Copyright & Disclaimer -Before beginning any new exercise, nutrition or dietary supplement program you should consult a physician

first. The information presented herein is not meant to treat or prevent any disease or to provide the reader with medical advice. If you are looking for specific medical advice then you should obtain this information from a licensed health-care practitioner. This publication is intended for informational use only. Lee Hayward and www.LeeHayward.com will not assume any liability or be held responsible for any form of injury, personal loss or illness caused by the utilization of this information. The individual results obtained from the use of this program will vary from person to person and we make no guarantee as to the degree of results that you will personally achieve. This publication is fully copyrighted and does not come with giveaway or resale rights. You may not sell or redistribute this report. It is reserved solely for LeeHayward.com.com members. Copyright and illegal distribution violations will be prosecuted.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 1

Table Of Contents…
Part 1 - The Best Muscle Building Exercises For Each Bodypart (page 3) - Chest Exercises (page 6) - Shoulder Exercises (page 11) - Tricep Exercises (page 16) - Back Exercises (page 21) - Bicep Exercises (page 26) - Leg Exercises (page 31) - Calve Exercises (page 36) - Ab Exercises (page 41) - Forearm Exercises (page 46 Part 2 - Is There A Perfect Workout Routine? (page 51) Part 3 - The Correct Lifting Technique For Gaining Muscle And Strength (page 54) Part 4 - I am not getting any bigger... Why...? (page 58) Part 5 - The Truth About Bodybuilding Supplements (page 63) Part 6 - Gaining Muscle With Squats And Milk (page 70) Part 7 - Workout Motivation - Top 10 Ways to Stay Motivated (page 76) Part 8 - A Forgotten Exercise - The Barbell Clean & Press (page 80) Part 9 - Gaining Herculean Muscle Mass and Power Fast (page 85) Part 10 - The Key To Building Your Ultimate Body (page 94)

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 2

-- Part 1 of 10 --

The Best Muscle Building Exercises For Each Bodypart

Dear Friend, In this first part of the Bodybuilding Tips E-mail Training Course I'm going to cover the most effective exercises for fast muscle gains. The question of "what exercises should I use?" is one that has plagued bodybuilders and strength athletes for years. In this section I will outline some simple tips that you can use to help you pick the most productive muscle building exercises for your workouts.

Exercise Selection - Compound vs. Isolation Exercises
Compound exercises work multiple muscles across more then one joint. Bench press, dips, and squats are examples of compound exercises. Isolation exercises work fewer muscles across a single joint. Dumbbell flyes, pec deck, and leg extensions are examples of isolation exercises. Some people believe that in order to target a certain muscle you should use more isolation exercises and thus develop that muscle more efficiently. However, this is not the best approach. Isolation exercises that work the muscles across a single joint are not the most effective way to build muscle. Compound exercises are far more effective in building muscle because they incorporate the use of several muscle groups, allow for a heavier training load, and work more muscle mass in the same amount of time.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 3

Let's look at the squat. It is a compound exercise. It works the quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteus, lower back, abdominals, hips, and abductors. Squats allow for heavy weights to be lifted. This makes the squat an incredibly effective muscle building exercise. Compared to an isolation exercise such as the leg extension, which only focuses on the quadriceps. From this simple example you can clearly see how much more productive compound exercises are for building muscle.

Free Weights VS. Machines
Free weight exercises are more effective for building muscle then machine exercises. Machines make the exercises easier to perform. You do not have to balance the weight with machine exercises because the machine balances the weight for you. You will get less muscle stimulation from machine exercises because they do not require the same concentration or effort as free weight exercises. Free weights have a greater ability to involve stabilizer muscles than machines. Free weights put you in a natural, 3 dimensional environment for exercise. The majority of your exercises should be compound free weight exercises. This does not mean that you should avoid machine exercises or isolation exercises. They are easy to learn and there is a low risk of injury, which is great for people who are just starting out or for rehabilitation purposes. And there are some good machine exercises that cannot be duplicated with free weights such as various cable pulley exercises. However, the majority of lifters should always base their workouts around compound, free weight exercises and supplement their workouts with machine and isolation exercises. I've put together a listing of the top 5 weight training exercises for each bodypart. Complete with exercise pictures and text descriptions that explain how to perform all the movements with proper technique.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 4

The following workout exercise pictures are taken from the Lee Hayward's Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System.

Click Here for more information.

www.LeeHayward.com/dvd

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 5

Top 5 Chest Exercises For The Best Chest Workout Flat Barbell Bench Press

This is a great upper body exercise. It works the entire pectoral area, deltoids, and triceps. The lats, biceps, and forearms also come into play to help stabilize and balance the barbell. Lie down on the flat bench press. Place your feet flat on the floor on each side of the bench. Grab the bar with a wider then shoulder width. Straighten your arms to lift the barbell off the rack. Position the bar so it is at arms length over your chest. Lower the barbell until it touches your chest then press the bar back up until it is locked out at the starting position. As you lower the bar keep your elbows tucked so that your upper arms are at a 45-degree angles to the sides of your body. Do not let your upper arms go straight out to the sides as this will place excess strain on the shoulder joints. Tip - you should always have a training partner spot you when doing the bench press, just in case you need help lifting the barbell off your chest.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 6

Incline Barbell Bench Press

This is very similar to the bench press, it works the same muscle groups (i.e. pectorals, deltoids, and triceps). But the incline bench press places more of the workload on the upper chest. Lower the barbell until it touches your upper chest then press the bar back up until it is locked out at the starting position. As you lower the bar keep your elbows tucked so that your upper arms are at a 45-degree angles to the sides of your body. Do not let your upper arms go straight out to the sides as this will place excess strain on the shoulder joints. Tip - you should always have a training partner spot you when doing the incline bench press, just in case you need help lifting the barbell off your chest.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 7

Decline Barbell Bench Press

This is very similar to the bench press, it works the same muscle groups (i.e. pectorals, deltoids, and triceps). But the decline bench press places more of the workload on the lower chest. Lower the barbell until it touches your lower chest / upper abs then press the bar back up until it is locked out at the starting position. As you lower the bar keep your elbows tucked so that your upper arms are at a 45-degree angles to the sides of your body. Do not let your upper arms go straight out to the sides as this will place excess strain on the shoulder joints. Tip - you should always have a training partner spot you when doing the decline bench press, just in case you need help lifting the barbell off your chest.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 8

Dumbbell Bench Press

The dumbbell bench press variation works the pectorals, deltoids, and triceps. But because you are balancing two weights instead of one the dumbbell bench press will bring more stabilizer and supporting muscles into play. Dumbbells also force both the left and right sides to handle an equal workload thus helping to develop balance and proportion between both the left and right sides of the body. Grab a pair of dumbbells and lie down on a flat bench. Lower the dumbbells until they touch your chest then press the dumbbells back up until they are locked out at the starting position. Dumbbells allow more freedom of movement with your hand positions. You can keep your hands in a more neutral position, unlike with the barbell bench press. Tip - when handling heavy weights you may want to have a couple spotters help hand you the dumbbells rather then try and position them by yourself.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 9

Push Ups

Push ups are a good basic exercise that most people tend to ignore. They work the entire chest area. Secondary stress is placed on the shoulders and triceps. Lie face down on the floor. Place your hands palms down on each side of your body. Keeping your legs and torso in a straight line push yourself up and support your upper body on your arms. Slowly lower yourself until your chest is about an inch from the floor. Hold this stretched position for a second. Push yourself back up to the starting position. Repeat. This is a good exercise to use as both a warm up to your chest exercises and as a high rep finishing exercise to really pump up your chest muscles.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 10

Top 5 Shoulder Exercises For The Best Shoulder Workout Seated Barbell Shoulder Press (aka "Military Press")

This is a basic shoulder exercise that works the front and side delts and the triceps. It also works the upper chest and upper back as secondary muscles. Sitting on an upright bench. Grab the barbell with a wider then shoulder width grip. Push the barbell directly upward until it is at arms length above your shoulders. Lower the barbell down to the front of your shoulders, then press it back to starting position. This exercise can also be done lowing the barbell to back of the head. But some people find that the behind the head version places more stress on the shoulder joints. Tip - you should always have a training partner spot you when doing the barbell shoulder press, just in case you need help lifting the barbell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 11

Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press

This exercise works the entire deltoid area and the triceps. Secondary stress is placed on the upper chest and upper back muscles. Sit on an upright bench. Grab 2 dumbbells and pull them to your shoulders. The palms of your hands should be facing forwards during the exercise. Keep your feet at least shoulder width apart. Keeping your elbows directly under the dumbbells press them upwards until they are at arms length above your head, then lower the dumbbells back to the starting position. Tip - when handling heavy weights you may want to have a couple spotters help hand you the dumbbells rather then try and position them by yourself.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 12

Barbell Upright Row

This is a good exercise for working the muscles of your shoulder girdle. Primary muscles are the traps and the deltoids. Secondary muscles are the biceps, brachialis, and the forearms. Stand holding a barbell with a shoulder width grip and keep your feet shoulder width apart. Keep your elbows above your hands at all times. Pull the bar directly up from the starting position until your elbows are shoulder height. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction, then lower to the starting position. Tip – using an EZ bar is generally more comfortable on the wrists compared to using a straight barbell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 13

Dumbbell Side Lateral Raises

This exercise works the medial (side) deltoids. Secondary stress is applied to the front deltoids and the forearms. Grab 2 dumbbells. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Hold the dumbbells just in front of your body with the palms of your hands facing each other. Keep a slight bend in your elbows. Using your deltoid strength, raise the dumbbells out to the sides and upwards in a semicircular arc until they are just above shoulder level. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the deltoids. Lower the dumbbells back to the starting position. Repeat. Tip - to really isolate your deltoids you can do this exercise seated on a bench. This will eliminate any body motion.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 14

Bent Over Lateral Raises (aka "Bent Over Dumbbell Flyes")

This exercise works the entire upper back, rear deltoids, and traps. This is a very important shoulder exercise because most people tend to focus more on the front and side deltoids and the rear deltoids are most often neglected. Well developed rear delts will balance out your shoulder development and help to prevent a lot of shoulder injuries and rotator cuff problems. Grab 2 dumbbells. Bend over at the waist with your feet shoulder width apart. Keep a slight bend in the knees to prevent stain on the lower back. Hold the dumbbells at arms length in front of you with the palms of your hands facing each other. Keep a slight bend in your elbows. Using your rear deltoid and upper back strength, raise the dumbbells to the back and upwards in a semicircular arc as far as you can. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the rear deltoids and then lower the dumbbells back to the starting position. Tip - to really isolate your deltoids you can do this exercise lying face down on a high exercise bench. This will eliminate any body motion.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 15

Top 5 Tricep Exercises For The Best Tricep Workout French Press (aka "Lying Tricep Extension")

This exercise works the triceps, particularly the large inner head of the tricep muscle. Lie back on a flat bench. Feet shoulder width apart on each side of the bench. Have a training partner hand you a barbell. Grip it with your hands place a bit narrower then shoulder width. Press the barbell up until it is at arms length above your shoulders. Moving only your forearms lower the barbell in an arc motion until it is about an inch above your forehead, then using just your triceps strength push the bar back up in an arc motion to the starting position. Tip - using an ez curl bar is generally more comfortable and will place less stress on the wrists then a straight bar.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 16

Close Grip Bench Press

This exercise is a big basic compound movement that heavily works the triceps as well as the chest and shoulders. Lie down on the flat bench press. Place your feet flat on the floor on each side of the bench. Grab the bar with a grip no wider then the width of your torso, generally for most guys this will be with the index fingers on the smooth part of an standard Olympic barbell. Straighten your arms to lift the barbell off the rack. Position the bar so it is at arms length over your chest. Lower the barbell until it touches your lower chest / upper abs, then press the bar back up until it is locked out at the starting position. As you lower the bar keep your elbows tucked in close to the sides of your body. Do not let your upper arms go straight out to the sides as this will place excess strain on the shoulder joints. Tip - you should always have a training partner spot you when doing the close grip bench press, just in case you need help lifting the barbell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 17

Tricep Cable Push Downs

This exercise targets the outer head of the triceps. Attach a bar to an overhead pulley. Stand in front of the pulley with your feet shoulder width apart. Grab the bar with a narrow overhand grip. Bend your arms fully and tuck your elbows close to your sides at all times during the exercise. Moving just your forearms push the bar down in an arc motion until your arms are straight. Hold this position and squeeze your triceps for a second to maximize the peak contraction. Then slowly lower to the starting position. Tips - do not let the weight plates touch during the exercise, keep the tension on the tricep muscles. For variety you can use different bars attached to the overhead pulley (i.e. rope, ez bar, V bar, etc.) to work the muscles at different angles.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 18

Dips

This exercise works the triceps hard, but it is also a great chest and shoulder exercise as well. Grab a pair of parallel bars so the palms of your hands are facing each other. Straighten your arms and support yourself between the bars. Slowly bend your arms and lower your body between the bars until your elbows are at 90-degree angles. Hold this stretched position for a second, then push yourself back up to the starting position and lock out your arms at the top. Tip - this is an advanced exercise because you have to be able to lift your entire bodyweight. But as you get stronger you can add extra weight to the exercise by hanging weights from your waist using a weight belt.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 19

Tricep Push Ups

This push up variation works the triceps harder then regular push ups. Lie face down on the floor. Place your hands palms down on the floor with your index fingers and thumbs touching (as shown in the pics). Keeping your legs and torso in a straight line push yourself up and support your upper body on your arms. Spread your feet a bit wider then shoulder width apart for better balance. Slowly lower yourself until your chest is about an inch from the floor. Hold this position for a second and then push yourself back up to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 20

Top 5 Back Exercises For The Best Back Workout Deadlift

This is one of the best power building exercises that you can do. Deadlifts work almost every major muscle group, especially the; spinal erectors, lats, trapezius, quadriceps, hamstrings, buttocks, hips, and forearms. Stand in front of a barbell with your shins close to the bar. Feet shoulder width apart. Grab the bar with your hands slightly wider then shoulder width. Keeping your arms straight, bend your legs and flatten your back. Position yourself so it is like you are doing a squat with the barbell at arms length in front of you. Pull the barbell off the floor by straightening your legs and torso until your body is completely erect. Pull your shoulders back. Then lower the bar back to the floor. Tip – holding the bar with one hand facing forwards and one hand facing backwards will allow you to get a stronger grip on the barbell, because as the bar is rolling out of one hand it will also be rolling into the other hand, thus allowing you to hold onto heavier weights.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 21

Pull Downs

The lat pulldown works the lats, rear deltoids, biceps, and forearms. Attach a bar to a high pulley. Grab the bar a bit wider then shoulder width. Sit down at the machine and place your knees under the knee pad. Straighten your arms and let your lats stretch. Hold this position for a second. Arch your back and pull the bar down in front, try to touch the bar to your chest. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction, then straighten your arms to the starting position. Tips - you can vary your grip to work your back from different angles. (i.e. wide grip, narrow grip, overhand, underhand, etc.).

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 22

Pull Ups (aka Chin Ups)

The pull up works that same muscles as the lat pulldown (i.e. the lats, rear deltoids, biceps, and forearms). Pull ups are an advanced exercise because you have to be able to lift your entire bodyweight. Grab a pull up bar with your hands a bit wider then shoulder width apart. Straighten your arms and let your lats stretch. Hold this position for a second. Arch your back slightly and pull yourself up to the bar until your chin is over the bar. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction, then slowly lower yourself to the starting position. Tips - you can vary your grip to work your back from different angles. (i.e. wide grip, narrow grip, overhand, underhand, etc.).

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 23

Bent Over Barbell Row

This is a basic back exercise that works the latissimus dorsi, trapezius, erector spinae, biceps, and the forearms. Bend over at the waist and grab a barbell with your hands placed shoulder width apart. Keep a slight bend in the knees. Lift the bar with your arms straight. Keep your upper body at a 45-degree angle to the floor and arch your back. Moving just your arms row the barbell into your stomach. Hold this position and squeeze your back muscles for a second to maximize the peak contraction. Lower the bar until your arms are straight, but do not let the barbell touch the floor in between each rep in order to keep the tension on the muscles. Tips - For variety you can use an underhand grip (i.e. palms of the hands facing forward) this will work the lower lats more. You can also do this exercise with dumbbells or a low cable pulley.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 24

Hyper Extensions (aka Back Raise)

This exercise is great for working the spinal erectors, buttock, and hamstrings. Stand in the middle of the hyperextension station. Facing toward the large flat pad, lean forward until your upper thighs are placed on the pad. With your legs straight place your feet under the smaller pad. When in position, lower your upper body at the waist until it is perpendicular to the floor. Then lift your upper body back to the starting position. At the top of the movement hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction. Tip - If you want to add resistance to the exercise you can hold a weight plate to your chest.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 25

Top 5 Bicep Exercises For The Best Bicep Workout

Standing Barbell Curls

This exercise is a basic movement that works the biceps and forearms. Grab a barbell with an underhand grip. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Let the barbell hang in front of you at arms length. Keep your elbows close to your torso at all times. Moving only your forearms, use your bicep strength to curl the barbell up to shoulder level. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the biceps, then slowly lower the barbell to the starting position. Tip – Grabbing the barbell with a wider grip will work more of the inner head of the biceps, helping to develop more muscle fullness. Grapping the barbell with a closer grip will work more of the outer head of the biceps, helping to develop more bicep peak.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 26

Standing Dumbbell Curls

This exercise is performed similar to the barbell curl. Grab a pair of dumbbells. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Let the dumbbells hang at arms length on each side of your body. Keep your elbows close to your torso at all times. Moving only your forearms, use your bicep strength to curl the dumbbells up to shoulder level. Rotate your hands so that your palms are facing upwards at the top. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the biceps. Slowly lower the dumbbells to the starting position. Tip - you can do this exercise in an alternating fashion curling one arm first and then curling the other arm. Curling one arm at a time will allow you to handle heavier weights then you could by curling both arms simultaneously.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 27

Bicep Preacher Curl

This exercise isolates the biceps. Secondary stress is applied to the forearms. Sit on a preacher bench with the back of your upper arms lying flat on the pad, palms of your hands facing up. Grip the barbell with an underhand grip. Lower the barbell until your elbows are almost straight and you feel a good stretch in the biceps. Moving only your forearms, use your bicep strength to curl the barbell up, hold this position for a second, then slowly lower the barbell back to the starting position. Tip – using an EZ bar is generally more comfortable on the wrists compared to using a straight barbell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 28

Pinwheel Curls

This exercise is similar to the alternate dumbbell curl. It works the outer head of the biceps, brachialis, and forearms. Grab a pair of dumbbells. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Let the dumbbells hang at arms length on each side of your body. Curl one arm at a time. Moving only your forearm, use your bicep and forearm strength to curl the dumbbell in an arc motion across the front of your body up to shoulder level. Hold the top position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the biceps. Slowly lower the dumbbell to the starting position. Repeat and do the same with the other arm.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 29

Bicep Cable Curls

This exercise is similar to the standing barbell curl. But cable resistance provides constant tension on the muscles at all times. Attach a straight bar attachment to a low pulley cable. Grab the bar with an underhand grip. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart. Let the bar hang in front of you at arms length. Keep your elbows close to your torso at all times. Moving only your forearms, use your bicep strength to curl the bar up to shoulder level. Hold this position for a second to maximize the peak contraction in the biceps, then slowly lower the bar to the starting position. Tips - do not let the weight plates touch during the exercise, keep the tension on the bicep muscles. For variety you can use different bars attached to the low pulley (i.e. rope, ez bar, straight bar, etc.) to work the muscles at different angles.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 30

Top 5 Leg Exercises For The Best Leg Workout

Barbell Squats

This is the single best leg exercise that you can do. Squats work the quads, glutes, hamstrings, and hips. It also works the upper and lower back, and abdominals as secondary muscles. Use a rack such as a squat or power rack to hold the barbell. Place your feet shoulder width apart under the bar. Grasp the bar wider then shoulder width, duck your head under the bar and position it on your trapezius muscles behind your neck. Lift the bar from the rack and take a couple of steps back. Position your feet wider then shoulder width apart with your toes pointed forwards or just slightly out to the sides. Look forward. Bend your legs and squat down with the bar across your upper back. Squat down until your upper thighs are below parallel with the floor. Arch your back and straighten out your legs until you are standing upright.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 31

Leg Press

This movement works the quads, hamstrings, and glutes. The leg press allows you to work your legs hard without putting extra stress on your back. Sit in the leg press machine with your back on the angled seat and your feet on the footplate about shoulder width apart with your toes pointed forward or just slightly out to the sides. Straighten your legs and release the bars at the sides of the machine. There is usually a handle on each side for you to hold on to and stabilize yourself. Bend your legs and slowly lower the weight until your knees are at a 90-degree angle. Straighten your legs and lift the weight back up to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 32

Lunge

This movement is great for working the quads, hamstrings, and glutes. Doing lunges in a smith machine will make the exercise easier and allow you to handle more weight then you could doing lunges with a free weight barbell. Step forward with one foot and space your feet about 20-25 inches apart. Keep your toes pointed forward and your front foot flat on the floor. Bend your legs until your knees are at 90-degree angles. Push up and return to the starting position. Repeat for the desired number of reps, then do the same with the other leg out front.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 33

Leg Extension

This movement isolates the quadriceps. This exercise is good for developing muscle detail between the individual segments of your quadriceps muscles. Sit on the leg extension machine (adjust the seat according to your body). Hook your feet beneath the roller pads and grasp the handles at the sides of the machine for support. Straighten your legs and lift the weight up. Pause at the top for a second or two to enhance the peak contraction in the quads, then lower the weight slowly to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 34

Lying Leg Curls

This movement isolates the hamstrings. This exercise is good for developing muscle detail in the backs of your legs. Lie face down on the padded bench with your knees just over the edge of the bench. Hook your feet beneath the roller pads and grasp the handles at the sides of the machine for support. Curl your legs and lift the weight up. Pause at the top for a second or two to enhance the peak contraction in the hamstrings, then lower the weight slowly to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 35

Top 5 Calve Exercises For The Best Calve Workout Standing Calve Raise

This is a basic calve movement that works the gastrocnemius muscles. Position yourself on a standing calve raise machine. Space your feet a bit closer then shoulder width apart. Keep your knees straight. Stand up on your tippy toes and hold this position for a second to enhance the peak contraction in the calves, then lower your heels as far down as you can getting a good stretch throughout the calves.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 36

Smith Machine Calve Raise

This is a good standing calve raise variation to do if you do not have access to a standing calve raise machine. This exercise can also be done with a free weight barbell, but it is much harder to maintain your balance. Unrack the bar as if you were going to do squats. Space your feet shoulder width apart or a bit closer. Keep your knees straight. Stand up on your tippy toes and hold this position for a second to enhance the peak contraction in the calves. Lower your heels back to the floor.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 37

Seated Calve Raise

This exercise targets the soleus muscles because it is performed with your legs bent at a 90-degree angle. This exercise also works the gastrocnemius muscles are as secondary muscles. Adjust the knee pads of the machine so that you can sit with your knees snug to the pads. Place the balls of your feet on the foot block, with your feet a bit closer then shoulder width apart, toes pointing forward. Rise up as high as you can on your tippy toes. Hold this position for a second to enhance the peak contraction in the calves. Lower your heels until your calve muscles stretch down as far as possible and hold the stretched position for a second.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 38

Leg Press Calve Raise

Sit in a leg press machine with your toes on the bottom of the foot plate and your heels hanging off the bottom edge. Press the weight sled up with your feet until your knees straight. Press up with your toes and the balls of your feet, pushing the sled up a few inches. Feel your calve muscles contract, then lower your toes back down, getting a good stretch in the calves. An important note: Leg press machines vary considerably in design. If the foot plate doesn’t allow you to hang your heels off the bottom edge, the leg press calve raise will not be as effective, due to only working the muscles through a partial range of motion.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 39

1 Leg Calve Raise

This is a good calve exercise for developing balance and proportion between both calves. Hold a dumbbell in one hand at your side. Step onto the ledge of a sturdy platform (at least 6 inches high) with the balls of both feet. With your free hand, grasp a fixed support bar for balance. Keep your chest up, abs tight and your eyes focused forward. Keep your working leg (dumbbell side) straight as you keep your nonworking leg off the floor. Concentrate on maintaining perfect balance, keeping the dumbbell steady at your side. Slowly lower your heel toward the floor until it can go no farther; hold briefly, feeling a good stretch in the calve. Without bouncing, forcefully press through the ball of your foot to drive your body up as high as possible. Hold the peak contraction for a second before lowering your heel and repeating. Once you complete all reps for one leg, repeat with the other leg.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 40

Top 5 Ab Exercises For The Best Ab Workout

Decline Bench Sit Ups

This exercise works the entire frontal abdominal wall. Sit on an decline bench and place your feet under the foot pads to restrain your legs. Either cross your arms over your chest, or place them behind your head to support your neck. Sit up and squeeze your abs at the top. Hold this position for a second. Then slowly lower your torso back up to the starting position. Tip - If you want to add resistance to the exercise you can hold a weight plate to your chest.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 41

Leg Raises

This exercise works the frontal abdominal wall, particularly the lower half of the abdominals. Position yourself on the leg raise station. Support your bodyweight on your forearms. Keep your torso upright. Raise your legs in a semicircular arc until your legs are parallel to the floor. Then slowly lower back to the starting position. Tip - a less intense version of this exercise is to keep your knees bent at a 90-degree angle during the exercise.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 42

Pull Down Cable Crunches

This is a good all around abdominal exercise. It places intense stress on the rectus abdominis, intercostals, and serratus muscles. Attach a handle to a lat pull down machine. Facing away from the weight stack. Grab the handle with an underhand curl grip and brace the back of your legs against the knee pad. Bend forward at the waist and crunch your abdominal muscles. Breath out as you contract your abs. Hold this position for a couple of seconds to maximize the peak contraction in the abs. Then return back to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 43

Frog Kicks (aka Seated Knee Up)

This exercise works the frontal abdominals, especially the lower half of the abdominal muscles. Sit on the floor or a flat bench with your legs out straight. Place your hands palms down behind you. Lean back slightly and use your abdominal strength to lift your legs. Simultaneously bend your legs and bring your knees as close to your chest as possible. Slowly straighten out your legs and return to the starting position. Repeat. Do not let your feet touch the floor during the exercise, keep the tension on the abdominal muscles.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 44

Crunches

This basic abdominal exercise isolates the upper half of the fontal abdominal wall. Lie on your back on the floor. Your feet should be flat on the floor shoulder width apart with your knees bent at a 90-degree angle. Place your hands behind your head for support. Without pulling on your neck, slowly lift your shoulders off the floor using your abdominal strength. Breath out as you contract your abs. Hold this position for a couple of seconds to maximize the peak contraction in the abs. Then slowly lower yourself to the starting position.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 45

Top 5 Forearm Exercises For The Best Forearm Workout Barbell Wrist Curls

This is a basic forearm exercise that works the forearm flexor muscles. Sit on a flat bench and lay your forearms on your lap while holding a barbell palms up. Using only your hands and wrists, curl the barbell up toward the ceiling as high as possible, keeping your forearms flat on your lap. When you return to the start position, allow the barbell to roll all the way down into your fingertips and then repeat.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 46

Barbell Reverse Wrist Curls

This is a basic forearm exercise that works the forearm extensor muscles. Sit on a flat bench and lay your forearms on your lap while holding a barbell palms down. Using only your hands and wrists, reverse curl the barbell up toward the ceiling as high as possible, keeping your forearms flat on your lap. Lower the barbell down as far as you can, then repeat.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 47

Dumbbell Wrist Curl

This exercise targets the forearm flexors and allows you to work each forearm individually, thus helping to develop balance and proportion between both forearms. Sit and hold a dumbbell with an underhand grip. Rest your forearm on the bench between your thighs with your wrist just beyond the edge of the bench. Allow the dumbbell to roll down the palm towards the fingers. Curl the dumbbell back up and flex your wrist. Once you perform the desired number of reps for one arm, switch and repeat with the other arm.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 48

Dumbbell Reverse Wrist Curl

This exercise targets the forearm extensors and allows you to work each forearm individually, thus helping to develop balance and proportion between both forearms. Sit and hold a dumbbell with an overhand grip. Rest your forearm on the bench at a 90 degree angle, holding the dumbbell off the side of the bench, this position is generally more comfortable on the wrists. Lower the dumbbell as far as you can, then reverse curl the dumbbell back up and flex your wrist. Once you perform the desired number of reps for one arm, switch and repeat with the other arm.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 49

Reverse Barbell Curls

The reverse barbell curl work both the biceps and forearm extensor muscles. Grip a barbell with a shoulder width overhand grip. Stand straight up with your back flat and head up. Keep your elbows tucked into your sides, curl the bar up towards the top of your chest. Pause for a second to fully contract the forearms, then slowly lower the barbell back down. Tip - using an EZ curl barbell will generally be more comfortable on the wrists.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 50

-- Part 2 of 10 --

Is There A Perfect Workout Routine?

Dear Friend, I get a lot of e-mail from people asking me all sorts of exercise related questions such as: • • • • • • How many days per week should I workout? How many exercises should I do for each body part? How many sets and reps should I do? Heavy weights & low reps or light weights & high reps? How often should I train each body part? Etc. Etc. Etc...

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

Well, the simple answer is that there is really no right or wrong way to workout. You could ask 10 different bodybuilders to explain their workout routine and most likely you would get 10 different answers.

You will find people growing on routines that most bodybuilding literature rejects as ineffective. A lot is written about overtraining for instance. Yet, some of the top bodybuilders flourish on daily workouts that last for 3 hours! Others obtain awesome muscularity on a short 45 minute barbell blasting program. How can this be?

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 51

"Everything works, but nothing works forever."
That is probably the most important thing to remember for making consistent progress with your workouts. You can follow most any type of workout routine and you will make good progress for the first several weeks (provided that you are getting adequate nutrition, rest, etc.). But generally after a period of time of following a set workout program your progress will slow down and eventually you will no longer make progress with that particular routine. Our bodies are very smart and naturally accommodate to stress. Your body will add as little muscle as necessary to get the job done. This is why construction workers get only big enough to handle the exact amount of work they do during a days work and no bigger, even though they are doing physical work all day long. Adding muscle is a very unnatural thing to your body. You must constantly throw "curve balls" at your muscles to get them to grow. Generally, you will make the best progress within the first 6 weeks of starting a new workout routine. After 6 weeks your body starts to adapt and your muscle gains slow down. In the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System I've included a comprehensive workout CD-ROM that contains 25 different training programs designed to fit your training goals, schedule and experience level. You can start off with a basic training regimen and as you become more advanced in your workouts you can move on to more advanced routines and really kick your training up a notch to take your muscular development to the next level. By following this type of progressive system you will learn the training options and techniques that will eliminate years of trial and error learning and set you in the right direction to becoming your own muscle building expert.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 52

"Lee's Training DVD’s are a wealth of knowledge"
It doesn't matter how long you've been weight training you can always know more. Lee's Training DVD’s are a wealth of knowledge. Also the diet log, articles, and ebooks that are on the CD are awesome and give excellent guidance. The workout programs are great and have really helped me improve my strength and muscle gains in the gym.

Proper training gives real results and real results are what you will get from this awesome training system that Lee has put together. Trevor Prior Canada

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 53

-- Part 3 of 10 --

The Correct Lifting Technique For Gaining Muscle And Strength
Dear Friend, I see this lifting mistake all the time. It's an all too common a scene in gyms all over the world - some guy is starting his chest workout on the bench press with two or three 45 pound plates on each side of the barbell. While his faithful spotter is standing by preparing to deadlift the barbell off his friends chest. After pacing back and forth the gym and getting "psyched up" the lifter plops down on the bench and takes the weight off the rack. The bar drops towards his body at a lightning fast speed. As the bar makes impacts with his chest it bounces nearly half way back up before any force is required to keep the momentum going. Then with a huge grunt and an arch that lifts his ass eight inches off the bench, the bar starts to inch its way up. With the help of the spotter (who is yelling "it's all you"), the weight barely gets pressed to lockout. Then the lifter jumps up and shouts: "I did it!" Just think of all the people that you have seen do this at one time or another. Do they ever really improve their strength? You will usually see them doing the same bench press "circus act" with the same weight week after week. Do these folks strike you as "strong" lifters? Probably not. The strongest lifters you will see are those who have complete control over the weight throughout the exercise - be that bench presses, squats, shoulder presses, or curls. This is not to say that these people are always the ones lifting the biggest weights. I've seen some guys that I consider to be strong, lifting moderate weights, but doing it in a way that dictates strength.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 54

The difference between these lifters and the previously mentioned lifters is made crystal clear as time passes on. Just keep track of the progress of the "strong" lifters who use good form and they will be the ones who make consistent long-term improvement with their lifts and muscular development. Where as the "circus act" lifters are usually doing the same thing week in and week out until they are side lined with a muscle tear or some other major injury. Gains in muscle and strength don't come overnight. They take consistent training and one cannot be consistent with their training if they are injured. Improper form and fast jerking of excessive weight will eventually lead to an injury, it's just a matter of time.

...with a huge grunt and an arch that lifts his ass eight inches off the bench... Note: this pic is an example of what NOT to do.

The reason why the good lifters make better gains in strength and muscular development is found in their lifting form. They control the weight during the eccentric (lowering) portion as well as the concentric (lifting) portion of the exercise. Muscle tension is at its greatest during the eccentric contraction and controlling the weight through this negative phase has been shown to increase strength and development at a faster rate then controlling it through the concentric contractions alone. However, this emphasis on the eccentric phase of the rep doesn't mean that the concentric contraction should be ignored. Once the weight is lowered to the bottom of the exercise in a controlled manner, it should be lifted up with maximal speed. Increasing the speed of the contraction leads to increased power output and directly effects the intensity of the exercise.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 55

When starting any new training routine or implementing a different lifting technique you should always start off conservatively and make gradual progress overtime. So if this lifting form is new to you, then you may have to adjust your training weights to somewhat less then normal for a short period of time, until you become comfortable with the form. To show you the ideal form and repetition tempo I will use the bench press as an example. Starting with a warm up weight, bring the bar down to your chest slowly. It should take approx. 2 seconds (i.e. one-thousand-one, one-thousand-two) once the bar is lowered, you should explode and forcefully push the weight back up to the top position in approx. 1 second (i.e. one-thousand-one). Exhale as you drive the bar from your chest with maximum speed. Even though you are moving the weight fast there should be no bouncing, jerking, or lifting your butt off the bench. Keep the form strict and make the muscles do the work. Now you don't have to be too anal about the times mentioned, I'd rather you have your attention focused on your lifting form then counting the seconds in your head. Just make sure to lower the barbell slowly and under control and lift it as fast as you can with good form. Counting the 2 seconds for lowering and 1 second for lifting is something that a training partner could keep track of as you do your set. After each set they can give you feedback and let you know if you should slow down the negative portion of the lift or speed up the concentric portion, etc. Use this lifting technique on every rep of every set, even your warm ups. Don't make the mistake of using sloppy form during your warm ups and then trying to lift strict during your work sets. Use proper form all the time so it becomes second nature to you. As you get comfortable with this style of lifting you will develop a rhythm for it and you will not need to consciously think about your lifting form, you will just lift with good form automatically. The Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System provides you with step-by-step instructions on how to perform all of your exercises with proper technique. You will learn the most common errors that people make with each exercise and how to avoid them.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 56

"...watching the dvd's has allowed me to perfect my workouts..."

These dvd's have helped me massively, I was worried about doing the wrong things with my workouts. But watching the dvd's has allowed me to perfect my workouts from the professional examples. The dvd's were easy to follow yet full of information, I really enjoyed them and I hope you make more! Also I have to give credit to you're website and forum, I have been to others in the past but none compare to your's. It is full of information, full of people willing to help including yourself and its a very friendly community. I can't thank you enough for the advice and tips that I have gotten from your site! Thanks again and please make more DVD's in the future! Leo Skipton England

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 57

-- Part 4 of 10 --

"...I go to the gym regularly and I train hard, but I am not getting any bigger... Why...?"

Dear Friend, I get asked this question a lot by both men and women who are desperately trying to put some solid muscle mass on their bones. Your diet is one of the most critical aspects of gaining muscular bodyweight. You can have your training routine down pat, but if your diet doesn't meet your nutritional needs you will NOT get bigger, regardless of how hard you train in the gym. Most people who call themselves "hard gainers" are usually just under eaters. A lot of folks will skip breakfast, have a small lunch or snack during the day, then pig out and stuff themselves at dinner and think that they are eating a lot. You need to eat every 2-3 hours, or approx. 6 times per day, in order to provide your body with a steady supply of nutrients from which to grow from. If you let yourself go 4 hours of more without eating then you are putting your body into a catabolic state and burning up precious muscle tissue.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 58

There are many different formulas you can use to determine how many calories you need to eat each day. But the quickest and easiest way to guesstimate how much you should be eating is to simply take your total current body weight and multiply it by the following: • • • For Fat loss = eat 12 calories per pound of bodyweight For Maintenance = eat 15 calories per pound of bodyweight For Weight Gain = eat 19 calories per pound of bodyweight

This is a very easy way to estimate caloric needs. However, there are obvious drawbacks to this method because it doesn't take into account your activity levels or body composition. But it will put you in the ballpark and you can adjust your caloric intake up or down as needed based on your progress. A good nutrient break down for gaining muscular bodyweight is 35% protein, 45% carbohydrates, and 20% fat. Note: each gram of protein has 4 calories, each gram of carbohydrate has 4 calories, and each gram of fat has 9 calories. The whole idea of eating 6 well balanced meals per day is by no means a new concept. Most of the clients that I work with usually already have a good idea of how they should be eating. But their main excuse is they don't have the time to eat properly. So below I've outlined a few time saving eating tips that you can use to help make eating a healthy muscle building diet simple and easy. When you cook your food, cook up large quantities so you'll have left overs. This saves time and makes it easier to have quick nutritious meals on hand. I'll often grill several steaks at a time, cook several chicken breasts at a time, bake several potatoes at a time, cook up a large pot of rice, etc.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 59

A George Foreman grill (or similar type of grill) is awesome for fast cooking. A frozen chicken breast can be cooked and ready to eat in just 10 minutes. While you are eating your breakfast each morning you could have your chicken breasts cooked on the grill for meals later in the day. Potatoes, yams, etc. can be cooked within 10 minutes in the microwave. Bags of pre-made salad, spinach, bags of chopped frozen veggies, etc. are a quick way to add healthy veggies to your diet. Fresh fruit like bananas, apples, oranges, etc. are easy to pack with lunches.

An easy to make breakfast favorite of mine; is to cook up some instant oatmeal, stir in a couple scoops of vanilla protein powder, add some apple sauce, top with a dash of cinnamon and some low calorie sweetener. Presto, you'll have yourself a tasty nutritious breakfast ready to eat in about 5 minutes. A fast and healthy lunch would be to pack a grilled chicken breast and baked potatoe in a small Tupperware container. Toss in some pre-washed salad veggies, take a piece of fruit, and you're all set. Most people usually do not have much of a problem eating well for dinner as this is typically the biggest meal of the day for the average person. Just make sure to have generous portions of protein foods like beef, chicken, turkey, fish, etc. Wholesome complex carbohydrates such as potatoes, yams, brown rice, whole wheat pasta, etc. And also include some green veggies like a garden salad, steamed, or stir fried veggies. For in between meal snacks and times when you can't sit down to the table for a formal meal you can still keep a steady supply of protein and nutrients in your system with quick foods like; protein / meal replacement bars, protein / meal replacement drinks, beef jerky, mixed nuts, fresh fruit, cottage cheese, etc.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 60

If you would like to learn more specific training and dietary strategies for building a lean muscular physique then you need to get a copy of the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System. Because as a special bonus with your DVD order you'll also get My Bodybuilding Contest Diet Log. I kept a detailed nutritional log every day for 4 months during my pre-contest diet for the 2006 bodybuilding season. You'll see exactly what I ate every single day to get in my most muscular contest condition ever! To order your copy of the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System online over our secure encrypted order page please visit: www.LeeHayward.com/dvd/dvdorder.htm And if don't have a credit card or don't want to use your card online. No problem, you can also order by mail at: www.LeeHayward.com/dvd/mail.htm

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 61

"...Gained 48 lbs. of Muscular Bodyweight..."
I just wanted to thank you for all your tips and advice. I am now beginning to have the physique that I have always wanted, my skinny frame has become a distant memory. I’m 6' 2" and when I began training I was 187 pounds. Since following your training system I’m now 235 pounds. People I have known for a long time comment on how big I look now, which is what I have always wished for. This training system has been a great breakthrough for me, thanks to you, and I hope that there will be others who gain like me through taking your advice. Without your help I never would have got the results that I have achieved in gaining mass in such a short period of time. Thanks Lee. Keep up the good work. Paul Collins United Kingdom

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 62

-- Part 5 of 10 --

The Truth About Bodybuilding Supplements

Dear Friend, I have been involved with bodybuilding since 1990 and I have seen fads, trends, and scams come and go. I've literally spent thousands of dollars on various supplements in my effort to put muscle on fast. I've seen and studied how the supplement industry operates. Both as a customer buying up the latest craze, and as an "insider" with my own supplement sales company. I must issue you a warning here. My discoveries will not only shock you but may make you a little upset. That's understandable. I felt exactly the same way when I first discovered this "inside information" of the supplement industry. The reality is that supplements are not necessary to build a lean muscular physique. Exercise and nutrition are the only things that you really need to succeed. Some supplements can help speed up the process a little, but not nearly as much as you may have been lead to believe.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 63

The Advertisements Only Tell Part Of The Story
You've seen the advertisements for supplements in the magazines. The ridiculous claims made in some of these advertisements. Things like "Gain 10 lbs. in 7 days on super duper creatine", "Scientifically proven to burn fat now" and other claims made by the supplement companies to push their supplements on you. Of course if you dispute any of their claims, they can quickly show a scientific study that "proves" it does what is advertised. The truth is these advertisements are only telling you part of the story. They conveniently forget to tell you the study that "proves" beyond a shadow of a doubt the supplement works, was performed on some sickly person in the hospital who would have probably gained muscle on anything you gave them.

A Peek Inside the Supplement Industry
Supplement companies have only one goal in mind. To make a profitable product. They will go to great lengths, even lie, to try and get their supplements to be bought by you off the shelves of your local GNC or by calling a 1-800 number. This misleading (a politically correct way of saying lie) can take many different forms. The biggest problem with the misinformation of supplements comes from the bodybuilding magazines themselves. A lot of people (especially those new to the bodybuilding game) do not know most of these bodybuilding magazines also own the supplement companies. And these supplement companies use their magazines as a sort of advertisement. These conflicts of interests make it literally impossible to provide an objective viewpoint of a supplement. How can a supplement company publish an article in its magazine which paints a negative (but true) picture of a supplement they sell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 64

Hidden agendas are everywhere in this industry. To help you here is a list of some popular bodybuilding magazines and their sister supplement companies. • • • • • • • Muscle & Fitness Magazine - promotes Weider products Flex Magazine - promotes Weider products Muscular Development Magazine - promotes Twinlab products Muscle Mag - promotes MuscleTech products Testosterone Magazine - promotes Biotest products Pumped Magazine - promotes SAN Nutrition products Double XL Magazine - promotes Nutrabolics products

And recently one of the most heavily promoted supplement brands is XYIENCE which is regularly seen on the UFC, Spike TV, The Fight Network, and several magazines worldwide. Note: Keep this list in mind when reading information on any supplements. It doesn't mean these supplements are useless. But it will help you decipher the hidden agenda.

The Best Supplement Brand...
The next dirty little secret of the supplement industry is about product manufacturing. Supplement companies get their products made from a contract manufacturer. A contract manufacturer is a large company with the equipment and tools to get the materials needed for a specific product, and is able to put the product together. They do this in large quantities for bodybuilding supplement companies. For example, if I wanted to start my own supplement company I would contract with one of these manufacturers. They would then get the basic supplements (i.e. protein, creatine, or whatever) from one of the major suppliers and formulate a product with my label, and now I'm in business. The point I am trying to make is almost all the supplements come from a few major companies, which produce it in large quantities. They sell it to the contract manufacturers who put it into product form under safe conditions. After that, they slap a label on it and it is sent to the sports nutrition company for them to sell.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 65

So the bottom line is that one brand of supplements is no better then another brand in terms of real world results. They may have different flavors, colors, etc. added to make it different from the others. But the actual product itself is no better then any other brand. You’ll get just as good of results by using one brand of supplements as you will by using another brand, regardless of what the magazine advertisements say, or what the paid sponsored athletes say.

Lee's Top 5 List...
Below I have listed my top 5 supplements that I personally use regularly and that I believe are good supplement investments.

Protein Powder:
Your body needs protein, and lots of it. It is the building block of muscle. Without enough protein in the body, muscle mass will not increase. During your weight training workouts, your muscles are getting broken down. In order to rebuild and repair your muscles, your body needs protein. It is as simple as that. Protein powder is a really convenient and inexpensive way to get extra protein in your diet. All bodybuilders and fitness enthusiasts need to eat at least 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day. Getting this much protein from food alone can be tough. But by adding a couple protein drinks per day you'll easily be able to get extra protein in your diet. Protein powder is also a lot cheaper then most high protein foods, so by getting some of your daily protein intake from a protein powder you can cut down on your grocery bill.

Creatine:
Creatine increases protein synthesis and minimizes protein breakdown. This can increase lean muscle mass, improve performance in high-intensity exercise, increase energy levels, and speed up recovery rates. Creatine is naturally found in many foods such as meat and fish, but to get the best benefit bodybuilders and athletes should supplement their diets with creatine. For your money the best creatine supplement to use is Pure Creatine Monohydrate powder. This will work just as well as the more expensive and heavily advertised creatine supplements that are available, but at a fraction of the cost.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 66

EFA's:
Essential Fatty Acids are the "good fats". They are important for immune system development, digestive support, healthy brain function, soft and smooth skin, circulatory health, and anti-aging benefits. Essential Fatty Acids are necessary fats that humans cannot synthesize, and must be obtained through diet. EFAs are longchain polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from linolenic, linoleic, and oleic acids. Foods such as fish, flax seeds, olives, and nuts are great sources of EFAs. But if you do not consume enough of these foods in your diet on a regular basis you should supplement with fish oil and/or flax seed oil supplements.

Greens:
Studies show that phytonutrients such as chlorophyll, polyphenols, carotenoids and other antioxidants help protect the body from free radical damage. Greens are rich in phytonutrients which help support the body's self defense mechanism, detoxify and nourish the body. A serving of Greens is approx. the equivalent to 8-10 servings of fruits and vegetables, they are one of the best antioxidant supplements available. We all know that we are supposed to eat 8-10 servings of fruits and veggies each day, but very few people actually do this on a daily basis. That's why I consider Greens a must have supplement for overall health and well being.

Multi-Vitamins:
It makes sense to get the Daily Recommended Values for vitamins and minerals just in case you don't get them from food. Many people run short on some key nutrients, possibly raising their risk of heart disease, weakened bones, nerve damage, as well as slowing down their muscle growth. Taking a multi-vitamin, multi-mineral supplement daily is a good way to provide your body with potent antioxidants and supply your muscles with key vitamins and minerals that they need to perform optimally.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 67

Obviously, you can't expect supplements to make up for a lousy diet and poor training program. Your main focus should be on perfecting your workout and nutrition program first. And then you can take advantage of the nutritional supplements I've listed above to help you get the extra edge that they can provide. The Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System provides all the sound training and nutritional information that you need with no hype, no B.S., and no gimmicks - just the FACTS of what you need to know to build muscle, burn bodyfat, and get in the best shape of your life! I've taken all of the most effective modern muscle-building methods available today and combined them with Dennis Weis' 40+ years of Bodybuilding Experience to create the one of the most complete muscle building training systems ever available!

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 68

"I wholeheartedly recommend these reports to anyone interested in building a stronger, more muscular physique."
Dennis has really outdone himself with these incredible e-reports. As a dedicated trainer myself, I eagerly devoured the information I found in them! He presents invaluable advice on arm training, abdominal training, creatine supplementation, and much more. I've been a personal trainer for 9 years and have been weight training for more than 16 years and I found myself nodding in both agreement and amazement at the powerful information in these reports. I wholeheartedly recommend these reports to anyone interested in building a stronger, more muscular physique. Nick Nilsson
Author of "The Best Exercises You've Never Heard Of"

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 69

-- Part 6 of 10 --

Gaining Muscle With Squats And Milk -- The 20 Rep Squat Routine --

Dear Friend, It's Lee Hayward here again with another great muscle building tip. One of the fastest ways to gain size and strength in the entire body is by following the 20 Rep Squat Routine (aka the "squats and milk" program). This is an old time workout routine that has been around for over 50 years, but it works awesome for fast gains. Even if you are a hard gainer. The way it works is you train 3 days per week (i.e. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) Each workout you will start with full squats. Do 2-3 easy warm up sets to get the blood flowing and to warm up your joints. Then take a moderate weight and do 1 set of 20 reps. For each rep take a couple big mouthfuls of air, hold your breath, squat down and up, and repeat. As you progress through the reps you will need to take more breaths in between reps. During reps 15-20 you may need to take 5 or more big mouthfuls of air in between reps. It takes me up to 3 minutes to complete 1 all out set of 20 rep squats. Each workout add 5 lbs. to the squats and get all 20 reps. This is the key to making serious muscle gains with the program. You have to make 5 lb. jumps in weight each workout.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 70

When doing this program you should do full squats. I personally squat down until the backs of my legs touch my calves. This will make the squats far more effective for muscle growth.

Full Squats

"ass to the ground" (almost

)

Another thing, do NOT wear a weight lifting belt while doing the 20 rep squats. By squatting with out a belt you will strengthen your lower back and it will be easier to take deep breaths while doing high rep squats. Make no mistake about this routine is brutally tough, those 20 rep squats will take every bit of energy that you have, but the gains are awesome. This routine will stimulate your entire body to grow bigger and stronger. High rep squatting stimulates the central nervous system and has a progressional muscle building effect on the entire body. This will cause muscle growth in the arms, chest, back, and shoulders, as well as the legs.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 71

After you finish the 20 rep squats do some other supplemental exercises to complete the workout. For example, you could do a circuit routine of: Chin Ups, Dips, and Sit Ups. - Do Rest - Do Rest - Do a a a a a set of chin ups for as many reps as you can do minute set of dips for as many reps as you can do minute set of sit ups for as many reps as you can do

Repeat for a total of 3 sets of each exercise. And strive to perform at least 1 additional rep on each set for your next workout. The other exercises that you do after the 20 rep squats can vary depending on your training goals and personal preferences. Instead of a circuit of chin ups, dips, and sit ups you could train chest with one workout, work your back with the next workout, and do some arm training with the next workout. The main thing is that you start each workout with the 20 rep squats and add 5 lbs. to the bar each time. This progressive overload will force your muscles to grow like nothing else.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 72

Tom Platz did high rep squatting as a regular part of his workout routine. Not only did he have huge legs, but he was huge and thick all over.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 73

Bulk Up Diet - Squats and "Milk"
As for your diet you need to eat as much food as you can, and as often as you can. The program is called "squats and milk" because the old timers used to drink at least 1 gallon of milk every single day to help them gain weight with the program because milk is high in protein, vitamins, minerals, and calories. But remember this was back in the day before protein powders were available like they are now. So 'milk' was the old timers protein drink so to speak. You don't necessarily have to drink a gallon of milk each day to follow the 20 rep squat program. Just make sure you eat a high calorie, high protein diet. A typical days eating for the 20 rep squats and milk program would look something like this: Breakfast: Eggs, pancakes, piece of fruit, and a glass of milk Snack: Bran Muffin and a glass of milk Lunch: Sandwich (i.e. meat, cheese, tuna fish, etc.) piece of fruit and a glass of milk Snack: Granola bar, couple slices of cheese, and a glass of milk Supper: Generous portions of meat (i.e. chicken, beef, pork, etc.) Pasta, Rice, or Potatoes Green veggies glass of milk Snack: Sandwich (i.e. meat, cheese, tuna fish, etc.) piece of fruit and a glass of milk *also be sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day This is just a sample eating plan, you can change it around to suit your own tastes. But you get the idea of how much you should eat and how often in order to gain size and strength. If you strictly follow the 20 rep squat program and consume a good high calorie diet you can realistically gain approx. 10-20 lbs. of muscular bodyweight with in the next 2-3 months.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 74

"I was able to gain 20 lbs. of solid muscle mass"
I was an ectomorph and my training was going nowhere and I was running out of ideas. I had followed all the mainstream workout routines and they never produced the muscle gains that I desired. But by following Lee’s Total Fitness Bodybuilding program I was able to gain 20 lbs. of solid muscle mass, going from 172 lbs. up to 192lbs. This was the first time I actually could look in the mirror and think..WOW.. this is really me! Alongside Lee's great program is his undivided attention to his clientele. He is always available to answer questions and personally help out with any workout related topic. Lee is awesome in every aspect and I thank him for helping me through my rough bodybuilding journeys. Christopher Imhoff USA

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 75

-- Part 7 of 10 --

Workout Motivation -- Top 10 Ways to Stay Motivated --

Dear Friend, We all go through phases where we are not very motivated to train, eat right, etc. I'm sure you have experienced this for yourself on more then one occasion. Here are some tips that I have used over the years to help both my clients and myself with workout motivation.

1. Take it slow and steady. Many people, in a combination of enthusiasm and impatience, wind up doing too much, too soon, too frequently. That results in soreness, exhaustion, and feeling burnout - in other words, lack of motivation. Take your workouts one day at a time and enjoy the journey. "Inch by inch life’s a synch, yard by yard life is hard" 2. Schedule your workouts in advance. Make a “workout appointment” with yourself for a specific time and place. Treat this appointment the same as you would any important business meeting. If you schedule time for your workouts in advance and plan on keeping your word, you're more likely to keep consistent.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 76

3. Get a workout buddy. Try to find a good training partner who is very serious about working out. Preferably someone who is bigger and stronger then you are. This will help motivate you and push yourself to become bigger and stronger as well. A good training partner will really help you be consistent with your workouts. You'll not only have to show up at the gym for yourself, but you'll have someone else depending on you as well. A lot of times we will do more for others then we will do for ourselves, and in this case it will help both you and your training partner. 4. Keep a training journal. This is one thing that nearly every bodybuilding and fitness expert agrees on, and as you know, when it comes to “experts” we don't agree on too many things . By keeping an accurate record of your workouts you’ll be able to monitor your strength and muscle gains. Also keep track of your bodyweight and bodyfat percentage. This will help to not only motivate you, but give you feedback on whether or not your training and nutrition program is working on not. 5. Strive to be the best that you can be. This one sort of ties in with keeping a training journal. Actual changes in strength and body composition are often so gradual that most of us take them for granted. For example, I often hear from guys who have went from 150 lbs. to 175 lbs. in the matter of months and then they e-mail me saying that they are a “hard gainer”. Most times it is because they are comparing themselves to the pictures of the pros they see in the magazines, or to some jacked-up guy at their local gym. Bottom line, there will always be people who are better then you, and people who are not as good as you. So judge your progress based on your personal improvements, not on how you compare to someone else. 6. Educate yourself. Read bodybuilding and fitness related books and articles. You will constantly be picking up new tips and training ideas that you can apply to your own workouts. Also watching workout videos is awesome for motivation and it’s very educational as well. Reading about training is one thing, but actually seeing it is totally different. Most of us learn better with visual examples. It’s much easier to grasp new exercises and training techniques by seeing them actually being performed, rather then just reading about them. 7. Change your workout. If your training progress is slow, then boredom is sure to follow. If you find you’re bored with your current workout program, then change it. There are lots of training programs that you can follow, there is no need to stick to doing the same thing day in, day out. Try something new.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 77

8. Change the gym where you workout. This one ties in with changing your workouts. Different gyms will have different pieces of equipment, a different atmosphere, different members, etc. this can all help to add variety and fun to your workouts. To give you an example, in the past 5 years I have trained at 8 different gyms, and each one provided a fresh and stimulating change to my workouts. 9. Go watch local bodybuilding, powerlifting, and weight lifting contests. This is really motivating. Nothing fires me up more then seeing a good bodybuilding or lifting contest. You will get to meet lots of like minded people who are all interested in bodybuilding and weight training. Plus you may want to train and get ready for a local competition yourself. Nothing will motivate you to train hard and stick to your diet like training for a competition. 10. Don't make bodybuilding your life. And last, but not least. Don't make bodybuilding and working out the whole focus of your life. Have other hobbies and interests outside of the gym. By having other interests and priorities in your life you'll be a more well rounded person. When something is a hobby it is fun, when it becomes an obsession you usually take the fun out of it.

If you are looking for a fun new routine to spice up your workouts and help renew your training motivation then look no further then the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System. There are 25 different workout routines included so you'll never get stuck doing the same old training routine day in and day out. Click Here to order your copy online over our secure encrypted order page. And if don't have a credit card or don't want to use your card online. No problem, you can also order by mail order.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 78

"I made awesome gains with this program."
The information that Lee teaches on the DVD's has helped me to customize my diet and training to the point that my strength, size, and conditioning improvements are consistent. Lee has helped me on numerous occasions over the last year, including some one on one training when I tried his Blast Your Bench Program. I made awesome gains with this program. Even though it is a bench press specialization routine, I made solid gains all over. For example, my bent barbell rows went up by 30 lbs, squats went up by 30 lbs, and my bench press went up by 40 lbs. Lee has a ton of experience in bodybuilding, as well as powerlifting, and it shows. Not only does he have an impressive physique, but the man’s head is jam packed with all kinds of exercise and nutritional information. Now we can get a taste of his knowledge base, as he has put together all the valuable information he has collected over the years, and created his own Bodybuilding DVD Training System. Congrats Lee, and thanks for everything. Steve Cook Canada

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 79

-- Part 8 of 10 --

The Barbell Clean & Press -- A Forgotten Exercise --

Dear Friend, Many decades ago before the bench press became popular, the Olympic clean & press overhead (often just referred to as the “Press”) was the standard exercise for the strength world. The bench press wasn’t practiced until the 1950’s and didn’t become really popular until the 1970’s. Today they ask you, “How much can you bench?”. Years ago the question was, “How much can you press?”. The Olympic clean & press overhead was recognized as one of three standard international lifts (the other two are the snatch and the clean & jerk) that was performed in competitions. For quite a few years this lift was performed in a meritorious style (erect stance, nearer shoulder width grip, and elbows consciously held in.

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 80

You can refer to the diagram and description below for a full explanation of how to properly perform the “Barbell Clean & Press”.

Barbell Clean & Press

Stand over the barbell as if you were going to do a deadlift. Squat down and grasp the bar with a shoulder width grip. Using your legs, explode the bar off the floor. When the barbell passes your knees, push in with your hips. Start to pull the barbell up with your back. This action will bring the bar into contact with your legs at mid-thigh. At the moment of contact, accelerate the bar upward with your legs and back until your body reaches a full extension. At full extension rise up on your toes and shrug your shoulders. This movement puts maximum momentum into the barbell, allowing it to continue to rise while you drop under it. Bend your elbows, pulling the bar up with your arms as you jump your feet out to the sides. Descend into a half squat as quickly as possible. With the bar moving up and your body moving down, twirl your elbows under it. The barbell should come to rest on your anterior deltoids and clavicle bones on or before your thighs become parallel to the floor. Keeping your back muscles tight, stand upright with the bar. Then contract your shoulder muscles and explode the barbell to a locked-out position overhead. Keep your back upright and try not to bend more then 45 degrees away from midline as you press the bar. Hold the bar overhead momentarily and then slowly bring it back down.

Then an odd development begin to manifest itself through a liberalization of the rules, due in part to the influence of the Russian and Asiatic lifters. It got to a point where many of the officials were not able to keep to a strict interpretation of the rules governing this lift and gradually the rules became so lenient that the press was often called the "odd ball" lift.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 81

It was a joke to see a lifter pressing nearly as much or more as he could jerk overhead, an example being in a 1972 competition where the great Soviet Olympic lifter Vasiily Alexeev "pressed" 518 pounds but only clean & jerked 507 pounds. Judging the Olympic clean & press overhead continued to become such a monumental problem (obvious slumped upper body/hyper-extended back, knee-kicks, and sudden jolts in the starting drive of the press) that it was finally abolished as one of the official international lifts in the early 1970s.

During its hey day as one of three standard tests of combined strength and athletic ability in weight lifting the Olympic clean & press was the most basic of all exercises, especially for the development of the shoulders. Sadly though because of its abolishment the Olympic clean & press (along with the Continental and Military press) quickly faded in popularity and became an almost forgotten exercise for Olympic style-lifters, power-bodybuilders, powerlifters and strength athletes alike. However as time has gone on many of these iron game veterans have began to S-LO-W-L-Y return to a more isolated and traditional form of the clean & press, from decades past, as a core exercise of choice for the development of a strong overhead kinetic structural support accompanied with HUGE deltoids and traps.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 82

Dennis Weis has written an information-packed, result-producing eBook that reveals how to use the barbell clean and press to build broad, massive, and powerful shoulders! And, he'll show you how to enhance your overhead pressing strength. This muscle building eBook reveals many of the secrets for obtaining MOUNTANIOUS OVERHEAD PRESSING STRENGTH. You'll discover such detailed technical tips and instruction as: • • • • The 10 Tracking Patterns of the Overhead Barbell Press. The Power Rack Attack. The 90 Day Graduated Incline Press System. The Famous Doug Hepburn One-Rep System.

The Barbell Clean & Press is just one of 21 power bodybuilding e-books that is included with the Total Fitness Bodybuilding Muscle Building System. Get your very own copy of this ultimate collection of muscle building knowledge and transform your body into an award winning muscular physique!

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 83

Doug Hepburn (who is featured in the "Barbell Clean & Press eBook") was considered the strongest man in the world at one time, and for good reason. Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, Douglas Ivan Hepburn (1926-2000) went on to win the heavyweight class over American weightlifting icon John Davis with lifts of 371 in the press, 297 in the snatch, and 364 in the clean and jerk. Hepburn was the first man to officially bench 400, 450, and 500 lbs. He was also a great squatter: he held a world record of 630 lbs. squat, that Paul Anderson eventually exceeded in late 1952. Doug would later improve his personal best squat to 760 lbs.

During his prime Doug weighed 280 and was reportedly capable of the following lifts: • • • • • • • • • • Press off the rack: 440 lbs Two-Hand Dumbbell Press: 175s Press Behind The Neck: 350 lbs Two Hand Barbell Curl: 260 lbs Wide Grip Bench Press: 580 lbs Jerk Press: 500 lbs Crucifix: 200 lbs Squat: 760 lbs Deadlift without straps: 705 lbs Deadlift with straps: 740 lbs

If you would like to learn more about Doug Hepburn’s training and his impressive lifts, then be sure to get a copy of the Total Fitness Bodybuilding Muscle Building System and check out the "Barbell Clean & Press eBook" that is included on the Bonus CD-ROM.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 84

-- Part 9 of 10 --

Gaining Herculean Muscle Mass and Power Fast -- By: Dennis B. Weis "The Yukon Hercules" --

Dennis B. Weis is a Ketchikan, Alaska-based power/bodybuilder. He is a hardhitting, uncompromising freelance professional writer and investigative research consultant in the fields of bodybuilding, nutrition, physiology, and powerlifting. Dennis was first published over three decades ago (1976) in the pages of Iron Man magazine. Since that time he has become known to almost every mainstream bodybuilding/physique magazine's readership throughout North America and Europe. The magazines that publish his articles include and are not limited to Bodybuilding Monthly (U.K. publication), Exercise For Men Only, Hardgainer (Nicosia, Cyprus, publication), Iron Man, Muscle & Fitness, Muscle Mag Int'l, and Natural Bodybuilding & Fitness.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 85

During the past 30+ years that I have been writing for the various bodybuilding magazines I have received letters from the readers requesting answers to their bodybuilding and nutritional problems. Of all the letters, at least 75% are from those who want to get "brutally huge" and powerful as fast as possible. It then seems that gaining muscle weight is still the foremost concern of the average bodybuilder. A majority of you began training because you were below that certain muscular body weight that you personally considered ideal. From my 40 plus years of active involvement in the iron game both as a former bodybuilding and powerlifting competitor and as a contributing consultant to many of the bodybuilding magazines, my observations lead me to the conclusions that bodybuilders are perpetually on a ceaseless search for greater muscle size and want to "be big", no matter what their body types dictates! Most bodybuilders also reach a point when they feel their power would go up in a big jump if they could just add a few pounds of muscle body weight. Gaining muscle body weight should be a relatively simple process, yet, it has always been given the status of a major problem! The down-to-earth concepts of gaining muscle body weight has suddenly been dignified with a lot of technical jargon. It has now become a deep science complicated with sophisticated advertisements and articles about metabolic programming. Frankly, I find it amazing! You, the average bodybuilder who is underweight or who simply want more Herculean muscle mass, needn’t be frightened by these seeming difficulties. Like the vastly over-inflated "science of bodybuilding" itself, most of this concern is totally unnecessary. Except for the very few advanced bodybuilders who might lie awake at night worrying about a blurred "cut" in his left pectoral, gaining muscle weight can still be a simple, quick and sure process. What I propose to do in this article is present to you a unique but basic 4 Phase Program, that will accelerate your muscle body weight gains and double your present power, but first let’s review a few crude, basic, unglamorous facts. A normal health body maintains its average body weight by consuming a certain number of calories per day. If you continue consuming that number of calories but reduce the amount of your daily physical activities, your body over a period of time will become heavier. By the same token when you increase your daily calorie consumption but maintain your daily physical activities you will also gain weight. It seems pretty simple when I explain it this way, doesn’t it? Why then, do some bodybuilders fail to gain Herculean muscle mass as readily as others? That’s not quite as simple but is still not a big mystery.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 86

Some bodybuilders have a faulty metabolism that prohibits the assimilation of use of food (nutrients) into a muscle weight gain. Others have peculiarities of body chemistry that causes shortages of iron, copper, B vitamins, enzymes or trace minerals that are vital to the gaining cycle. Other bodybuilders have such a faulty nutritional program that they do not consume the vitamins and natural elements they need; instead they are merely shoveling down "empty calories". Still others have digestive difficulties that allow the food they have consumed to be passed off as waste without being fully utilized. With rare exception, each of these conditions responds to eating correct foods in sufficient amounts, use of natural supplements and regular exercise with heavy weights. All of the top champions in competitive bodybuilding recognize the value in obtaining Herculean muscle mass and power, for it has allowed them to make gains in muscle body weight, measurements, strength and endurance. Perhaps you may be wondering at this point whether adding Herculean muscle mass is good for one’s physique. I will let you be the judge of this as you consider the following: Bill Pearl was beaten in the 1956 NABA Mr. Universe by Jack Delinger. It was shortly after this narrow defeat that Bill decided to get Brutally Huge, and did so by increasing his muscular body weight to 255 pounds. It was at this new body weight that he had a 55" chest, 60" shoulder circumference, and 21" upper arms. My good friend, the late, John Grimek who was never defeated in any amateur or professional bodybuilding contest that he entered, once increased his muscle body weight to a Herculean 250 pounds at a height of only 5’8 ½". Some of the top physique champions of yesteryear have gone to some real extremes nutritionally to gain Herculean muscle mass. Bruce Randall, a former Mr. Universe winner once reached a body weight of 400 lbs. by following such dietary measures as drinking an average of 8-10 quarts of milk per day (though one day he drank 19 quarts of milk), an average of 12-18 eggs per day, along with 7 lbs. of meat per day. Bruce gained this Herculean size as a means by which to try and break some of Paul Anderson’s lifting records. This was the absolute extreme in eating for the purpose of gaining Herculean size that I ever observed. However, there was a bodybuilder I met up with in Miami, FL back in the late ‘60s who could run a close second to Bruce Randall’s "Shovel Method" (this termed was coined by Dr. Terry Todd when referring to gorging one’s self with gargantuan heaps of food) of eating. His name was Richard Simons and it was during that era (‘60s) that he was one of the prolific writers for Iron Man Magazine. This guy went on a 21 day program of intense training and a stepped up daily calorie consumption. He increased his daily calorie consumption from 5,000 to 9,000. To do this he was downing six to nine quarts of milk per day, along with 3 lbs. of meat-mostly hamburger, but for the sake of variety he would also eat plenty of cheese, fish and tuna. His protein consumption was a 250-390 grams per day and to make sure that it was properly assimilated he would drink 1 quart of papaya juice daily. He took in plenty of vitamins and minerals in supplement form.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 87

His workouts consisted of high sets and reps utilizing maximum poundages and perfect form at all times. By following this program of heavy duty eating and heavy training he gained 25 lbs. of Herculean muscle mass in 21 days and weighted 225 pound at the height of 6’2". His upper arms measured 18 ½", forearms 15 ½" with a wrist of 7.8", chest 51 ¼", waist 34", thighs 28 ¼" and calves 16 ½". He told me that his primary goal was to one day weigh in at a rock hard 255 lbs. To do this he would go up to 300 pounds in body weight and then train back down slowly to his goal of 255 lbs. Being a free-lance writer, in the fields of bodybuilding, powerlifting, anatomy and physiology, nutrition, etc. I have had the unique opportunity to not only observe the techniques for gaining Herculean muscle mass and power from the previously mentioned bodybuilders, but many other outstanding ones as well. All the champions that I have talked to about the subject of building Herculean muscle mass and power universally agree that its success is based on a 4 phase program which consists of the following: 1) 2) 3) 4) POWER PROGRESS TRAINING SCHEDULE TOTAL REST AND RECUPERATIVE SLEEP AND REST PERIODS SUPER NUTRITION POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE

In this age of bodybuilding sophistication, I realize that this 4 phase program will seem too easy, but be assured that it does still work. I will now discuss each phase individually. The first phase is the...

POWER PROGRESS TRAINING SCHEDULE
The exercise plan is "set-up" on a 90-day schedule by which you will work the 3 major and 4 minor muscle groups of the body (thighs, chest, back, deltoids, biceps, calves, and abdominals) on non-consecutive days per week. These muscle groups are the important ones for gaining muscular bodyweight and power fast. One of the best ways to keep your muscle gains momentum going is to vary your training volume and intensity. Depending on your past training experiences and capacity for hard work you can either work all seven muscle groups in one total body workout but if you don’t have the time necessary to give in a day to complete the entire training schedule you could go with a split training schedule where you utilize the popular PUSH/PULL system, where you train pushing muscles one day, and train pulling muscles the next. Basically, your training schedule should be kept simple and uncluttered. The exercises you select are up to you, suffice to say I do not have enough scope and space reserved in this article to go into a description of actual workouts. But there are several sample progressive training workout programs that you can follow in the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System. Enter phase two...

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 88

TOTAL REST AND RECUPERATIVE SLEEP AND REST PERIODS
Recuperation is very important!! If you don’t recuperate, you are not going to be ready for your next workout and you’re at a setback. You don’t make the gains you are striving for. You should get your rest and I mean NAPS during the day. Ted Arcidi (the first man to bench press 700 lbs. officially) takes a 1.5-hour nap every day. Ted says that most body growth takes place during the REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Ted believes that you must have TOTAL REST. As far as getting a good solid 8-10 hours of sleep at night, there are a number of important steps which should be taken. NEVER GO TO BED ON AN EMPTY STOMACH (eat a little something and perhaps a small glass of your favorite blender drink. Don’t eat foods which might cause you an upset stomach and cause you to awaken in the middle of the night.) YOUR BEDROOM SHOULD BE WELL VENTILLATED (cool, but not cold), BED SHEETS AND BLANKETS SHOULD ALWAYS BE CLEAN, YOUR BEDROOM SHOULD BE PITCH BLACK AND AS NOISEPROOF AS POSSIBLE. I have always found it to my advantage to take a nice tepid shower prior to going to bed. This helps to induce a fast, sound slumber. The third phase of the program for Gaining Herculean Muscle Mass and Power Fast is...

SUPER NUTRITION
Eliminate all white sugar from your daily diet - use honey or raw sugar instead. No more white bread and rolls - use whole wheat bread only. Eliminate fancy desserts, pies, cakes, cookies and pastries - instead use natural ice cream, banana pudding (sugar free), natural brown rice pudding or a dish of sliced bananas, dates, figs with honey; serve all of these with cream. Drink 3-4 quarts of milk each day, a Chuck Sipes favorite for gaining (at least one pint or more with each feeding). If you have a problem with sugar lactose in the milk, there is a milk on the market now in which the sugar lactose has been removed. Vince Gironda "The Iron Guru" told me many years ago about a rather unique weight gaining trick where equal parts of Ginger Ale and half and half is used between main meals. You can also use half and half on cereals, with sliced fresh fruits and puddings. Add natural peanut butter in large amounts; on whole wheat and 12-grain breads, in sandwiches, and blender shakes. Concentrate on consuming plenty of the following as snacks during the day: cheese, olives, nuts, dried, and fresh fruit.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 89

Six 1000 calorie feedings are easier to digest and assimilate rather than three 2000 calorie meals, and keeps the stomach from stretching or distending. It is important to never skip a meal when you are attempting to gain additional muscle mass. Instead of a coffee break at work, drink a pint or two of milk. Better yet you might have a pre-mixed blender drink. A couple of these drinks which come to my mind are as follows: Drink #1 4 raw eggs (boil for 15-20 seconds) ½ pint heavy dairy cream ½ cup honey 1 cup powdered milk 1 cup Protein Powder Add 1.5 quarts of whole milk Drink #2 1 cup whole milk ½ cup heavy dairy cream 2 tablespoons Brewer’s Yeast powder 1 tablespoon flax seed oil ½ banana 2 raw eggs (boil for 15-20 seconds) 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter 1 scoop natural ice cream. I will be the first to admit that the eating regime I have talked about in this article is unbalanced for normal living. It is swimming in fats, and swarming with nasty carbohydrates. It’s intended for bulking up the body and will do exactly that; it is NOT recommended for use throughout the year. The bodybuilder who wants to bulk up another ten or twenty pounds is not interested in technicalities nor pseudoscientific nonsense about cuts and striations. Using this nutritional program you’ll get those extra additional pounds if it is combined with the other three phases detailed in this article. Only then will you reach your new weight with a well built and solid physique. The fourth and final phase for Gaining Herculean Muscle Mass and Power is a...

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 90

POSITIVIE MENTAL ATTITUDE
Bill Pearl once told me "A proper mental attitude plays a large role in your efforts to build size and strength. When thinking positive thoughts, one has a happy outlook on life. You should think positively about all your daily activities, physical, mental and moral. It will aid you in your training in the gym as well as your personal life. A healthy, positive attitude will improve your body and help make you a better person." Adopt the attitude of a champion by developing a positive self image of yourself, set some specific goals both short and long term. Above all have that burning intense desire to succeed and THINK BIG!!!

A CLOSING COMMENT... It may seem as though you are taking in literally thousands of calories per day and you are. John Parrillo, a recognized exercise and nutrition expert says that some male bodybuilders need to eat up to 10,000 calories in extreme cases. He says that it all depends on a person’s individual metabolic rate and exercise level. Even with all the calories you might be taking in on a daily basis, there is a fluctuation in everyone’s bodyweight, so do not become discouraged if it bounces up and down from time to time and this is especially true during the first week or two, for your system is simply adjusting to the increased dietary and hard workouts you are putting it through.. Well there you have it, the 4 Phase Program for GAINING HERCULEAN MUSCLE MASS AND POWER FAST!

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 91

Massive Muscle Pumping
Think it's impossible to gain 25lbs of muscle in just 21 days? Think again! Massive Muscle Pumping is guaranteed to help you destroy your own muscle mass barrier and gain Over 1 Pound of Muscle Density every day for 21 days. Massive Muscle Pumping contains the most dynamic, unorthodox, and advanced training principles available today. The revolutionary training techniques revealed within this eBook are beyond normal by 21st century training standards. But you're not looking for normal training results, are you? You want to get stronger and more massive than you ever dreamed! With Massive Muscle Pumping, your EXPLOSIVE MUSCLE GROWTH (EMG Index) will be so impressive that no one will believe that you are anabolic steroid free.

Click Here To Order

In this NO BULL, 107 page, eBook, your pulse will race and you'll want to run to the gym to try out the all the plateau crashing intelligence found in this eBook. Underground information like: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • The Japanese Counter-Split Body Blast System The 24 Hour Float Method The Juxtaposition Principle The 3 x 3 x 3 Exercise System The Shock Rebound Technique (SRT) The SECRET for 'Leg-Cuts' The Double-Oxygen Saturation Technique The Atomic Triceps Program The Regular Set Plus Fast Doubles Principle The 'EXTREME' CALF MACHINE An Anabolic Mega Vitamin/Mineral Regime Stealth Mega-Calorie Diet (designed to thicken muscle fiber) A Man's Breakfast The Egg and Red Wine concoction! (A potent appetite stimulant) Vince Grionda's Three Natural Anabolic Secrets! Pros and Cons of a Muscular Bulk Routine Evolutionary High-Volume Training Euro-Blast Weight Gaining Big Secret! Anabolic Pharmacology Factor (Tissue Drugs? Blessing or Curse?)

"Massive Muscle Pumping" is just one of 21 power bodybuilding e-books that is included with the Total Fitness Bodybuilding Muscle Building System. Get your very own copy of this ultimate collection of muscle building knowledge and transform your body into an award winning muscular physique!

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 92

Hi Lee, I’ve been a frequent visitor of your website for quite sometime. I’ve used the diet and training information that you have outlined in your Total Fitness Bodybuilding workout system to help me win first place at the NPC South Florida Teenage Bodybuilding Championships as well as first place at the Florida State University Bench Press Championships. thank you, Yumon Eaton USA

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 93

-- Part 10 of 10 --

The Key To Building Your Ultimate Body

Dear Friend, Like most folks, I once thought there was a magic formula that would create a championship physique. To reinforce this myth, fancy ads galore appear in the bodybuilding magazines offering you that magic formula. For the first several years of my bodybuilding experience, I was on a quest to discover the training routine that combined the best techniques and would work for everybody. After all, some of the famous trainers of the past claimed they found it. And many trainers of today still claim to have that one “magic” muscle building formula. I have tried a lot of these different training methods at one time or other on both myself, as well as others that I trained. And I discovered that...

Lee Hayward * Certified Strength Coach * Competitive Bodybuilder & Powerlifter

Everything works - but nothing works forever.

If you are familiar with my writings, you have no doubt heard me say this before. There is really no right or wrong way to workout. You could ask 10 different bodybuilders to explain their workout routine and most likely you would get 10 different answers.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 94

But there has to be some special factor that is common to all the successful routines that makes them work. This mysterious factor is the same element that makes one person a champion, while another with the same potential never gets good enough to compete. It’s that force that allows a healer to place his hand on the forehead of someone with an incurable disease and heal him. Simply stated, it’s...

FAITH... The absolute belief in the effectiveness of the routine you’re using.
If a bodybuilder is convinced that the method he’s using works, he’ll naturally apply that extra effort it takes to make it work. This theory also works in reverse. If you hate a particular routine or don’t believe that it is effective, you’ll end up just "going through the motions" and "spinning your wheels". In this way, a trainer is right convincing a student that the routine he’s on is the very best and can’t fail to produce results. That is, provided the student can follow the program safely and that the program is complete and covers all major muscle groups. From this simple but very important muscle building principle, you can now get the answers to many of bodybuilding’s greatest mysteries.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 95

Why Do You Want To Gain Muscle And Transform Your Body?
Psychologists have discovered that the reason for doing something rates much stronger than how you get to the job done. If you have a strong enough reason why you want to gain muscle and transform your body then you will find a way to get the body you want. Ask yourself- Why do you want to gain muscle? Do you want more confidence, more attention from the opposite sex, to intimidate people that have been bothering you, or just to look better with your shirt off? All of these and any one that is personal to you can be used as very powerful motivators to reach your muscle building goals. In my case I just didn't like being weak and thin. I wanted a physique that looked powerful and exuded confidence. In order to get to your desired level of muscular development you need to constantly remind yourself where you are headed. This will help you recognize the things it takes to reach your goal.

Muscle Building Goal Setting
The process of setting goals helps you choose where you want to go in life. By knowing precisely what you want to achieve, you know where you have to concentrate your efforts. You'll also quickly spot the distractions that would otherwise lure you from your course. Goal setting techniques are used by all top-level athletes, successful businesspeople and achievers in all fields. They give you both vision and motivation. They help you to organize your time and your resources so that you can make the very most of your life. By setting clearly defined goals you can take pride in the achievement of those goals. You can see measurable progress in what might seem like a long pointless journey. Goals are set on a number of different levels: First you decide what is your ultimate long term goal that you want to achieve. Second, you break this big goal down into smaller, short-term goals, and treat each one of these as small goals as steppingstones towards your long-term goal. Finally, once you have a written plan of what you want to accomplish, you have to work on it daily to achieve it.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 96

Your Ultimate Body
The first step in setting your muscle building goals is to consider what you want to achieve. • • • • • What does your ultimate body look like? How strong do you want to be? How much would you like to weigh? How lean do you want to be? How big do you want your arms to be?

This goal will give you the overall perspective that shapes all other aspects of your bodybuilding journey. Actually take a few minutes and think about this. If you could design your body just the way you wanted it to be; how would it look, how would it feel, what would it be like to walk around in that impressive muscular body. Grab a paper and pen or just open up your word processor and write out the answers to the questions above. Once you have written down your ultimate body goal, set a plan of smaller goals that you should complete if you are to reach your ultimate body. Set a 3 year plan, a 1 year plan, and a 3 month plan of progressively smaller goals that you should reach to achieve your goal. Each of these should be based on the previous plan. Then create a daily "to-do list" of things that you must do each day to work towards your bodybuilding goals. At the early stages these goals may be to read books, watch videos, and gather information on proper training and nutrition. This will help you to improve the quality and realism of achieving your ultimate body goal.

Staying on Course
Once you have decided your plan, keep the process going by reviewing and updating your to-do list on a daily basis. Periodically review the longer term plans, and modify them to reflect your changing priorities and experience. In the case of bodybuilding, you may find that certain body parts respond better to training then others, and you have to change your workout routine to help bring up the development of the slower responding body parts. Or you may find that you are gaining too much bodyfat during your muscle growth phases and that you need to modify your diet and training to prevent excess bodyfat gain. By reviewing your goals and monitoring your progress regularly you can adjust your program as needed to help you stay on course and achieve your ultimate goal.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 97

Goal Setting Tips
The following guidelines will help you to set effective physique transformation goals: • State each goal as a positive statement: Express your goals positively 'Eat a healthy and nutritious diet' is a much better goal than 'Don't eat junk food'. Be precise: Set a precise goal, putting in dates, times and amounts so that you can measure achievement. If you do this, you will know exactly when you have achieved the goal, and can take complete satisfaction from having achieved it. Don’t just say something like “I want to get bigger”. Be specific: how much muscle do you want to gain and by when do you want to gain it? Set priorities: When you have several goals, give each a priority. This helps you to avoid feeling overwhelmed by too many goals, and helps to direct your attention to the most important ones. For example, if you have a goal to build more muscle and a goal to lose bodyfat then decide for yourself which one should be the top priority. If you are naturally slim, but also have some excess bodyfat (i.e. “skinny fat”), then you should probably prioritize gaining muscle first. If you are currently overweight, but still want to gain lean muscle, then you should probably prioritize fat loss first. • • Write goals down and review them daily: this crystallizes them and gives them more power. Set performance goals, not outcome goals: You should be-careful to set goals over which you have as much control as possible. There is nothing more disheartening than failing to achieve a personal goal for reasons beyond your control. If you base your goals on personal performance, then you can keep control over the achievement of your goals and draw satisfaction from them. For example, don’t set a goal to "win a bodybuilding contest". But rather set a goal to "compete and do your personal best". If you set your goal to perform at your best, then you can realistically achieve this goal regardless of the outcome of the competition.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 98

Set realistic goals: It is important to set goals that you can achieve. When starting a bodybuilding journey people are sometimes a bit naïve in setting very high goals. They might not appreciate either the obstacles in the way, or understand quite how much skill is needed to achieve a particular level of performance. To give you an example, when I started bodybuilding at the age of 12 years old, I set my goal to be the next Mr. Olympia (and at the time I honestly thought I could do it :-) Do not set goals too low: Just as it is important not to set goals unrealistically high, do not set them too low. People tend to do this where they are afraid of failure. You should set goals so that they are slightly out of your immediate grasp, but not so far that there is no hope of achieving them. No one will put serious effort into achieving a goal that they believe is totally unrealistic.

"No one lives long enough to learn everything they need to learn starting from scratch. To be successful, we absolutely, positively have to find people who have already paid the price to learn the things that we need to learn to achieve our goals." -- Brian Tracy --

Achieving Your Muscle Building Goals
When you have achieved a particular goal, such as bench pressing 300 lbs. or bulking up to a certain bodyweight, then take the time to enjoy the satisfaction of having done so. Absorb the implications of the goal achievement, and observe the progress you have made towards your other goals. If you fail to meet a certain goal, don't beat yourself up over it. In the big picture it does not matter as long as you learn from it. Take the experiences you learn and adjust your goal-setting plan accordingly. Your goals will change as you mature (like my goal of winning the Mr. Olympia). Adjust them regularly to reflect this growth in your personality. If your goals do not hold the same attraction that they once did, then let them go and set some new goals. Goal setting is an important method of: • • • • Deciding what is important for you to achieve in your life Separating what is important from what is irrelevant Motivating yourself to achievement Building your self-confidence based on your achievements

When you achieve your goals, allow yourself to enjoy the achievement and reward yourself appropriately.

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 99

Doug Lost 64 Pounds of Bodyfat!

I recently competed in my first bodybuilding competition. I started my contest diet at 242 lbs. and with the help of Lee's program I lost 64 lbs. and got into the best shape of my life. I didn't make the middleweight class like I had hoped, but even as the lightest competitor (178 lbs.) in the light-heavyweight class I still managed to place 3rd. I would like to thank Lee for all the help that he gave me during my contest prep. His knowledge and experience really helped ease off the pressure of being a first time competitor. I feel really proud of what I've accomplished and it is amazing how far I have come from where I started. Again, thanks Lee for your help with everything, it was greatly appreciated and you helped make the whole experience a great one. Cheers Doug Croft Canada

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 100

No Matter What Your Fitness Goals Are, You Can Start Using The Total Fitness Bodybuilding System RIGHT NOW To Become Leaner, Stronger, & More Muscular Than You've Ever Been Before!

Even though the Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System has been designed by bodybuilders. It is not just for bodybuilders. My definition of “Total Fitness Bodybuilding” is simply building your body to be as strong, healthy, and fit as possible. It doesn’t mean that you have to get on stage and compete in a bodybuilding contest. The competition can be with yourself to get in your personal best shape ever. In fact most of people that I coach are “regular everyday folks" who are busy with work, school, families, and other responsibilities. You DO NOT have to be a fitness fanatic and spend all day in the gym to get fantastic results with this system. The training principles and techniques that you will learn can be applied to help you achieve your personal fitness goals. By following the Total Fitness Bodybuilding System you can literally choose the type of body you want to have: • • • Whether it is a simply to develop a lean, fit, well toned body that looks good in a bathing suit. To increase your strength and energy while building functional muscle onto your chest, arms, shoulders, back, and legs. Or to take it all the way and build a powerful muscular physique that is ready for the bodybuilding stage.

Whatever your fitness goals are, when begin applying the proven training techniques that are found in the Total Fitness Bodybuilding System you’ll see an amazing change in your body and your life. Your body is the vehicle that will carry you through this life. If you take good care of it, your body will take you wherever you want to go, with the power, strength, energy, vitality, and confidence you need. Click Here to order your copy of the Total Fitness Bodybuilding Muscle Building System Today!

"Don't put it off any longer, you owe it to yourself, take the next step to developing Your Ultimate Body!" Sincerely,

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 101

Lee Hayward's Total Fitness Bodybuilding DVD Training System is jampacked with the most powerful techniques for pushing your overall muscular development to a whole new level.

Click Here To Get Your Copy Now!

© 2007 - www.LeeHayward.com - All Rights Reserved

Page 102

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful