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5.3 ex 50

5.3 ex 50

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Published by Justin Drawbert
MTH 252 Section 5.3 Exercise 50
Justin Drawbert July 14, 2010
In James Stewart’s Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition, Section 5.3, Exercise 50, we √ are given a graph of y = 4 x, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 where the area that is shaded is between the area above the curve and y = 1. We are asked to find the area shaded above the curve by thinking about this in 2 ways. First by integrating with respect to y, and the by imagining the graph roated 90 degrees counter-clockwise, substututing y for x, solving f
MTH 252 Section 5.3 Exercise 50
Justin Drawbert July 14, 2010
In James Stewart’s Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition, Section 5.3, Exercise 50, we √ are given a graph of y = 4 x, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 where the area that is shaded is between the area above the curve and y = 1. We are asked to find the area shaded above the curve by thinking about this in 2 ways. First by integrating with respect to y, and the by imagining the graph roated 90 degrees counter-clockwise, substututing y for x, solving f

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MTH 252 Section 5.

3 Exercise 50
Justin Drawbert July 14, 2010
In James Stewart’s Calculus: Concepts and Contexts, 4th Edition, Section 5.3, Exercise 50, we √ are given a graph of y = 4 x, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 where the area that is shaded is between the area above the curve and y = 1. We are asked to find the area shaded above the curve by thinking about this in 2 ways. First by integrating with respect to y, and the by imagining the graph roated 90 degrees counter-clockwise, substututing y for x, solving for y and then integrating in terms of y.

If we first consider the shaded portion as being the area between y = 1 and the curve, we would state this mathematically as 1 1 √ y = 1 dx − y = 4 x dx
0 0

If we recall that
a

b

c dx = c(b − a), where c is any constant

This gives us
1 0 1

y = 1 dx −

y=
0

√ 4 x dx ⇒ 1

1 0

4x5/4 5

1

0

=1−0−

4 1 −0= 5 5

1

The other way of thinking about is is to think of the graph rotated counter-clockwise 90 degrees.
1.1 x4

1.0

0.9

0.8

0.6

0.5

y

0.4

0.2

0.1

0.0

-0.1 −1.125

−1

−0.875 −0.75 −0.625

−0.5 x

−0.375 −0.25 −0.125

0

0.125

Substituting our x and y values and then solving for y gives us √ √ 4 y=x⇒ 4y
4

= x4 ⇒ y = x4

Realizing that our x values are now opposite that which they once were, we evaluate
0

−1

y = x4 dx ⇒

x5 5

0

−1

=0−

(−1)5 1 = 5 5

So we can see that no matter which way you think about it, the results are the same. The key is realizing that when you rotate the graph counter-clockwise, your positive y-values become negative x-values. So if our function had a range of say, [5, 6], once we rotated it counter clockwise, and substituted x and y values, we would evaluate from −6 to −5. I have a feeling this concept, or a concept similar will show up again later. If not later on in Calculus, then probably in Linear Algebra and/or Differential Equations.

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