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FMWRC Annual Report 1996

FMWRC Annual Report 1996

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The Annual Report for the U.S. Army's Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command.
The Annual Report for the U.S. Army's Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command.

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The ratio of APF to NAF support for CDS
programs remained nearly the same as the
previous year with 65 percent of costs borne by
APF and 35 percent borne by NAF. Through
sustained efforts at all levels, CDS continued to
show a dramatic turnaround in NAF operations.
The NAF subsidy decreased by 55.6%. This
improvement resulted from slight increases in
NAF revenue, a $700,000 decrease in NAF
operating costs, and continued implementation
of the CDC financial management turnaround
plan.

Armywide CDS programs executed $108.2M in
direct APF as of September 1996; $101.5M was
programmed for direct program costs, with the
year’s execution rate of 107 percent. CDS
continues to build on the program cornerstones
of affordability, availability, and quality with the
following initiatives:

DOD certification of 118 of 122 CDS pro-

grams.

Accreditation of 128 of 156 (82 percent)
CDCs by the National Academy of Early Child-
hood Programs, a 20 percent increase over FY
95.

During FY 96, the Army continued expansion of
child care spaces and school-age program
options. The School-Age Services program
serves as a bridge between Youth Services and
CDS, helping installations meet full-day, part-
day, and hourly child care needs for young
children, as well as recreational and sports needs
for youth. FY 96 initiatives included:

Fifty-four installations serving as Army
School-Age and Teen pilot sites to identify poli-
cies and procedures necessary for operation.

Training more than 180 management staff
on school-age programs.

Implementing MWR Youth Partnerships at
10 pilot installations to increase available child
spaces and youth program options.

♦ Training school-age staff in adolescent
growth and development.

Figure 5-12

Figure 5-11

Figure 5-13

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32

1996 MWR ANNUAL REPORT

Section 5

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