ennai Stee1s:: 'roup # B 1 ! TOT#4 Main a0ti6ities 9L +L 2L 3L <L -L ;L /L ?L 9,L 5ecruitment and promotion cell. !isciplinary cell. &erformance appraisal cell #d%ances K(B# 7ehicle and other ad%anceL 4ea%e cell Training and welfare cell. 4T) and 1)# cell. "er%ices records 1entral dispatch 1entral diary 2+ "anctioned strength Men in position 7acancy position U/ U/ 999 /+ 9-<

;/ /932 DY. GENERAL MANAGER 9<9 (P&A) --/ <<; <3? 3;? 932/ 9+;2

STEELS D ORGANISATION C+ART OF +UMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

Pers%!"l Assist"!t

SR. PERSONNEL MANAGER

MANAGER (PERSONNEL)

ASST. MANAGER (OFF. LANGUAGE)

Sr. Supdt.(O) R & P Cell

Sr. Asst. (O) Le"(e Cell

Sr. Supdt. (+i!di Tr"!sl"t%r)

Sr. Supdt.(O)
Dis ipli!"r# Cell

Sr.Asst. (O)

LTC & ALTC

Sr. Asst. (Ste!%) +i!di

Sr. Supdt.(O) P"# Fi$"ti%!

Sr. Asst. (O) Ad("! es

Asst. (O) Ser(i e Re %rds

Sr. Asst. (O)

Per&%r'"! e Appr"is"l Cell

Asst.(O) Tr"i!i!) & *el&"re Cell

Asst.(O)
Ce!tr"l Disp"t , & Di"r#

D"&tr# & DMO

ALL GROUP -D. STAFF

22

DY. GENERAL MANAGER (P&A)

*UMAN RESOUR$E PO I$Y B RU ES IRECTOR Trans8er 4o1i0/ 'enerally transfers are meant to utiliDe the indi%idual skillIpotential in areas in which heIshe has been trained Iskilled. The transfer policy shall apply to all the transferable posts in all discipline. 9. :ormal transfer seasonS for both inter region and intra region. :ormal transfer season would be K#pril @ May each yearL +. Inter regional transfer. 2. Intra regional transfer 3. (ome town <. Transfer on promotion. -. Transfer to tenure stations. ;. Transfer from tenure stations. /. )*emptions from transfer. E-41o/ee <e18are -eas3res in AVTAR STEE S The employee welfare program at #7T#5 "T))4" in based on the management policy which is aimed shaping perfect employees. Therefore the concept of employeeMs welfare includes tow aspects namely physical and mental welfare. =elfare at #7T#5 "T))4" is 9. #pplication of merit system or work performance system as the basis for employee rewarding +. )mployee insurance program to pro%ide the employees with better security. 2. Impro%ement in health security for one employees and their families so that they may work confidently and producti%ely. 3. 5ecei%es on social psychology no reach a balance between physical and mental well being. <. &ro%iding facilities for employees to make use of the allowance for housing %ehicles etc. -. &ro%iding education allowance for employeeMs children for their studies. ;. &ro%iding rest rooms to fi%e the employees to rela* after the light schedule.

23

E-41o/ee -oti6ation s0.e-es 9. Incenti%e scheme for acquiring professionalIadditional qualifications +. &roduction linked incenti%e 2. 0le*ible complementing scheme K01"LS "taffs that ha%e been waiting for promotion for long years after completing the eligibility period. 3. 1areer progression scheme K1&"LS #s a one time measure #sst. managersImanagers in %arious disciplines are eligible for consideration for promotion to the ne*t higher post. $o-;ination o8 7i88erent >in7s o8 1ea6es C .o1i7a/s • • • • • • 5egular lea%e . "aturday "undays 1asual lea%e 5estricted holiday 1ompensatory holiday (olidays "pecial casual lea%e

!) DEPARTMENT OF FINAN$E AND A$$OUNTS F3n0tions o Maintenance of a system of financial control internal check and financial scrutiny of all e*penditure and re%enue proposals. o !isbursements to staff including retired persons o !isbursements to outside agencies for supplies and ser%ices pro%ided. o 5e%enue billing follow up and realiDation. o &reparation of budget and maintenance of a proper system of budgetary control. o Maintenance of financial accounts in accordance with the directions of (eadquarters and preparations of financial statements. o Management of info systems.

2<

o 1oordinating with internal and e*ternal audit and go%ernment audit for smooth disposal of audit queries. Di88erent se0tions in a00o3nts 7e4art-ent ,. !. D. E. F. G. 5e%enue section. "teels accounts section. Budget and accounts section =orks section )stablishment sections 1ontributory pro%ident fund section K1&0L

D) DEPARTMENT OF STEE S

9. )*port +. Import 2. Transshipment
#7T#5 "T))4" air steels terminals pro%ide for truck locks strong rooms li%e animals sheds haDardous steels go down and palletisation station offices for airlines go%ernment regulatory agencies multimodal steels operators break bulk agents and consolidators for ease of operation and user con%enience. E) DEPARTMENT OF OPERATIONS The entire function of the terminal building is been controlled by the operations dept. The work has been di%ided and is controlled by %arious sections according to their acti%ities such as house keeping electronic material management. F3n0tions:

 

5eceipt and disposal of complaints and possible action on comments and suggestions from the passengerIuser agencies. To maintain and look after terminal building city side and baggage make up and baggage breakup areas to ensure ser%ice ability of facilities pro%ided. (andling terminal building and air craft emergencies and bomb threats as per laid down emergency procedure. 2-

 

(andling of 77I&"I7I&" and up keep and allotment of retiring rooms. 4ost and found property receipt shortages are sent to the department after e*piry of +3 hours. &erishable item can be disposed off with in reasonable time.

   

1oordination with electrical ci%il electronics departments for ser%ice ability of terminal facilities. 1oordination with airlinesIagencies and regulatory authorities in the steels. )ndea%oring enjoyable transit for passengers. 1arrying out terminal inspections city side toilet inspections and record obser%ations toilet ca%e pro%ided.

F) DEPARTMENT OF $OMMER$IA #7T#5 "T))4" has o%er last 9, years or so de%eloped a team of e*perts in the field of commercial aspects and based on the e*perience gained can pro%ide assistance to other steels operators in impro%ing the financial %iability of the steelss. F3n0tions:

       

Management of all commercial re%enue contracts #ll space allotment s in the steels area Insurance of #7T#5 "T))4" assets #llotment of residential quarters #llotment of community centre 5ecommendation of passes to concessionairesIagencies. Manage ground handling functions #dministrati%e work.

G) DEPARTMENT OF E)A 2;

O;He0ti6es: o To minimiDe the cases against #7T#5 "T))4" o &ro%iding legal assistanceIad%ice to other dept on the queries required. o "peedy disposal of the files. o #ttending and making a%ailable facts oat the time of contingency situations of ##9 and acting according to the contingency plan. Do03-ents -aintaine7: o &olicy circular issued of the (A. o 5egulation of ##9. o !elegation of power. o >udgment copies of the important cases. o :otification files. I) DEPARTMENT OF )ROUND F I)*T SAFETY F3n0tions:   Issue of temporaryIpermanent %ehicle permits. #rranging airfield en%ironment management and aerodrome meetings.      Issue of airfield dri%ing permit to dri%ersIoperators. #rranging full scale aircraft crash mockup e*ercise. #rranging for disabled aircraft mo%ement. 1orrespondence with air traffic ser%icesI (qrsI airlinesI municipalities. Implement safety management systems and future de%elopments committee

#) DEPARTMENT OF PRO+E$T The project department handles with under taking of new projects for the de%elopment or the e*pansion of the steels. There are two major sub di%isions which handle the project by the specific department. They are 9L )lectrical di%ision +L 1i%il di%ision E1e0tri0a1 7e4art-ent: 2/

#s per the head of the department !'M shall be o%er all in charge for proper administration of T=ork contractT and shall ensure that all pro%isions of the contract agreement are correctly implemented and installed of the same quality.

RESPONSIBI ITIES AND FUN$TIONS: • • • • • • • O%er all proper admin of work contract and shall ensure that all pro%isions of contract agreement are correctly implemented. To accord technical sanction and appro%al of draft :IT as per !elegation of power. To assist and guide engineer.in charge. In processing and defending the arbitration proceedings. To e*ercise effecti%e budgetary control. To issue completion certificates. To attend periodical (O! meetings conducted by #&!.

$i6i1 De4art-ent: The main duty of ci%il department is to e*amine the details which are gi%en in the report as per the requirement. The total e*penses for the completion of the project number of bricks required and time required for the completion of the project and the necessity of the product. D3ties an7 Res4onsi;i1ities o To project yearly budget for the maintenance and original works. o 5esponsible for utiliDation of funds pro%ided in the appro%ed budget. 2?

o To guide engineer in charge and appro%al of e*tra itemsI substituted items. o To finaliDe replies to 1T)M" obser%ations and submit the same with in the stipulated time. o 0ollow up obser%ations of quality control and those raised by technical and financial audit. o To e*ercise effecti%e budgetary control. o The ci%il department is not only responsible for the construction works but also take care of the en%ironment of the steels through horticulture.

3,

&5O!$1T &5O0I4) #%tar steels has a huge amount of products dealing with and it continues to produce more for the welfare of the society. 0ollowing are some of the products of the company

,. IN)OTS: Ingots of all siDes and lengths confirming to all standards and grades are manufactured at #%tar "teel. The products are well.suited for all industrial applications It co%ers the range of both standard as well as special products. Ingots are manufactured confirming to I"O standards. A6tar Stee1 -an38a0t3re a11 t/4es o8 : IN)OT SI5ES In Inches 26363; 36<62? 36<63; 36<63; In Millimeters ;-69,+699?3 9,+69+;6??9 9,+69+;699?3 9,969+;699?3 ......In Kgs/piece -< ?, 99, 92< 39 (EI)*T OF T*E IN)OT

<.<6-.<63;6/62? ;6/63; ;.+<6/.+<63; /6?63;

93,69-<699-? 9;/6+,26??9 9;/6+,2699?3 9/36+9,699?3 +,26++?699?3

+,, +;< 2+< +9, 3,,

2.

BRI)*T BARS :

In "teel Industry we are known amongst the Best Bright Bar producers in I:!I#. The production range includes Ro3n7s@ F1ats@ Ingots@ Stri4s up to 9<,,, tons per annum.

D. *OT RO

ED B A$' BARS:

Our (ot 5olled Bar is perfect product for the needof the forging companies likewise upsetting or 5e.5olling.

=hile hot rolling by selection of the most appropriate IngotI Billet siDe optimum reduction ratios are maintained. =hich further ensure the complete breakage of as cast product and afterwards resulting the good internal soundness in the rolled products.

#t e%ery step proper identification and traceability of the material is maintained for the proper sorting of the material as per grade %ise.

E. F ATS: 0lats of different siDes and lengths confirming to all standards and grades are manufactured at #%tar "teel. The products are well.suited for all industrial applications It co%ers the range of both standard as well as special products. 0lats are manufactured confirming to I"O standards. F. FOR)ED : (ea%y 0orged rounds weighing are specially used in forging industry. 3+

=e at AVTAR STEE offer forging rounds for the %arious application likewise forging upsetting ring rolling production of bars flats and large siDed flanges. G. *OT RO ED PATTI:

0lat strips of different siDesand lengths confirming to all standards and grades are manufactured at #%tar "teel. The products are well.suited for all industrial applications It co%ers the range of both standard as well as special products. 0lats are manufactured confirming to I"O standards.

I. F AT (A$ID BRI)*T): 0lats of acid bright of different siDes and lengths confirming to all standards and grades are manufactured at #%tar "teel. The products are well.suited for all industrial applications It co%ers the range of both standard as well as special products. 0lats are manufactured confirming to I"O standards. A6tar Stee1 -an38a0t3re a11 t/4es o8 F1ats (A0i7 Brig.t): T*I$'NES < mm - mm / mm 9, mm 9+ mm 9- mm +, mm +< mm 2, mm #. $O D RO (IDT* 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm 9-, mm @ 9;, mm ED PATTA: EN)T* in ( in in0.es) up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr up to - Mtr

$o17 Ro11e7 Patta of different siDes and lengths confirming to all standards and grades are manufactured at #%tar "teel. The products are well.suited for all industrial applications It co%ers the range of both standard as well as special products are manufactured confirming to I"O standards. 32

A6tar Stee1 -an38a0t3re a11 t/4es o8 $o17 Ro11e7 F1at (Brig.t Patta):

Thickness (In mm) 2mm 3mm <mm

Width (In mm) <,, mm 3,, mm 3,, mm Length (In inches) ?,T ;,T -,T

33

E. REVIE( OF ITERATURE
# re%iew on the pre%ious studies on stress among the employees is necessary to know the areas already co%ered. This will help to find our new areas unco%ered and to study them in depth. The earlier studies made on stress among the employees are briefly re%iewed here. The research study of >amal. MV finds that job stressors were significantly related to employeesG psychosomatic problems job satisfaction unproducti%e time at the job and absenteeism. Type # beha%ior was found to be an important moderator of the stress outcome relationship. Brief. #. &. and >. M. #tiehV argues that it is not safe to assume that job conditions that ha%e an ad%erse impact on affecti%e reactions to the job will also ha%e a negati%e impact on o%erall subjecti%e well.being. 0ienmann %iews stress as a psychological response state of negati%e effect characteriDed by a persistent and a high le%el of e*perienced an*iety or tension. 5ecent research into the interaction between the mind body show that we may place our body on stress HalertG quite unconsciously because of our psychological and emotional attitudes to stress. #nticipatory emotions like impatience an*iety and anger can produce the same ner%e impulses and chemical reactions as being faced with a concrete challenge. "o when faced with a stressful situation we must either use up the energy created by the body to challenge or learn how to Eturn offF the response using a conscious rela*ation technique.

V >amal M. E>ob stress.prone Type # beha%ior

personal and organiDational

consequencesF 1anadian >ournal #dministration "ciences 9?/<. pp 2-,.;3.

3<

Brief. #. & and >. M. #tieh E"tudying job stressS #re we making mountains out of molehillsWF >ournal of occupational beha%ior 9?/; pp99<.+-. (ans "eyle the endocrinologist whose research on 'eneral #daptation "yndrome K'#"L for the first time re%ealed how human beings adapt themsel%es to emotional stri%es and strains in their li%es. #ccording to him emotional stress occurs in three important stages. 9. #larm reaction stage +. 5esistance stage 2. )*haustion stage. #larm reaction is caused by physical or psychological stressors. 5esistances are brought about by #1T( hormone of the body. )*haustion follows when #1T( dwindles as a result of continual stress. K#1T(.#prinocorticotropicL #ccording to "tephen .&. 5obbinsV stress related headaches are the leading cause of loss of work time in $. ". industry. 1ooper and MarshallV %isualiDe stress as characteristics of both the focal indi%idual and his en%ironment. They designate the internal and e*ternal consulti%e forces as HpressuresG or HstressorsG and the resulting stalk of the organism on stress.

V "tephen 5obbins EOrganiDational Beha%iorF &rentice (all $.B 9?/? pp 3??.<,9. 1ooper. 1. 4. and Marshall. > E$nderstanding )*ecuti%e "tressF The McMillan &ress 4td 9?;/ p 3. 3-

3;

F. OB+E$TIVES OF T*E STUDY

Pri-ar/ o;He0ti6e: • To undergo an in.depth study about the stress among the employees of #7T#5 "T))4".

Se0on7ar/ o;He0ti6e: • • • • To identify the factors causing stress among the employees. To find out the le%el and kind of stress among the employees of different age groups. To study about the effects of stress on employees in #7T#5 "T))4". To identify the coping strategies to manage stress.

3/

3?

G. S$OPE OF T*E STUDY
The present world is fast changing and there are lots of pressures and demands at work. These pressures at work lead to physical disorders. "tress refers to indi%idualGs reaction to a disturbing factor in the en%ironment. (ence this study would help the organiDation to know the factors of stress and to reduce the stress in employees. "ince it is a well known fact that healthy employee is a producti%e employee.

<,

<9

I.

IMITATIONS OF T*E STUDY

In that there are certain limitations.

spite

of

the

precautions

%igilance

and

scrupulousness taken by the in%estigator to make the study objecti%e it cannot be denied

 

The employees were reluctant to gi%e correct information. )%en though the employees ga%e correct information during the unstructured inter%iew conducted they ga%e positi%e answer while answering the questionnaire.

 

The in%estigator intended to co%er only few areas of stress rele%ant to the proposed study. #s the study was done within a limited time in%estigator could not select a sufficiently large sample for the study.

<+

<2

#. RESEAR$* MET*ODO O)Y
Resear0. is defined as human acti%ity based on intellectual application in the in%estigation of matter. The primary purpose for applied research is disco%ering interpreting and the de%elopment of methods and systems for the ad%ancement of human knowledge on a wide %ariety of scientific matters of our world and the uni%erse. 5esearch can use the scientific method but need not do so. S0ienti8i0 resear0. relies on the application of the scientific method a harnessing of curiosity. This research pro%ides scientific information and theories for the e*planation of the nature and the properties of the world around us. It makes practical applications possible. "cientific research is funded by public authorities by charitable organisations and by pri%ate groups including many companies. "cientific research can be subdi%ided into different classifications according to their academic and application disciplines. 5esearch methodology is a way to systematically sol%e the research problem. The research methodology in the present study deals with research design data collection methods sampling methods sur%ey analysis and interpretations. APPROA$*ES TO RESEAR$* !escripti%e approach is one of the most popular approaches these days. In this approach a problem is described by the researcher by using questionnaire or schedule. This approach enables a researcher to e*plore new areas of in%estigation.

<3

RESEAR$* DESI)N # research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine rele%ance to the research purpose with economy in procedure.
• • •

# well structured questionnaire is framed. !ata is collected from the employees in #7T#5 "T))4". 0indings are made and necessary suggestions and recommendations are gi%en.

<<

DATA SOUR$ES There are two types of data collection namely primary data collection and secondary data collection. PRIMARY DATA The primary data is defined as the data which is collected for the first time and fresh in nature and happen to be original in character through field sur%ey. &rimary data collection you collect the data yourself using methods such as inter%iews and questionnaires. The key point here is that the data you collect is unique to you and your research and until you publish no one else has access to it. There are many methods of collecting primary data and the main methods includeS
• • • • • • • •

questionnaires inter%iews focus group inter%iews obser%ation case.studies diaries critical incidents portfolios.

SE$ONDARY DATA <-

The secondary data are those which ha%e already been collected by someone else and ha%e been passed through statistical process. The secondary data for this study are already a%ailable in the firmMs internal records annual report broaches and companyMs website. In research "econdary data is collecting and possibly processing data by people other than the researcher in question. 1ommon sources of secondary data for social science include censuses large sur%eys and organiDational records KMintelL. In sociology primary data is data you ha%e collected yourself and secondary data is data you ha%e gathered from primary sources to create new research. In terms of historical research these two terms ha%e different meanings. # primary source is a book or set of archi%al records. # secondary source is a summary of a book or set of records. #d%antages to the secondary data collection method are . 9L it sa%es time that would otherwise be spent collecting data +L pro%ides a larger database KusuallyL than what would be possible to collect on ones own (owe%er there are disad%antages to the fact that the researcher cannot personally check the data so itMs reliability may be questioned.

DATA $O

E$TION MET*OD The data collection method used in this research is sur%ey method. (ere the

data are systematically recorded from the respondents. <;

RESEAR$* TOO # structured questionnaire has been prepared to get the rele%ant information from the respondents. The questionnaire consists of a %ariety of questions presented to the respondents for their despondence. The %arious types of questions used in this sur%ey areS    Open ended questions 1losed ended questions Multiple choice questions

SAMP IN)JMEANIN) </

Sa-41ing is that part of statistical practice concerned with the selection of indi%idual obser%ations intended to yield some knowledge about a population of concern especially for the purposes of statistical inference. )ach o;ser6ation measures one or more properties Kweight location etc.L of an obser%able entity enumerated to distinguish objects or indi%iduals. "ur%ey weights often need to be applied to the data to adjust for the sample design. 5esults from probability theory and statistical theory are employed to guide practice. The sampling process comprises se%eral stagesS
• • • • • • •

!efining the population of concern "pecifying a sampling frame a set of items or e%ents possible to measure "pecifying a sampling method for selecting items or e%ents from the frame !etermining the sample siDe Implementing the sampling plan "ampling and data collecting 5e%iewing the sampling process

SAMP E UNIT The employees of #7T#5 "T))4" are the sample unit in the sur%ey. SAMP E SI5E The sample siDe chosen for this study is 9,,. (5 1I7I4 )4)1T5I1#4 "T))4" #11O$:T" 1OMM)51I#4 . . . 9, . +< < .......... 9,, TYPE OF SAMP IN) 2< . . 9< 9,

<?

The sampling type is non.probability which in%ol%es deliberating selections of particular units constituting a sample which represents the uni%erse. STRATIFIED SAMP IN): "tratum means a layer population from which samples are to be selected may contain a number of layers from each layer a few samples are selected that is why this method is called stratified sampling. STATISTI$A MET*ODS USED  &ercentage analysis  Bars @ charts  &ie diagrams STATISTI$A TOO S USED  1hi.square test  =eighted a%erage PER$ENTA)E ANA YSIS: &ercentage refers to a special kind of ratio. &ercentages are used in making comparison between two or more series of data. &ercentage is used to describe relati%e terms the distribution of two or more series of data. :o. of 5espondents &ercentage of 5espondents X ........................ Total 5espondents 6 9,,

-,

DEFINITION OF *YPOT*ESIS: #ccording to 'oode and (att T(ypothesis is a proposition which can be put to test to determine %alidityT. # hypothesis can be defined as a logically conjectured relationship between two or more %ariables e*pressed in the form of testable statement. NU *YPOT*ESIS (*"): :ull hypothesis is formulated only to test whether there is any relationship between %ariables related to the problem being studied. $sually the null hypothesis is formed as a negati%e statement. A TERNATE *YPOT*ESIS (*,): #lternate (ypothesis K(9L is a statement which is accepted after the null hypothesis is rejected based on the test result. The alternate hypothesis usually is formed as a positi%e statement $*IJSAUARE TEST: The 1hi."quare test is one of the simplest and most widely used non parametric tests in statistical work. The symbol X2 is the 'reek letter 1hi. Barl &earson first used the chi.square test in the year 9?/,. The quantity chi.square describes the magnitude of the discrepancy between theory and obser%ation. In this 1hi.square test 8ates correction is used when the %alue of obser%ed frequency in less than 9,. The formula is gi%en as X2 X KYOi N )iYL+ )i Po<er o8 Asso0iation Test: If calculated %alue KcalL Z X2 table %alue the :ull hypothesis is rejected and it is interpreted that the two %ariables are associated with each other. This chi.square test is strong one for determining the e*istence of association between two %ariables.

-9

(EI)*TED AVERA)E: It can be defined as an a%erage whose component items are multiplied by certain %alues KweightsL and the aggregate of the products are di%ided by the total of weights. If *9 *+ *2 ...*n are n %alues and f9 f+ f2........fn are their weights KfrequenciesL respecti%ely then f9*9Uf+*+U.....Ufn*n 6 X ........................... f9Uf+U.......Ufn PI OT STUDY (Teste7 <it. ," sa-41es initia11/): &ilot study is defined as a study which is done in the initial stage of the project in order to find the reliability of the questionnaire and to restructure the questionnaire on the respondentMs suggestions. IMPORTAN$E OF PI OT STUDY:     It will increase the reliability of the scheduler. It helps to restructure the scheduler. It identifies the defects in the scheduler. It helps to add or remo%e the questions in the scheduler.

AREA AND PERIOD OF SURVEY: The project is being done for a period for three months from >anuary ; +,,/ to #pril ; +,,/ and the sur%ey was conducted in #7T#5 "T))4" 1hennai.

-+

-2

:. DATA ANA YSIS AND INTERPRETATIONS
Ta;1e :.!: A)E (ISE $ ASSIFI$ATION OF EMP OYEES

A)E K+9.2,L 85" K29.3,L 85" K39.<,L 85" <, @ #BO7) 85" Total

NO. OF RESPONDENTS -? ;< ;+ /3 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +2J +<J +3J +/J 9,,J

$*ART :.!: A)E (ISE $ ASSIFI$ATION OF EMP OYEES

5 6

5 6

5 6

4

4

4

*)

*,)

*.)

3+

3,

3-

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that +<J of the respondents are between K29.3,L yrs +3J of the respondents are between K39.<,L yrs +/J of the respondents are abo%e <, years and +2J of the respondents are between K+9.2,L yrs. -3

.)

7

A

B

O V

E

5

6 S

S

S

S

2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) )

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

TAB E :.D: )ENDER (ISE $ ASSIFI$ATION OF EMP OYEES

'):!)5 M#4) 0)M#4) Total

:O. O0 5)"&O:!):T" 9;9 9+? 2,,

&)51):T#') <;J 32J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,: )ENDER (ISE $ ASSIFI$ATION OF EMP OYEES

#A:E 8E#A:E

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that <;J of the respondents are male and 32J of the respondents are female.

-<

TAB E :.E: $ ASSIFI$ATION ON EDU$ATIONA AUA IFI$ATION

AUA IFI$ATION ""41 $:!)5 '5#!$#T) &O"T '5#!$#T) T)1(:I1#4 &5O0)""IO:#4 Total

NO. OF RESPONDENTS -, -? <9 <9 -? 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +,J +2J 9;J 9;J +2J 9,,J

$*ART :. !: $ ASSIFI$ATION ON EDU$ATIONA AUA IFI$ATION

SS:C UNDE6 G6ADUATE 9OST G6ADUATE TEC;NICA: 96O8ESSIONA:

In8eren0e: It is e%ident from the sur%ey that -?J of the respondents are professionally qualified +2J of the respondents ha%e graduation 9;J of the respondents ha%e post graduation and technically qualified +,J of the respondents ha%e only done finished ""41.

--

TAB E :.F: (OR' E?PERIEN$E (IT* AVTAR STEE S

ATTRIBUTES Q < 85" K<.9,L 85" K9,.9<L 85" Z 9< 85" TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS ;< -? /3 ;+ 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +<J +2J +/J +3J 9,,J

$*ART :. F: (OR' E?PERIEN$E (IT* AVTAR STEE S
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) <. 56S 3.-*)4 56S 3*)-*.4 56S = *. 56S NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that +3J of the respondents ha%e more than 9< years of e*perience +2J of the respondents ha%e K<.9,L yrs of e*perience and +/J of the respondents ha%e their e*perience between K9,.9<Lyrs remaining +3J of the respondents ha%e less than < years of e*perience.

TAB E :.G: P*YSI$A (OR'IN) $ONDITION OF T*E OR)ANI5ATION -;

SATISFA$TION (I'(48 "#TI"0I)! "#TI"0I)! :$)T5#4 (I'(48 !I""#TI"0I)! !I""#TI"0I)! TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS -? /3 ;+ <9 +3 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +2J +/J +;J 9;J /J 9,,J

$*ART :.G: P*YSI$A (OR'IN) $ONDITION OF T*E OR)ANI5ATION
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) ;IG;:5 SATIS8IED SATIS8IED NUET6A:

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that more than half of the respondents K+/JL are satisfied with the physical working condition of the organiDation. +;J of the respondents are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the physical working condition of the organiDation +2J of the respondents are highly satisfied with the physical working condition of the organiDation 9;J of the respondents are highly dissatisfied wth physical condition pro%ided and /J respondents are dissatisfied with physical working condition of the organiDation.

DISSATIS8IED

;IG;:5 DISSATIS8IED

-/

TAB E :.I: OPINION ABOUT T*E PAYPA$'A)E PROVIDED BY T*E OR)ANI5ATION

-?

SATISFA$TION (I'(48 "#TI"0I)! "#TI"0I)! :$)T5#4 (I'(48 !I""#TI"0I)! !I""#TI"0I)! TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS /3 ;+ -? +3 <9 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +/J +3J +2J /J 9;J 9,,J

$*ART :. D : OPINION ABOUT T*E PAY PA$'A)E
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) ;IG;:5 SATIS8IED SATIS8IED NUET6A:

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is e%ident from the sur%ey that +/J of the employees are highly satisfied with the pay scale pro%ided +3J of the respondents are satisfied with their pay scale +2J of them are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied /J of them are highly dissatisfied and 9;J of the respondents are dissatisfied with the pay scale pro%ided.

TAB E :.#: OPINION ABOUT T*E +OB

DISSATIS8IED

;IG;:5 DISSATIS8IED

;,

PARTI$U ARS

NO. OF RESPONDENTS PER$ENTA)E +3 /3 <9 ;+ -? 2,, /J +/J 9;J +3J +2J 9,,J

1(#44):'I:' I:T)5)"TI:' 5O$TI:) BO5I:' MO:OTO$" TOT#4

$*ART :.E: OPINION ABOUT T*E +OB
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) )
A: :E N IN TE GIN G 6E ST I 6O NG UT IN BO E 6I # N O NO G TO US

9A6TICU:A6S NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that +/J of the respondents feel the job interesting +3J of them feel it boring 9;J of the respondent feel it routine +2J of them feel it boring and /J of them feel it challenging.

TAB E :.:: OPINION ABOUT T*E $OMP ETION OF T*E (OR' AT T*E SPE$IFIED TIME

C;

;9

SATISFA$TION "T5O:'48 #'5)) #'5)) $:!)1I!)! "T5O:'48 !I"#'5)) !I"#'5)) TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS -? +3 ;+ /3 <9 2,,

PER$ENTA)E +2J /J +3J +/J 9;J 9,,J

$*ART :. :: PRO)RAMS T*AT $OU D BE ADAPTED TO MANA)E STRESS
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) UNDECIDED ST6ONG:5 AG6EE ST6ONG:5 DISAG6EE DISAG6EE AG6EE

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that +2J of them strongly agree that they can complete the work at time / J of them agree that they can complete work at time +3J of them ha%e no idea +/J of them strongly disagree that they cannot complete the work in time 9;J of them disagree that they cannot finish the work in time.

TAB E :.,": (OR' OVER OAD

PARTI$U ARS "T5O:'48 #'5)) #'5))

NO. OF RESPONDENTS <9 /3

PER$ENTA)E 9;J +/J ;+

$:!)1I!)! !I"#'5)) "T5O:'48 !I"#'5)) TOT#4

;+ -? +3 2,,

+3J +2J /J 9,,

$*ART :. ," : (OR' OVER OAD
ST6ONG:5 ST6ONG:5 AG6EE UNDECIDED DISAG6EE

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

)

.)

*))

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that 9;J of the respondents are o%erloaded with work +3J left it undecided and +2J of the respondents say that they are not o%erloaded with work.

TAB E :.,,: STRESS IN +OB

;2

PREFERN$E 8)" :O TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS 9/2 99; 2,,

PER$ENTA)E -9J 2?J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,,: STRESS IN +OB

5ES NO

In8eren0e: It is e%ident from the sur%ey that -9J of the respondents suffer stress and 29J of the respondents do not suffer stress.

TAB E :. ,!: STRESS $AUSIN) FA$TORS AMON) DIFFERENT EVE S OF EMP OYEES

FA$TORS 5O4) O7)54O#!

NO.OF RESPONDENTS 9+,

PER$ENTA)E 3,J ;3

5O4) $:!)54O#! I:T)5&)5"O:#4 5)4#TIO:"(I& TOT#4

?2 /; 2,,

29J +?J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,!: STRESS $AUSIN) FA$TORS AMON) DIFFERENT EVE S OF EMP OYEES
*-) *+) *)) 1) /) -) +) )
6: O AD DE IN 6: TE O 69 AD E6 SO 6E NA :A : TI O N S; I9

NO!O8 6ES9ONDENTS

O VE :E 6O

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that for most of the respondents of all the le%el of employees role o%erload is the major stress causing factorR the second place goes to the role under load and then comes the inter personal relationship

TAB E :.,D: 'IND OF STRESS IN +OB AMON) DIFFERENT A)E )ROUP

6O

:E

UN

PARTI$U ARS

NO.OF RESPONDENTS

PER$ENTA)E

;<

&(8"I1#4 M):T#4 BOT( TOT#4

?2 /; 9+, 2,,

29J +?J 3,J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,D: 'IND OF STRESS AMON) DIFFERENT A)E )ROUP
*-) *+) *)) 1) /) -) +) )
9; 5S IC A: EN TA : BO T;

NO!O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that 29J of them suffer physical stress +?J of them suffer mental stress and the remaining of them suffer from both the stress.

TAB E :. ,E: EVE OF STRESS

#

;-

EVE OF STRESS 7)58 (I'( (I'( MO!)5#T) 4O= 7)58 4O= TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS ;+ -? <9 ;+ 22,,

PER$ENTA)E +3J +2J 9;J +3J 9+J 9,,J

$*ART :.,E: EVE OF STRESS

:O >

;I G ;

O DE 6A ;I G TE ;

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

#

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that 9;J of the respondents ha%e moderate le%el of stress +3J of the respondents ha%e high le%el of stress and only 9+J of the respondents ha%e %ery low le%el of stress.

VE 6

)

+)

-)

/)

1)

5

TAB E :.,F: P*YSI$A IN$ONVENIEN$E DUE TO STRESS PREFERN$E NO. OF RESPONDENTS PER$ENTA)E ;;

8)" :O TOT#4

9<933 2,,

<+J 3/J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,F: P*YSI$A IN$ONVENIEN$E DUE TO STRESS

5ES NO

In8eren0e: It is e%ident from the sur%ey that <+J of the respondents suffer from physical incon%enience due to stress and 3/J of the respondents do not suffer stress.

TAB E :.,G: 'IND OF IN$ONVENIEN$E

IN$ONVENIEN$E ()#!#1() (I'( B4OO! &5)""$5)

NO. OF RESPONDENTS ;+ 2-

PER$ENTA)E +3J 9+J ;/

!I')"TI7) &5OB4)M (8&)5T):"IO: :)57O$":)"" TOT#4

-? ;+ <9 2,,

+2J +3J 9;J 9,,J

$*ART :.,G: 'IND OF IN$ONVENIEN$E
1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) DIGESTIVE 96OB:E# ;59E6TENSION ;IG; B:OOD 96ESSU6E NE6VOUSNESS ;EADAC;E

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that most of the respondents +3J suffer from headache and hypertension and second comes the digesti%e problem due to stress then comes the ner%ousness and only less J of the respondents suffer from ner%ousness and digesti%e problems.

TAB E :.,I: OR)ANI5ATION STEPS TO MANA)E STRESS

;?

PREFEREN$E 8)" :O TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS 9<2 93; 2,,

PER$ENTA)E <9J 3?J 9,,J

$*ART :.,I: OR)ANI5ATION STEPS TO MANA)E STRESS

5ES NO

In8eren0e: It is e%ident from the sur%ey that <9J of the respondents agrees that their organiDation is helping them in o%ercoming stress and the 3?J of them are not satisfied with the help pro%ided by the organiDation to o%ercome stress.

TAB E :.,G: 'IND OF IN$ONVENIEN$E

IN$ONVENIEN$E ()#!#1() (I'( B4OO! &5)""$5)

NO. OF RESPONDENTS ;+ 2-

PER$ENTA)E +3J 9+J /,

!I')"TI7) &5OB4)M (8&)5T):"IO: :)57O$":)"" TOT#4

-? ;+ <9 2,,

+2J +3J 9;J 9,,J

$*ART :.,G: 'IND OF IN$ONVENIEN$E
1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) DIGESTIVE 96OB:E# ;59E6TENSION ;IG; B:OOD 96ESSU6E NE6VOUSNESS ;EADAC;E

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that most of the respondents +3J suffer from headache and hypertension and second comes the digesti%e problem due to stress then comes the ner%ousness and only less J of the respondents suffer from ner%ousness and digesti%e problems.

TAB E :.,# PRO)RAMS T*AT $OU D BE ADABTED TO MANA)E STRESS

PARTI$U ARS )M&4O8)) 1O$:")4I:' )00)1TI7) @ T5#I:I:'

NO. OF RESPONDENTS ;+ 2-

PER$ENTA)E +3J 9+J /9

!)7)4O&M):T &5O'5#M =O5B '5O$&" ()#4T( 14$B" #$TO:OMO$" T5#:"&O5T "$B"I!8 TOT#4

-? ;+ , <9 2,,

+2J +3J ,J 9;J 9,,J

$*ART :.,#: PRO)RAMS T*AT $OU D BE ADABTED TO MANA)E STRESS
1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) E#9:O5EE COUNSE:ING >O6? G6OU9S AUTONO#OUS

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey +3J groups and the remaining need transport subsidy. of them recommend employee counseling 9+J of them need effecti%e training +2J need work groups +3J need health

TAB E :.,:: OPINION ABOUT $OUNSE IN) TO REDU$E T*E STRESS

/+

PARTI$U ARS "T5O:'48 #'5)) #'5)) :)$T5#4 !I"#'5)) "T5O:'48 !I"#'5)) TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS <9 /3 ;+ -? +3 2,,

PER$ENTA)E 9;J +/J +3J +2J /J 9,,J

$*ART :. ,: : OPINION ABOUT $OUNSE IN) TO REDU$E T*E STRESS
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) ST6ONG:5 AG6EE NEUT6A: ST6ONG:5 DISAG6EE DISAG6EE AG6EE

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: 0rom the abo%e we can find that9;J of them strongly agree that counseling can o%ercome stress +/J of them agree that they can o%er come stress through counseling +3J of them donGt ha%e any idea +/J disagree and the remaining disagree.

TAB E :.!": OR)ANI5ATION PO I$IES AND PRO$EDURES ARE STRESS FREE

/2

PARTI$U ARS (I'(48 #11)&T)! #11)&T)! :OT #11)&T)! (I'(48 :OT #11)&T)! TOT#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS <9 /3 ;+ ?2 2,,

PER$ENTA)E 9;J +/J +3J 29J 9,,J

$*ART :. !": OR)ANI5ATION PO I$IES AND PRO$EDURES ARE STRESS FREE

ACCE9TED

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that most of the respondents accept that the companies policies are stress free +/J of them ha%e accepted that organiDation policies are stress free +3J of them ha%e not accepted it 29J of them ha%e not accepted that their organiDation policy is full of stress.

TAB E :.!,: BEST INTERVENTION TO REDU$E STRESS PARTI$U ARS 5)4#6#TIO: T)1(:IA$)" TIM) M#:#')M):T T5#I:I:' #:! !)7)4O&M):T NO. OF RESPONDENTS ?2 /3 ;+ PER$ENTA)E 29J +/J +3J /3

ACCE9TED

*)) 2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) ;IG;:5

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

NOT

=O5BI:' TOT#4

<9 2,,

9;J 9,,J

$*ART :. !,: BEST INTERVENTION TO REDU$E STRESS

*)) 2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) TI#E #ANAGE#ENT T6AINING AND DEVE:O9#ENT >O6?ING 6e@$ $tio" tecA"iBues

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is obser%ed from the sur%ey that most of the respondents 29J says that rela*ation techniques +/J of them need time management +3J says that training is the best inter%ention 9;J says working inter%ention is the best thing to o%ercome stress.

TAB E :.!!: OPINION ABOUT INTERPERSONA RE ATIONS*IP

PARTI$U ARS "T5O:'48 #'5)) #'5)) :)$T5#4

NO. OF RESPONDENTS <9 /3 ;+

PER$ENTA)E 9;J +/J +3J /<

!I"#'5)) "T5O:'48 !I"#'5)) TOT#4

-? +3 2,,

+2J /J 9,,

$*ART :. !! : OPINION ABOUT INTERPERSONA RE ATIONS*IP
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) ST6ONG:5 AG6EE NEUT6A: ST6ONG:5 DISAG6EE DISAG6EE AG6EE

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: 0rom the abo%e we can find that9;J of them strongly agree that they ha%e strained interpersonal relationship +/J of them agree that they ha%e strained interpersonal relationship stress +3J of them donGt ha%e any idea +/J disagree that they do not ha%e strained interpersonal relationship.

TAB E :.!D: OPINION ABOUT STRESS EVE IN NI)*T S*IFT $OMPARED TO DAY S*IFT

PARTI$U ARS 7)58 (I'( (I'(

NO. OF RESPONDENTS <9 /3

PER$ENTA)E 9;J +/J /-

MO!)5#T) 4O= 7)58 4O= TOT#4

;+ -? +3 2,,

+3J +2J /J 9,,

$*ART :. !! : OPINION ABOUT STRESS

EVE IN NI)*T S*IFT $OMPARED TO DAY S*IFT

2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) )
;I G O ; DE 6A TE ; :O > :O > ;I G

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

5

VE 6

In8eren0e: 0rom the abo%e we can find that9;J of them strongly agree that they ha%e stress in night shift +/J of night shift. them agree that they ha%e stress in night shifts +3J of them donGt ha%e any idea +/J disagree that they do not ha%e any stress in

TAB E :.!E: SPENDIN) T*E (EE'END PARTI$U ARS 'OI:' TO MO7I)" ')T TO')T()5 7I"IT NO. OF RESPONDENTS /3 <9 ;+ PER$ENTA)E +/J 9;J +3J /;

#

VE 6

5

05I):!"I5)4#TI7)" M$"I1 14#"")" #:8 OT()5 K"&)1I08L TOT#4

-? +3 2,,

+2J /J 9,,

$*ART :.!E: SPENDIN) T*E (EE'END
2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) GET TOGET;E6 VISIT 86IENDSC6E:ATIV ES GOING TO #OVIES #USIC C:ASSES AN5 OT;E6 3S9ECI854

NO! O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: 0rom the abo%e we can find that +/J of them would like to go to mo%ies 9;J would like a get together +3J would like to %isit friendsIrelati%es and+2J would like to go to music class and the remaining prefer any other thing.

TAB E :.!F: FAMI Y FA$TOR (*I$* INF UEN$E STRESS PARTI$U ARS !)&):!):T NO.OF RESPONDENTS ?2 PER$ENTA)E 29J //

I44:)"" 0I:#:#1I#4 &O"ITIO: OT()5 &5OB4)M" TOT#4

/; -, -, 2,,

+?J +,J +,J 9,,J

TAB E :.!F: FAMI Y FA$TOR (*I$* INF UEN$E STRESS
*)) 2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) DE9ENDENT 8INANACIA: 9OSITION I::NESS OT;E6 96OB:E#S

NO!O8 6ES9ONDENTS

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that 29J of them says dependency influence stress +?J says that illness influence stress +,J of them says that financial as well as other problem influence stress.

TAB E :.!G: PERSONA FA$TOR INF UEN$IN) STRESS PARTI$U ARS &)51)&TIO: NO.OF RESPONDENTS -, PER$ENTA)E +,J /?

#TTIT$!) ()#4T( 1O:!ITIO: &)5"O:#4IT8 TOT#4

/; -, ?2 2,,

+?J +,J 29J 9,,J

TAB E :.!G:PERSONA FA$TOR INF UEN$IN) STRESS
*)) 2) 1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) ) 9E6CE9TION

NO!O8 6ES9ONDENTS

ATTITUDE

;EA:T; CONDITION

In8eren0e: It is found from the sur%ey that +,J of them says perception influence stress +?J says that attitude influence stress +,J of them says that health condition influence stress and the remaining says that personality influence stress.

TAB E :.!I: STRATER)Y TO REDU$E STRESS 0#1TO5" (I'(48 "#TI"0I)! "#TI"0I)! :)$T5# 4 !I""#TI "0I)! (I'(48 !I""#TI"0 I)! TOT# PER$ENTA)E 4 ?,

9E6SONA:IT5

8O'# M)!IT#TIO : MOTI7#TIO : 1O$:")4I: ' I:!OO5 '#M)" O(T)5"

9, 9, 99 , 99 +

9, 99 99 , +, 9,

9, 99 9, , +, -

9, 9; +, ? 99 9,

99 +, +, , 99 ,

<, -? ;+ ? ;+ +/

,I !D

!E

DK

+2

-J

$*ART :.!I: STRATER)Y TO REDU$E STRESS
1) 0) /) .) -) ,) +) *) )
S$ tis D S$ ied tis Die Ne d ;i D % A is s utr$ $ @& @ Di tisD i ss e $t d isD ie d To t$ @

5OGA medit$tio" #OTIVATION COUNSE:ING INDOO6 GA#ES O;TE6S

In8eren0e: It is found from the abo%e table that 9;J prefer yoga majority prefer indoor games and the ne*t majority prefer moti%ation.

;i %A @&

?9

$*IJSAUARE TEST ON SPENDIN) (EE'END Vs STRATE)Y TO REDU$E STRESS
N311 */4ot.esis (*"): There is no significant relation between spending weekend and strategy to reduce stress A1ternate */4ot.esis (*,): There is a significant relation between spending weekend and strategy to reduce stress TAB E :.!!: $ROSS TABU ATION FOR "&):!I:' =))B):! 7s

"T5#T)'8 TO 5)!$1) "T5)""
STRATE)Y

8O'#
SPENDIN) (EE'END

M)!IT# TIO:

MOTI7 #TIO:

1O$:" )4I:'

5O= I:!OO5 '#M)" OT()5 TOT#4

'OI:' TO MO7I)" ')T TO')T()5 7I"IT TO 05I):!"I 5)4#TI7)" M$"I1 14#"")" #:8 OT()5 1O4$M: TOT#4

. 3

. 9-

3 /

. +

3 +/

/

++

9,

9,

3/

. . 9+

3 . 3+

3 2+

+ . 93

9+ / 9,,

!egrees of freedom X 9+ 1alculated %alue X +;.3?; 0or 9+ degrees of freedom at <J le%el of significance the chi.square table %alue is <.++-. In8eren0e: ?+

1alculated %alue Z Tabulated %alue. (ence (, is rejected and (9 is accepted. $on013sion: There is a significant relation between the spending weekend and strategy to reduce stress

?2

?3

FINDIN)S • Out of the total sample most of the respondents are male and many are between <, and abo%e. Most of the respondents are under graduate and ha%e professional qualification. • • Most of the respondents ha%e 9,.9< years of long association with the organiDation. #lmost all the respondents are satisfied with the physical and psychological working condition of the organiDation and only fewer respondents are dissatisfied with the psychological working condition of the organiDation. • • • • • • • The opinion about the training programs conducted by the organiDation is almost better according to majority of the respondents. #lmost all the respondents are satisfied with the pay package pro%ided by the organiDation and nearly half of the respondents feel that they do a routine job. Most of the respondents agree that they can complete their work within the specified time and some of the respondents are undecided. :early half of the respondents agree that they are o%erloaded with work. More than half of the respondents suffer stress in their job. #mong all other factors role o%erload cause more stress according to most of the respondents. Most of the respondents from steels department suffer from physical stressR most of the respondents from accounts department suffer from mental stress and most of the respondents from ci%il department suffer from both physical and mental stress. • • • • Most of the respondents feel only moderate le%el of stress and some of the respondents feel high le%el of stress in their job. More than half of the respondents ha%e physical incon%enience due to stress and most of the respondents suffer from headache and high blood pressure. #lmost all the respondents prefer to follow coping strategies personally to manage stress and they prefer to do meditation and yoga to reduce stress. Most of the respondents say that the organiDation does not take suitable steps to manage stress. ?<

)mployee counseling and effecti%e training @ de%elopment programs are the company wide programs that could be adapted to manage stress.

?-

,".

SU))ESTIONS

  

The employees must gi%e importance to time management techniques there by they can complete their work within the specified time. Many tasks can be delegated to subordinates without losing effecti%eness so that we can reduce the o%erload of work. #dopt the work to home transition strategy. It means instead of carrying the pressures of the work to home the suggestion is to start the unwinding process during the work day and enter the home in a rela*ed and peaceful mind.

'i%ing counseling to the employees when they face problems because counseling is the discussion of a problem that usually has emotional content with an employee in order to help the employee cope within better.

The organiDation must introduce )mployee #ssistance &rogrammes K)#&sL and stress control workshops accordingly to the le%el of employees because there is a strong relation between the le%el of stress and le%el of employees. )#& includes counseling employees who seek assistance on how to deal with alcohol and drug abuse managing personal finances handling conflicts at the work place dealing with marital and other family problems and coping with health problems.

)ngaging the bored employee in aerobic e*ercise because it stimulates the brain and the body. #lso the employee must do meditation and yoga in their daily life.

?;

,,.

$ON$ USION

"tress in the work place has become the black plague of the present century. Much of the stress at work is caused not only by work o%erload and time pressure but also by lack of rewards and praise and more importantly by not pro%iding indi%iduals with the autonomy to do their work as they would like. Most of the employees were not satisfied with the grie%ance handling procedure of the organiDation which was found by the unstructured inter%iew. OrganiDation must begin to manage people at work differently treating them with respect and %aluing their contribution. If we enhance the psychological well being and health of the employees in the coming future the organiDation would make more re%enue as well as employee retention. Because it is said that

%A *ea1t./ E-41o/ee is a Pro730ti6e E-41o/ee& ?/

??

BIB IO)RAP*Y
BOO'S
,. !. D. E. F. G. I. #. :. A.3Ha. '.'J %In73stria1 4s/0.o1og/ an7 organiLationa1 ;e.a6ior&@ '.anna 43;1is.ers@ Ne< De1.i@ ,::,. Bis<anat. ).os.J %A ne< 1oo> organiLationa1 ;e.a6ior&@ *i-a1a/a P3;1is.ing *o3se Ne< De1.i@ ,::E. Fine-annJ %A Ps/0.o1ogi0a1 Mo7e1 o8 Stress an7 its a441i0ation to -anageria1 3ne-41o/-ent&@ *3-an re1ations@ ,:I:. ).os. P.'. an7 ).or4a7e M.B. J %In73stria1 an7 OrganiLationa1 Ps/0.o1og/&@ *i-a1a/a P3;1is.ing *o3se@ Bo-;a/ ,::,. 'a43r S.'@ P3nia B.'.J%OrganiLationa1 Be.a6ior an7 Manage-ent&@ t7@ S.'.P3;1is.ers@ Ne< De1.i. a3rie +. M311ins 9 %OrganiLationa1 Be.a6ior&@ Pit-an=s 43;1is.ing on7on@ ,::". Pa31*erse/@ 'ennet. *. B1an0.ar7@ De<e/ E. +o.nson 9%OrganiLationa1 Be.a6ior&@ Prenti0e *a11 o8 In7ia P6t. t7@ ,::#. Sri6asta6a.A.'@ %A st37/ o8 Ro11 Stress Menta1 .ea1t. re1ations.i4 a -o7erator ;/ a7o4te7 0o4ing strategies@ 4s/0.o1ogi0a1 st37ies&@ ,::,. Ste4.en P. Ro;;ins@ %OrganiLationa1 Be.a6ior&@ Prenti0e *a11@ U .'. ,:::.

+OURNA S AND MA)A5INES
,. !. D. E. B3siness 1ine@ %T.e stress is ;eginning to s.o<&@ Finan0ia1 E24ress 43;1is.e7 ;/ *in73@ Tri6an7r3-@ ,:#:. Brie8 A.P. an7 Atiet. +.M.@ %St37/ing +o; Stress: Are <e -a>ing -o3ntains o3t o8 -o1e *i11sM& +o3rna1 o8 o0034ationa1 ;e.a6ior@ ,:#I. +a-a1 M.@ %+o; StressJProne T/4e A ;e.a6ior an7 4ersona1 an7 organiLationa1 0onseN3en0es&@ $ana7ian +o3rna1 o8 A7-inistrati6e. Dr.Satis. $.an7ra Pan7/@ %In7ian <a/s o8 <inning Stress&@ T.e +o3rna1 o8 In7ian Manage-ent an7 Strateg/@ ,::I. 9,,

9,9

AUESTIONNAIRE PERSONA PROFI E
'in71/ 4ro6i7e /o3r 6a13a;1e 4ersona1 in8or-ation. : OOOOOOO 9. :ameS 9. #ge group +. 2. <. yrs "e* SMale I 0emale )ducational AualificationS )*perience Z 9< yrs ""41I$'I&'ITechnicalI&rofessional S P < yrs K<.9<L K+ K+9.2,L yrs K29.3,L yrs K39.<,L yrs <, @ abo%e yrs OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO De4t:

AUA ITY OF (OR' IFE -. (ow do you feel about the physical working condition of the organiDationW (ighly satisfied !issatisfied ;. /. ?. (ow do you feel about the psychological working condition of the organiDationW (ighly #micable )*cellent 1ordial 'ood :eutral Better "atisfied "trained Bad 7ery poor =hat is your opinion about the training programs conducted in the organiDationW =orse :eutral (ighly (ow do you feel about the pay package pro%ided by the organiDationW (ighly satisfied dissatisfied !issatisfied 9,. (ow do you feel about your jobW 1hallenging Boring 99. !o you agree that you can complete your work within the specified timeW 9,+ Interesting 5outine Monotonous "atisfied :eutral (ighly dissatisfied

"trongly agree !isagree 9+.

#gree

$ndecided

"trongly !isagree

!o you agree that you are o%erloaded with workW "trongly agree !isagree #gree $ndecided "trongly !isagree

92.

!o you suffer any stress in your jobW

8es

:o

FA$TORS AND EFFE$TS OF STRESS 93. 9<. 9-. low 9;. 9/. !o you suffer any physical incon%enience due to stress in your jobW 8es If yes what kind of incon%enienceW (eadache (igh blood pressure (ypertension !igesti%e problem :er%ousness :o In your accordance which of the following factors cause more stressW 5ole o%erload &hysical 7ery high 5ole under load Mental (igh Both Moderate 4ow 7ery Interpersonal relationship =hat kind of stress do you suffer in your jobW =hat is the le%el of stress that you feel in your jobW

$OPIN) STRATE)IES 9?. +,. walk +9. ++. 8es stressW 9,2 (a%e you taken any coping strategies personally to manage stressW 8es )*ercise :o Meditation 4istening music Take a =hat kind of strategies of the following ha%e you takenW "pend time with children !oes this organiDation take any suitable steps to manage stressW :o =hat type of company.wide programs that areIcould be adapted to manage

)mployee counseling Transport subsidy +2.

)ffecti%e Training @ !e%elopment program (ealth clubs

#utonomous work groups

Bindly gi%e your suggestions to reduce stress………………………………

9,3

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