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The Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro Technique

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Published by Lorenzo Mendoza

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Published by: Lorenzo Mendoza on Jul 29, 2010
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Set the timer, and as always, begin with the first activity on your list. Every time the Pomodoro
rings, put an X in the first empty box (fig. 2.22).

The Pomodoro Technique

17

© Francesco Cirillo

19/10/2006

TO DO TODAY

Rome, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

#"

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

"""

Summarize laws of thermodynamics in writing

"""

Figure 2.22 To Do Today Sheet: First Pomodoro estimated and accomplished.

If you finish the activity in the exact number of estimated Pomodoros, cross out the
description of the activity as in Figure 2.23.

TO DO TODAY

Roma, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

##

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

"""

Summarize laws of thermodynamics in writing

"""

Figure 2.23 To Do Today Sheet: Activities done in the exact number of estimated Pomodoros.

If you finish the activity in fewer Pomodoros than you estimated (overestimation error),
again, cross out the description of the activity (fig. 2.24).

THINGS TO DO TODAY

Rome, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available
Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

##

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

##"

Summarize laws of thermodynamics in writing

"""

Figure 2.24 To Do Today Sheet: Underestimation.

If you’ve used up the estimated Pomodoros and you still need more Pomodoros to
finish the task you’re working on (quantitative underestimation error), you can do one of two
things:
! Continue and mark down the next Pomodoros without taking into account new estimates.
Below is an example of a case where another Pomodoro is needed to complete an activity
(fig. 2.25).

TO DO TODAY

Rome, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

##

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

##"

Summarize laws of Thermodynamics in writing

###!

Figure 2.25 To Do Today Sheet: Overestimation.

! Make a new estimate, in Pomodoros, and mark these new estimated Pomorodos to the right
of the last estimated and completed Pomodoro using a different color or shape. This way,
you can highlight the need for second or third estimates and verify relative error (fig. 2.26).

The Pomodoro Technique

18

© Francesco Cirillo

19/10/2006

TO DO TODAY

Rome, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available
Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

##

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

##"

Summarize laws of thermodynamics in writing

###$$

Figure 2.26 To Do Today Sheet: Second estimate.

As you can see from Figure 2.27, the summary took Lucy four Pomodoros, three of
which were originally estimated (underestimation) and only one of the two estimated later
(overestimation).

TO DO TODAY

Rome, 12 July 2006
Lucy Banks
Available
Pomodoros: 8

Answer questions on thermodynamics in Ch 4

##

Repeat laws of thermodynamics out loud to Mark

##"

Summarize laws of Thermodynamics in writing

###%$

Figure 2.27 To Do Today Sheet: Finishing the activity with the second estimate.

Since tasks don’t usually tend to last more than seven estimated Pomodoros (Rule: If It
Lasts More Than 5-7 Pomodoros, Break It Down.), usually there are no more than three
estimates. All the activities that require a third estimate have to be carefully reconsidered to
understand the reasons why estimating was so complicated.

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