Contents

1 Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves 7
1.1 Terminology and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2.1 Analogy-Based Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2.2 Volumetric Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2.3 Performance Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
I Fundamentals 15
2 Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology 17
2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.2 The Basic Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2.1 Clastic Sedimentary Rocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.2.2 Nonclastic Sedimentary Rocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.3.1 Source Rock and Generation of Petroleum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.3.2 Petroleum Migration and Accumulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.3.3 Classification of Petroleum Reservoir-Forming Traps . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.4 Types of Hydrocarbon Traps on the Norwegian Continental Shelf . . . . . . . . 28
3 Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering 31
3.1 Continuum Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.2 Porosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.3 Saturation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.3.1 Residual Saturation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.3.2 Laboratory Determination of Residual Oil and Water Saturation . . . . 34
3.4 Reservoir Pressure and Distribution of Fluid Phases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4 Porosity 45
4.1 General Aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2 Models of Porous Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4.2.1 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Parallel Cylindrical Pores . . 46
i
4.2.2 Idealised Porous MediumRepresented by Regular Cubic-Packed Spheres
47
4.2.3 Idealised Porous MediumRepresented by Regular Orthorhombic-Packed
spheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.2.4 Idealised Porous MediumRepresented by Regular Rhombohedral-Packed
spheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.2.5 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Irregular-Packed Spheres
with Different Radii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.3 Porosity Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4 Measurement of Porosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4.1 Full-Diameter Core Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4.2 Grain-Volume Measurements Based on Boyle’s Law . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.4.3 Bulk-Volume Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.4.4 Pore-Volume Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.4.5 Fluid-Summation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.5 Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.6 Porosity Estimation from Well Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
5 Permeability 63
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
5.2 Darcy’s Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
5.3 Conditions for Liquid Permeability Measurements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.4 Units of Permeability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5.5.1 Turbulent Gas Flow in a Core Sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.6.1 The Klinkenberg Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
6 Wettability and Capillary Pressure 83
6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
6.2 Surface and Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
6.3 Rock Wettability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
6.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
6.5 Capillary Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.5.1 Capillary Pressure Across Curved Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.5.2 Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.5.3 Capillary Pressure in a Cylindrical Tube . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.7 Pore Size Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
6.9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
6.10.1 Hysterisis in Contact Angle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
6.10.2 Capillary Hysterisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
ii
6.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
7 Relative Permeability 111
7.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
7.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
7.3 Drainage/Imbibition Relative Permeability Curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
7.4 Residual Phase Saturations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
7.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
7.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
8 Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids 121
8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
8.2.1 Rock Stresses and Compressibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
8.2.2 Compressibility of Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
8.2.3 Compressibility of Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
8.3 Deformation of Porous Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
8.3.1 Compressibility Measurements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
8.3.2 Betti’s Reciprocal Theorem of Elasticity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
8.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
9 Properties of Reservoir Fluids 135
9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
9.2 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
9.3.1 Ternary diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
9.4 Natural gas and gas condensate fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
9.5 Oil fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
9.7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
9.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
II Reservoir Parameter Estimation Methods 153
10 Material Balance Equation 155
10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
10.2 Dry gas expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
10.3 A general oil reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
10.3.1 A1: Expansion of oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
10.3.2 A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
10.3.3 B: Expansion of gas cap gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
10.3.4 C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduc-
tion of pore volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
10.3.5 Production terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
10.4 The material balance equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
iii
10.5 Linearized material balance equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
10.6 Dissolved gas expansion drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
10.7 Gas cap expansion drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
10.8 Water influx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
10.9 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
11 Well Test Analysis 173
11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
11.1.1 Systems of Uunits Used in Well Test Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
11.2 Wellbore Storage Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
11.3.1 Diffusivity Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
11.3.2 Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
11.3.3 Gas Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
11.3.4 The Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation in Dimensionless Form . . . 181
11.3.5 Wellbore Pressure for Semi Logarithmic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
11.4 Semi Steady State Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
11.4.1 Average Reservoir Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
11.4.2 Well Skin Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
11.4.3 Wellbore Pressure at Semi Steady State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
11.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
11.5.1 Transition Time Between Semi Logarithmic Period and Semi Steady
State Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
11.5.2 Recognition of Semi Logarithmic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
11.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
12 Methods of Well Testing 193
12.1 Pressure Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
12.2 Pressure Drawdown Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
12.2.1 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Logarithmic Conditions . . . . . 195
12.2.2 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Steady State Conditions . . . . . 196
12.3 Pressure Build-Up Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
12.4 Pressure Test Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
12.4.1 Miller - Dyes - Hutchinson (MDH) Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
12.4.2 Matthews - Brons - Hazebroek (MBH) Analysis (Horner plot) . . . . . 201
12.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
iv
Preface
The topics covered in this book represent a review of modern approaches and practical methods
for analysing various problems related to reservoir engineering.
This textbook, part I Fundamentals and part II Reservoir Parameter Estimation Meth-
ods, constitutes the main content of the book. The subjects presented, are based on the course
of lectures in Reservoir Engineering 1 held by the authors at the Rogaland University Centre
in the period from 1989 to 1995. Part III Fluid Flow in Porous Media and part IV Enhanced
Oil Recovery are a collection of subjects extending the fundamental knowledge into areas of
more advanced theoretical description. The last part VProjects Exercises presents quite a few
exercises of the type students are asked to solve at their examination test.
The book contains a short introduction to important definitions for oil and gas reservoirs
(Chapter 1). The two main parts of the book is related to petro-physics (Chapter 2 to 10), and
related to two important methods in Reservoir Engineering, namely Material Balance (Chapter
11) and Well Testing (Chapter 12, 13 and 14). Modelling of fluid flow in porous media is pre-
sented through different examples using various mathematical techniques (Chapter 15 to 20).
Classification and description of several methods used in enhanced oil recovery are associated
with examples for oil and gas fields in the North Sea (Chapter 21 to 27)
The Preface contains a list of some of the most commonly used parameters and systems of
units used in petroleum engineering.
In Chapter 1 some basic definitions of gas and oil reserves are given and the methods of
their evaluation.
Chapter 2 is a brief introduction to the basics of petroleum geology, with some illustra-
tive examples relevant to the Norwegian Continental Shelf. This chapter contains some basic
concepts and definitions related to the origin, habitat and trapping of petroleum
In Chapter 3 some basic concepts and definitions used in Reservoir Engineering are pre-
sented. Some laboratory techniques are explained and examples of equipment are shown. A
short description of reservoir pressure distribution is also presented.
Chapter 4 introduces porosity and some examples of experimental techniques used to
estimate porosity. Some examples describing the method of error propagation are also given.
Permeability is introduced in Chapter 5. A short deduction of Darcy’s law is given and
some examples of its use is described. Measurements of gas permeability is exemplified and
together with laminar and turbulent gas flow, some additional factors affecting permeability are
discussed.
In Chapter 6, viscosity is introduced and some basic equations, describing laminar fluid
flow are derived. Examples of different viscosity measuring techniques are discusses and some
flow characteristics are mentioned.
1
2
Wettability and capillary pressure are discussed in Chapter 7. In this chapter we intro-
duce the term surface energy to replace interfacial tension and an important relation between
surface energies are derived. Examples of the effect of capillary forces are given and different
experimental techniques are discussed.
Relative permeability is introduced briefly inChapter 8. There has been no attempt made,
to give a broad and consistent description of relative permeability in this book. The chapter is
meant as an introduction to basic concepts of relative permeability and possibly an inspiration
for further reading.
In Chapter 9, some basic aspects of compressibility related to reservoir rock and fluids are
introduced. Examples are related to the behaviour of porous reservoir rocks and core samples
under laboratory conditions.
Chapter 10 lists some basic definitions and properties related to reservoir fluids. Volume-
factors and other important relations are explained and examples of their use are given.
The Material Balance Equation is deduced inChapter 11. The equation is applied in sev-
eral examples, describing different types of reservoirs, such as gas-reservoir and oil- reservoirs
with and without a gas cap.
Well test analysis is introduced in Chapter 12. A somewhat simplified derivation of the
pressure solution for three important production periods are presented, i.e., the wellbore storage
period, the semi-logaritmic period and the semi-steady state period. Dimension-less parameters
are used and the set of pressure solutions are presented.
Chapter 13 introduces some basic methods of well testing, like drawdown test, build-up
test and combinations of the two, are presented. Examples of two "classical" well test analysis
is also included.
Modern well test analysis, like transient testing techniques, is presented inChapter 14.
Use of type curves and matching techniques are shortly presented.
Part III Fluid Flow in Porous Media gives an introduction to mathematical modelling
of oil displacement by water-flooding. This part presents a broad classification of models
describing fluid flow in porous media. Basic principles behind equations of Buckley- Leverett
theory and their application are presented, as well as various analytical solution techniques.
Some few exercises are included at the end of this part.
Enhanced Oil Recovery is presented in part IV. A basic mathematical description of EOR
methods are given and various methods are classified. Examples of polymer flooding is pre-
sented as well as EOR related to surfactants and different solvents. Various techniques using
WAG, foams and Microbial methods are also briefly described.
Most chapters in part I and II contain several exercises, illustrating the concepts and meth-
ods presented, while all exercises in part III and IV are added at the end.
This book does not contain complicated mathematical equations or calculus. The math-
ematical prerequisite required are minimal, though necessary. The student should know the
elements of matrix and linear algebra, probability theory and statistics, and also be acquainted
with single and partial-differential equations and methods of their solution. In part III and IV,
however some slightly more advanced mathematical formalism is used.
A reference list is given at the end of the book. The book does not cover all the relevant
literature, nor is the reference list intended to be a complete bibliography. Only some necessary
references and key publications are included in the reference list.
3
J.-R. Ursin & A. B. Zolotukhin
Stavanger, 1997
4
Units and conversion factors
The basic knowledge of units and conversion factors is absolutely necessary in reservoir engi-
neering, although the choice of industrial units depend on company, country or simply tradition.
Since the choice of units has been largely a question of preference, the knowledge of conversion
factors is practical necessary.
English and American units are most commonly used in the petroleum industry, but there is
a tendency to turn to SI-units or practical SI-units, especially in the practice of the Norwegian
and the other European oil companies.
In this book we will use both SI-units and industrial units in explaining the theory as well
as in examples and in exercises. Since both set of units are widely used in the oil industry, it is
important to be confident with both systems, -simply due to practical reasons.
A selection of some of the most frequently used parameters are listed in the table below.
The Metric unit is seen as a practical SI-unit, often used in displaying data or calculations.
Metric unit = Conversion factor Industry unit,
i.e. metric unit is found by multiplying a given industry unit by an appropriate conversion
factor.
5
Parameter (SI unit) Industry unit Conversion factor Metric unit
Area, m
2
sq mile 2.589988 km
2
acre 4046.856 m
2
sq ft 0.09290304 m
2
sq in. 6.4516 cm
2
Compressibility, Pa
−1
psi
−1
0.1450377 kPa
−1
Density, kg/m
3
g/cm
3
1000.0 kg/m
3
lbm/ft
3
16.01846 kg/m
3
o
API 141.5/(131.5 +
o
API) (γ
sg
)

Flow rate, m
3
/s bbl/d 0.1589873 m
3
/d
ft
3
/d 0.02831685 m
3
/d
Force, N lbf 4.448222 N
pdl 138.2550 mN
dyne 0.01 mN
Length, m mile 1.609344 km
ft 30.48 cm
in. 2.54 cm
Pressure, Pa atm 101.325 kPa
bar 100.0 kPa
lbf/in.
2
(psi) 6.894757 kPa
mm Hg (0
o
C) 1.333224 kPa
dyne/cm
2
0.1 Pa
Mass, kg ton 1000 kg
lbm 0.4535924 kg
Temperature, K
o
C + 273.15 K
o
F (
o
F-32)/1.8
o
C
R 5/9 K
Surface tension, N/m dyne/cm 1.0 mN/m
Viscosity, Pas cp (poise) 0.001 Pas
Volume, m
3
acre-ft 1233.489 m
3
cu ft 0.02831685 m
3
bbl 0.1589873 m
3
U.S. gal 3.785412 dm
3
liter 1.0 dm
3

Spesific gravity of oil.
6
Chapter 1
Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves
1.1 Terminology and Definitions
In the period from 1936 to 1964, the American Petroleum Institute (API) set some guiding stan-
dards for the definition of proved reserves. They were presented in a joint publication of API
and the American Gas Association (AGA), "Proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas liquids
and natural gas", in 1946. In 1964, the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) recommended
reserve definitions following the revised API definitions. In 1979, the U.S. Security and Ex-
change Commission (SEC) issued a newer set of definitions, whereby also the SPE definitions
were updated in 1981. In 1983, the World Petroleum Congress issued a set of petroleum reserve
definitions, which included categories ranging fromproved to speculative reserves [2].
Fig. 1.1 shows a conceptual scheme of the oil and gas resources and reserves, where the
following definitions are used [2]:
Reserves are estimated volumes of crude oil, condensate, natural gas, natural
gas liquids, and associated substances anticipated to be commercially recoverable
from known accumulations from a given date forward, under existing economic
conditions, by established operating practices, and under current government regu-
lations. Reserve estimates are based on geologic and/or engineering data available
at the time of estimate.
The relative degree of an estimated uncertainty is reflected by the categorisation of reserves
as either "proved" or "unproved"
Proved Reserves can be estimated with reasonable certainty to be recoverable
under current economic conditions. Current economic conditions include prices
and costs prevailing at the time of the estimate.
Reserves are considered proved is commercial producibility of the reservoir is
supported by actual engineering tests.
Unproved Reserves are based on geological and/or engineering data similar to
those used in the estimates of proved reserves, but when technical, contractual,
economic or regulatory uncertainties preclude such reserves being classified as
proved. They may be estimated assuming future economic conditions different
from those prevailing at the time of the estimate.
7
8 Chapter 1. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves
Undiscoveed
Nonrecoverable
Resources
Recoverable
Resources
Reserves
Cumulative
Production
Proved
Reserves
Unproved
Reserves
Probable
Reserves
Possible
Reserves
Discovered
Total Oil and Gas Resource
Figure 1.1: Conceptual scheme for oil and gas resources and re-
serves.
Unproved reserves may further be classifiedprobable and possible, see Fig. 1.1.
Probable Reserves are less certain than proved reserves and can be estimated with
a degree of certainty sufficient to indicate they are more likely to be recovered than
not.
Possible Reserves are less certain than proved reserves and can be estimated with
a low degree of certainty, insufficient to indicate whether they are more likely to
be recovered than not.
The estimation of reserves will depend upon the actual mode of petroleum recovery, which
may involve either a natural-drive mechanism improved by water or gas injection, or some
special technique of enhanced oil recovery (EOR).
In general, "possible" reserves may include:
• Reserves suggested by structural and/or stratigraphic extrapolation beyond areas classi-
fied as probable, based on geological and/or geophysical interpretation.
• Reserves in rock formations that appear to be hydrocarbon-bearing based on logs or
cores, but may not be productive at a commercial level.
• Incremental reserves based on infill drilling are subject to technical uncertainty.
1.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 9
• Reserves attributable to an improved or enhanced recovery method when a pilot project
is planned (but not in operation) and the rock, fluid and reservoir characteristics are such
that a reasonable doubt exists whether the estimated reserves will be commercial.
• Reserves in a rock formation that has proved to be productive in other areas of the field,
but appears to be separated from those areas by faults and the geological interpretation,
indicates a relatively low structurally position.
1.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation
1.2.1 Analogy-Based Approach
Another producing reservoir with comparable characteristics can be used as a possible analogue
for the reservoir under consideration, either by a direct well-to-well comparison or on a unit-
recovery basis. This can be done by determining an average oil or gas recovery per well in
the analogue reservoir (e.g., 100,000 bbl/well) and applying a similar or adjusted recovery
factor to the wells in the reservoir considered. The unit-recovery approach refers to a recovery
calculated in barrels per acre-foot or Mcf per acre-foot.
In an analogue approach, one has to consider similarities of well spacing, reservoir rock
lithofacies, rock and fluid properties, reservoir depth, pressure, temperature, pay thickness and
drive mechanism. All possible differences between the analogue reservoir and the reservoir in
question need to be considered to make a realistic adjustment of the recovery estimates.
The use of an analogue may be the only method available to estimate the reserves in a situ-
ation where there are no solid data on well performance or reservoir characteristics. However,
an analogue-based approach is also the least accurate and little reliable method of petroleum
reserve estimation, simply because perfect analogues can seldom be found.
1.2.2 Volumetric Estimates
The methods of reserve estimation based on reservoir data are volumetric and can be divided
into deterministic and probabilistic (stocastic) estimates. The main difficulty in a volumetric
estimate of resources/reserves is in the transfer of data obtained at a small scale (core analysis,
lithofacies data, well logs, etc.) into a much larger scale ( i.e. data "upscaling" for interwell
space).
Deterministic Methods
The principle of a deterministic approach to resources/reserve estimates is to "upscale" the
information derived from the wells and supported by seismic survey, into the interwell space
by using an interpolation technique.
The main parameters used for a volumetric estimate in this approach are:
• The reservoir "gross" isopach map, which means the bulk thickness of the reservoir rocks
(formation).
• The reservoir "net" isopach map, which means the cumulative thickness of the permeable
rock units only. The Net-to-Gross ratio (N/G) is an important parameter indicating the
productive portion of the reservoir.
10 Chapter 1. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves
• The reservoir rock porosity (as a volume-based weighed average):
φ =

i
φ
i
A
i
h
i

i
A
i
h
i
,
where φ is the local porosity, A
i
is a subarea and h
i
is a subthickness (of permeable rock).
• The permeability and net-thickness product (kh
N
) is important for the estimation of well
production capacity:
(kh
N
) = h
N

i
k
i
h
i

i
h
i
=
N
G

i
k
i
h
i
,
where k
i
is the local permeability (other symbols as above).
• Volume-based average saturation of water, gas and oil. For example water saturation:
S
w
=

i
S
wi
φ
i
A
i
h
i

i
φ
i
A
i
h
i
.
Plotting these parameters as contoured maps (isopachs, isoporosity, isopermeability, etc.)
provides the crucial information on their variation and distribution in the reservoir and makes
it possible to evaluate the reservoir pore volume and its fractions saturated with oil and gas
(hydrocarbon volume). The numerical value of hydrocarbon resources/reserve estimate their
represents an outcome of "integrated" map analysis.
Stochastic Methods
An alternative approach is a probabilistic estimation of resources/reserves, which takes more
account of the estimate uncertainty. Stochastic reservoir description is usually based on the pro-
cedure of random-number generator. This numerical technique assumes that the main reservoir
properties (porosity, permeability, N/G, ect.) all have random, possibly normal, frequency dis-
tributions, with the range of values included by core and well-log data. The maximum and
minimum values are specified for each of the reservoir parameters and the random number
generator then "drowns data", so to speak, and then simulates their actual density distribution
in the whole reservoir.
In practice, it is necessary to repeat the stochastic simulation for different "seeds" (initial
boundary values) in order to asses and quantify the actual variation of a given parameter. Each
numerical realisation bears an uncertainty for the reservoir characterisation, where the prob-
abilistic rather than deterministic, is an estimate of resources/reserves. Different realisations
lead to different volumetric estimates, with different probabilities attached. The cumulative
frequency distributions of these estimates, that is used to asses their likelihood will be a very
unclear formulation. See Fig. 1.2.
In common usage [8] we have:
– An estimate with 90 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven value.
– An estimate with 50 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven + probable
value.
1.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 11
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y

o
f

c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
Probability, that a given
value of resources will
be at least as great
as shown
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
Min Max Value
Figure 1.2: Example of stochastic volumetric estimate based on a se-
ries of random-number simulations.
– An estimate with 10 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven +probable
+ possible value.
As more information on the reservoir becomes available, the cumulative frequency graph
may change its shape and the uncertainty of our resource/reserve estimates may decrease, see
Fig. 1.3.
More generally, the problem of certainty can be considered in terms of "fuzzy" [61], prob-
abilistic and deterministic estimates based on the data available at a particular time, as seen
in Fig. 1.4. A comparison of these estimates may be more revealing that each of them is in
isolation.
At the very early stages of field appraisal, the data are usually too limited for using statis-
tical analysis and, hence, a fuzzy estimate of the resources/reserves may be best or only option
[22, 28, 56]. The lack or scarsity of data in such cases is compensated by a subjective assess-
ment of the reservoir characteristics (i.e. the shape of the distribution and the maximum and
minimum values of a given reservoir parameter), Based on the knowledge from other reservoirs
or simply a theoretical guess. A rectangular distribution means no preference and a triangular
distribution means that strong preference distributions are used.
When more data have been collected and statistical analysis becomes possible, aprobabilis-
tic estimate can be made. The range in the possible values of the reservoir parameters would
then be narrower, compared to a fuzzy assessment. When the data available are abadundant, a
deterministic estimate can be made based on a well- specified value of a particular parameter
for a particular part (zone, subunit or layer) of the reservoir.
1.2.3 Performance Analysis
The methods of performance analysis presently used include:
• Analysis based on Material Balance Equation (MBE) [33, 34].
• Reservoir Simulation Models (RSM) [10, 45].
12 Chapter 1. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
o
f
c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value Min Max
0.0
1.0
Pre-drilling Discovery Appraisal
Delineation/
early production
Mature
production
Late time
depletion
Figure 1.3: Changes in the uncertainty resources estimate with in-
creasing data acquisition (after Archer and Wall, 1992).
• Decline Curve Analysis (DCA) [53].
The aim of all of these methods is to obtain the best reservoir performance prediction on
the basis of available data.
The MBE method is based on the data obtained from previous reservoir performance and
PVT analysis, but involves some assumptions for the reservoir driving mechanism in order
to minimise the range of possible predictions from the dataset. The method is thus adjusted
differently to reservoirs containing oil, gas or oil with a gas cap (primary or secondary).
The RSM method involves a numerical simulation technique, with the matching of the
production and the reservoir’s previous performance (history). The discrepancy between the
simulation results (prediction) and the available data is minimised by adjusting the reservoir
parameters and taking into account the most likely reservoir drive mechanism (history match).
The DCA method is to predict future performance of the reservoir by matching the ob-
served trend of the production decline with one or several standard mathematical methods of
the production rate-time (hyperbolic, harmonic, exponential, ect.). If successful, such a perfor-
mance analysis allows to estimate both the reserves and the future performance of the reservoir.
The following "decline curves" from production wells are commonly used in the DCA:
– Production rate vs. time.
– Production rate vs. cumulative oil production.
– Water cut vs. cumulative oil production.
1.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 13
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y

o
f

c
u
m
u
l
a
t
i
v
e
p
r
o
b
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
Value
0.0
1.0
M.L.V V.P.V
V.O.V
Fuzzy
Probabilistic
Deterministic
Figure 1.4: The concept of uncertainty in resources/reserves estima-
tion illustrated by fuzzy, probabilistic and deterministic
approach (data set).
– Gas-oil ratio vs. cumulative production.
– Percentage oil production vs. cumulative oil production.
– The (p/z) ratio vs. cumulative gas production.
Some of these decline curves are shown in Fig. 1.5.
14 Chapter 1. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves
0
0 0
Cumulative oil producction Cumulative oil producction
Cumulative oil producction
Economic
limit
Economic
limit
Economic
limit
Economic
limit
G
q
0
Np
Np
Np Gp
q
Time
O
i
l
p
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
,

%
100
(
p
z
)
Figure 1.5: Different ways of data representation for a decline curve
analysis.
Part I
Fundamentals
15
Chapter 2
Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
2.1 Introduction
Reservoir Engineering is a part of Petroleum Science that provides the technical basis for the
recovery of petroleum fluids from subsurface sedimentary-rock reservoirs.
The Fig. 2.1 below indicates the place and role of Reservoir Engineering in the broad field
of Petroleum Science.
Geology and
Geophysics
Reservoir
Engineering
Production
Engineering
Facilities
Engineering
Reservoir correlation
Reservoir characterization
Geochemical studies
Workover reserve analysis, well completion design, production
facility design, production log interpretation, prediction of
production schedules
Design proposals for
separation, treating, metering
and pipeline facilities
Final facility design and
operation
Reserve estimates for well
proposal evaluation
Reserve estimates, material balance calculations, fluid flow
equations, reservoir simulation, pressure transient analysis,
well test design and evaluation
Reservoir screening for
improved recovery projects
Improved recovery project
design and maintenance
Figure 2.1: Reservoir engineering and petroleum science.
This chapter pertains to the basic concepts of Petroleum Geology and covers the following
17
18 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
main topics:
• The source rock of hydrocarbons.
• The generation, maturation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons.
2.2 The Basic Concepts
Petroleum is a mineral substance composed of hydrocarbons and produced from the natural
accumulations of organic matter of a faunal and/or floral provenance. Petroleum is a gaseous,
liquid or semisolid substance, present in the pore space of porous rocks, referred to as reservoir
rocks, which are mainly of sedimentary origin.
2.2.1 Clastic Sedimentary Rocks
Sedimentary rocks results from the deposition of sedimentary particles, known as clastic mate-
rial or detritus (from the Latin "worn down"), consisting of mineral grains and rock fragments.
Sedimentary particles are derived from weathered and fragmented older rocks, igneous, meta-
morphic or sedimentary, usually with some chemical changes. Sediment comprising loose
mineral detritus or debris is referred to as clastic sediment (from the Greek word "klastos",
meaning broken). Some clastic sediments consist of the accumulations of skeletal parts or
shells of dead organisms, commonly fragmented, and are referred to as bioclastic rocks (see
next section). The particles of clastic sediment may range widely in size, and the predominant
grain-size fraction is the primary basis for classifying clastic sediments and clastic sedimentary
rocks. As shown in Table 2.1 clastic sediments can be divided into 4 main classes: gravel, sand,
silt, and clay [49], where mud is a mixture of clay and silt, possibly including also some very
fine sand. The narrower the grain-size range of a given sediment, the better its "sorting". Both
the grain size and sorting have direct implications for the sediment permeability to fluids.
Table 2.1: Definition of grain-size and the terminology for sediments
and sedimentary rocks.
Sediment Grain-size limits Unconsolidated Consolidated
grain-size fraction in mm sediment rock
Boulder More than 256 Boulder gravel Boulder conglomerate

Cobble 64 to 256 Cobble gravel Cobble conglomerate

Pebble 4 to 64 Pebble gravel Pebble conglomerate

Granule 2 to 4 Granule grawel Granule coglomerate

Sand 1/16 to 2 Sand Sandstone
Silt 1/256 to 1/16 Silt Siltstone
Clay Less than 1/256 Clay Claystone (clayshale, if fissile)
Clay & slit mixture Mud Mudstone (mudshale, if fissile)

The term "gravelstone" is preferred by some authors on semantic basis [51].
2.2 The Basic Concepts 19
2.2.2 Nonclastic Sedimentary Rocks
Chemical Deposits
Some sedimentary rocks contain little or no clastic particles. Such a sediment, formed by the
precipitation of minerals from solution in water, is achemical sediment. It forms by means of
either biochemical or purely chemical (inorganic) reactions [51]. The primary porosity of such
rocks is practically zero, and their possible porosity is totally dependent on the development of
secondary porosity, chiefly in the form of microfractures.
Biogenic Deposits
Sedimentary rocks commonly contain fossils, the remains of plants and animals that died and
were buried and preserved in the sediment as it accumulated. A sediment composed mainly
or entirely of fossil remains is called a biogenic sediment. If the fossil debris has not been
homogenised by chemical processes, the deposit can be regarded as a bioclastic sediment [51].
Main nonclastic rocks are: limestone, dolomite, salt, gypsum, chert, and coal. Chalk is a
special type of biogenic limestone, composed of the sheletal parts of pleagic coccolithophorid
algea, called coccoliths. The main types of sedimentary rocks and their chemical compositions
are shown in list below, containing main sedimentary rock types and their chemical composi-
tion of categories [37].
Sandstone a siliciclastic rock formed of sand, commonly quartzose or arhosic, cemented with
silica, calcium carbonate, iron oxide or clay.
Chemical composition: SiO
2
. Density: ∼ 2.65 g/cm
3
.
Shale a fissile rock, commonly with a laminated structure, formed by consolidation of clay or
mud ( mainly siliciclastic)
Argillite (mud rock) – any compact sedimentary rock composed mainly of siliciclastic mud.
Chemical composition: SiO
2
.
Dolomite a carbonate rock, consisting largely of the mineral dolomite (calcium magnesium
carbonate)
Chemical composition: CaMg(CO
3
)
2
. Density: ∼ 2.87 g/cm
3
.
Limestone a carbonate rock consisting wholly or mainly of the mineral calcite.
Chemical composition: CaCO
3
. Density: ∼ 2.71 g/cm
3
.
Calcarenite a sandstone composed of carbonate grains, typically a clastic variety of limestone.
Chemical composition: CaCO
3
. Density: ∼ 2.70 g/cm
3
.
Marl a friable rock consisting of calcium carbonate and siliciclastic mud/clay.
Chemical composition: SiO
2
+CaCO
3
. Density: ∼ 2.68 g/cm
3
.
Salt (rock salt) – a chemical rock composed of the mineral halite.
Chemical composition: NaCl.
20 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
Gypsum a chemical, evaporitic rock composed of the mineral gypsum
Chemical composition: CaSO
4
2H
2
O.
Anhydrite a chemical, evaporitic rock composed of the mineral anhydrite.
Chemical composition: CaSO
4
.
Some of the typical reservoir rocks are shown in Fig. 2.2
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum
2.3.1 Source Rock and Generation of Petroleum
Local large concentrations of organic matter in sedimentary rocks, in the form of coal, oil or
natural gas are called the fossil fuels.
A rock rich in primary organic matter is called a source rock, because it is capable of
releasing large amounts of hydrocarbons in natural burial conditions. Usually this is ashale
or mudrock which itself is a very common rock type, consisting about 80% of the world’s
sedimentary rock volume. Organic carbon-rich shale and mudrock are characteristically black
or dark greyish in colour, which indicates a non-oxidised primary organic matter.
Many hypotheses concerning the origin of petroleum have been advanced over the last
years. Currently, the most favoured one is that oil and gas are formed from marine phytoplank-
ton (microscopic floating plants) and to a lesser degree from algae and foraminifera [51]. In the
ocean, phytoplankton and bacteria are the principal of organic matter buried in sediment. Most
of organic matter is trapped in clay mud that is slowly converted into shale under burial. Dur-
ing this conversion, the organic compounds are transformed (mainly by the geothermal heat)
into petroleum, defined as gaseous, liquid or semisolid natural substances that consist mainly
of hydrocarbons.
In terrestrial sedimentary basins, it is plants such as trees, bushes, and grasses that con-
tribute to most of the buried organic matter in mud rocks and shales. These large plants are rich
in resins, waxes, and lignins, which tend to remain solid and form coal, rather than petroleum.
Many organic carbon-rich marine and lake shales never reach the burial temperature level
at which the original organic molecules are converted into hydrocarbons forming oil and nat-
ural gas. Instead, the alteration process is limited to certain wax-like substances with large
molecules. This material, which remains solid, is called kerogen, and is the organic substance
of so-called oil shales. Kerogen can be converted into oil and gas by further burial by mining
the shale and subjecting it to heat it in a retort.
Petroleum is generated when the kerogen is subjected to a sufficient high temperature in
the process of the sediment burial. The alteration of kerogen to petroleum is similar to other
thermal-cracking reactions, which usually require temperatures greater than 60
o
C. At lower
temperatures, during the early diagenesis, a natural biogenic methane called marsh gas, is
generated through the action of microorganisms that live near the ground surface.
A temperature range between about 60
o
C and 175
o
C is most favourable for the generation
of hydrocarbons, and is commonly called theoil window. See Fig 2.3.
At temperatures much above 175
o
C, the generation of liquid petroleum ceases and the for-
mation of gas becomes dominant. When the formation rock temperature exceeds 225
o
C, most
of the kerogen will have lost its petroleum-generating capacity [49],as illustrated by Fig. 2.3 .
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 21
Figure 2.2: Typical reservoir rocks.
The long and complex chain of chemical reactions involved in the conversion of raw or-
ganic matter into crude petroleum is called maturation. Additional chemical changes may
occur in the oil and gas even after these have been generated or accumulated. This explains,
for example, why the petroleum taken from different oil fields has different properties, de-
spite a common source rock. Likewise, primary differences in the source composition may be
reflected in the chemistry of the petroleum.
22 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
Generation Intensity
Biogenic Methane
Heavy
Light
Oil
Wet Gas
Dry Gas
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,
°
C
100
175
225
315
60
Dry
Gas
Zone
Wet
Gas
Zone
Oil
Zone
Immature
Zone
Figure 2.3: Generation of petroleum vs. burial temperature.
Two types of evidence support the hypothesis that petroleum is a product of the decompo-
sition of natural organic matter [51],
• oil has the optical properties of hydrocarbons that are known only to derive from organic
matter and
• oil contains nitrogen and certain other compounds that are known to originate from living
organic matter only.
Oil source rocks are chiefly marine shales and mudrocks. Sampling of mud on the conti-
nental shelves and along the bases of continental slopes has shown that the shallowly buried
mud contains up to 8% organic matter. Similar or even higher total organic-carbon (TOC)
content characterizes many ancient marine shales. Geologists conclude therefore that oil is
originated primarily from the organic matter deposited in marine sediments.
The fact is that most of the world’s largest hydrocarbon fields are found in marine sedimen-
tary rock successions representing ancient continental shelves. However, some lake sediments
may be just as oil-prone as marine source rocks. Many oil fields in various parts of the world
are in ancient lacustrine deposits (formed at the bottom or along the shore of lakes, as geo-
logical strata). Fig. 2.4 shows the distribution of the world’s sedimentary basin and petroleum
accumulations (from [51]).
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 23
- Areas where major
amounts of oil and gas
have been found
- Areas of ocean deeper than
2000m underlain by thick
accumulations of sedimentary rock
Legend:
Figure 2.4: World’s main sedimentary basins and petroleum accu-
mulations.
2.3.2 Petroleum Migration and Accumulation
The accumulation of petroleum occur in only those areas, where geological conditions have
provided the unique combination of both hydrocarbon prone source rocks and hydrocarbon
traps.
Hydrocarbons are less dense than water. Once released from the source rock, they thus
tend to migrate upwards in the direction of the minimum pressure, until they either escape at
the ground surface, or an impervious barrier, called atrap.
In a trap, the oil and gas accumulate by displacing pore water from the porous rock. The top
may be imperfectly sealed, which means that gas and possibly also some oil may "leak" to yet
higher lying traps or up to the ground surface. The part of the trap that contains hydrocarbons
is called a petroleum reservoir.
Water generally underlines the hydrocarbons in a trap. The water bearing part of the trap
is called an aquifer, and is hydrolically connected with the reservoir. This means that any
pressure change in the aquifer will also affect the reservoir, and the depletion of the reservoir
will make the aquifer expand into this space.
Both oil and gas are generated together, in varying proportions, from a source rock which
results in a primary gas cap above the oil in the reservoir. Likewise, a secondary gas cap may
develop when the reservoir pressure has decreased and the lightest hydrocarbon begin to bubble
out from the oil. Some "leaky" or limited-capacity traps may segregate oil and gas that have
been generated together, such that these accumulate in separate reservoirs.
24 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
In summary, several factors are required for the formation of a petroleum reservoir [49]:
1. There must be a source rock, preferably rich in primary organic matter (carbon- rich
marine or lacustrine shale). This source rock must be deeply buried to reach efficient
temperatures to cause the organic matter to mature and turn into petroleum.
2. There has to be a migration pathway that enables the shale-released petroleum to migrate
in a preferential direction.
3. There must be a reservoir rock that is sufficiently porous and permeable to accumulate
the petroleum in large quantities.
4. There must be a trap that is sealed sufficiently to withhold the petroleum. Otherwise,
the majority of petroleum will bypass the porous rock and be dispersed or escape to the
ground surface.
5. An impermeable seal or caprock, is critical in preventing the petroleum from leaking out
from the reservoir or escaping to the surface.
If any of these key factors is missing or inadequate, a petroleum reservoir field cannot be
formed. A large isolated reservoir or group of closely adjacent reservoirs is referred to as an
oil field.
2.3.3 Classification of Petroleum Reservoir-Forming Traps
In this section, a general classification of petroleum reservoir-forming traps is discussed (after
[1]). In broad terms, one may distinguish between structual traps (related to tectonic struc-
tures) and sratigraphic traps (related to the sealing effect of unconformities and rock-type, or
lithofacies, changes).
Domes and Anticlines
Domes and anticlines are structures formed by the tectonic uplift and/or folding of sedimentary
rocks. When viewed from above, a dome is circular in shape as in Fig. 2.5, whereas an anticline
is an elongate fold as in Fig. 2.6.
Salt Domes
This type of geological structure is caused by the upward intrusion of a diapiric body of salt,
volcanic rock, or serpentine. In pushing up or piercing through the overlaying sedimentary
rocks, the diapir may cause the formation of numerous traps on its flanks, in which petroleum
may accumulate, as seen in Fig. 2.7. Some salt domes may be highly elongated, rather than
cylindrical, and are called salt walls (e.g. southern North Sea region). Salt itself is a perfect
sealing rock.
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 25
Im
b
p
r
e
m
e
a
le
Bed
Porous Strata
G
A
S
O
IL
W
A
T
E
R
Figure 2.5: Oil and gas accumulation in a dome structure.
I
m
le
p
r
m
a
e
b
e
B
e
d
Porous Strata
G
A
S
O
IL
W
A
T
E
R I
e
m
e
m
e
p
r
a
b
l
S
trata
Figure 2.6: Oil and gas accumulation in an anticline structure.
Fault Structures
Many petroleum traps are related to faults, which commonly displace permeable rocks against
the impervious one. The fault plane, where lined with a shear-produced gouge or heavily
cemented by the percolating groundwater fragments of rock, acts on impermeable barrier that
further increases the trapping effect on the migration of oil and gas. See Fig. 2.8.
Structures Unconformity
This type of structure is a sealing unconformity, with the permeable rocks tilted, erosionally
truncated and covered by younger impermeable deposits. A reservoir may be formed where
the petroleum is trapped in the updip part of the bluntly truncated and sealed, porous rock unit,
as seen in Fig. 2.9.
26 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
Gas
Oil
Oil
Oil
Water
Water
Salt Mass
Figure 2.7: Hydrocarbon accumulation associated with a salt dome.
Gas
Oil
Water
Fault
Figure 2.8: Hydrocarbon accumulation related to a fault.
Lenticular Traps
Oil and gas may accumulate in traps formed by the bodies of porous lithofacies (rock types)
embedded in impermeable lithofacies, or by the pinch-outs of porous lithofacies within imper-
meable ones, as seen in Fig. 2.10.
Examples of such lenticular traps include: fluvial sandstone bodies embedded in floodbasin
mudrocks, deltaic or mouth-bar sandstone wedges pinching out within offshore mudrocks, and
turbiditic sandstone lobes embedded in deep marine mudrocks. Similar traps occur in various
limestones, where their porous lithofacies (e.g. oolithic limestone or other calcarenites) are
embedded in impermeable massive lithofacies; or where porous bioclastic reefal limestones
pinch out in marls or in mudrocks.
The approximate percentages of the world’s petroleum reservoirs associated with those
2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 27
Gas
Oil
Water
Impermeable
Beds
Figure 2.9: Oil and gas trapped below an unconformity.
Oil
Water
Tight-increasing
Shale Content
Figure 2.10: Petroleum trap formed by lithofacies change (Sand-
stone pinch-out).
major trap types are given in Fig. 2.11.
On of the present-day Earth’s surface, over half of the continental areas and adjacent ma-
rine shelves have sediment covers either absent or too thin to make prospects for petroleum
accumulation. Even in an area where the buried organic matter can mature, not all of it re-
sults in petroleum accumulations. The following statistical data may serve as a fairly realistic
illustration [49]:
• Only 1% by vol. of a source rock is organic matter,
• < 30% by vol. of organic matter matured to petroleum,
• > 70% by vol. of organic matter remains as residue and
• 99% by vol. of petroleum is dispersed or lost at the ground surface in the process of
migration, and only 1% by vol. is trapped.
These data lead to the following estimate: only 0.003 vol.% of the world’s source rocks
actually turn into petroleum that can be trapped and thus generate our petroleum resources.
28 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
Structural
Traps
Stratigraphic
Traps
Combination
Traps
F
a
u
l
t
s
S
a
l
t

D
i
a
p
i
r
s
U
n
c
o
n
f
o
r
m
i
t
y
R
e
e
f
O
t
h
e
r
S
t
r
a
t
i
g
r
a
p
h
i
c
C
o
m
b
i
n
a
t
i
o
n
0.75
0.50
0.25
0
A
n
t
i
c
l
i
n
e
s
Figure 2.11: Percentages of world’s petroleum accumulations asso-
ciated with the major traps types.
2.4 Types of Hydrocarbon Traps on the Norwegian Continental
Shelf
Structural traps, particularly fault and dome structures, are the most common type of trap in the
Norwegian Continental Shelf [4]. Stratigraphic traps are far less common for this region, al-
though there are several reservoirs associated with unconformities or porous lithofacies pinch-
outs (e.g. fluvial sandstone in the Snorre filed and turbiditic sandstone in the Frigg and Balder
fields).
Table 2.2 summarises the regional information about some of the hydrocarbon fields be-
longing to the most common types of traps in the Norwegian continental shelf [4].
2.4 Types of Hydrocarbon Traps on the Norwegian Continental Shelf 29
Table 2.2: Types of petroleum trap in the main fields of the Norwe-
gian Continental Shelf [4].
Field Type of Trap Reservoir Rock Rock Age
AGAT Stratigraphic Sandstone Cretaceous
BALDER Stratigraphic Sandstone Tertiary
DRAUGEN Stratigraphic Sandstone Jurassic
EKOFISK Dome Chalk Cretaceous
ELDFISK Dome Chalk Cretaceous
EMBLA Structural Sandstone Carboniferous
FRIGG Stratigraphic Sandstone Tertiary
GULLFAKS Structural Sandstone Jurassic
HEIDRUN Structural Sandstone Jurassic
MIDGARD Structural Sandstone Jurassic
OSEBERG Structural Sandstone Jurassic
SNORRE Structural Sandstone Jurassic
SN
˙
IHVIT Structural Sandstone Jurassic
STATFJORD Structural Sandstone Jurassic
TROLL Structural Sandstone Jurassic
VALHALL Dome Chalk Cretaceous
30 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
Chapter 3
Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
3.1 Continuum Mechanics
The present understanding of the subsurface processes relevant to reservoir engineering is
based on the physical concepts of continuum mechanics [12]. According to these concepts,
a porous rock formation saturated with fluids forms a continuum, which means that all the
components involved (rock, water, oil and/or gas) are present in every element, or volumetric
part, of the reservoir space, even if the elementary volume considered is very small and ap-
proaches zero. This conceptual approach allows us to develop a useful theory for the flow of
liquid and gas through a porous medium, called thefiltration theory. All of the most important
numerical simulation programs (ECLIPSE, MORE, FRANLAB, FRAGOR, UTCHEM, etc.)
are based on this theory.
The flow of fluids that occurs in the partial volume of a porous rock, even if very small, can
only be described qualitatively, because of the great complexity of the phenomenon. However
there are some regularities in the behaviour of the "rock-fluids" systems that can be described
by continuum mechanics. For the purpose of the filtration theory, the laws of continuum me-
chanics are considered to be effective only if the elementary volume is sufficiently large to
render the number of pores and rock grains very large or "innumerable". This condition makes
the average parameters of the porous medium sufficiently representative for a description of
the fluid flow processes occurring in the rock. If the elementary volumes are too small and
comparable to the rock’s pore or grain size, the filtration theory cannot be successfully applied.
The need for this concept assumption can be explained as follows. Let us consider the flow
of liquids and gas in a natural reservoir, with the scale of the flow phenomenon varying from
very small to large, as seen in Fig. 3.1. In Fig. 3.1, many physical phenomena (capillary effects,
fluid adhesion effects associated, etc.) occur at a scale comparable to the rock’s grain size or
the dimension of a fractured rock’s fragment (10
−4
−10
0
m).
At a large scale, with the elementary volumes considered on the order of 10
2
−10
4
m,
the effect of the micro-scale phenomena "average" and can more readily be parameterizied.
Likewise, the concepts of continuum mechanics can be applied if the reservoir heterogeneity
is considered at a macro-scale level (lithofaces variation, bedding, ect.), whereas all micro-
heterogeneities on a scale comparable to the grain size are being considered as constants in
31
32
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
A B C D
Fracture
A
B
Well
~ 10 m
-3
~ 10 m
0
~ 10 m
2
~ 10 m
4
C
Figure 3.1: Structure of a fractured-rock reservoir at different scales
of observation.
the equations of flow (parametrized connate-water saturation, residual-oil saturation, etc.) or
described by some empirical relationships (functions). The fundamental definitions in the fil-
tration theory include the distribution betweenporosity (i.e. the rock’s fluid storage capacity)
and permeability (i.e. the rock’s fluid flow capacity), as well as the consideration offluid satu-
ration (i.e. the pore volume percent occupied by water, oil and gas, respectively).
3.2 Porosity
The porosity constitute the part of the total porous rock volume which is not occupied by rock
grains or fine mud rock, acting as cement between grain particles. Absolute and effective
porosity are distinguished by their access capabilities to reservoir fluids. Absolute porosity is
defined as the ratio of the total void volumeV
p
a
, whether the voids are interconnected or not,
to the bulk volume V
b
of a rock sample,
φ
a
def
=
V
p
a
V
b
. (3.1)
Effective porosity implies the ratio of the total volume of interconnected voidsV
p
to the
bulk volume of rock,
φ
def
=
V
p
V
b
. (3.2)
Effective porosity depends on several factors like rock type, heterogeneity of grain sizes
and their packing, cementation, weathering, leaching, type of clay, its content and hydration,
etc. It should be noted that porosity is a static parameter, unlike permeability which makes
sense only if liquid or gas is moving in porous medium.
3.3 Saturation
Let us consider a representative elementary volume of the reservoir, with the pores filled with
oil, gas and water. In volumetric terms, this can be written as follows:
3.3 Saturation 33
V
p
=V
o
+V
g
+V
w
, (3.3)
which leads to the definition of saturation, S, as a fraction of the pore volume occupied by a
particular fluid:
S
i
def
=
V
i
V
p
, i = 1, ..., n
where n denotes the total number of fluid phases present in the porous medium.
Consequently,
n

i=1
S
i
= 1.
If two fluids coexist (say, oil and water), they are distributed unevenly in the pore space
due to the wettability preferences. See Fig. 3.2. Simply, the adhesive forces of one fluid against
the pore walls (rock-grain surface) are always stronger than those of the other fluid. In the vast
majority of petroleum reservoirs, both siliclastic and carbonate, the pore water is the wetting
phase and oil is a non-wetting phase.
Rock
Water
Oil
Figure 3.2: Distribution of water and oil phases in a water-wet
porous medium.
Importantly, the fluid saturation (S
o
, S
g
and S
w
) in a reservoir varies in space, most notably
from the water-oil contact to the reservoir top (see figures in previous chapter), and also in
time during the production. In short, different parts of the reservoir may have quite different
fluid saturations, and also the saturation in any elementary volume of the reservoir changes
progressively during the production.
3.3.1 Residual Saturation
Not all the oil can be removed from the reservoir during production. Depending on the produc-
tion method, or the actual "drive mechanism" of the petroleum displacement, the oil- recovery
factor may be as low as 5-10% and is rarely higher than 70%. Part of the oil will remain as
residue, this is called the residual oil. One has to distinguish between the residual oil and pos-
sibly gas saturation reached in a reservoir after the production stage, and the residual saturation
34
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
of fluid phases in a reservoir-rock sample after a well coring operation. A fresh, "peel-sealed"
core sample is taken to the laboratory, where the reservoir saturation and the oil-recovery factor
are estimated. The laboratory process is illustrated in Fig. 3.3, where water is displacing the
initial oil in the core sample.
Water
Oil
Water
Sample holder
Core sample
Figure 3.3: Evaluation of residual oil saturation S
or
by a laboratory
displacement from a core sample.
If the pore volume V
p
of the core sample in known, then
S
or
=
V
oi
−V
o
V
p
, (3.4)
where V
oi
is the initial volume of trapped oil in the core sample, andV
o
is the displaced or
produced oil.
3.3.2 Laboratory Determination of Residual Oil and Water Saturation
The cores recovered from wells contain residual fluids (depleted due to the drilling-fluid inva-
sion, the changes in pressure and temperature, etc.) that are assumed to reflect:
• The fluid saturation at the reservoir conditions.
• The possible alterations due to the drilling-fluid invasion into the core.
• The efficiency of possible oil displacement from the reservoir rock represented by the
core.
The modern techniques of core-samples collection prevent dramatic alterations of the rock
fluid characteristics, (foam-based drilling fluid, rubber sleeves containing the core samples and
maintaining their reservoir pressure, deep freezing of retrieved cores, etc.)
Two laboratory techniques are commonly used for determining the residual oil and water
saturation,
• a high temperature retort distillation method and
• the Dean-Stark method.
3.3 Saturation 35
The Retort Distillation Method
The core sample is weighed and its bulk volume measured or calculated. The sample is then
placed in a cylindrical metal holder with a screw cup at the top and a hollow stem projecting
from the bottom. The top is sealed and the sample holder is placed in a retort oven. A ther-
mostat controller raises the temperature of the core to a selected level, at which point the water
within the core is vaporised and recovered. The temperature is then increased to∼ 650
o
C
(1200
o
F) to vaporise and then distil oil from the sample. The vaporised fluids are first collected
in the sample holder and then released vertically downwards through the hollow stem (down-
draft retort). They are subsequently condensed and measured in a calibrated receiving tube.
See Fig. 3.4.
Temperatur
controller
Oil
Water
Insulated
oven
Heating
elements
Sample cup
Condensing
tube
Water
bath
Receiving
tube
Termocouple
Water
inlet
Screen
Figure 3.4: The high temperature retort distillation method.
N.B.! Samples are usually destroyed in this test due to the high temperature and for this
reason small-diameter samples or "plugs" (small cores from the well core), are normally used.
The calculation of the oil and water saturation is straightforward. The following parameter
values are derived from the laboratory test:
36
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
• V
b
, ρ
r
– the sample bulk volume and rock density, determined prior to the experiment.
• V
o
;V
w
– the recovered oil and water volumes, registered during the test..
• V
p
– the pore volume, which is calculated.
The water and residual oil saturation are calculated as follows:
S
w
=
V
w
V
p
, and S
o
=
V
o
V
p
, (3.5)
where the saturation are fractional parts of the pore volume. Frequently, saturation are also
given in %.
The Dean-Stark Apparatus for Measuring Initial Fluids
When the core to be analysed is weighed, the measurement includes the weight of rock grains,
and the pore fluid. The sample is then placed in the tare apparatus (to be sure that no sand grains
are lost from the core sample during its analysis, which might otherwise lead to an erroneously
high oil saturation!) and this unit is suspended above a flask containing a solvent, such as
toluene, as shown in Fig. 3.5.
There are several requirements for choosing a proper solvent,
• it must have a boiling temperature higher than that of water,
• it must be immiscible with water and
• it must also be lighter than water.
Toluene satisfies all of those requirements.
When heat is applied to the solvent, it vaporises. The hot solvent vapour rises, surrounds
the sample and moves up to the condensing tube, where it is cooled and condensed. The
condensate collects into the calibrated tube until the fluid there reaches the spill point, where
upon the solvent condensate drips back onto the sample containing the reservoir fluids. The
solvent mixes with the oil in the sample and both are returned to the solvent flask below. See
Fig. 3.5. The process continues until the sample’s temperature has risen above the boiling point
of water. At that point, the water vaporises, rises in the condensing tube, condenses therein
and falls back into the calibrated tube. Because it is heavier than the solvent, it collects at
the bottom of the tube, where its volume can be directly measured. When successive readings
indicate no additional water recovery, the water volume is recorded for further calculations.
After all the oil and water have been recovered from the sample, it is dried and weighed again.
The difference between the original and final weights equals to the weight of the oil and water
originally present in the sample. Because the water collected in the calibrated tube is distilled,
with a density of 1.0 g/cm
3
and a known volume, the weight of oil in the sample can be
calculated. This information is subsequently combined with the estimated porosity of the clean,
dry sample, the volumes of the oil and water can be converted into percent pore-space fraction
(saturation).
3.3 Saturation 37
Condensing
tube
Flask
Solvent
Tare
Sample
Water
Solvent
Offset
calibrated
tube
Figure 3.5: The Dean-Stark apparatus.
N.B. The samples in the process are not destroyed and can be further used in other mea-
surements, i.e., pore volume pycnometry or perhaps capillary measurements, ect..
The calculation of the oil and water saturation is straightforward. The following parameters
are derived from the laboratory test:
• W
i
– the initial weight of the core sample, determined prior to the tests.
• W
d
– the weight of the dry, clean core sample, determined directly after the tests.
• φ, V
b
– the rock’s porosity and the core sample’s bulk volume, determined after the tests.
• V
w
– the reservoir volume of water, registered during the test.
• V
o
– the recovered volume of oil, which is calculated.
Water and oil (residual) saturation is calculated according to Eqs. (3.5), where both the
retort distillation method and the Dean-Stark method are capable of yielding fluid saturation
values within ±5% of the true values.
38
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
3.4 Reservoir Pressure and Distribution of Fluid Phases.
The migration and accumulation of petroleum in a reservoir leads to the replacement of the
original pore water by gas and oil , even though the rock pores remain "water-wet" (i.e, their
walls are covered with a thin filmof water). The density difference makes the gas accumulate at
the top of the reservoir, and the oil directly below. Water underlies the petroleum, as an aquifer,
but is continuously distributed throughout the reservoir as the wetting fluid. See Fig. 3.6.
GOC
OWC
FWL
crest
0.0 1.0
S
W
D
e
p
t
h
Gas cap
Gas
Oil zone
Oil
Water zone
Water
Water zone
c
Figure 3.6: The distribution of fluid phases in a reservoir.(S
w
is the
water saturation.)
The following fluid interfaces in the reservoir are important:
• The Gas-Oil Contact (GOC) – a surface separating the gas cap from the underlying oil
zone (also referred to as the oil "leg" or oil "column"). Below the GOC, gas can be
present only as a dissolved phase in oil.
• The Oil-Water Contact (OWC) – a surface separating the oil zone from the underlying
water zone. Below the OWC, oil is generally absent.
• The Free-Water Level (FWL) – an imaginary surface at which the pressure in the oil
zone equals to that in the water zone, i.e. p
o
= p
w
. In other words, FWL is the oil-water
contact in the absence of the capillary forces associated with a porous medium, i.e. in a
well.
However, the term "oil-water contact" does not have a single, unique meaning in reservoir
engineering considerations. The continuos distribution of water saturation in the reservoir zone
(see S
w
in Fig. 3.6) affects strongly the relative mobility of the oil phase, which in turn makes
it necessary to distinguish the following saturation interfaces:
• The Free-Oil Level (FOL) – the level above which the oil saturation is sufficiently high
to allow full oil mobility (100% oil productivity) and the water saturation is low enough
to make water immobile. In most reservoirs, this is the level whereS
o
exceeds ca. 70%,
which means S
w
< 30%.
• The Economic OWC – the level above which enough oil will be mobile, rendering the
whole overlying part of the reservoir economical viable. In most reservoirs, this is the
3.4 Reservoir Pressure and Distribution of Fluid Phases. 39
level where S
o
exceeds ca. 50%, although the actual threshold value may vary, depending
upon reservoir conditions.
• The Productive OWC – The level above which oil become mobility. This may meanS
w
as high as 80-85% and S
o
of merely 15-20%.
• The Edge-Water Level – which is the OWC as defined earlier (level of S
w
= 100%),
located below the productive oil-water contact. In strict terms, this is not always the
"100% water level", as our common terminology refers to it, because the oil saturation
may still be in the order of some percent. This is the base of the reservoir, or the oil- col-
umn level below which the capillary forces render oil completely arrested, or "imbibed",
by the rock pores (such that only thermal distribution can possibly remove the oil from
the "dead-end" pores). Therefore, some engineers prefer to refer to this surface as the
capillary oil displacement level or threshold pressure level.
Needless to add, the distribution of these surfaces is of crucial importance when it comes
to physical (fluid dynamics) and economical (oil recovery) considerations. The interfaces are
usually determined on the basis of analysis and well (drill-stem) tests. The FWL would then
appear to be the only rock-independent OWC, representing the absolute base of the oil column,
as shown in Fig. 3.6.
The total pressure at any reservoir depth, due to the weight of the overlying fluid saturated
rock column, is called the overburden pressure, p
ov
.
The total pressure at any depth is the sum of the overlaying fluid-column pressure (p
f
) and
the overlaying grain- or matrix-column pressure (p
m
), as sketched in Fig. 3.7, and thus,
p
ov
= p
f
+ p
m
.
Pressure
D
e
p
t
h
FP GP
Overburden
pressure
(OP)
underpressure
overpressure
normal hydrostatic
pressure
Figure 3.7: Overburden pressure as the combined grain- and fluid
column pressure.
40
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
Because the overburden pressure p
ov
is constant at any particular depth D, then the differ-
ential overburden pressure is zero, i.e. [21]:
dp
f
=−dp
m
.
This means that any reduction of the fluid pressure, as it occurs during production, will
lead to a corresponding increase in the grain pressure. Rock compressibility is therefore an
important parameter to be considered when petroleum (preferably oil) production is estimated.
3.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs
The hydrostatic water pressure at any depthD, can be calculated as follows:
p
w
(D) =

D
D
0
(
dp
dz
)
w
dz + p
w
(D
0
), (3.6)
where (dp/dz)
w
denotes the pressure gradient of the water phase at depthz, and D
0
is an arbi-
trary depth with a known pressure (for instance, the pressure at the sea bottom or the pressure
at the sea surface). The hydrostatic pressure is therefore identical to the water pressure, at any
reservoir depth, as long as there is a continous phase contact in the water, all the way up to the
sea surface.
If the hydrostatic pressure gradient considered to be constant we can write,
p
w
(D) = (
dp
dD
)
w
(D−D
0
) + p
w
(D
0
), (3.7)
and if D
0
is taken at the sea level, the equation becomes,
p
w
(D) = (
dp
dD
)
w
D+14.7 (in psia), or
p
w
(D) = (
dp
dD
)
w
D+1.0 (in bar) (3.8)
Typical "normal" pressure gradients for the water, oil and gas phases are:
(dp/dD)
w
= 0.45 psi/ft = 10.2kPa/m,
(dp/dD)
o
= 0.35 psi/ft = 7.9 kPa/m,
(dp/dD)
g
= 0.08 psi/ft = 1.8 kPa/m
Abnormally high or low reservoir pressure can appear when the reservoir is "sealed" off
from the surrounding aquifer, as a result of geological processes. The reservoir pressure can
then be corrected, relative the hydrostatic pressure, by using a constant (C) in the above pressure
equations. The constant C accounts for the fact that the reservoir pressure is not in hydrostatic
equilibrium, where the pressure in the reservoir is somewhat higher or lower than otherwise
expected.
The water pressure for a general reservoir is then as follows,
p
w
(D) = (
dp
dD
)
w
D+14.7+C, (in psia,) (3.9)
3.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs 41
where C is positive when over-pressure is observed and negative for a under-pressured reser-
voir.
In order to evaluate the pressure distribution in a reservoir, let us consider the reservoir
which cross-section, as shown in Fig. 3.8 (see also [21]).
Gas
Oil
Water
GOC
OWC
FWL D
e
p
t
h
,
f
t
5000
5250
5500
5510
Figure 3.8: Cross-section of a reservoir.
Assuming normal pressure condition, we can evaluate the fluid-phase pressures at the dif-
ferent reservoir "key" levels.
• Water phase:
(p
w
)
FWL
= 0.45 5510+14.7 = 2494.2 psia
(p
w
)
OWC
= 0.45 5500+14.7 = 2489.7 psia
(p
w
)
GOC
= 0.45 5250+14.7 = 2377.2 psia
(p
w
)
top
= 0.45 5000+14.7 = 2264.7psia
• Oil phase:
(p
o
)
FWL
= = 0.35 5510+C
o
= 2494.2psia
which gives: C
o
= 565.7psia
(p
o
)
OWC
= 0.35 5500+565.7 = 2490.7psia
(p
o
)
GOC
= 0.35 5250+565.7 = 2403.2psia
(p
o
)
top
= 0.35 5000+565.7 = 2315.7psia
• Gas phase:
(p
g
)
GOC
= 0.08 5250+C
g
= 2403.2psia
which gives: C
g
= 1983.2psia
(p
g
)
top
= 0.08 5000+1983.2 = 2383.2 psia
The different phase pressures (water, oil and gas) are derived from a common reference
which normally is the FWL pressure, (p
w
)
FWL
. At this level there is no pressure difference
42
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
between water and oil and the two pressures are identical, i.e., (p
w
)
FWL
= (p
o
)
FWL
. Ideally
there is no oil present in the zone between the FWL and the OWC, since the oil pressure is too
low to allow the oil phase to enter the pore space (the largest pore throats). Accordingly, the
OWC becomes the level in the reservoir where the water saturation becomes less than one and
consequently the water saturation is ideally considered to be 100% in this zone.
Similar to the FWL, the definition of the GOC, is the level in the reservoir where the pres-
sures in the oil and gas phases are identical. Often this pressure is referred to as thereservoir
pressure.
Different phase pressures are observed at the same elevation in the reservoir, as seen in
Fig 3.9. The pressure difference between two coexisting phases is calledcapillary pressure and
denoted (P
c
)
i j
, where the subscripts i and j refer to oil-water, gas-oil or gas-water.
Pressure, psia
Treshold
capillary
pressure
D
e
p
t
h
,

f
t
5000
5000
5250
5250
5500
5500
5510
5510
Gas
Oil
Water
GOC
OWC
FWL
2250
W O G
2375 2500
Figure 3.9: Pressure distribution in a reservoir (hypothetical exam-
ple).
The capillary pressure at the top of the reservoir, shown in Figs. 3.8 and 3.9, can be evalu-
ated as follows,
(P
c
)
top
ow
= (p
o
)
top
−(p
w
)
topt
= 2315.7−2264.7 = 51.0 psi(a) = 3.5 bar
(P
c
)
top
go
= (p
g
)
top
−(p
o
)
top
= 2383.2−2315.7 = 67.5 psi(a) = 4.6 bar
(P
c
)
top
gw
= (p
g
)
top
−(p
w
)
top
= 2383.2−2264.7 = 118.5 psi(a) = 8.1 bar
The capillary calculations and the Fig. 3.9, show that the phase pressures are different at
the same elevation in the reservoir, and that the capillary pressure is additive, i.e. [7]:
(P
c
)
gw
= (P
c
)
ow
+(P
c
)
go
, (3.10)
At static (initial reservoir) conditions, the distribution of phases within a reservoir is gov-
erned by counteracting gravity and capillary forces. While gravity forces tend to separate
3.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs 43
reservoir fluids accordingly to their densities, the capillary forces, acting within and between
immiscible fluids and their confining solid substance, resist separation. The balance of these
two forces result in an equilibrium distribution of phases within the reservoir prior to its devel-
opment, as shown in Fig. 3.6
Example: Water pressure in a vertical cylindrical tube
The water pressure at a depth D is found using Eq. 3.6, where p
w
(D
0
) is the atmo-
spheric pressure, p
atm.
.
The water pressure at any depth is,
p =
F
A
⇒ dp = d

F
A

,
where F/A is force due to water weight per cross-section area. We may there-
fore write the pressure change as,
dp = d

mg
A

= d

ρ
w
gV
w
A

= d

ρ
w
gAD
A


w
gdD
In the equation above, ρ
w
is the water density, g is the gravitational constant
and D is the water depth.
Substituting the last results into Eq.3.6 we obtain the following general formula
for water pressure at depth D,
p
w
(D) =

D
0
ρ
w
gdD+ p
atm.
.
NB! The pressure variation in a reservoir is determined by the fluid densities
alone (when the gravitational coefficient is considered constant).
.
44
Chapter 3. Basic Concepts and Definitions
in Reservoir Engineering
3.6 Exercises
1. Determine the porosity and lithology of a core sample, given the following data:
Weight of dried core sample: 259.2 g
Weight of 100% water-saturated core sample: 297g
(the density of water is 1.0 g/cm
3
)
Weight of core sample in water: 161.4 g
Define the terms absolute and effective porosity and decide which term to use when
characterising the core sample.
2. A laboratory cylindrical cup contains 500cm
3
water and weighs 800 g. Carbonate sand
(limestone, CaCO
3
) is poured into the cup until the level of sand and water coincide.
Calculate the bulk volume and porosity of this saturated porous medium knowing that
the total weight of cup and its content (water and limestone) is 2734 g. How do you
define the porosity ?
3. A glass cylinder has been filled with dolomite grains up to the 2500cm
3
mark. The mass
of dolomite is 4714 g. Calculate and characterise the sand’s porosity.
4. Estimate numerically the change in carbonate-rock porosity caused by a complete dolomi-
tization of calcite, accounting to the chemical reaction,
2CaCO
3
+Mg
2+
=CaMg(CO
3
)
2
+Ca
2+
,
will yield a carbonate rock’s porosity of 13% .
5. Calculate the porosity of a sandstone core sample given the data from core analysis:
Bulk volume of dried sample: 8.1 cm
3
,
Weight of dried sample: 17.3 g,
Sand grain density: 2.67 g/cm
3
.
6. Calculate the density of formation water when the pressure gradient is measured,dp/dz
= 10.2 kPa/m.
7. Areservoir water pressure of 213bar is measured at a sub-sea depth of 2000m. Evaluate
the pressure situation in the reservoir and determind whether there is an over- /underbur-
den pressure, when the water pressure gradient is 10.2kPa/m.
8. Formation water salinity will influence hydrostatic pressure estimation. Given that un-
certainty in salinity may lead to an uncertainty in water density of ∆ρ = 1.11 - 1.31
g/cm
3
, determine the pressure change inside a reservoir where the depth from thetop
down to the FWL is 150 m.
(answ. 1. 28%, effective, 2.65 g/cm
3
, sandstone, 2. 41%, absolute, 3. 34%, absolute, 4.
4%, 6. 20%, 7. 1.4 g/cm
3
, 8. 8.1 bar, 9. 3 bar)
Chapter 4
Porosity
4.1 General Aspects
According to the definition, already presented, the porosity is the fluid-storage capacity of a
porous medium, which means the part of the rock’s total volume that is not occupied by solid
particles. It should also be noted that porosity is astatic parameter, defined locally as an average
over the representative elementary volume of porous rock media considered.
Genetically, the following types of porosity can be distinguished :
• Intergranular porosity.
• Fracture porosity.
• Micro-porosity.
• Vugular porosity.
• Intragranular porosity.
Rock media having both fracture and intergranular pores are called double-porous or fracture-
porous media.
Fromthe point of viewof pores susceptibility to mechanical changes one should distinguish
between consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. A consolidated medium means a rock
whose grains have been sufficiently compacted and are held together by cementing material.
An important characteristic of consolidated porous media is the ability to restore elastically, to
a great extent, to their shape (volume) after the removal of the overburden pressure.
Porosity is a statistical property dependent on the rock volume taken into consideration.
If the volume selected is too small, the calculated porosity can deviate greatly from the "true"
statistical average value [35]. Only a volume selected large enough (a representative volume)
will result in a representative and correct statistical average (see Fig. 4.1).
4.2 Models of Porous Media
The geometric character of rock’s permeable pore space is in reality quite complicated, and
may vary greatly from one rock type to another. In practice, it is impossible to counter the
45
46 Chapter 4. Porosity
Domain of
microscopic
effects
Domain of
porous
medium
Homogeneous
medium
Inhomogeneous
medium
Grain
Bulk
volume
0
1.0
0.0
V
b
Figure 4.1: Definition of a representative elementary volume for
porosity measurements [35].
pore-system geometry in a detailed and faithful way. Therefore, several idealised models have
been developed to approximate porous rock media and their varied characteristics.
4.2.1 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Parallel Cylindrical Pores
V
b
V
p
Figure 4.2: Idealised porous medium represented by a system of par-
allel cylindrical pores (pipes).
Estimation of porosity accounting to this model, see Fig. 4.2, is as follows:
φ =
V
p
V
b
=
πr
2
n m
2rn 2rm
=
π
4
= 0.785, or 78.5%,
where r is the pipe radius and m n is the number of cylinders contained in the bulk volume.
It is rather obvious that rocks do not have pores like this and that this model gives a unre-
alistically high porosity value. This model may though, be used in some situations where fluid
flow under simplified conditions is modelled.
4.2 Models of Porous Media 47
4.2.2 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Cubic-Packed Spheres
2
r
Figure 4.3: Idealised porous medium represented by a regular sys-
tem of cubic-packed spheres.
The estimation of porosity according to this model, see Fig. 4.3, is as follows:
V
b
= (2r)
3
and V
m
=
1
8
(
4
3
πr
3
) 8 =
4
3
πr
3
,
and
φ =
V
b
−V
m
V
b
=
8r
3

4
3
πr
3
8r
3
= 1−
π
6
= 0.476 or 47.6%
where V
m
is the "matrix" volume or the volume of bulk space occupied by the rock.
4.2.3 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Orthorhombic-Packed
spheres
2
r
60
o
Figure 4.4: Idealised porous medium represented by a regular sys-
tem of orthorhombic-packed spheres.
The estimation of porosity according to this model, see Fig. 4.4, is as follows:
V
b
= 2r 2r h = 4r
2
2r sin(60
o
) = 4

3r
3
and V
m
=
4
3
πr
3
,
where h is the height of the orthorhombic-packed spheres. The matrix volume is unchanged
and thus,
48 Chapter 4. Porosity
φ = 1−
V
m
V
b
= 1−
4πr
3
12

3r
3
= 1−
π
3

3
= 0.395 or 39.5%
4.2.4 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Rhombohedral-Packed
spheres
2
r
45
o
Figure 4.5: Idealised porous medium represented by regular system
of rhombohedral-packed spheres.
The estimation of porosity according to this model, see Fig. 4.5 and it follows from Fig. 4.5
that,
h =

4r
2
−2r
2
=

2r,
where h is the height in the tetrahedron and
V
b
= 2r 2r

2r = 4

2r
3
and V
m
=
4
3
πr
3
,
which gives
φ = 1−
4πr
3
12

2r
3
= 1−
π
3

2
= 1−0.74 = 0.26 or 26.0%
4.2.5 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Irregular-Packed Spheres with
Different Radii
Real reservoir rock exhibits a complex structure and a substantial variation in grain sizes and
their packing, which results in variation of porosity and other important reservoir properties,
often associated with the hetrogeniety of porous medium.
Fig. 4.6 shows an example of an idealised porous medium represented by four populations
of spheres (I - IV) sorted by different radii and the histogram showing the hypothetical grain
-size distribution.
By drawing a graph with radii of the spheres plotted on the horizontal axis and heights
equal to the corresponding frequencies of their appearance plotted on the vertical axis, one can
obtain a histogram of distribution of particles (spheres) in sizes.
4.2 Models of Porous Media 49
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
r
I
I
II
II
III
III
IV
IV
Figure 4.6: Idealised porous medium represented by an irregular sys-
tem of spheres with different radii.
The different models, described above, may serve as a "mental image" or idealised con-
cretization of a rather complex porous structure of porous rocks. The advantage of idealised
models, in general and in particular in the case of porous media, is the opportunity they offer for
simple quantification and representation of characteristic parameters. Since rock porosity has
so many representations, it is important to maintain a representative image, though idealized,
of the rock porosity, for further analysis and improved undersanding.
Example: Porous medium of irregular system of spheres
A porous medium is blended with three types of sediment fractions: fine pebble
gravel with porosity (φ
pebble
= 0.30), sand (φ
sand
= 0.38) and fine sand (φ
f .sand
=
0.33).
The three sediments are mixed in such proportions that the sand fills the pore
volume of the fine pebbles and that the fine sand fills the pore volume of the sand.
The volume of fine pebble gravel is equal to the bulk volume, i.e.,V
b
= V
pebble
.
Since the sand fills the pore volume of the pebble and the fine sand the pore volume
of the sand, the following table is listed:
Volume of sand: V
sand
= φ
pebble
V
pebble
.
Volume of fine sand: V
f .sand
= φ
sand
V
sand
.
Pore volume of fine sand: V
p
= φ
f .sand
V
f .sand
.
The total porosity is then defined,
φ =
V
p
V
b
=
φ
f .sand
φ
sand
φ
pebble
V
pebble
V
pebble
,
= 0.3 0.38 0.33 = 0.037.
The porosity of the porous medium is ∼ 4%.
.
50 Chapter 4. Porosity
4.3 Porosity Distribution
The multiple sampling of porosity measurements for reservoir rocks at different depths and in
different wells gives a data set that can then be plotted as a histogram, to reveal the porosity’s
frequency distribution. See Fig. 4.7. The distribution may appear to be unimodal (left) or
polymodal (right). Such histograms may be constructed separately for the individual zones,
or units, distinguished within the reservoir, and thus give a good basis for statistical estimates
(mean porosity values, standard deviations, etc.).
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
Porosity
Min Max
F
r
e
q
u
e
n
c
y
Porosity
Min Max
Figure 4.7: Unimodal and polymodal porosity distributions.
Numerical simulation of fluid flow in porous media, related to laboratory tests on core sam-
ples as well as full field production estimation, require a realistic picture of the rock porosity
and its variation throughout the reservoir. This picture is not easily obtainable since porosity
is measured locally (in the well) and porosity extrapolations introduce large uncertainty in the
estimated average values.
The grouping of porosity data according to the reservoir zones, depth profile or graphical
co-ordination, may reveal spatial trends in the porosity variation , see Fig. 4.8. The recognition
of such trends is very important for the development of a bulk picture of the reservoir as a
porous medium and representation of the reservoir porosity in mathematical simulation models
(reservoir characterisation, lateral correlation, numerical modelling, etc.)
Mechanical diagenesis (compaction) and chemical diagenesis (cementation) have a pro-
found effect on a sedimentary rock’s porosity. This burial effect is illustrated by the two typical
examples of sand and clay deposits in Fig. 4.9.
4.4 Measurement of Porosity
4.4.1 Full-Diameter Core Analysis
A full-diameter core analysis is used to measure the porosity of rocks that are distinctly hetero-
geneous, such as some carbonates, and fissured, vugular rocks, for which a standard core-plug
analyse is unsuitable. The same core-plug is a non-representative elementary volume for this
type of rock. The porosity measurement in such rocks requires samples that are as large as can
be obtained (portions of full-diameter drilling cores). In heterogeneous rocks, the local poros-
ity may be highly variable, as it may include micro-porosity, intergranular porosity, vugues,
4.4 Measurement of Porosity 51
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Porosity
D
e
p
t
h
Figure 4.8: Examples of trends of porosity distribution in the depth
profiles of two reservoir sandstone.
sand
clay
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.0
0 300 600 900 1200 1500 1800
P
o
r
o
s
i
t
y
Depth, m
Figure 4.9: Sediment compaction burial and porosity change.
fractures, or various combinations of these. A full-diameter core sample usually has a diameter
of 5 inches (12.5 cm) and the length of 10 inches (25 cm).
The full-diameter core technique does not differentiate between the actual types of porosity
involved, but yields a singe porosity value that represents their effective combination. Several
laboratory techniques used for porosity measurements, and the procedure is generally similar
for full-diameter cores and core "plugs".
4.4.2 Grain-Volume Measurements Based on Boyle’s Law
This gas transfer technique involves the injection and decompression of gas into the pores of a
fluid-free (vacuum), dry core sample, see Fig. 4.10. Either the pore volume or the grain volume
can be determined, depending upon the instrumentation and procedures used.
52 Chapter 4. Porosity
Sample
Chamber
Valve Valve
Reference
volume
Pressure
gauge
Pressure
regulator
To gas
pressure
source
Figure 4.10: Porosity measurements based on the Boyle’s law.
To perform the laboratory measurement, Helium gas is often used due to its following
properties,
• the very small size of helium molecules makes the gas rapidly penetrate small pores,
• helium is an inert gas that and will not be absorbed on the rock surfaces and thus yield
erroneous results.
Other gases, such as N
2
and CO
2
, might be good alternatives to Helium. The advantage of
CO
2
is it’s hydrophilic ability, which increase the effect of dehydrating the core sample. N
2
is
also used, simply due to its availability.
The Calculation of the Grain Volume
Using the ideal gas law,
pV = nRT
where the temperature, T= const, one obtains p
1
V
1
= p
2
V
2
, and in the case of vacuum inside
the sample chamber (Fig. 4.10,
p
1
V
re f
= p
2
(V
re f
+V
s
−V
g
),
where V
re f
, V
s
and V
g
are the reference volume, the volume of the sample chamber and the
grain volume, respectively. See Fig. 4.10.
Assuming adiabatic conditions, one obtains,
V
g
=
p
2
V
re f
+ p
2
V
s
−p
1
V
re f
p
2
, (4.1)
where p
1
denotes initial pressure in the reference cell, and p
2
the final pressure in the system.
Successive measurements will increase the accuracy, due to effects of dehydration of the porous
core sample.
4.4 Measurement of Porosity 53
4.4.3 Bulk-Volume Measurements
This technique utilizes the Archimedes’ principle of mass displacement:
1. The core sample is first saturated with a wetting fluid and then weighed.
2. The the sample is then submerged in the same fluid and its submerged weight is mea-
sured.
The bulk volume is the difference between the two weights divided by the density of the
fluid.
Fluids that are normally used are,
• water which can easily be evaporated afterwards,
• mercury which normally not enters the pore space in a core sample due to its non-wetting
capability and its large interfacial energy against air.
The laboratory measurements, using this technique, are very accurate, where uncertainties
in the order of ± 0.2%, is normally obtained.
Example: Uncertainty analysis in measuring the bulk volume using Archimedes’
principle.
The bulk volume of a porous core sample can be measured in two steps, first by
weighing the sample in a cup of water; m
1
(assuming 100% water saturation) and
then weighing the sample in air as it is removed from the cup; m
2
.
The bulk volume is then written,
V
b
=
m
2
−m
1
ρ
w
.
Differentiating the equation above gives us,
dV
b
=
∂V
b
∂m
2
dm
2
+
∂V
b
∂m
1
dm
1
+
∂V
b
∂ρ
w

w
,
dV
b
=
m
2
−m
1
ρ
w
¸
dm
2
m
2
−m
1

dm
1
m
2
−m
1


w
ρ
w

.
If the density measurement as well as the two mass-measurements above, is
considered to be independent measurements, the relative uncertainty in the bulk
volume is written,

∆V
b
V
b

2
= 2

∆m
(m
2
−m
1
)

2
+

∆ρ
w
ρ
w

2
,
where the uncertainty introduced in the process of weighing the two masses is
considered to be identical, i.e., ∆m = ∆m
1
= ∆m
2
.
54 Chapter 4. Porosity
The uncertainty equation above may also be written,

∆V
b
V
b

2
= 2

∆m
ρ
w
V
b

2
+

∆ρ
w
ρ
w

2
.
If the relative uncertainty in determined the water density is estimated to 0.1%
and the weighing accuracy is equal to 0.1 g, we find a relative uncertainty in the
bulk volume of approximately 0.5%. The bulk volume of the core sample is ap-
proximately 30 cm
3
and water density is assumed equal to 1g/cm
3
.
(Note that the uncertainty related to the assumption of 100% water saturation
prior to the first mass measurement, in some experimental tests could be larger
than the effective uncertainty related to the measuring technique.)
.
4.4.4 Pore-Volume Measurement
Pore volume measurements can be done by using the Boyle’s law, where the sample is placed
in a rubber sleeve holder that has no voids space around the periphery of the core and on the
ends. Such a holder is called the Hassler holder, or a hydrostatic load cell, see Fig. 4.11.
Hydrostatic
pressure
To flow
meter
Rubber tubing
Core sample
Flow into
core
Figure 4.11: Hydrostatic load cell (Hassler holder) used for a direct
measurement of pore volume.
Helium or one of its substitutes is injected into the core plug through the end stem. The
calculation of the pore volumeV
p
is as follows:
p
0
V
p
+ p
1
V
re f
= nRT (4.2)
p
2
(V
p
+V
re f
) = nRT (4.3)
and
V
p
=
(p
1
−p
2
)
(p
2
−p
0
)
V
re f
where (p
1
> p
2
> p
0
)
It is important to notice that the Hassler core holder has to be coupled to a volume of known
reference V
re f
, as seen in Fig. 4.10, when the pore volumeV
p
, is measured.
4.4 Measurement of Porosity 55
4.4.5 Fluid-Summation Method
This technique is to measure the volume of gas, oil and water present in the pore space of a
fresh or preserved (peel-sealed) core of known bulk volume. If the core has been exposed to
the open air for some time, some of the oil and water can evaporate and the saturation will be
measured inaccurately.
The volumes of the extracted oil, gas and water are added to obtain the pore volume and
hence the core porosity.
The core sample is divided into two parts. One part (ca. 100 g) is crushed and placed in a
fluid-extraction retort (see figure in previous chapter), where the metal-holder unit has a cap to
prevent the evaporation of gases at the top.
The vaporised water and oil originally contained in the pores, move down and are subse-
quently condensed and collected in a calibrated glassware, where their volumes are measured.
The second part of the rock sample (ca. 30 g) with a roughly cylindrical shape, is weighed
and then placed in a pump chamber filled with mercury (a pycnometer) in which its bulk vol-
ume is determined, measuring the volume of the displaced mercury. Then the pressure of the
mercury, p
Hg
, is raised to 70 bar (1000 psi). At this pressure, the mercury enters the sample and
compresses the gas, filling the pore space originally occupied with the gas. With an appropriate
calculation, the volume of the mercury "imbibed" in the rock gives the gas volumeV
g
.
The bulk volume and weight of the fresh sample allow the computation of the effective bulk
density of the rock. This in turn is used to convert the weight of the first part of the sample,
which was 100 g (to be retorted), into an equivalent bulk volume.
The oil, water and gas volumes are each calculated as fractions of the bulk volume of the
rock sample and the three values are added to yield the porosity value .
The laboratory procedure provides the following information:
• First subsample gives the rock’s weight W
s1
and the volumes of oil V
o1
and water V
w1
are
recorded.
• Second subsample gives the volume of gasV
g2
and the rock’s bulk volumeV
b2
.
From the second subsample, the fraction of the bulk volume occupied by gas (i.e., the
fraction of the gas-bulk volume) can be calculated,
f
g
=
V
g
2
V
b
2
= φS
g
where the subscript 2 is omitted for f
g
, S
g
, and φ, because these values are representative for
both parts of the sample.
Denoting the apparent bulk density of the fluid-saturated rock sample asρ
app
, we can write,
W
s
1
=V
b
1
ρ
app
and W
s
2
=V
b
2
ρ
app
→V
b
1
=V
b
2
W
s
1
W
s
2
The formation oil- and water-volume factor are calculated as follow,
f
o
=
V
o
1
V
b
1
= φS
o
,
f
w
=
V
w
1
V
b
1
= φS
w
,
56 Chapter 4. Porosity
and the sum of the fluid-volume factor then gives the porosity value:
f
o
+ f
w
+ f
g
= φ(S
o
+S
w
+S
g
) = φ
Example: Use of pycnometer in matrix volume calculation.
The pycnometer is a lab-tool occasionally used for measuring bulk- and pore vol-
umes of core samples. A pycnometer is in principle a contained volume, a cell,
where a defined amount of mercury can be injected or withdrawn. The sketch
below illustrates the working principle of the pycnometer.
V
0
Hg
Figure 4.12: Sketch of the pycnometer.
In order to define the matrix volume, V
m
of a core sample, the following mea-
suring steps are carried out:
1. The pycnometer cell is fully saturated with mercury.
2. The pycnometer piston is withdrawn and a gas (air) volume of V
0
is mea-
sured.
3. The core sample is placed in the cell, and the cell volume is sealed. The
equilibrium condition inside the cell is written; p
0
(V
0
−V
m
), where p
0
is the
atmospheric pressure and V
m
is the matrix of the sample (the rock’s grain
volume).
4. Mercury is injected into the cell and a new gas volume,V
1
and gas pressure,
p
1
is measured. NB: The mercury does not enter the pore system of the core
sample, due to its high interfacial tension. (Mercury, as laboratory fluid, has
become less popular due to its toxic characteristics and is quite often replaced
by other fluids.)
5. New equilibrium is reached and we write; p
1
(V
1
−V
m
).
Finally, the matrix volume is found as follows:
V
m
=
p
1
V
1
−p
0
V
0
p
1
−p
0
.
.
4.5 Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation 57
4.5 Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation
Experimental data is always contaminated with measuring uncertainty. For characteristic pa-
rameter estimation, like determination of the porosity, we will expect the uncertainty in the
measured parameters to introduce an error in the estimate of the porosity found.
Porosity will normally be a function of V
p
, V
m
and/or V
b
. Since the three parameters are
dependent, i.e.
V
b
=V
p
+V
m
, (4.4)
only two of them should appear in the uncertainty analysis.
If we define porosity as,
φ =
V
p
V
b
,
we may differentiate the equation and we obtain,

φ
=
dV
p
V
p

dV
b
V
b
.
The pore- and bulk volumes are independent measurements, i.e., the resultsV
p
and V
b
are
independent parameters and so are their uncertainties, ∆V
p
and ∆V
m
.
The relative error or uncertainty in the porosity is then given by
∆φ
φ
=

∆V
p
V
p

2
+

∆V
b
V
b

2
. (4.5)
In laboratory experiments we wish to reduce uncertainties to a minimum. Eq. (4.5) tells
us that it is not sufficient to reduce the uncertainty in only one of the measured parameters,
leaving the other unchanged, since the total relative uncertainty is mainly influenced by the
largest relative uncertainty.
Example: Error propagation
From laboratory measurements one has estimated the relative uncertainty related
to the pore volume to be, ´V
p
/V
p
= 5.0% and the relative uncertainty related to
the matrix is, ´V
m
/V
m
= 7%.
The porosity is defined,
φ =
V
p
V
b
=
V
p
V
p
+V
m
.
We could start to differentiate the porosity with respect toV
p
and V
m
, given the
equation above, but instead we intend to differentiate Eq. (4.4) and then substitute
the results into Eq. (4.5).
Differentiation of Eq. (4.4) gives,

´V
b
V
b

2
=

´V
p
V
p
+V
m

2
+

´V
m
V
p
+V
m

2
,
58 Chapter 4. Porosity
and substitution in Eq. (4.5) gives,
´φ
φ
=

´V
p
V
p

2
+

´V
p
V
p
+V
m

2
+

´V
m
V
p
+V
m

2
,
or written differently,
´φ
φ
=

(1+φ
2
)
´V
p
V
p

2
+

(1−φ)
2
´V
m
V
m

2
.
If the porosity is, φ = 0.2 (or 20%), then the relative uncertainty in the porosity
is ∼ 7.57% and the porosity with uncertainty is written,
φ ±´φ = (20 ±1.5)%.
Note that if the equation φ =V
p
/(V
p
+V
m
) is differentiated directly, the result
would be slightly different because the differentiation was used only once, com-
pared to the process above where a two step differentiation is performed. Every
extra operation in the error propagation increases the final uncertainty.
.
4.6 Porosity Estimation from Well Logs
Porosity of reservoir rock can be estimated not only by using methods, as has been described
above, but also from geophysical well logs, often called wireline logs. This method of porosity
evaluation is not very accurate, but has the advantage of providing continous porosity data.
Once these logs are obtained and converted into a porosity log, they can be calibrated using
core-sample porisity data and serve as additional reliable source of porosity distribution evalu-
ation.
Porosity can be estimated from:
• Formation resistivity factor (F).
• Microresistivity log (from which F can be derived).
• Neutron - gamma log.
• Density (gamma - gamma) log.
• Acoustic (sonic) log.
The Formation resistivity factor is defined as the ratio of the resistivity of the porous sample
saturated with an ionic solution R
o
of the bulk resistivity of the same solutionR
w
, i.e. [23]
F =
R
o
R
w
. (4.6)
The Formation resistivity factor measures the influence of pore structure on the resistance
of the core sample. There are several relationships which can be used for the porosity evaluation
using F-values [23],
4.6 Porosity Estimation from Well Logs 59
• F = φ
−m
, where m is the cementation constant (Archie, 1942).
• F = (3−φ)/2φ (Maxwell, 1881).
• F = X/φ, where X is the electric tortuosity of the sample (Wyllie, 1957).
For more information regarding porosity evaluation using geophysical well logs, see refer-
ence [7, 23, 37].
60 Chapter 4. Porosity
4.7 Exercises
1. Calculate the bulk volume of a preserved (paraffin-coated) core sample immersed in
water, given the following data:
weight of dry sample in air: 20 g,
weight of dry sample coated with paraffin: 20.9 g (density of paraffin is : 0.9 g/cc),
weight of coated sample immersed in water: 10 g (density of water is: 1g/cc)
Determine the rock’s porosity, assuming a sand-grain density of 2.67 g/cc.
2. Calculate the bulk volume of a dry core sample immersed in mercury pycnometer, given
the following data:
weight of dry sample in air: 20 g,
weight of mercury-filled pycnometer at 20
o
C: 350 g,
weight of mercury-filled pycnometer with the sample at 20
o
C; 235.9 g.
density of mercury: 13.546 g/cc.
3. Determine the sandstone’s grain density and porosity, given the following data:
weight of crushed dry sample in air: 16 g,
weight of crushed sample plus absorbed water: 16.1 g,
weight of water-filled pycnometer: 65 g,
weight of water-filled pycnometer with the sample: 75 g.
4. Determine the sandstone’s grain volume and porosity using Boyl’s law, given the follow-
ing data:
volume of chamber containing the core sample: 15 cc,
volume of chamber containing air: 7 cc,
bulk volume of core sample: 10 cc
5. Calculate the effective porosity of a sandstone sample using the following data:
weight of dry sample in air: 20 g,
weight of saturated sample in air: 22.5 g,
density of water is : 1.0 g/cc),
weight of saturated sample in water: 12.6 g.
6. A core sample is saturated with an oil (ρ
o
= 35
o
API), gas and water. The initial weight
of the sample is 224.14 g. After the gas is displaced by water (ρ
w
=1g/cm
3
), the weight
is increased to 225.90 g. The sample is the placed in aSoxhlet distillation apparatus, and
4.4 cm
3
water is extracted. After drying the core sample, the weight is now 209.75 g.
The sample bulk volume, 95 cm
3
is measured in a mercury pycnometer.
Find the porosity, water saturation, oil saturation, gas saturation and lithology of the core
sample. (Notice that the oil density is ρ[g/cm
3
] = 141.4/(131.5 +ρ[
o
API]), when the
water density at that particular temperature and pressure is 1g/cm
3
)
7. Another core sample is brought to the laboratory for compositional analysis, where 80
g of the sample is placed in a mercury pycnometer and the volume of gas found is 0.53
cm
3
. A piece of the same sample, weighing 120 g is placed in a retorte, where the water
and oil volume is measured to 2.8 cm
3
and 4.4 m
3
, respectively. A third piece of the
4.7 Exercises 61
sample, weighing 90 g is placed in a pycnometer and the bulk volume is measured to
be 37.4 cm
3
. Assume oil and water densities as in the exercise above and find the same
characteristic parameters.
8. Calculate the porosity of the sample described below:
mass of dry sample: 104.2 g,
mass of water saturated sample: 120.2 g,
density of water 1.001 g/cm
3
,
mas of saturated sample immersed in water: 64.7g.
Is this effective porosity or the total porosity of the sample? What is the most probable
lithology of the matrix material? Explain .
9. A core, 2.54 cm long and 2.54 cm in diameter has a porosity of 22%. It is saturated with
oil and water, where the oil content is 1.5cm
3
.
a) What is the pore volume of the core?
b) What are the oil and water saturations of the core?
10. If a formation is 2.5 m thick, what is the volume of oil-in-place (in m
3
and in bbl) of a
40.47 hectare large area, if the core described in the excercise above is representative of
the reservoir?
Answer to questions:
1. 24.3%, 2. 9.95 cm
3
, 3. 2.67 g/cm
3
, 1.6%, 4. 20%, 5. 25%, 6. 19%, 14.5%, 75.8%, 9.6%,
2.73 g/cm
3
, 7. 16%, 35.1%, 55.1%,10%, 2.69 g/cm
3
, 8. 29%, 2.64 g/cm
3
, 9. 2.831 cm
3
, 53%,
47%, 10. 738235.6 bbl
62 Chapter 4. Porosity
Chapter 5
Permeability
5.1 Introduction
Permeability in a reservoir rock is associated with it’s capacity to transport fluids through a
system of interconnected pores, i.e. communication of interstices. In general terms, the per-
meability is a tensor, since the resistance towards fluid flow will vary, depending on the flow
direction. In practical terms, however, permeability is often considered to be ascalar, even
though this is only correct for isotropic porous media.
If there were no interconnected pores, the rock would be impermeable, i.e., it is natural
to assume that there exists certain correlations between permeability and effective porosity.
All factors affecting porosity will affect permeability and since rock permeability is difficult
to measure in the reservoir, porosity correlated permeabilities are often used in extrapolating
reservoir permeability between wells.
Absolute permeability could be determined in the laboratory by using inert gas (nitrogen
is frequently used) that fills the porous rock sample completely and limits the possibility of
chemical interaction with the rock material to a minimum. Since the gas molecules will pen-
etrate even the smallest pore-throats, all pore channels are included in the averaging process
when permeability is measured.
When several phases or mixtures of fluids are passing through a rock locally and simulta-
neously, each fluid phase will counteract the free flow of the other phase’s and a reduced phase
permeability (relative to absolute) is measured, i.e. effective permeability.
5.2 Darcy’s Law
The first important experiments of fluid flow through porous media, were reported by Dupuit in
1854, using water-filters. His results showed that the pressure drop across the filter is propor-
tional to the water filtration velocity. In 1856 Henry Darcy proved that flow of water through
sand filters, obeys the following relationship:
q = K A
h
∆l
, (5.1)
63
64 Chapter 5. Permeability
where h is a difference in manometer levels, i.e. hydrostatic height difference,
A is cross-sectional area of the filter,
∆l is thickness of the filter in the flow direction and
K is a proportionality coefficient.
In Darcy’s experimental results, as in Eq. (5.1), viscosityµ, was not included because only
water filters were investigated and hence, the effects of fluid density and viscosity had no real
experimental significance.
Experiments repeated after Darcy, have proved that if the manometric level, h, is kept
constant, the same flow rate (or flow velocity) is measured, irrespective of the orientation of
the sand filter (see Fig. 5.1).
Datum
plane
θ = 90
o
0 < < 90
o o
θ θ = 90
o
θ
I II III
Figure 5.1: Orientation of the sand filter with respect to the direction
of gravitation.
The pressure difference across the sand filter in Fig. 5.1, for the 3 cases are given,
I : ∆p
I
= ρg(h−∆l),
II : ∆p
II
= ρg(h−∆l sinθ),
III : ∆p
III
= ρgh,
where ∆l is the thickness or length of the sand filter in the flow direction.
Since the water velocity is proportional to the manometric level (observation made by
Darcy), the flow velocity is proportional to,
v ∝ (∆p+ρg∆z),
where ∆z is the elevation in the gravitational field. (∆z accounts for the inclined flow direction
relative to horizontal flow.)
If the sand filter is made longer, a reduced flow velocity is expected and similarly if the
water is replaced by a fluid of higher viscosity, a reduced flow velocity is expected.
5.2 Darcy’s Law 65
v ∝
1
µ
∆p+ρg∆z
∆l
.
The proportionality, above, can be replaced by equality, by introducing a proportionality
coefficient k,
v =
k
µ
∆p+ρg∆z
∆l
, (5.2)
where k is the permeability.
The pressure at any point along the flow path is related to a reference height or datum plane
z
0
, where ∆z = z −z
0
and e.g. z
0
= 0 at a level where the reference pressure is 1 atm. A
pressure difference ∆(p+ρgz) = (p+ρgz)
2
−(p+ρgz)
1
will create a fluid flow between the
two points, unless the pressure p is equal to the static pressure −ρgh. In these cases no flow
is expected and static equilibrium is established, as observed in any reservoir where the fluid
pressure increases with depth.
Fluid flow in a porous rock is therefore given by the pressure potential difference ∆(p +
ρgz), i.e. the sum of pressure difference and elevation in the gravity field. In a historical
context, the pressure potential has been associated with the energy potential (energy pr. mass)
and the following definition has been used,
Φ
def
=
p
ρ
+gz.
Substituting the pressure potential difference ∆Φ in Eq. (5.2), one can rewrite the equality
equation based on Darcy’s deduction,
q = A
k
µ
ρ
∆Φ
∆l
where k is the permeability of the porous medium (filter, core sample/plug, etc.), µ is the
viscosity of the fluid and l is the length of the porous medium in the direction of flow andΦ is
the pressure potential. The flow rate q = dV/dt, is volume pr. time.
The Darcy’s law in differential form is,
q = A
k
µ
ρ

dl
= lim
∆l→0

A
k
µ
ρ
∆Φ
∆l

. (5.3)
For linear and horizontal flow (parallel to the x-axis) of incompressible fluid, the elevation
is constant, i.e. dz/dx = 0, and Dracy’s law is written,
q =−A
k
µ
dp
dx
, (5.4)
where the minus sign "-", in front of the pressure gradient term, compensates for a negative
pressure gradient in the direction of flow (since fluids move from high to low potential). Ve-
locity and flow rate are pr. definition positive parameters (see the example below).
At this point it is important to notice that the permeability, k, is introduced in Eqs. (5.4)
and (5.3), as a proportionality constant and not as a physical parameter. The permeability
does pr. definition, not carry any characteristic information about the porous medium. When
66 Chapter 5. Permeability
permeability is related to the transport capability of the porous medium, as often is the case
in practical situations, the fact that this information about the porous medium is missing in
Eq. (5.4), is often overlooked. The proportionality constant k, called permeability, describes
not only the porous medium transport capability, as such, but represents all information about
the porous medium etc., which is otherwise not described by any of the other parameters in
Eq. (5.4).
Example: Linear horizontal core flow
The minus sign "-" in the horizontal flow equation Eq. 5.4 is justified by consider-
ing linear core flow.
Let’s assume a constant liquid flow rate q, through a core sample, as shown
in Fig. 5.2. The pressures p
1
, p
2
and the positions x
1
, x
2
are labelled according to
standard numbering and orientation.
x
x
2
p
1
p
2
x
1
q q
Figure 5.2: Horizontal flow in a core sample.
Assuming a homogeneous porous medium and integration from position 1 to
2, the pressure term is written as follows,
dp
dx
=
p
2
−p
1
x
2
−x
1
=−
p
1
−p
2
x
2
−x
1
,
where p
1
> p
2
in positive flow direction. Since x
2
obviously is larger than x
1
,
the value of dp/dx is pr. definition negative, i.e. the minus sign "-" is needed to
balance the equation.
.
The fluid velocity related to the cross-section areaA is called the superficial (i.e. filtration)
or bulk velocity, and the linear flow velocity is written,
u =
q
A
=−
k
µ
dp
dx
. (5.5)
The real velocity of fluid flow in the pores is called theinterstitial (true) velocity, v
pore
and
is necessarily higher than the bulk velocity, since the flow cross-section area is, on average,φ
times smaller than the bulk cross-section A. The directions of pore flow are inclined relative
to the general flow direction and a characteristic inclination angle α is assigned to describe
this effect. This effect will increase the pore velocity even more, as illustrated in Fig. 5.3. If,
in addition, the porous medium contains a residual saturation of a non-flowing phase, e.g. a
connate water saturation S
wc
, the pore flow velocity is affected through the reduction of the
5.2 Darcy’s Law 67
flow cross-section area. The sum of these effects will cause the pore flow velocity to become
considerably higher than the bulk velocity,
v
pore
=
q
A
1
φ
1
1−S
wc
1
cos
2
α
. (5.6)
α
α
z
x
y
v
q
v
pore
Figure 5.3: Pore flow velocity in a porous medium.
Experimental tests from different porous rocks have shown that an average inclination an-
gle, α ·36
o
and that this angle may vary between 12
o
to 45
o
. If a typical porosity of 25% and
a connate water saturation of 10% are assumed, then the pore velocity will be about 7 times
higher than the bulk velocity.
Example: Linear inclined core flow
When the direction of flow is inclined, with an angle θ to the horizontal flow
direction, the gravitational force has to be considered, since the fluids are moving
up or down in the gravitational field.
In order to keep a constant flow rate q, through a porous medium of length ∆l,
a pressure difference ∆p is applied. See Fig. 5.4.
l
l
2
p
1
p
2
l
1
q
q
x
θ
r
g
Figure 5.4: Core flow at a dip angle θ to the horizontal axis
Flow at an angle to the horizontal direction is described by Eq. (5.3), where the
minus sign is describing linear flow,
q =−A
k
µ
d(p+ρgz)
dl
.
68 Chapter 5. Permeability
z is the elevation in the gravitational field and from Fig.5.4 it’s evident that
z = l sinθ, where l is the direction of flow. The flow equation becomes,
q =−A
k
µ
dp
dl
−A
k
µ
ρgsinθ.
Integration from position 1 to 2, gives

q+A
k
µ
ρgsinθ

∆l = A
k
µ
∆p.
The pressure difference is given,
∆p =
µ∆l
Ak
q+ρg∆l sinθ,
where horizontal linear flow is ∆p
θ=0
= q(µ∆l)/(Ak).
In order to maintain a constant flow rate through the core sample, the pressure
difference needs to be adjusted relative to the inclination angle (dip angle). In a
up-dip situation, as in Fig. 5.4, the pressure difference has to be larger relative to
the horizontal case, since the fluid is pushed upwards in the gravitational fields,
i.e.,
0 ≤θ < 90
o
⇒ ∆p ≥∆p
0
−90
o
< θ < 0 ⇒ ∆p <∆p
0
.
5.3 Conditions for Liquid Permeability Measurements.
Permeability in core samples is measured in the laboratory using Darcy’s law for horizontal
flow, Eq. (5.4). In these tests, some important conditions have to be satisfied before permeabil-
ity could be estimated from the measured data. These conditions are the following:
• Horizontal flow.
• Incompressible fluid.
• 100% fluid saturation in the porous medium.
• Stationary flow current, i.e. constant cross-section in flow direction.
• Laminar flow current (satisfied in most liquid flow cases).
• No chemical exchange or - reactions between fluid and porous medium.
5.4 Units of Permeability 69
q
∆p
slope;
a = Ak/ l µ∆
Figure 5.5: Experimental determination of liquid permeability.
Having satisfied all the above conditions, permeability is found by integrating the linear
flow equation where the permeability is experimentally determined using the formula,
q =
Ak
µ∆l
∆p, (5.7)
where the flow rate q and the pressure difference ∆p are the measured data. Permeability is
found by plotting the measured data as shown in Fig. 5.5.
The linear best fit through all experimental data-points will give a slope, from which the
permeability can be calculated using Eq. (5.7) [54].
The importance of linear representation of the measured data is the advantage of visual
inspection, which may reveal non-linear effects in the data, e.g. at high or low flow rates, or
uncertainty in laboratory measurements, e.g. large spread in data around the linear fit.
5.4 Units of Permeability
Dimensional analysis applied to the Darcy’s law, shows that permeability has the dimension of
surface area, L
2
. It is not convenient to measure permeability of porous media in cm
2
or in m
2
.
By convention the unit for the permeability is called theDarcy. The following definition of the
Darcy has been accepted:
The permeability is 1 Darcy if a fluid with viscosity of 1cp is flowing at a rate of 1
cm
3
/s through a porous medium with a cross-section of 1cm
2
, creating a pressure
difference of 1 atm/cm.
Applying Darcy-units to Eq. (5.4), we get the following equality:
1
cm
3
s
=−1cm
2
1D
1cp


1atm
1cm

,
where the Darcy-units are preferably used in connection with laboratory tests.
There are two systems of units which are widely used in petroleum field engineering;
• Field units.
• SI units (international system of units).
70 Chapter 5. Permeability
The value 1 Darcy is defined in SI-units by substitution:
q = 10
−6
m
3
s
,
µ = 1cp = 10
−3
kg
m s
,
dp
dl
= 1
atm
cm
= 1.01 10
5
Pa
cm
= 1.01 10
7
kg
m
2
s
2
and
A = 10
−4
m
2
k =

A dp/dl
= 0.987 10
−12
m
2
= 0.987µm
2
.
Here: µm
2
= (µm)
2
.
It follows from these evaluations that,
1 D = 0.987 µm
2
.
Instead of the unit 1 Darcy, the 1/1000 fraction is used, which then is called millidarcy
(mD).
It is important to remember that permeability is a tensor, which means that permeability
might have different values in different directions. Vertical permeability (i.e. normal to the
bedding of formations) is usually much lower in comparison than the horizontal permeability
(measured along the bedding of formations). In its turn, the horizontal permeability can be
different in different directions. These permeability features should be taken into account while
measuring permeability.
Example: Core sample liquid permeability.
A cylindrical core sample is properly cleaned and all remains of hydrocarbons are
removed from the pore space. The core is saturated with water and then flushed
horizontally. The core length is 15cm, it’s diameter is 5 cm and the water viscosity
is 1.0 cp.
The permeability might be determined by plotting the data in a "rate/pressure"
diagram, as shown in Fig. 5.5, or more directly, by calculating the permeability
value for each data-pair, using the formula,
k =
µ∆l
A
q
∆p
,
where A = π(d/2)
2
and d is the core sample diameter.
The pressure drop ∆p, is measured for three different flow-rates and perme-
ability is calculated using the above formula,
q
w
[cm
3
/s] 1.0 3.0 10.0
∆p [atm] 7.2 24.5 76.0
k [D] 0.106 0.093 0.101
5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 71
The average or representative permeability is k = 0.1 D or 100 mD.
Laboratory measurements, always contain uncertainty related to the technol-
ogy used to obtain the lab-data. This uncertainty could be examined by plotting
the data-pairs in an appropriate way, e.g. as shown in Fig. 5.5. The advantage
of data-plotting, compared to straight forward calculations, as in this example, is
the opportunity to verify that the data used in the averaging process are "good" or
representative .
.
5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements
Due to certain interactions between the liquids and the porous rock, absolute permeability is
routinely measured in the laboratory by flowing gas (usually inert gas) through the core sample.
Because gas is a highly compressible substance, i.e. the gas rate is pressure dependent, the
Darcy’s law may not be utilised directly. Considering mass flow of gasqρ, one can write,
qρ =−A

µ
dp
dx
,
where ρ is the density of the gas at certain pressure.
It follows from the perfect gas law (pV = nRT) that,
ρ(p) =
ρ(p
0
)
p
0
p, or simply ρ =
ρ
0
p
0
p,
which when substituted into the previous equation equation yields,
qρ =−A

0
p
µp
0
dp
dx
. (5.8)
Here the subscript "0" refers to a certain pressure value, for instance, the pressure at normal
or standard conditions.
Taking into account the invariant quantity,
qρ = q
0
ρ
0
,
one finally obtains,
q
0
=−A
kp
µp
0
dp
dx
, (5.9)
or integrated from p
1
to p
2
,
q
0
= A
k
2µp
0
p
2
1
−p
2
2
∆l
. (5.10)
Another useful form in which Eq. (5.10) can be written is,
q
0
= A
k
µ
p
p
o
∆p
∆l
, (5.11)
72 Chapter 5. Permeability
where p = (p
1
+ p
2
)/2 is a mean (average) pressure in the core during the measurements.
Combining the invariant mass flow; qρ =qρ and the results generated from the perfect gas
law; ρ p = ρp with Eq. (5.11), one obtains,
q =−A
k
µ
∆p
∆l
, (5.12)
where q is the mean or average flow rate. Eq. (5.12) has exactly the same form as Darcy’s
law for horizontal liquid flow, except for the fact that the flow rate is the mean flow rate. In a
homogeneous porous rock, the mean flow rate is equal to the gas rate at the centre of the core
sample.
The Hassler core holder is commonly used for permeability measurements. It provides
measurements of permeability in both vertical and horizontal directions.
For permeability measurements in the vertical direction gas is injected through the core
plug in the axial direction (see Fig. 5.6, left). The core plug is placed in an impermeable rubber
sleeve protecting the gas flow at the outer-face of the core plug.
High air
pressure
Core sample
Rubber tubing
Low air
pressure
To flow
meter
High air
pressure
Rubber
disk
Low air
pressure
To flow
meter
Metal plug
Screen
Screen
Flow
directions
Figure 5.6: Full diameter vertical and horizontal permeability mea-
surement apparatus (from IHRDC, 1991).
Horizontal permeability measurements require a sealing of the top surfaces of the core with
non-permeable rubber disks (see Fig. 5.6, right). The area of cylindrical surface at the inflow
and outflow openings is covered with a screen and the sample is then placed into the core
holder. Under high air pressure the rubber tubing is collapsed around the core. Low pressure
air is introduced into the center of the holder and passes through the rubber boot and intersects
with the screen, and then flows vertically through the screen. The air then flows through the full
diameter sample along its full height and emerges on the opposite side, where the screen again
allows free flow of the air to exit. The screen are selected to cover designated outer segments
of the full diameter sample. In most cases the circumference of the core is divided into four
equal quadrants. In this test the flow length is actually a function of the core diameter, and the
cross-sectional area of flow is a function of the length and diameter of the core sample.
It is common to furnish two horizontal permeability measurements on all full diameter
samples. The second measurement is made at the right angles to the first.
5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 73
Example: Core sample gas permeability.
A gas permeability test has been carried out on a core sample, 1in in diameter and
length. The core has been cleaned and dried and mounted in a Hassler core holder,
of the type seen in Fig. 5.6.
The gas is injected and the pressure, p
1
measured, at one end of the core sam-
ple, while the gas rate, q
2
is measured at the other end, at atmospheric pressure,
i.e., p
2
= 1atm.
The gas permeability could be estimated using Eq. (5.10), written as follows,
q
2
= A
k
2µp
2
p
2
1
−p
2
2
∆l
.
Given the pressure p
1
and the gas rate q
2
, the mean pressure in the core sample,
p and the pressure drop across the core, ∆p, are calculated from the equation
above. The gas permeability k is found as a function of the mean core pressure.
The following data is given:
p
1
[mmHg] q
2
[cm
3
/min] p [atm.] ∆p [atm.] k [mD]
861 6.4 1.066 0.133 6.8
1276 35.6 1.33 0.667 6.3
2280 132.8 2.00 2.00 5.0
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
Reciprocal pressure: 1/p
m
[1/atm.]
2
3
4
5
6
7
P
e
r
m
e
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
:

k

[
m
D
]

Figure 5.7: Gas permeability plotted as the reciprocal of mean pres-
sure.
Note that the gas permeability is pressure dependent. As the mean pressure in
the core sample increases it is expected that the gas permeability will approach the
absolute (liquid) permeability, since at such high pressure the gas itself, will start
to behave as a liquid.(This asymptotic limit is not reached unless the pressure, e.g.
in air, is more than 1000 bar.)
74 Chapter 5. Permeability
The absolute gas permeability of the core sample is therefore found as the
asymptotic value of permeability, when p →∞or more conveniently, when 1/p →
0, as seen in Fig.5.7. The data, taken from the table is plotted and the absolute per-
meability is found k
liquid
= 3.0mD.
.
5.5.1 Turbulent Gas Flow in a Core Sample
When gas permeability in core samples are measured, turbulent flow may be experienced in
parts of the pore system, preferably in the larger pores and pore channels.
In order to adjust for the occurance of turbulence, the horizontal flow equation can be
expanded by adding a term particularly describing the turbulent flow situation. For this purpose
the Fanning Eq. (5.13), is used describing turbulent flow in a circular tube [7],
v
2
=
R
ρF
∆p
∆x
, (5.13)
where R is the tube radius, ρ is the gas density and F is the Fanning friction factor characteris-
ing the tube (i.e. roughness, wetting, etc.).
According to the Fanning equation one may assume that pressure drop across a pore chan-
nel is proportional to the square of the average gas velocity in the pore.
The horizontal flow equation, including a turbulent term can be written as,
∆p
∆x
=
µ
k
v +βv
2
,
where v is the average or mean flow velocity and β is the turbulent constant .
Considering the average gas flow velocity, v = q/A and rearranging the above equation
somewhat, one gets,
∆p
∆x
A
µ
1
q
=
1
k
+
β

q.
In an experimental situation one normally do not know the average core rateq. Instead the
gas rate is measured at the exhaust end, q
0
. Recall from above the relation,
q =
p
0
p
q
0
.
Substituting for average gas rate in the horizontal flow equation one gets an equation par-
ticularly adapted for experimental application,
A
∆xµp
0
∆pp
q
0
=
1
k
+
β p
0

q
0
p
. (5.14)
Eq. (5.14) is a linear equation where 1/k is the constant term.
In order to use Eq. (5.14), special care has to be taken to how data is plotted. Since
p = (p
1
+p
2
)/2 and ∆p = (p
1
−p
2
), are both functions of p
1
, one of them has to be kept fixed
when producing linear plots.
Assuming there are three sets of data; set a, b and c. For each set there are three measure-
ments; 1, 2 and 3, all together nine measurements.
5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 75
p
a
∆p
a,1
q
0,a,1
p
a
∆p
a,2
q
0,a,2
p
a
∆p
a,3
q
0,a,3
p
b
∆p
b,1
q
0,b,1
p
b
∆p
b,2
q
0,b,2
p
b
∆p
b,3
q
0,b,3
p
c
∆p
c,1
q
0,c,1
p
c
∆p
c,2
q
0,c,2
p
c
∆p
c,3
q
0,c,3
For each data set; a, b and c, a straight line is plotted through the measured data points and
the constant 1/k is evaluated, as shown in the Fig. 5.8.
q /p
0 m
p
ma
p
mb
p
mc
1/k
a
1/k
b
1/k
c
A
p
p
x
p
q


ν
m
0










0
Figure 5.8: Plotting linear data where the average pressure p = p
m
is
kept constant.
The three permeability values found form Fig. 5.8; k
a
, k
b
and k
c
are now plotted, in accor-
dance with the linear Eq. (5.14), as shown in the Fig. 5.9.
k
a
k
c
k
b
1/p
m
k
,

D
k
L
Figure 5.9: Absolute permeability as function of inverse average
pressure, p = p
m
When turbulence is considered, gas permeability is found using a step like plotting process,
where data having the same average core pressure are plotted together in the first step. Sec-
ondly, permeabilities are plotted as functions of the inverse average pressure, from where the
absolute (liquid) permeability is found.
76 Chapter 5. Permeability
5.6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values
General considerations show that permeability is a characteristic parameter describing flow
behaviour in porous media. Since the permeability is introduced as a proportional coefficient
in Darcy’s law, it is evident that other characteristics than the porous medium have important
influence on the numeric value of the permeability. In the case of overburden pressure, exper-
iments have shown that the permeability is even more dependent on the overburden pressure
than the porosity.
Permeability measurements are also (sometimes strongly) affected by the fluid, e.g. used
in laboratory tests, due to some interaction between the fluid and the porous medium. To avoid
this effect, gases (helium, nitrogen, carbon-dioxide and air) are often used for permeability
measurements. The use of gases introduce other problems, such as turbulent flow behaviour,
increased uncertainty in gas rate measurements and at low pressure, theKlinkenberg effect.
It follows from Eq. (5.11), that the rock permeability to gas is not the same as for liquids,
since gas permeability is pressure dependent, i.e. k = k(p),
k =
q
o
µ
A
p
o
p
∆l
∆p
, (5.15)
where the latter statement means that different average core pressures p, provide different val-
ues of the rock permeability to gas.
These facts should be considered when permeability from laboratory measurements is re-
lated to reservoir permeability.
5.6.1 The Klinkenberg Effect
It has been observed that at low average pressures, measurements of gas permeability give
erroneously high results, as compared to the non-reactive liquid permeability measurements
(absolute permeability). This effect is known as the gas slippage effect or as the Klinkenberg
effect, investigated by Klinkenberg in 1941. Klinkenberg found that the gas permeability of a
core sample varied with both the type of gas used in the measurements and the average pressure
p, in the core.
One of the conditions for the validity of Darcy’s law, as presented in Eqs. (5.7) or (5.11), is
the requirement of laminar flow, i.e. that the fluid behaves "classically" with respect to inter-
molecular interactions in the gas. At low gas pressure, in combination with small (diameter)
pore channels, this condition is broken.
At low p, gas molecules are often so far apart, that they slip through the pore channels
almost without interactions (no friction loss) and hence, yield a increased flow velocity or flow
rate. At higher pressures, the gas molecules are closer together and interact more strongly
as molecules in a liquid. Compared to laminar flow, at a constant pressure difference, the
Klinkenberg dominated flow will yield a higher gas rate than laminar flow,
q
Klinkenberg
> q
laminar
.
Experiments show that when gas permeability is plotted versus the reciprocal average pres-
sure p, a straight line can be fitted through the data points. Extrapolation of this line to infinite
mean pressure, i.e. when 1/p →0, gives the absolute (liquid) permeability. The permeability
5.6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values 77
1.2 1.6 2.0
2.0
4.0
6.0
8.0
0.0
0.0 0.4 0.8
Reciprocal Mean Pressure, 1/bar
G
a
s
P
e
r
m
e
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
,
m
D
He
N
2
CO
2
Liquid or absolute
permeability, k
L
Figure 5.10: Klinkenberg permeability determination.
value at 1/p →0 is comparable to the permeability obtained if the core were saturated with a
non-reactive liquid (see Fig. 5.10.
In early core analysis the Klinkenberg permeability was estimated by using a steady-state
technique for permeability measurements, at different mean pressures p, or by using the fol-
lowing correlation’s;
k
m
= k
L

1+
b
p

, (5.16)
where k
m
and k
L
are the measured- and the absolute (liquid) permeability, respectively. The
parameter b depends on the type of gas used and reflects, to some extent, properties of the rock
(Fig. 5.10).
Corrections to measured gas permeability due to the Klinkenberg effect are normally mod-
erate to small corrections, as seen for the table below.
Non-corrected Klinkenberg corrected
permeability, [mD] permeability, [mD]
1.0 0.7
10.0 7.8
100.0 88.0
1000.0 950.0
In most laboratory measurements of gas permeability, it is safe to neglect the Klinkenberg
effect if the gas pressure is higher than 10 bar. In reservoirs, the pressure will be much higher
and consequently the significance of the Klinkenberg effect of no importance.
Example: Onset of the Klinkenberg effect
The onset of the Klinkenberg effect is considered in a system comprised of a bun-
dle of identical capillary tubes. For such a system, using Poiseuille’s law for tube
flow, it is shown that the permeability can be written,
78 Chapter 5. Permeability
k =
π
4
r
2
8
, (5.17)
where r is the individual tube radius.
Irrespective of the fact that a bundle of cylindrical tubes is far from being a
realistic model of a porous medium, one can estimate the permeability at which
the Klinkenberg effect starts to become a significant effect.
As an example helium gas might be chosen in the flow experiment. Helium
has a mean free path, λ
He
=0.18 10
−6
m at atmospheric pressure and temperature
of 20
o
C [59]. At higher pressures, lower mean free paths are observed, i.e. λ <
λ
He
.
Since the Klinkenberg effect is said to become important when themean free
path of the gas and the size (diameter) of the pore channels are comparable, there
is a maximum permeability limit, below which the Klinkenberg effect becomes
active.
Substituting the helium mean free path for the diameter of the tube radius in
Eq. (5.17); r = λ
He
/2, it follows,
k
He
=
π
4

He
/2)
2
8
, (5.18)
Using helium gas, the Klinkenberg effect would be active at standard condi-
tions in a "porous" medium, as above, for permeabilities less thank
He
= 0.8 mD. In
an experiment where N
2
or CO
2
is used, the expected mean free paths are shorter
and consequently the permeability limits are lower than in theHe case.
For many gases, the mean free paths of their molecules at standard conditions
(room temperature and atmospheric pressure) are in the range: 0.01 to 0.1 µm,
whereas the mean free paths of CO
2
and N
2
are respectively 0.04 µm and 0.06
µm.
.
5.7 Exercises 79
5.7 Exercises
1. Prove that the numeric constant for convertingdyn/cm
2
to atm, is equal to 1.013310
6
,.
2. Darcy’s law is given,
q = A
k
µ
∆p
∆L
,
where; k:[Darcy], µ:[cp], A:[cm
2
], q:[cm
3
/s], L:[cm] and p:[atm].
Convert this equation to "Oil Field Units" where; k:[mD], µ;[cp], A:[ f t
2
], q:[bbl/d],
L:[ft] and p:[psi].
3. The cylindrical pore model consists of cylindrical tubes stacked on top of each other.
Assuming a tube radius equal to r and that the fluid flow velocity through the tubes, is
given by Poiseuilles equation,
v =
r
2

∆p
∆l
.
a) Calculate the porosity of the cylindrical pore model φ,
b) Show that the permeability is written as k = φr
2
/8.
c) Consider the average permeability of a serial coupling of two tubes with tube radius
R and r, where R r. Find an expression for the average permeability and evaluate
the consequences of relative increase/decrease in the pore radius, as shown in the
figure below.
∆l
∆l
r R
4. A reservoir has cylindrical geometry where the following parameters are defined;
p
e
[atm] Pressure at the outer boundary
p
w
[atm] Pressure in the well
r
w
[cm] Well radius
r
e
[cm] Radius at the outer boundary
h [cm] Reservoir height
Use Darcy’s law to derive a general equation for a cylindrical reservoir in the cases of
horizontal flow, when we have,
a) incompressible fluid and
b) ideal gas.
80 Chapter 5. Permeability
5. Use the laws of Darcy and Poiseuilles to estimate the lowest measurable permeability of
a sandstone core sample, without detecting the Klinkenberg effect. The measurements
are done under laboratory conditions, usingN
2
.
6. Calculate the air permeability, in two ways, for a cylindrical core sample where the
following data is given. Verify that the two approaches used above give the same answer.
(Use the equation for gas rate at the effluent endq
o
and the equation for the average gas
rate q.)
Length 3.0 in, p
1
55 psig,
Diameter 1.5 in, p
2
20 psig,
q
b
75 cm
3
/s, Atm. pressure 13 psia,
p
b
14.65 psia, µ 0.0185 cP.
q
b
and p
b
is the flow rate and back pressure, respectively.
(NB: p
psia
= p
psig
+ p
atm.pressure
)
7. An oil well is producing from a cylindrical reservoir with a drainage area of 20 acres.
Calculate the well pressure, given the following data:
r
w
= 6 in, µ = 5 cP,
k = 75 mD, h = 10 ft,
p
e
= 5000 psia, q = 175 BOPD,
BOPD is short for "Barrel of Oil Produced per Day".
Calculate the pressure in the reservoir at a distance 5 ft from the well. What is the
pressure drop from the well to this position, in percentage of the total pressure difference
in the reservoir?
8. Show that the average permeability
¯
k for n horizontal layers, stacked on top of each other
(in parallel), is given by the formula [8] (see Figure below),
¯
k =

n
j=1
k
j
h
j

n
j=1
h
j
,
where k
j
and h
j
are the permeability and thickness of the layers.
k
1
k
2
k
3
h
1
h
2
h
3
q
q
9. Linear flow in horizontal layers.
Calculate the total flow rate in f t
3
/d at the pressure p
b
for gas flow through parallel
layers, where the following data is given:
5.7 Exercises 81
width 200 ft, length 400 ft, p
atm.
15.0 psia,
h
1
2 ft, k
1
200 mD, p
in
500 psig,
h
2
6 ft, k
2
150 mD, p
out
400 psig,
h
3
4 ft, k
3
400 mD, p
b
14.65 psia.
Gas viscosity µ
g
= 0.0185cp. (Notice: p
psia
= p
psig
+ p
atm.
)
10. Show that the average permeability of rectangular porous media coupled in series is
given by the formula [8] (see Figure below),
¯
k =

n
j=1
L
j

n
j=1
L
j
/k
j
,
where L
j
is the length of the media in the direction of flow.
k
1
k
2
k
3
L
1
L
2 L
3
L
q q
11. Linear and horizontal flow through linear beds in series.
Calculate the total oil rate bbl/d through all media, when the following data is given:
width 100 ft, height 50 ft, µ
o
10 cP,
L
1
100 ft, k
1
100 mD, p
in
100 psig,
L
2
200 ft, k
2
50 mD, p
out
50 psig,
L
3
200 ft, k
3
200 mD, p
atm.
15.0 psia,
12. Show that the average permeability for n radial layers in a cylindrical reservoir is given
by the formula [8] (see Figure below),
¯
k =
ln(r
e
/r
w
)

n
j=1
ln(r
j
/r
j−1
)/k
j
,
where r
e
and r
w
is the radius to the outer boundary of the reservoir and the well radius,
respectively. k
j
is permeability to the layer with outer radius r
j
.
Are the formulas above valid both for gas- and liquid flow?
13. Radial and horizontal flow through cylindrical layers.
An oil well has a intermediate zone with reduced reservoir permeability k
1
. Calculate
the pressure at the outer boundary p
e
when the oil rate is 100 bbl/d and the following
data is given:
r
w
6 in, k
1
50 mD, p
w
2000 psia,
r
1
10 ft, k
2
200 mD, µ
o
5 cp,
k
3
330 ft, h 20 ft.
82 Chapter 5. Permeability
What is the pressure at outside the damaged zone (r
1
) ?
14. Absolute permeability of a core sample is being measured by water flooding. The core
sample is mounted in a transparent cylindrical tube, as shown in the figure below, and
the air-water surface is monitored as function of time.
The tube is placed in a vertical position and the water is assumed to flow through the
whole core sample, evenly distributed over the surface.
Calculate the absolute permeability of the sample when the air–water surface uses 400
seconds to move 18 cm.
Water
Core
sample
q
82 cm
100 cm
2 cm
Additional data;
Density of water 1 g/cm
3
Water viscosity 1 cp
Gravitational constant 980 cm/s
2
Thickness of core sample 2 cm
Answers to questions:
3. π/4, 5. 0.1 mD, 6. 0.1 D, 7. 262 atm, 288 atm,
9. 1.57 10
6
f t
3
/d, 11. 4710 bbl/d, 13. 2272 psi, 14. 1 D.
Chapter 6
Wettability and Capillary Pressure
6.1 Introduction
The exploitation of hydrocarbons is a complex process of controlling interactions in systems
involving crude oil, water, gas and rock formations. In such complicated systems, it is impor-
tant to recognise the effect of the surface properties of oil/rock, water/rock and, in combination,
the interface oil/water. A central property, when giving an overall picture of the interfacial con-
ditions, is the surface or interfacial tension (or more correctly the surface or interfacial energy).
This property is very sensitive to chemical changes at the interface.
In this chapter, the interaction between wettability and surface tension is revealed. Due
to the great significance of the surface/interfacial tension, several experimental methods have
been developed in order to measure this physical property. Some of the most commonly used
techniques are reviewed.
6.2 Surface and Interfacial Tension
An interface is known as the boundary region between two adjacent bulk phases. The equilib-
rium bulk phases can be:
• Liquid-vapor (LV).
• Liquid-liquid (LL).
• Liquid-solid (LS).
• Solid-vapor (SV).
(Gases are basically miscible and thus, no interfacial tension is observed between gases.)
Any surface that is in the state of lateral tension, leads to the concept ofsurface tension.
For curved interfaces, the definition is similar but slightly more complex. The surface tension,
denoted by σ, can be related to the work or energy required to establish the surface area.
If two fluids, say water and oil is forming an interface, as seen in Fig. 6.1, the molecules at-
tached to the oil-water interface do necessarily have less kinetic energy than the bulk molecules,
on average. The molecules on or close to the interface may not move with the same degree of
freedom and speed, due to the constraint put on them by the interface. Since the total energy of
83
84 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
the molecules is mainly a function of temperature, the potential energy of molecules attached
to the interface is greater than the potential energy of the bulk molecules.
water
oil
Figure 6.1: Molecular motion in bulk and close to the oil-water in-
terface.
Generally speaking, a molecule at a surface is in a state of higher potential energy than a
bulk molecule, due to anisotropy and intermolecular interactions. This means that energy is
required to move a molecule from the interior to the surface of a phase, i.e., to increase the
surface area of the system. Since a proportionality exist between surface area and potential
energy of the system of molecules and since equilibrium is reached at minimum potential
energy (actually minimum Gibbs energy), the surface area of a system is always minimised.
Keeping the temperature, pressure and amount of material in the system constant, the fol-
lowing expression for surface tension may be written,
σ =

∂G
∂A

T,p,n
i
. (6.1)
Here G is the Gibbs free energy and A is the surface area. The unit of surface tension is
therefore, the unit of energy pr. area, i.e., J/m
2
or more commonly N/m. Note, that what is
called surface or interface tension is in fact surface or interface energy and quite often it is more
advantageous to use the energy perspective than it is to deal with tension and forces.
The surface tension between a pure liquid and its vapour phase is usually in the range of 10
to 80 mN/m. The stronger the intermolecular attractions in the liquid, the greater is the work
needed to bring bulk molecules to the surface, i.e., the larger is the interfacial tensionσ. In
Table 6.1 some typical values for surface - and interfacial tensions are listed.
6.3 Rock Wettability
Laboratory experiments have proved that rock wettability affects oil displacement. The term
wettability can be defined as "the tendency of one fluid to spread or to adhere to a solid surface
in the presence of other immiscible fluids" [29].
The evaluation of reservoir wettability can be made through measurements of interfacial
tensions, i.e., tensions acting at the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interfaces, and thecontact angle.
Note that wettability itself is a microscopic characteristic, that has to be measured by using
micro-scale laboratory investigation techniques.
6.3 Rock Wettability 85
Table 6.1: Surface tension, σ
LV
and interfacial tension to water, σ
LW
for some liquids at temperature, T = 293
o
K. Note: Sur-
face tension σ
LV
, is here defined as the interfacial tension
between a liquid and its vapor.
Liquid σ
LV
(mN/m) σ
LW
(mN/m)
Water 72.8 –
n-octane 21.7 51.7
n-dodecane 25.4 52.9
n-hexadecane 27.5 53.8
dichoromethane 28.9 27.7
benzene 28.9 35.0
mercury 476.0 375.0
The angle θ is influenced by the tendency of one of the fluids, i.e. water, of the immiscible
pair, to spread on the pore wall surface in preference to the other (oil). The qualitative recog-
nition of preferred spread is called a wettability preference, and the fluid which spreads more
is said to be the wetting phase fluid. Contact angles are measured, by convention, through the
fluid whose wettability is studied or through the fluid which is wetting the solid surface. A ta-
ble of typical fluid pairs of interest in reservoir engineering is shown in the Table 6.2, together
with contact angles and interfacial tensions [8].
Table 6.2: Fluid pair wettability under reservoir and laboratory con-
ditions.
System Conditions
Wetting Non-wetting T = temperature θ σ
phase phase P = pressure (dynes/cm)
Brine Oil Reservoir, T, P 30 30
Brine Oil Laboratory, T, P 30 48
Brine Gas Laboratory, T, P 0 72
Brine Gas Reservoir, T, P 0 (50)
Oil Gas Reservoir, T, P 0 4
Gas Mercury Laboratory, T, P 140 480
The degree of wettability exhibited, depends both on the chemical compositions of the
fluid pair, particularly the asphaltine content of the oil, and on the nature of the pore wall.
Pure quartz sandstone or calcite surfaces are likely to be wetted preferentially by water. The
presence of certain authigenic clays, particularly chamosite, may promote oil wet character.
The differences in contact angle somehow indicate different wettability preferences which
86 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
can be illustrated by the following rule of thumb presented in Table 6.3 and in Fig. 6.2 [19].
Table 6.3: Wettability preference expressed by contact angle.
Contact angle values Wettability preference
0 – 30 Strongly water wet
30 – 90 Preferentially water wet
90 Neutral wettability
90 – 150 Preferentially oil wet
150 – 180 Strongly oil wet
s s s
o
o
o
w
w
w
θ = 0 θ = 90 θ ~ 180
Figure 6.2: Example of wetting preference.
6.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension
With two immisible fluids (oil and water) present in the reservoir, there are three interfacial
tension parameters to be assessed; σ
os
, σ
ws
and σ
wo
. The three interfacial tension are not
independent parameters, and in order to reveal the relationship between them a "gedanken"
experiment is carried out on a droplet of water, surrounded by oil, placed in a contact with a
water-wet reservoir rock, as seen in Fig. 6.3.
R
θ
θ
r
h
Water
Oil
Rock
Figure 6.3: Geometry of the water droplet in oil, placed in a contact
with a water-wet reservoir rock.
The following definitions will be used:
• surface tension between the oil and solid; σ
os
,
6.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension 87
• surface tension between the water and solid; σ
ws
,
• interfacial tension between the oil and water phases; σ
ow
,
• contact angle at the oil-water-solid interface measured through the water;θ,
• surface area of the water droplet; A
d
,
• area of the reservoir rock occupied by the water droplet; A
s
.
The water droplet is assumed to be in equilibrium with the surrounding medium. A small
deformation of the surface area, will deform the droplet slightly and force the droplet to expand
on the solid surface. The deformation is described by the equilibrium equation, expressing the
change in energy due to the change in area.
σ
ws
dA
s
+(−σ
os
dA
s
) +σ
ow
dA
d
= 0 (6.2)
Elaborating on Eq. (6.2), the following relationships are valid (see also Fig. 6.3),
A
s
= πr
2
⇒ dA
s
= 2πrdr
A
w
=π(r
2
+h
2
) ⇒ dA
w
= 2π(rdr +hdh)
V
w
=
πh
6
(3r
2
+h
2
)
Incompressible liquids give,
dV
w
=
∂V
w
∂r
dr +
∂V
w
∂h
dh = 0,
which leads to
dh =−
2rh
h
2
+r
2
dr.
Using these results, Eq. (6.2) is rewritten,
σ
ws
−σ
os

ow

1−
2h
2
h
2
+r
2

= 0, (6.3)
and taking into account that (see Fig. 6.3),
Rsinθ = r
Rcosθ = R−h
and
(1−
2h
2
h
2
+r
2
) = cos θ,
a final result is obtained,
σ
os
−σ
ws
= σ
ow
cos θ, (6.4)
which is known as the Young-Dupre equation [15].
88 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
6.5 Capillary Pressure
Capillary pressure may be defined as the pressure difference across a curved interface between
two immiscible fluids. By convention, the P
c
term is positive for unconfined immiscible fluid
pairs, where P
c
is defined as the pressure difference between the non- wetting and the wetting
phase.
P
w
P
o
Water
Oil
*
*
Figure 6.4: Pressure difference across a curved (spherical) interface.
Using an example with an oil drop floating in water where the density of oil and water are
assumed similar, as seen in Fig. 6.4, the capillary pressure is written,
P
c
= p
o
−p
w
.
If the droplet is small, one may assume the interfacial tension to be far more important
than the gravitational force acting on the droplet and thus, since the surface area is minimised,
the droplet takes the form of a perfect sphere. A small perturbation, i.e. a small reduction of
the sphere volume, is described by an equation taking into account the energy change due to
the volume and the surface change. The equilibrium condition is ecpressed as the change in
potential and surface energy,
p
w
dV +σ
ow
dA = p
o
dV.
Substituting definition of the capillary pressure p
c
, in the latter equation, one we succes-
sively obtain,
P
c
= σ
ow
dA
dV
= σ
ow
dA
dr

dV
dr

−1
= σ
ow
8πr
4πr
2
= σ
ow
2
r
.
Capillary pressure can be of significant magnitude, since this is the energy needed to form
a droplet that can pass through a porous channel . Taking typical values of a pore radius and
an interfacial tension of oil and water, the capillary pressure can be obtained by the following
evaluation:
r ∼1µm and σ
ow
= 0.025
N
m
⇒P
c
·10
4
N
m
2
= 0.5 bar
6.5.1 Capillary Pressure Across Curved Surfaces
For two immiscible liquids as part of a real physical system, a spherical interface is an odd
observation. Normally, a curved surface is characterised by two radii of curvature;R
1
and R
2
,
as seen in Fig 6.5.
6.5 Capillary Pressure 89
Figure 6.5: Curved surface and radii of curvature.
With a pressure difference across the interface in the two phases, the interface will show
a net curvature with the larger pressure on the concave side. The relationship between the
pressure difference ∆p = P
c
and the curvature is given by Laplace equation,
P
c
= σ

1
R
1
+
1
R
2

, (6.5)
where R
1
and R
2
are the principal radii of curvature and σ is the interfacial tension. For a
spherical droplet R
1
= R
2
= r and ∆p = 2σ/r. Across a planar interface/surface R
1
= R
2
=∞
and ∆p = 0.
Example: Surface tension and surface energy
The process of displacing water through a porous medium is comparable to the
formation of droplets of sizes equal to the capillary pore throats.
What is then the energy needed to transform 1 cm
3
of pure water to droplets
with an average radius of 1 µm, when the surface tension of water to vapor is 0.073
mN/m?
The energy in question, is the energy needed to increase the initial water sur-
face A, of the initial volume V to N number of droplets with area, A
d
and volume
,V
d
.
The area increase is,
∆A = N A
d
−A =
V
V
d
A
d
−A =
3
r
V −A,
where the droplet area and volume are respectively; 4πr
2
and (4/3)πr
3
.
Since the increased area ∆A is directly proportional to the increase in potential
energy ∆E
p
, which can be expressed by Eq. (6.1),
∆E
p
= σ
air,w
∆A =σ
air,w

3
r
V −A

.
If the initial water area is considered to be small (or negligible) to the area of
the droplets, a potential energy equal to about 0.22J is found.
90 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
.
6.5.2 Interfacial Tension
Assuming pairs of immicsible unconfined fluids the following phenomena, as illustrated in
Fig. 6.6 can be observed, depending on the sign of interfacial tension:
σ > 0
σ < 0
σ ~ 0
Figure 6.6: Formation of interface as function of the sign of the in-
terfacial tension in pairs of immicsible unconfined fluids.
• When the surface tension is positive, σ > 0, confined molecules, have a preference for
keeping their own company. The surface against the second type of molecules is min-
imised and in the case of small droplets, spherical interfaces are formed.
• In the cases when σ ≈ 0, liquids are classified as "truely" miscible. In these cases no
preference with respect to mixing of the two fluids is observed. (However, diffusion will
lead to mixing of the two fluids.)
• When the surface tension is negative, σ < 0, molecules of one type will prefer (have
affinity for) the company of the second type of molecules. We may observe a chemical
reaction where the final state is stable in time. An example of such a process is the
hydrophilic ability of pure ethanol to mix with air more or less instantaneously.
6.5.3 Capillary Pressure in a Cylindrical Tube
When a non-wetting fluid is displacing a wetting fluid, as is the case when oil is displacing
water in a water-wet porous rock, a curved interface is formed in the capillary tube. To reveal
the relation between the capillary pressure, the interfacial tension and the radius in a cylindrical
tube, two immiscible fluids (oil + water) are confined in a cylindrical capillary of radiusr
c
, as
shown in Fig. 6.7.
Using the Eq. (6.5) for the pressure difference between the two sides of the interface,
6.5 Capillary Pressure 91
θ
c
θ
c
r
c
R Water
Oil
Figure 6.7: Idealised model of a pore channel filled with two immis-
cible fluids forming a curved interface between them.
p
o
−p
w
= σ
ow

1
R
1
+
1
R
2

,
where R
1
and R
2
are main radii of the curvature, expressing the radius of the interfacial surface
R by means of the contact angle θ
c
and the capillary radius r
c
in the cylindrical tube. When
R
1
= R
2
= R and
R =
r
c
cosθ
c
,
the capillary pressure is written,
P
c
= p
o
−p
w
= σ
ow

1
R
1
+
1
R
2

=

ow
cos θ
c
r
c
, (6.6)
where Eq. (6.6) is the capillary pressure in a cylindrical tube of radiusr.
Example: Oil - water displacement in a capillary tube
Displacement processes in porous media are very often a competition between
viscous- and capillary forces. In this example, the process by which oil displaces
water in a cylindrical tube is considered in analogy with the production of oil from
a water-wet reservoir where oil is forced through capillary pores which initially
contained water.
Consider a dynamical situation, as sketch in Fig. 6.8 where the oil front has
reached a position x in to the cylinder (pore). The pressure drop along the cylin-
drical tube is partly the viscous pressure drop ∆p
o
+ ∆p
w
, in the oil- and water
zone and partly the capillary pressure drop, P
c
across the oil-water interface:
∆p
V
= ∆p
o
+∆p
w
=
q
Ak

o
x +µ
w
(L−x)] ,
P
c
=

ow
cosθ
r
.
92 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
Water Oil
0
x
L
∆p
o
∆p
c
∆p
w
Figure 6.8: Cross-section view of a cylindrical "pore channel".
The flow rate is q = Av, where A and v is respectively the cross-section area
and the pore velocity. The permeability of the tube is known as,k = r
2
/8, and r is
the tube radius.
The strength between the two forces is considered by simply comparing their
pressure drops,
∆p
V
P
c
= 4
¸

o
σ
ow
cosθ
x
r
+

w
σ
ow
cosθ
L−x
r

.
In the equation above, the relation vµ/(σ cosθ) is the only term contain-
ing dynamical parameters. In analogy with the definition of Reynolds number, a
dimension-less number could be defined,
N
c
=

σ cosθ
.
The Capillary number N
c
, describes the competition between the viscous- and
the capillary force.
In a situation where the two forces are assumed to be equally important, i.e.
∆p
v
/P
c
∼1, a set of "typical values" could be chosen and the average pore velocity
is found,
∆p
V
/P
c
= 1
θ = 60
o
L/r = 5
µ
o
≈µ
w
= 1mPa s
σ
ow
= 50mN/m

v
pore
≈1.3m/s.
Reservoir flow is commonly considered to be of the order of 1 foot pr. day,
which is equal to 3.5 µm/s. From this comparison , it is obvious (even when the
appropriate bulk velocity u = v
pore
/(φ(1−S
r
)cos
2
α) is taken into account) that
under reservoir flow conditions, capillary forces are totally predominant and that
viscous forces play a minor role when microscopic flowpattern is considered. This
means that the capillary forces alone decide which pore channels are going to be
swept and which are not, in the reservoir.
The Capillary number for reservoir flow becomes N
c
= 1.5 10
−5
(using the
numbers above), while the Capillary number at the "breaking point" when the
viscous force becomes equally important to the capillary force is 8 10
−3
.
6.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation 93
The capillary number for field water-floods ranges from 10
−6
to 10
−4
. Labo-
ratory studies have shown that the value of the Capillary number is directly related
to the ultimate recovery of oil, where an increase in the Capillary number im-
plies an increase in the oil recovery. The Capillary number is generally varied by
increasing the flow rate (pore velocity) and/or lowering the interfacial tension.
.
6.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation
Results from drainage and imbibiation laboratory experiments have shown that the capillary
pressure P
c
= p
o
−p
w
is dependent on the following parameters (see Fig. 6.9):
• surface tensions; σ
os
, σ
ws
and σ
ow
,
• contact angle measured through the water phase; θ
c
,
• rock porosity; φ,
• rock permeability; k,
• fluid saturations; S
w
and S
w
σ
ow σ
ow
θ
c
θ
c
σ
ws
σ
ws
σ
os
σ
os
Oil
Oil
Water
Water
Oil-wet Water-wet
Figure 6.9: Wettability of oil-water-solid system.
The task is to define (if possible) a correlation between capillary pressureP
c
and the param-
eters, mentioned above, being responsible for the numeric variation of the capillary pressure in
the experiments.
Relying upon the data obtained, the following dependency can be expressed,
P
c
= f (φ, k, σ
os
, σ
ws
, σ
ow
, θ
c
, S
o
, S
w
) (6.7)
Since some of the parameters are dependent on others,
S
o
= 1−S
w
,
σ
os
−σ
ws
= σ
ow
cosθ
c
,
the list of independent parameters is shortened and Eq. (6.7) is written;
P
c
= f (φ, k, σ
ow
cosθ
c
, S
w
) (6.8)
A dimensional analysis of Eq. (6.8) can be carried out using the following notation for
dimensions,
94 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
M – mass, L – length, and T – time,
which gives the following dimensions for all the parameters in Eq. (6.8):
[P
c
] = M L
−1
T
−2
, [k] = L
2
, [σ
ow
cosθ
c
] = M T
−2
,
[φ] = 1, [S
w
] = 1
(6.9)
Comparing all the parameters of the right-hand side of Eq. (6.8), it appears that both di-
mension parameters k and σ
ow
have independent dimensions. This means that dimension of
the capillary pressure can be defined through dimensions of those parameters, i.e.,
[P
c
] = [k]
α

ow
cosθ
c
]
β
.
Using notation (6.9), the last relation is written in the form,
M L
−1
T
−2
= L

M
β
T
−2β
,
which is followed by,
M : 1 = β,
L : −1 = 2α, ⇒ α =−1/2 and β = 1.
T : −2 = −2β,
Thus, a dimension-less parameter F can be composed,
F =
P
c
σ
ow
cosθ
c


k,
and by making use of this result, Eq. (6.8) can be rewritten in dimension-less form,
F = F(φ, S
w
),
or using the initial notation,
P
c
=
σ
ow
cosθ
c

k
F(φ, S
w
).
It can be shown that parameters φ and S
w
and their functions, can only appear in correla-
tions where they form a product,
P
c
=
σ
ow
cosθ
c

k
F
1
(φ) F
2
(S
w
) (6.10)
Thus by using the dimension analysis (the π-theorem) [11], the number of independent
variable parameters is reduced and an almost exact formof the correlation between the capillary
pressure P
c
, fluids and rock parameters is obtained.
The following correlation is widely used for reservoir simulation tasks [13, 15],
P
c
=
σ
ow
cosθ
c

(k/φ)
J(S
w
), (6.11)
where J(S
w
) is known as the J-function (after Leverett).
6.7 Pore Size Distribution 95
6.7 Pore Size Distribution
It is obvious that the capillary pressure is strongly affected by the distribution of pore chan-
nel sizes, represented by the 1/r relationship. The capillary pressure does also represent the
response of interfacial tensions and rock wettability. Generally, is the capillary pressure char-
acteristic of the reservoir heterogeneity.
To reveal the relation between the capillary pressure and the microscopic heterogeneity of
the reservoir, the following example is considered: An idealised model of the porous medium
consisting of cylindrical capillaries with different radii r
i
, where all pore channels have the
same type of wettability and, as a consequence, a fixed contact angleθ
c
. It is also assumed, that
a certain invariant distribution-function χ(r) defines a fraction of pore channels with capillary
radii belonging to the interval (r, r +dr) as,
χ(r) =
n(r, r +dr)
N
,
where N is the total number of pore channels.
Let V
i
be the pore volume of a single capillary with radiusr
i
and V be the total pore volume
of the porous medium considered, i.e.,
V =
N

i=1
V
i
.
Now let us consider a process of imbibition for a strongly water-wet rock initially saturated
with oil, as shown in Fig. 6.10.
Water Oil
Rock
Figure 6.10: Illustration of imbibition process in an idealised model
of porous medium.
Assume that at the starting point, the pressure in the oil phase p
o
, is high enough to protect
the water invading the pore channels. Then gradually decreasing the outlet pressure (pressure
in the oil phase), the water will invade the pores. It is quite obvious that the water enters only
those capillary channels with capillary pressureP
c
, exceeding the difference between the outlet
and inlet pressure ∆p
o
(t). Hence, at a certain time only those channels will be filled with water,
which satisfy the condition,
P
c
≥∆p
o
(t),
96 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
or, substituting Eq. (6.6) into the last inequality,
r
c


ow
cos θ
c
∆p
o
(t)
.
Then the volume of water which has invaded the porous medium can be defined as,
V
c
= N

r
c
0
χ(r)πr
2
ldr,
where l is the length of a single pore channel.
Defining the total pore volume as,
V = N


0
χ(r)πr
2
ldr,
the relations between the water saturation S
w
, and the capillary pressure P
c
, is
S
w
=
V
c
V
=

r
c
0
χ(r)r
2
dr


0
χ(r)r
2
dr
, and
P
c
=

ow
cos θ
c
r
c
, (6.12)
which explicitly indicates that microscopic reservoir heterogeneity strongly affects the capillary
pressure.
Since the pore size distribution varies between the different layers in a reservoir, it is ex-
pected that the capillary pressure curve shape will also vary from layer to layer. This phe-
nomenon is frequently observed in laboratory tests, by using a mercury injection technique, on
core samples taken from different elevations in the same well.
Example: Pore size distribution and capillary pressure curve
In this example, it will be shown how data from a mercury drainage experiment
could be used to produce a capillary pressure curve and how these data could be
used further, to define the pore size distribution for the core sample tested.
First, the core sample is properly cleaned, dried and placed in vacuum for some
time, before it is sealed in a mercury pycnometer. A series ofN+1, representative
pressure measurements p
i
, is recorded inside the pycnometer and the injection
volume V
i
is read as the pore sample is invaded by more and more mercury. The
experimental data is as follows:
p
Hg
p
0
p
1
p
2
p
3
p
N
V
Hg
V
0
V
1
V
2
V
3
V
N
The capillary pressure P
c
, is here the pressure difference between the mercury
pressure p
Hg
, and the gas pressure in the core sample p
g
,
P
c
= p
Hg
−p
g
=
2σ cosθ
r
.
6.7 Pore Size Distribution 97
The gas is the wetting phase since mercury definitely does not wet any core
sample. The wetting saturation is therefore written,
S
g
= 1−S
Hg
=
V
N
−V
i
V
N
−V
0
.
Based on the data in the table above, the following parameters are calculated,
S
g
1 S
1
S
2
S
3
0
r r
0
r
1
r
2
r
3
r
N
P
c
P
c,0
P
c,1
P
c,2
P
c,3
P
c,N
The pore size distribution D(r) is representing the relative increase in pore
volume as function of the pore throat radius,
D(r)
de f
= −
1
∆V
dV
dr
,
where ∆V =V
N
−V
0
and dV =V
i
−V
i−1
, taken from the above tabulated data. The
minus sign "-" is added due to convenience.
The pore size distribution is then rewritten,
D(r) =−
1
∆V
1
dr
∂V
∂S
∂S
∂P
c
dP
c
.
Remembering the definition of the wetting phase saturation
S
g
= (V
N
−V)/(V
N
−V
0
), one may write,
∂S
∂V
=−
1
∆V

∂V
∂S
=−∆V,
and by substituting in the pore size distribution equation, one gets,
D(r) =
1
dr
dP
c
(∂P
c
/∂S)
.
Using the definition of the capillary pressure P
c
= 2σ cosθ/r, gives
dP
c
=
∂P
c
∂r
dr =−
P
c
r
dr.
Substituting this last expression into the pore size distribution, one gets,
D(r) =−
P
c
r
1
(∂P
c
/∂S)
.
Fig. 6.11 shows the two curves for the capillary pressure and the pore size
distribution, respectively. When P
c
(S
g
) is known, then D(r) can be calculated,
using the following steps.
1. For a certain gas saturation S
g
, the corresponding capillary pressureP
c
(S
g
) is
calculated.
98 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
Pore radius, r
P
o
r
e
r
a
d
i
u
s
d
i
s
t
r
i
b
u
t
i
o
n
,
D
(
r
)
C
a
p
i
l
l
a
r
y
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
,
P
c
Water saturation, S
w
Incremental
Mercury
Injection
D(r)
P
c
r
dS
w
dP
c
=
Figure 6.11: Capillary pressure curve and corresponding pore size
distribution [8].
2. The pore radius related to this pressure is r = 2σ cosθ/P
c
.
3. The tangent to the curve P
c
(S
g
) through the co-ordinate (S
g
, P
c
(S
g
)) gives the
slope defined by ∂P
c
/∂S.
In Fig. 6.11 the pore size distribution is drawn in accordance with the enumer-
ated list.
.
6.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs
The equilibrium fluid saturation distribution in a petroleum reservoir, prior to production is
governed by the pore space characteristics. This is as a result of the non-wetting phase, nor-
mally hydrocarbons, entering pore space initially occupied by the wetting fluid, normally water,
during migration of hydrocarbons from a source rock region into a reservoir trap. A pressure
differential is required for the non-wetting phase to displace wetting phase and this is equivalent
to a minimum threshold capillary pressure and is dependent on pore size.
The physical significance of threshold pressure in an oil reservoir may be appreciated by
the analogy with a capillary rise of water in different vertical glass tubes suspended in an open
tray of water, as seen in Fig. 6.12. Since P
c
∝ 1/r it is observed that entry of the non-wetting
phase should be most difficult in the smallest tube (highest threshold pressure). For a water-air
system, the following relation exist,
P
c
= gρ
w
h, ⇒ P
c(3)
> P
c(2)
> P
c(1)
where r
3
< r
2
< r
1
.
The threshold capillary pressure, found in reservoir is proportional to the height above the
free water level (FWL), where a 100% water saturation is found.
The FWL is a property of the reservoir system, while an oil-water contact observed in a
particular well will depend on the threshold pressure of the rock type present in the vicinity of
the well.
6.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs 99
h
1
h
3
h
2
Figure 6.12: Capillary water elevation in cylindrical tubes as func-
tion of tube radii.
The relation between height above the free water level and the capillary pressure is derived
from consideration of the gravity-capillary pressure force equilibrium. Using a free water level
as the datum plane and defining its position in the reservoir as the place where the oil phase
pressure p
o
equals the water phase pressure p
w
, one obtains,
P
c(FWL)
= p
o
−p
w
= 0.
At some height h, above FWL, the pressures are,
p
o
= p
FWL
−ρ
o
gh
p
w
= p
FWL
−ρ
w
gh
Therefore, the capillary pressure at a depth equivalent toh above the FWL is,
P
c
= p
o
−p
w
= (p
FWL
−ρ
o
gh) −(p
FWL
−ρ
w
gh) = gh(ρ
w
−ρ
o
)
Since P
c
= P
c
(S
w
, r) there exist a dependence,
h = h(S
w
, r),
which indicated that saturation at height h, will depend on both the water saturation and the
pore radius (see example: "Equilibrium in a capillary channel"),
h
S
w
=

ow
cosθ
c
rg(ρ
w
−ρ
o
)
.
Similarly, the threshold height h
t
is equivalent to the height of an observed water-oil contact
above FWL. In a particular rock type, this height is given,
h
t
=
P
ct
g(ρ
w
−ρ
o
)
.
In real reservoir systems it is expected that a number of rock type units or layers will
be encountered. Each unit can have its own capillary pressure characteristic and the static
saturation distribution in the reservoir will be a superposition of all units, as seen in Fig. 6.13.
100 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
FWL
OWC
OWC
OWC
OWC
Well
k
1
k > k > k > k
1 4 3 2
k
2
k
3
k
4
Figure 6.13: Observed water-oil contacts and their relationship with
free water level (FWL) in a layered reservoir with a
common aquifer [8].
Example: Equilibrium in a capillary tube
In this example, the relation between elevation of water above FWL in reservoirs
is coupled to the pore dimension (pore radius).
Equilibrium in a vertical water wet capillary tube, as shown in Fig. 6.14, is
related to the saturation of water in a reservoir, where oil is the non-wetting fluid.
For a small perturbation ∆h, a small part of the tube surface will experience
a change in fluid coverage, when oil is replacing water as being the contact fluid.
The change in surface energy, caused by oil displacing water in a small fraction of
the capillary tube (see close up in Fig. 6.14), is given by the difference in surface
tension (or surface energy),
∆E
s
= 2πr(σ
os
−σ
ws
)∆h.
Water
w
Oil
o
∆h
h
r
Figure 6.14: Perturbation around equilibrium in a water-wet capil-
lary tube.
6.9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure 101
The corresponding potential energy change, due to change in elevation is writ-
ten,
∆E
p
= πr
2
∆h(ρ
w
−ρ
o
)gh.
If small perturbations close to equilibrium are considered, the surface- and
the potential energy changes is expected to be equal, i.e. ∆E
s
= ∆E
p
. Using the
Young- Dupre equation, the following relation is given,
σ
ow
cosθ =
g
2

w
−ρ
o
)rh.
In a oil reservoir where the fluids are well defined , i.e. where the densities
and the oil- water interfacial tension are known parameters, the pore radiusr and
the height above FWLh are reciprocal variables. This means that the saturation of
initial water present in the reservoir above a certain height h is localised in those
pores having a radii less than r.
From the above consideration, the capillary pressure has a "dual" characteris-
tic,
P
c
= g(ρ
w
−ρ
o
)h =

ow
cosθ
r
,
where the capillary pressure is the pressure difference between oil- and water
phase at a certain elevation h in the reservoir, and at the same time, the pressure
difference across a curved surface in inside a pore channel of radiusr. This dual
characteristic of the capillary pressure gives the condition for the coexistence of
oil and water in porous rock.
.
6.9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure
Laboratory measurements of capillary pressure are based on the fact thatP
c
∝σ cos θ/r, where
r characterizes the porous medium with respect to the pore throats and the pore size distribu-
tion . This implies that for any given porous medium and any pairs of fluids, the following
relationship is valid,
P
c1
(σ cos θ
c
)
1
=
P
c2
(σ cosθ
c
)
2
.
Practical use is made of this relationship in conducting laboratory tests with fluids other
than reservoir condition fluids. For example, air and brine with a (σ cos θ
c
)
lab
value of 72
dynes/cm may be used to measure capillary pressure for air- brine in the laboratory. The
relationship for the reservoir oil-brine pair capillary pressure is obtained using the appropriate
value of (σ cos θ
c
)
res
=26 dynes/cm, where,
P
c,res
= P
c,lab
(σ cosθ
c
)
res
(σ cosθ
c
)
lab
.
102 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
The migration of hydrocarbons into an initially water filled reservoir rock and subsequent
equilibrium vertical saturation distribution is modelled in the laboratory by a non-wetting phase
displacing a wetting phase (drainage capillary pressure test). Air and brine are frequently used
as the pseudo reservoir fluids, and the displacement is affected by increasing air pressure in
a series of discrete steps in water saturated core plugs sitting on a semi-permeable porous
diaphragm. As a result of an increase in pressure (equivalent to P
c
since P
c
= p
air
− p
brine
)
the water saturation decreases and its value is established by weighting the core plugs. The
apparatus layout is shown in Fig. 6.15.
Core plug
Capillary
contact
powder
Neoprene
diaphragm
Screen
Porous
plate
Air
pressure
Figure 6.15: Gas-liquid drainage capillary pressure measurement.
Portion of liquid in saturated core is displaced at a par-
ticular pressure level by either gas or liquid. Liquid sat-
uration measured after equilibrium saturation has been
reached. Repetition for several successive pressure lev-
els [8].
In laboratory tests the final irreducible wetting phase saturation value is often beyond the
breakdown pressure of the porous plate and is sometimes obtained by centrifuge spinning at
a rotational force equivalent to about 150 psi (10.34 bar), and measuring the quantity of any
produced wetting phase.
The pore size distribution in a given rock type is usually determined by a mercury injection
test. Although this test is destructive, in the sense that the sample cannot be used again, it has
the advantage that high pressures can be attained, where mercury, the non-wetting phase with
respect to air, can be forced into very small pores.
Example: Height of water - oil transition zone.
A laboratory air-brine capillary pressure of 1.25 bar has been measured in a reser-
voir core sample at residual water saturation. The air-brine interfacial tension is
0.070 N/m and the brine-oil interfacial tension for the reservoir fluids is 0.022
N/m.
The height of the water-oil transition zone is the height from FWL and up to
the point in the reservoir where connate water saturation is reached,
6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. 103
h
res
=
P
c,res
g(ρ
brine
−ρ
oil
)
,
where P
c,res
is the capillary pressure in the reservoir at this water saturation. ρ
brine
and ρ
oil
is respectively 1074 kg/m
3
and 752 kg/m
3
.
In the case of identical wetting preferences for the core sample and the reser-
voir, one may assume proportionality between capillary pressure and the interfa-
cial tension in the two situations,
P
c,res
= P
c,lab
σ
res
σ
lab
.
Combining these two equation, the height of the transition zone is found,
h
res
=
σ
res
σ
lab
P
c,lab
g(ρ
brine
−ρ
oil
)
,
which gives, h
res
= 12.5 m.
.
6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes.
When two or more fluids flow through a porous medium simultaneously, the phase pressures
p
i
, generally speaking, are not identical. The difference between the phase pressures of two
coexisting phases is defined as the capillary pressure. The capillary pressure is inversely pro-
portional to a generalised interfacial curvature, which is usually dominated by the smallest
local curvature (radius) of the interface, as illustrated in Fig. 6.16.
r
R
oil
water
rock
Figure 6.16: Local curvature of the interface of two coexisting liq-
uids.
An idealised permeable medium is considered by the arrangements of decreasing pore sizes
(a single pore bounded by the decreasing sizes sphere assemblage) and initially saturated with
a wetting phase (w) into which a non-wetting phase (nw) is alternatively injected and then
104 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
withdrawn. The forcing of a non-wetting phase into a pore (non-wetting saturation increasing)
is a drainage process. The reverse (wetting saturation increasing) is animbibition process. We
imagine the pores have an exit for the wetting fluid somewhere on the right.
Beginning at zero non-wetting saturation, injection up to the saturation shown incondition
1 in Fig. 6.17, is first considered. At static conditions, the pressure difference between the exit
and entrance of the assemblage is the capillary pressure at that saturation. When the wetting
fluid is introduced into the pore from the right, the non-wetting fluid disconnects leaving a
trapped or non-flowing glob in the largest pore (condition 2).
The capillary pressure curve from condition 1 to condition 2 is an imbibition curve that is
different from the drainage curve because it terminates (P
c
= 0) at a different saturation. At the
static condition 2, the entrance - exit pressure difference is zero since both pressures are being
measured in the same wetting phase.
1
3 4
5
6
Oil
Water
Rock
5
1
2 4 6
3
C
a
p
i
l
l
a
r
y
p
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
Non-wetting phase saturation
2
Figure 6.17: The distribution of a non-wetting phase at various satu-
rations.
Going from condition 2 to condition 3 is a second drainage process, that results in even
higher non-wetting saturation, a higher capillary pressure, and a higher trapped non-wetting
phase saturation after imbibition (condition). At the highest capillary pressure (condition 5), all
pores of the subtracted volume contain the non- wetting phase, and a post - imbibition trapped
saturation is maximum. The capillary pressure curve going from the largest non-wetting phase
saturation to the largest trapped non-wetting phase saturation is the imbibition curve (condition
6). Note, that the termination of any imbibition curve is at zero capillary pressure.
This representation, being quite simple, explains many features of actual capillary pres-
sure curves. Imbibition curves are generally different from drainage curves, but the difference
shrinks at high non-wetting phase saturations where more of the originally disconnected globs
6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. 105
are connected. This phenomenon is called trapping hysteresis or drag hysteresis and is caused
by differences in advancing and receding contact angles.
6.10.1 Hysterisis in Contact Angle
When oil is moving to cover a rock surface which previously has been wetted by water, it
has been experimental proven that the contact angle is smaller than in the case when water is
replacing oil, over the same surface.
This effect is called the hysterisis in contact angle and has to do with the inherent memory
of a physical system, which relates prehistoric events to present experience. In practical terms
this means that the back and forth movement is energy dependent, typical for non-reversible
systems.
The hysterisis is detected by measuring the advancingθ
a
, and residing θ
r
contact angles of
an oil drop suspended between two horizontal plates (made of polished rock material; quartz
or calcite) submerged in water, as shown in Fig. 6.18. One plate is fixed and the other can
move smoothly to either side. The oil drop is left to age between the plates for some time, until
the two contact angles are equal. When the mobile plate is moved, the two contact angles are
measured. The test is repeated after some time, when the two angles have stabilised.
s
oil
water
θ
r
θ
a
Figure 6.18: Measurement of hysterics in contact angle.
The hysterics observed, where the receding angle is smaller than the advancing angle, is
an expression of the fact that energy is lost in cyclic systems. In relation to multiphase flow in
porous media, the hysterics has two important effects:
• One is to stabilise the capillary surfaces (interfaces) between the fluids in the pore system,
such as to preserve the fluid distribution in the reservoir, unless a finite capillary pressure
difference is imposed.
• The second effect is related to the dissipation of energy towards the capillary walls, when
the interface is advancing through the pore. The effect of this dissipation of energy is
experienced as a resistance towards flow and is often materialised through "rip off" of
small droplets, which then becomes practically immobile.
6.10.2 Capillary Hysterisis
It is seen that capillary pressure depends both on wetting phase saturation and the direction of
its variation. A typical curve of the capillary pressure in case of two-phase flow, is shown in
the Fig. 6.19.
106 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
P
cb
P
(
S
)
c
w
S
nc
S
w
S
wc
1.0 0.0
1
2
3
Figure 6.19: Typical type of capillary pressure curve for a two-phase
flow problem: 1 drainage, 2 imbibition and 3 secondary
drainage.
Two ways in which one phase can be substituted by the other in a porous medium are usu-
ally considered. The first is the process of displacement where the wetting phase is displaced
by the non-wetting one, and the second is the process of imbibition, where the non-wetting
phase is displaced by the wetting one. The value P
cb
is defined as threshold capillary pressure
which should be exceeded to provide displacement. If displacement is preceded by imbibition
the capillary pressure curve is as the curve 3 in the Fig. 6.19, which is different from the curve
1. The presence of two different curves of imbibition and displacement is called capillary hys-
teresis. The presence of the negative capillary pressure near the saturation pointS
w
= S
nc
was
first discovered by Welge (1949). The hysteresis effect i demonstrated by the two curves 2 and
3 in Fig. 6.19.
6.11 Exercises 107
6.11 Exercises
1. Calculate the energy needed to transform 1 cm
3
of water into droplets with an average
radius of 1 µm. In analogy with displacement processes in porous media, assume an
interfacial tension σ
o,w
= 0.025 N/m.
2. Show that the general expression for capillary pressure
P
c
= σ

1
R
1
+
1
R
2

,
could be written
P
c
=
2σ cos θ
r
,
for a cylindrical tube. Define the parameters; r, R
1,2
, θ and σ.
3. A capillary glass-cylinder is positioned vertically in a cup of water. Calculate the height
of water inside the cylinder when the inner diameter is 0.1 cm. The surface tension
between water and air is 72 dyn/cm, and the water is assumed to wet the glass 100 %.
4. In order to displace water by air form a porous plate, a pressure of 25 psig is needed.
Find the diameter, given in µm, of the largest pore channel disconnecting the porous
plate, when the surface tension σ
air,w
is 72 dyn/cm.
5. A horizontal cylinder, filled with oil, is 0.1m long and has a inner diameter of 0.01 mm.
The oil has a viscosity similar to water, 1 mPa s. What is the pressure drop along the
cylinder, when the average flow velocity is found to be 0.01mm/s ?
An equal amount of water and oil is pumped through the cylinder and the water and oil
is assumed to move through the tube as droplets, with an average length of 0.03mm pr.
droplet. The advancing contact angle is 40
o
and the receding angle is 20
o
. Calculate the
pressure drop through the tube, assuming the same flowvelocity as above. The interfacial
tension between water and oil is 25 mN/m.
6. A core sample is placed in a core holder in a centrifuge. The radial distance to the
core sample is given by the two position vectors r
1
and r
2
. The length of the sample is
therefore; r
2
−r
1
. At a rotation frequency ω, air will displace some of the water in the
sample. The radial distance r
d
, corresponds to the threshold pressureP
d
at that particular
rotation frequency. See the figure below.
a) Show that the pressure difference for one phase is given by:
P
2
−P
1
=
1
2
ρω
2
(r
2
2
−r
2
1
), when P
2
= P(r
2
), P
1
= P(r
1
)
b) Show that
P
c
(r) =
1
2
∆ρω
2
(r
2
2
−r
2
)
108 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
ω
r
S
w
r
1
r
2
r
d
1.0
0.0
when its known that
P
c1
= P
c
(r
1
) =
1
2
∆ρω
2
(r
2
2
−r
2
1
)
and when
P
d
=
1
2
∆ρω
2
(r
2
2
−r
2
d
)
It is assumed that P
c2
= P
c
(r
2
) = 0.
c) The water saturation can be written,
S
w1
= S
w
(r
1
) =
d(
¯
S
w
P
c1
)
dP
c1
when r
1
∼r
2
, assuming the length of core sample to be short compared to the radius
of rotation. (This is an approximation, only partly true.)
Use the equations above to derive the a formula giving the capillary pressure as
function of the water saturation (P
c
–curve), when the capillary pressure is given in
kPa.
The following data is given for a core sample, saturated with sea-water and rotated
in air.
r
1
= 4.46 cm
r
2
= 9.38 cm
∆ρ = 1.09 g/cm
3
V
p
= 8.23 cm
3
RPM

415 765 850 915 1005 1110 1305
∆V[cm
3
] 0.00 0.00 0.10 0.15 0.30 0.50 1.10
RPM 1550 1835 2200 2655 3135 3920 4850
∆V[cm
3
] 2.20 2.90 3.61 4.21 4.72 5.24 5.75
RPM

: Rotation pr. Minute and ∆V: produced volume.
6.11 Exercises 109
7. In the laboratory, a capillary pressure difference of 5 psi has been measured between
water and air in a core sample. Calculate the corresponding height above the OWC in
the reservoir from where the core originates, when the following information is given
(assume capillary pressure at the OWC to be zero).
Laboratory Reservoir
σ = 75dyn/cm σ = 25dyn/cm
∆ρ
w/air
= 1.0g/cm
3
∆ρ
o/w
= 0.2g/cm
3
8. In a laboratory experiment, capillary data from two water saturated core samples was
obtained by using air as the displacing fluid.
1000 mD core sample 200 mD core sample
P
c
[psi] S
w
P
c
[psi] S
w
1.0 1.00 3.0 1.00
1.5 0.80 3.6 0.90
1.8 0.40 4.0 0.60
2.2 0.20 4.5 0.30
3.0 0.13 5.5 0.20
4.0 0.12 7.0 0.18
5.0 0.12 10.0 0.18
Calculate the distribution of vertical water saturation in the stratified reservoir given by
the figure below, i.e. determine S
w
as function hight in the reservoir.
12 ft
4 ft
6 ft
3 ft
4 ft
5 ft
FWL
Additional data:
Laboratory: σ
w/air
= 50dyn/cm
Reservoir: σ
o/w
= 23dyn/cm
ρ
o
= 0.81g/cm
3
ρ
w
= 1.01g/cm
3
9. Use the air - water capillary pressure curve for laboratory conditions, below, to calculate
the saturations; S
o
, S
g
and S
w
at the reservoir level (hight) 120 f t above the oil-water
contact (assume P
c
= 0 at this level). The distance between the contacts (OWC and
GOC) is 70 f t.
Additional data:
110 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure
Laboratory: σ
w/air
= 72dyn/cm
Reservoir: σ
o/g
= 50dyn/cm
σ
w/o
= 25dyn/cm
ρ
o
= 53lb/ f t
3
ρ
w
= 68lb/ f t
3
ρ
g
= 7lb/ f t
3
20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
Water saturation [%]
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
C
a
p
i
l
l
a
r
y

p
r
e
s
s
u
r
e

[
p
s
i
]

10. An oil water capillary pressure experiment on a core sample gives the following results:
P
c,o/w
[psi] 0 4.4 5.3 5.6 10.5 15.7 35.0
S
w
[%] 100 100 90.1 82.4 43.7 32.2 29.8
Given that the sample was taken from a point 100 ft above the oil-water contact, what
is the expected water saturation at that elevation? If the hydrocarbon bearing thickness
from the crest (top) of the structure to the oil-water contact in 175 ft, what is the average
water saturation over this interval? (ρ
w
= 64lbs/ f t
3
and ρ
o
= 45lbs/ f t
3
)
11. If we assume an interfacial tension; σ cosθ = 25 dyn/cm and a permeability and porosity
respectively 100 mD and 18 %, in the exercise above, we may construct the capillary
curve for a laboratory experiment using mercury as non-wetting phase. In the laboratory
experiments one assume the lithology to be unchanged, but the permeability and porosity
to be respectively 25 mD and 13 %. Find laboratory capillary curve when the interfacial
tension to mercury is 370 dyne/cm.
Answers to questions:
1. ∆E = 0.075J, 3. h = 3cm, 4. d = 0.5µm, 5. ∆p = 3.2mbar, ∆p = 29bar, 7. h = 5.8m, 9.
S
o
= 0.2, S
g
= 0.62 , S
w
= 0.36, 11. S
w
= 0.41.
Chapter 7
Relative Permeability
7.1 Definitions
Relative permeability is a concept used to relate the absolute permeability (100% saturation
with a single fluid) of a porous system, to the effective permeability of a particular fluid in the
system, when that fluid occupies only a fraction of the total pore volume.
When measuring a flow-rate of a fluid versus the pressure difference in a core sample, we
can obtain (single phase flow),
q =
k
e
A
µ
´p
´x
,
and
k
e
=
q
A
µ´x
´p
.
Here k
e
is called effective permeability. For 100% saturation, the effective permeability is
identical to the absolute permeability; i.e. k
e
= k.
In multiphase flow a generalisation of Darcy law has been accepted [12],
q
j
= k
je
A
µ
j
´p
j
´x
,
where j denotes a fluid phase j, and k
je
is called the effective (phase) permeability.
According to the last equation we can obtain,
k
je
=
q
j
A
µ
j
´x
´p
j
.
In a vast number of laboratory experiments it has been observed that a sum of effective
permeability’s is less than the total or absolute permeability, i.e.,
n

j=1
k
je
< k.
Moreover, effective (phase) permeability was noticed to be a function of quite a number of
parameters, such as: fluid saturation, rock property, absolute permeability, fluid property, and
reservoir conditions (pressure, temperature),
k
je
= f (k, p, T, S
1
, S
2
, . . . , S
n
, . . .) j ∈ [1, n].
111
112 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability
In two phase systems the latter relationship is expressed as functions of a single (by con-
vention, wetting) saturation.
The effective permeability can be decomposed into the absolute permeability and the rela-
tive permeability, as shown below,
k
e j
= k
r j
k.
The relative permeability is a strong function of the saturation of phaseS
j
. Being a rock-
fluid property, the functionality between k
r j
and S
j
is also a function of rock properties (e.g.
pore size distribution) and wettability. It is not, in general, a strong correlation between relative
permeability and fluid properties, though when certain properties (e.g. interfacial tension)
change drastically, relative permeability can be affected [40].
It is important to note that the phase permeability is a tensorial function (as the absolute
permeability) and that the relative permeability is not.
Though there have been attempts to calculate relative permeability on theoretical grounds,
by far the most common source of them, has been experimental measurements. This implicates
that it is important to keep definitions of mobility, phase permeability and relative permeability
separate and clear.
Functions k
j
(S
j
) depend both on the structure of the porous medium and on the saturation
distribution of the phases. However in mathematical modelling of two-phase and multi-phase
flowit is conventional to assume that relative permeabilities are the functions of saturation only.
This assumption considerably simplifies the task of laboratory experiments carried out in order
to determine relative permeabilities.
In the presence of two coexisting phases, the typical curves of relative permeability are as
shown in Fig. 7.1.
S
wc
S
w
S
nc
k
c k
w
1.0
1.0
0.0
0.0
Figure 7.1: Typical type of relative permeability characteristics for a
two-phase flow, where S
w
is the wetting phase and S
n
is
the non-wetting phase.
One important feature in the behaviour of the rel.perm.-curves should be emphasised. If
saturation of one of the phases becomes less than some definite value: S
w
< S
wc
or S
n
< S
nc
,
then the corresponding relative permeability for that phase becomes zero and the phase be-
comes immobile. This means that continuity of the phase is broken or disturbed and the phase
7.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities 113
remains in a passive or loose state. The values S
jc
, j = w, where n
1
are defined as residual
saturation of the i-th phase. Let us note that those values depend on thermodynamic condition
of the reservoir (reservoir pressure, temperature, number of phases, type of rock, etc.).
7.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities
It should be noted that evaluations of phase- and relative permeabilities can be done through
measurements of capillary pressure, which shows the evidence of strong correlation between
them. Because of certain links between them, we would expect micro-heterogeneity and rock
wettability to have a certain influence on relative (phase) permeability. Typical water-oil rela-
tive permeabilities are presented for strongly water-wet and oil-wet formations in Fig. 7.2 (left)
and 7.2 (right), respectively.
0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0.0
Oil
Water
S
w
k
r
0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
1.0
0.8
0.6
0.4
0.2
0.0
Oil
Water
S
w
k
r
Figure 7.2: Characteristics of typical relative permeability for a two-
phase flow, where S
w
is the wetting phase and S
n
is the
non-wetting phase (left: a water-wet formation and right:
an oil-wet formations).
The difference in the flow properties that indicates different wettability preferences can be
illustrated by the following rule of thumb [29]:
1
Here w and n denote wetting and non-wetting phase, respectively.
114 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability
Water-wet Oil-wet
Connate water satura-
tion
Usually greater than
20 to 25 percent PV
Generally less than 15
percent PV, frequently
less than 10 percent
Saturation at which
oil and water per-
meabilities are equal
(crossover saturation)
Greater than 50 per-
cent water saturation
Less than 50 percent
water saturation
Relative permeabili-
ties to water at maxi-
mum water saturation;
i.e. flood-out
Generally less than 30
percent
Greater than 50 per-
cent and approaching
100 percent
Let us note that the endpoint values of the relative permeabilities are usually (if not always)
less than 1 and which are measures of wettability. The non-wetting phase occurs in isolated
globules, several pore diameters in length, that occupy the center of the pores. Trapped wetting
phase, on the other hand, occupies the cavities between rock the grains and coats the rock
surfaces. Thus we would expect the trapped non-wetting phase to be a bigger obstacle to the
wetting phase, then the trapped wetting phase is to the non-wetting phase. The wetting phase
endpoint relative permeability will, therefore, be smaller than the non-wetting phase endpoint.
The ratio of wetting to non-wetting endpoints proves to be a good qualitative measure of the
wettability of the medium. For extreme cases of preferential wetting, the endpoint relative
permeability to the wetting phase can be 0.05 or less. Others view the crossover saturation
(k
r2
= k
r1
), of the relative permeabilities is a more appropriate indicator of wettability, perhaps
because it is less sensitive to the value of the residual saturations (see the rule of thumb, above).
7.3 Drainage/Imbibition Relative Permeability Curves
In a gas-oil systems, the direction of displacement is particularly important, as the process can
represent a drainage process, such as gas drive (gas displacing oil immiscibily) or an imbibition
process, such as:
1. Movement of an oil zone into receding depleting gas cap.
2. Movement of an aquifer into receding depleting gas cap.
In gas-oil systems the third phase, water, which is always present in the reservoir, is consid-
ered to stay at irreducible saturation and play no part in the displacement processes. It is there-
fore argued that experiments in the laboratory can be conducted with or without irreducible
water present and that effective permeabilities could be correlated to total liquid saturation
(S
L
), rather than gas saturation. The relation is based on a definition of liquid saturation,
S
L
= S
o
+S
w
= 1−S
g
.
7.4 Residual Phase Saturations 115
1.0
1.0
0.0
S
gc
S
g
S
gmax
k
ro
k
rg
k
=

k
/

k
r
o
1.0
1.0
0.0
S
gr
S
g
S
gmax
k
ro
k
rg
k
=

k
/

k
r
o
Figure 7.3: Gas-oil relative permeabilities [8].
In a system where gas saturation increases from zero, as in a liquid drainage process, it
is observed that gas does not flow until some critical gas saturation (S
gc
) has been attained.
This is attributed to the physical process of the gas phase becoming continuous through the
system, as a condition for gas flow. In liquid imbibition processes (gas saturation decreasing
from a maximum initial value) the gas permeability goes to zero when the residual or trapped
gas saturation (S
gr
) is reached. See Fig. 7.3.
7.4 Residual Phase Saturations
As we know from the previous discussion, increasing pressure gradients force the non-wetting
phase into the pore channels, causing the wetting phase to retreat into the concave contacts
between the rock grains and other cavities in the pore body. At very high pressure differences,
the wetting phase approaches mono-layer coverage and a low saturation.
The residual non-wetting phase is trapped in the large pores in globules several pore di-
ameters in length. Repeated experimental evidence has shown that under most conditions, the
S
nwr
could be as large as S
wr
.
According to experimental observations there is a strict evidence of a relationship between
residual non-wetting or wetting phase saturations and the so-called local capillary number. This
relationship is called the capillary de-saturation curve (CDC). Typically, these curves are plots
of percent residual (non-flowing) saturation for the non-wetting (S
nwr
) or wetting (S
wr
) phases
on the y axis versus a capillary number on a logarithmic x axis. The capillary number N
c
is a
dimension-less ratio of viscous forces to local capillary forces, and can be variously defined.
One of the examples is shown below (after Dombrovsky and Brownell):
N
c
=
k [ ∇

Φ[
σ
ow
cosθ
c
116 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability
where

Φ is the potential of flow.
10 10 10 10 10 10
-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2
Wetting phase
Normal range
waterfloods
Nonwetting
critical N
c
30
20
10
0
Nonwetting
phase
Wetting
critical N
c
Capillary number N
c
R
e
s
i
d
u
a
l

n
o
n
-
w
e
t
t
i
n
g

o
r
w
e
t
t
i
n
g

s
a
t
u
r
a
t
i
o
n
,

%
Figure 7.4: Schematic capillary de-saturation curve [40].
It is important to mention that chemical additives reduce capillary forces at the interface
of the oil/water system, resulting in increased capillary number N
c
and reduced residual oil
saturation, being either wetting or non-wetting phase. The reduction of interfacial tension at
the interface allows the trapped oil to become mobile and be displaced by the water.
7.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data
Laboratory determination of effective permeability is generally conducted as a special core
analysis test on representative and carefully preserved core plug samples. A reservoir condition
test is conducted at reservoir pore pressure conditions and reservoir temperatures with real
or simulated reservoir fluids. Such reservoir condition tests may model displacement under
unsteady state, or steady state conditions. Different equipment arrangements for those test are
shown in Figs. 7.5 and 7.6.
Unsteady state rel.perm. test simulate the flooding of a reservoir with an immiscible fluid
(gas or water). The determination of rel. perm. is based on observation of the fractional flow
of displacing phase fluid from the outlet end of the core plug and its relationship with satu-
ration. The displacement theory of Buckley and Leverett is combined with that of Weldge in
a technique described by Johnson, Bossler and Naumann [38]. The detection of the break-
through time of the displacing phase at the outlet core face is critical in the representation of
relative permeability, and severe errors can occur with heterogeneous samples. Flow rates are
determined according to the method of Rappoport and Leas in order to minimize the effect
of capillary pressure forces in retaining wetting phase fluid at the outlet end face discontinu-
ity. The unsteady state or dynamic displacement test is most frequently applied in reservoir
analysis of strong wetting preference, and with homogeneous samples.
For reservoirs with more core-scale heterogeneity and with mixed wettability, the steady
state laboratory test is preferred. The steady state process provides simultaneous flow of dis-
placing and displaced fluids through the core sample at a number of equilibrium ratios. At each
7.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data 117
Hg
res.
Ruska
pump
Hg
Brine Oil
Chart
recorder
Oil
colector
Sample
3 way
valve
Brine
colector
Hg
Hg
B
r
i
n
e
Oil
Chart
recorder
0 - 50 psig
Transducer
Oil
colector
Sample
3 way
valve
Brine
colector
Soltrol
O
i
l

S
o
l
t
r
o
l
300
cc
300
cc
1000
cc
Figure 7.5: Unsteady state relative permeability measurement at
constant rate (above) and at constant pressure (below).
ratio from 100% displaced phase to 100% displacing phase an equilibrium condition must be
reached at which the inflow ratio of fluids equals to the outflow ratio, and at which the pressure
difference between inlet and outlet is constant. At such a condition the Darcy law equation is
applied to each phase to calculate effective permeability at the given steady state saturation.
Capillary pressure tends to be ignored and a major difficulty is the determination of saturation
at each stage. Between five and ten stages are usually needed to establish rel.perm. curves.
118 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability
Hg
res.
Hg
Oil
res.
Brine
Oil
Oil
Chart
recorder
Sample
Constant displacement
Ruska pumps
Pressure
transducer
Figure 7.6: Steady state relative permeability measurement [8].
7.6 Exercises
1. Use Darcy’s law for radial flow and show that the fractional flow for water, f
w
, can be
written:
f
w
=
q
w
q
w
+q
o
=
1
1+k
ro
µ
w
/k
rw
µ
o
Assume the capillary forces to be negligible anddP
o
/dr = dP
w
/dr.
The following laboratory data is given:
S
w
k
ro
k
rw
P
lab
c
[psi]
1.00 0.00 1.00 1.0
0.90 0.04 0.78 3.4 ρ
o
= 0.85g/cm
3
0.80 0.14 0.58 3.9 ρ
w
= 1.00g/cm
3
0.70 0.29 0.39 4.5 σ
res.
= 22dyn/cm
0.60 0.49 0.23 5.7 σ
lab
= 75dyn/cm
0.50 0.73 0.09 8.4 µ
o
= 15.0cp
0.40 1.00 0.00 18.0 µ
w
= 1.0cp
0.30 1.00 0.00 ∞
Use critical oil saturation, S
oc
= 0.05 and the data above to construct a graph showing
the water fraction as function of height above the WOC.
What is the water fraction at 15 m above the WOC ?
7.6 Exercises 119
2. The laboratory data below is recorded at stationary conditions, measuring the relative
permeability for a oil-water injection experiment.
q
o
[cm
3
/time] q
w
[cm
3
/time] ∆P [psi] V
w
[cm
3
]
90 0 49.25 2.17
75 5 91.29 2.87
60 9 109.52 3.63
45 20 123.30 4.65
30 34 137.05 5.93
15 85 164.30 7.95
0 122 147.00 9.86
V
w
is the volume of water in the core sample, determined by weighing. q
o
and q
w
is the
oil- and water rate through the sample, respectively. ∆P is the pressure drop.
Additional data is given:
Absolute permeability 16.7 mD length of core sample 9 cm
Diameter of core sample 3.2 cm Oil viscosity 2.0 cp
Water viscosity 1.1 cp Porosity 0.20
1 atm. equals 14.65 psi
Draw the rel.perm. curves for k
ro
and k
rw
using the data above.
Answers to questions:
1. 25%
120 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability
Chapter 8
Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and
Fluids
8.1 Introduction
Compressibility is a universal phenomenon, of significant importance where all substances are
compressible, some more compressible than others. Compressibility is therefore an important
"drive mechanism" in underground petroleum production.
Oil and gas are naturally existing hydrocarbon (HC) mixtures, quite complex in chemical
composition which exist at elevated temperatures and pressures in the reservoir. When pro-
duced to the surface, the temperature and pressure of the mixture are reduced, where the state
of the HC mixture at the surface depends upon the composition of the HC fluid found in the
reservoir. The fluid remaining in the reservoir at any stage of depletion undergoes physical
changes as the pressure is reduced due to removal of quantities of oil, gas and initial water
from the reservoir.
It is necessary to study the physical properties of these naturally existing HC and in partic-
ular, their variation with pressure and temperature, in order to fully understand and control the
production process. This information is important in estimating the performance of the fluids
in the reservoir.
Compressibility, as physical phenomenon, plays a key role in general underground petroleum
production. Nearly all production of oil, gas and formation water is related to volume expan-
sion when the reservoir pressure decreases due to removeal of reservoir fluids.
8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases
For a mixture of HC it is quite obvious that pressure and temperature are essential parameters.
The state of equilibrium is defined by these two parameters and consequently also the phase
behaviour of the fluid, i.e. the fractional volume of oil and gas.
In the case of formation rock and the saturation of fluids contained therein, pore volume
and fluid changes due to the pressure decline is the dominating phenomenon, responsabile for
reservoir fluid production, since the reservoir temperature changes slightly or remain constant
in most cases. Volumes of reservoir fluid brought to the surface will experience change in both
121
122 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
pressure and temperature, i.e. the final state of oil and gas is characterised by volume changes
due to both drop in pressure and in temperature.
The general behaviour of materials can be described by the compressibility and expansion
terms;
c = −
1
V

∂V
∂ p

T
, (8.1)
β =
1
V

∂V
∂T

p
, (8.2)
where c is the isothermal compressibility, c ≥0 and β is the isobaric thermal expansion, β ≥0.
In practice, it is normal to use an average compressibility factor of the different HC com-
ponents. In relation to reservoir production, it is common practise to distinguish between the
following definitions of compressibility:
• Rock matrix compressibility; c
r
.
• Rock bulk compressibility; c
b
.
• Liquid compressibility (oil or initial water); c
o
and c
w
.
• Gas compressibility; c
g
.
8.2.1 Rock Stresses and Compressibility
When rocks are subjected to external load or force, internal stresses are developed and if the
stresses are sufficiently strong, deformation such as volume and shape changes of the rock will
be the result. The stresses on any plane surface through a rock sample under in situ. conditions
are composed of a normal stress vector (perpendicular to the plane) and two shear stresses,
parallel to the plane surface. The general stress condition may be characterised by a stress
tensor, with nine components as shown in Fig. 8.1. The stress tensor is often written in matrix
form;

¸
σ
x
τ
xy
τ
xz
τ
yx
σ
y
τ
yz
τ
zx
τ
zy
σ
z
¸

Due to the general conditions of equilibrium, the stress tensor will be symmetric around
the diagonal, which means that τ
xy
= τ
yx
and so on. There are thus only six independent stress
components in the stress tensor:
3 normal stresses: σ
x
, σ
y
and σ
z
and
3 tangential (shear stresses): τ
xy
, τ
yz
, τ
zx
.
Underground gas and oil reservoirs experience stresses due to the overload of rock material
and water and the lateral confinement stresses exerted on the reservoir from the surrounding
rock masses, see Fig. 8.2. It is possible to show that there exist one set of ortogonal axis with
8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases 123
σ
z
σ
y
σ
x
τ
zy
τ
zy
τ
zx
τ
zx
τ
xy
τ
xy
z
x
y
Figure 8.1: Stress conditions of formation rock media.
σ
z
σ
y
σ
x
Figure 8.2: Principal stresses on reservoir rock..
respect to which all shear stresses are zero and the normal stresses have their extreme values.
These stresses are called the principal stresses
For most reservoirs, the principal normal stresses are orientated as shown in Fig. 8.2, where
the major principle stress σ
z
is acting parallel to the force of gravity, while the two lateral
stresses σ
x
and σ
y
are acting in the horizontal plane, e.g. σ
z
> σ
x
, σ
y
.
The average normal stress is generally defined by,
σ =
1
3

x

y

z
). (8.3)
The collective action of the principal stresses will cause the rock material to deform. The
relative longitudinal deformation is given by theprincipal strain,
ε
i
=
∆l
i
l
i
=
l
i
−l
/
i
l
i
, where i = x, y, z, (8.4)
where l
i
is the initial length of the rock in the i’th direction, l
/
is the length after deformation.
The sum of principal strains will give the relative volume change∆ε = (ε
x

y

z
), where
ε
V
=∆V/V. (In case of non-zero shear stresses, a displacement or rotation of the rock may be
experienced.)
The stress - strain relationship is dependent on several parameters of which the following
are the most important; the composition and lithology of the rocks, the degree of cementation
of the rock material, the type of cementing material, the compressibility of the rock matrix, the
porosity of the rock material and the pressure and temperature in the reservoir.
124 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
In the following, the rock will be assumed to be isotropic, which means equal properties
in all directions. For simplicity, it is also assumed that the stresses are refered to the principal
stress directions.
Within the elastic limit of volume deformation of any rock material, Hooke’s law states
that there exist a proportionality between stress, σ and strain, ε, where σ
1
, σ
2
and σ
3
are the
principar stress directions.
σ
1
= Eε
1
, (8.5)
where E is the Young’s modulus of elasticity and the subscript indicate change in stress and
strain in the same direction and where the stresses normal to this direction are constant.
If a cylindrical rock sample is subjected to a compressive stress, σ
1
, parallel to its long
axis, it will shorten, ε
1
and the diameter will increase. The ratio of transverse strain to the axial
strain is expressed by the Poisson ratio ν. If the transverse strain is defined by ε
2
and ε
3
, then
the transverse deformation is given,
ν =
ε
2
ε
1
=
ε
3
ε
1
, (8.6)
where ε
1
is the principal strain direction.
The significance of Poisson’s ratio, coupling axial and transverse strain, indicates that de-
formation along one principal axis is caused by a combination of all three principal stresses.
This observation is presented in Hooke’s law in three dimensions:

x
= σ
x
−ν(σ
y

z
), (8.7)

y
= σ
y
−ν(σ
x

z
), (8.8)

z
= σ
z
−ν(σ
x

y
). (8.9)
In writing Hooke’s law this way, the strains are reddered to the condition of zero stresses.
It is often convenient to write Hooke’s law in changes of stresses, ∆σ
x
etc. In that case srain
are refered to the initial conditions.
The total deformation due to all three principal stresses acting on the rock material is given
by ∆V = (ε
x

y

z
)V. Using Hooke’s law, Eqs. (8.7) to (8.9), the relative volume change is
given,
∆V
V
=
3σ(1−2ν)
E
(8.10)
Relative volume deformation of the rock is also described by the compressibility Eq. (8.1)
on differential from,
∆V
V
= c
r
∆σ. (8.11)
In introducing c
r
, one assumes that the rock is completely solid with no pores or cracks
within it.
Combining equation Eq. (8.10) and Eq. (8.11) proves that the compressibility and the elas-
ticity are "two sides of the same case",
8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases 125
c
r
=
3(1−2ν)
E
, (8.12)
where also the elastic constants E and ν, refer to the solid rock material.
In Eq.(8.12) the important relation between the compressibility and the elastic properties
of the rock material is established. Under the assumption that the deformation of the rock is
within the range of the elasticity (see Fig. 8.3), compressibility is constant, i.e.
dV
V
=−c
r
dσ, (8.13)
according to Eq.(8.1) the deformed volumeV is equal to,
V =V
0
e
−c
r
(σ−σ
0
)
·V
0
[1−c
r
(σ −σ
0
)]. (8.14)
The approximation is valid when c
r
∆σ is small, i.e. c
r
(σ −σ
0
) <1.
V
p p
0
V
0
0
Within the range
of elasticity
Figure 8.3: Deformation of rock bulk volume under conditions of
elastic behaviour (constant compressibility factor).
The dimension of compressibility c
r
is reciprocal pressure, as follows from Eq.(8.1) or
(8.14), i.e.
[c
r
] = [σ]
−1
For normal reservoir rock like quarts, the compressibility is;c
quarts
∼2.5 10
−6
bar
−1
.
8.2.2 Compressibility of Liquids
Deformation of liquids can be explained, following the same chain of arguments as seen for
solid (rock) material. Within the elastic limit of the liquid, one can expect the compressibility
to be constant and in accordance to Eq.(8.1) and in analogy with Eq.(8.14),
V
l
=V
l
0
e
−c
l
(p−p
0
)
·V
l
0
[1−c
l
(p−p
0
)], (8.15)
126 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
where the last approximation is valid whenc
l
(p−p
o
) <1.
Various liquids may behave quite differently depending on the composition of that liquid.
Water is not particularly compressible and has a compressibility factorc
w
∼ 4.6 10
−5
bar
−1
.
Oil, on the other hand, may have a varying compressibility factor, depending on the compo-
sition of oil, i.e. the mixture of light and heavy HC and the amount of gas contained in the
oil.
Black oils may have a compressibility ∼25 10
−5
bar
−1
, while light oils can have substan-
tially higher compressibility, depending on the content of the solution gas.
8.2.3 Compressibility of Gases
Experience tells us that gases are very compressible. Gas compressibility can be defined
equally to solids and liquids, using the definition in Eq.(8.1), in an attempt to consistently
describe the nature of compressibility as a universal characteristic, also valid for gases.
In the case of a perfect gas,
pV = nRT, (8.16)
where
p: absolute pressure of the gas phase,
V: volume which it occupies,
T: absolute temperature of gas,
n: number of moles of gas equal to its mass divided
by its gaseous molecular weight and
R: the gas constant.
Combining Eqs.(8.1) and (8.16) one obtain,
c
g
=−
1
V
∂V
∂ p
=
1
p
. (8.17)
Form this deduction it must be conclude that compressibility of gases is notconstant, but
varies as the reciprocal pressure (under the assumption of constant temperature).
Example: Compressibility of real gas
The real gas law is,
pV = znRT,
where z is the deviation factor, expressing the non-ideal deviation from perfect gas
behaviour.
Since compressibility describes the volume deformation, we may assume the
volume to be a function of pressure, temperature and a non-ideal factor, i.e. V =
V(p, T, z).
Differentiation of the volum function,
dV =
∂V
∂ p
dp+
∂V
∂T
dT +
∂V
∂z
dz,
= −
V
p
dp+
V
T
dT +
V
z
dz.
8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases 127
At reservoir condition, T is constant and consequently,

1
V
dV
dp
=
1
p

1
z
dz
dp
.
Compressibility for real gases in the reservoir is then given by,
c
g
=
1
p

1
z
dz
dp
.
The deviaton factor z, is a non-trivial function of pressure and temperature.
The z-factor is usually expressed as a function of the so-called pseudo reduced
pressure p
pr
and pseudo reduced temperature T
pr
, as seen in Fig. 8.4, i.e.
z = z(p
pr
, T
pr
),
where pseudo reduced pressure and temperature are defined as,
p
pr
=
p
p
pc
, T
pr
=
T
T
pc
,
where p
pc
and T
pc
are pseudo critical pressure and pseudo critical temperature,
respectively.
Z
p
pr
1.0
0
T
pr
n
T
pr
T
pr
1
Figure 8.4: z-factor as a function of pseudo reduced pressurep
pr
and
temperature T
pr
.
Critical pressure and temperature for a mixture of m numbers of HC compo-
nents are defined,
p
pc
=
m

i
n
i
p
ci
, T
pc
=
m

i
n
i
T
ci
,
where p
ci
and T
ci
are critical pressure and temperature of the different HC compo-
nents and n
i
is the volume fraction or the mole fraction of each component given
by Avogadro’s law.
.
128 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
8.3 Deformation of Porous Rock
The elastic deformation or compressibility of porous rock is complicated by the fact that it is
subjected to an external confining stressσ, and in addition to an internal pore pressure p, acting
on the surface of the pore walls. The total external stress acting on the porous rock is partly
counterbalanced by the pore presssure and the forces acting through the rock matrix. This is
depicted in Fig. 8.5, where the total stress will be the pressure acting on the outer surface, while
the pore pressure and the forces acting through the rock matrix are the counteracting pressures
[62].
p
p
σ
σ
σ
Figure 8.5: Stresses working on a porous rock.
Experience in rock and soil mechanics has shown that the deformation of porous and pre-
meable materials depend on the effective stress which is the difference between the applied
total stress and the pore pressure. Effective stress was originally introduced by Terzaghi and is
defined as,
σ
/
= σ −p, (8.18)
later the defineition of effective stress has been generalized to,
σ
/
= σ −αp,
where the constant α, often called the Biot constant is a number equal or less than one,α ≤1.
For most reservoir rocks α will become close to one and may be neglected. It should be
noted however that the consept of effective stress does not follow from strictly theoretical
considerations, but must be regarded as a close approximation. For porous rocks, the stresses
in Hooke’s law should be replaced by effective stresses.
When a reservoir is produced the reservoir pressure will in most cases be reduced. The
overburden load will however remain more or less constant and thus the vertical effective
stress will increase, causing compaction of the reservoir rock. The horizontal stresses may
also change with pore pressure and the development of complete stress conditions may be
difficult to determine.
For reservoir engineering, it is first of all the volumetric behaviour that is important. The
volumetric changes are given by the average applied stress and one will therefore for simplicity
in the following assume a hydrostatic applied stress field on the porous rock.
8.3 Deformation of Porous Rock 129
Variation of the effective stress on the rock due to withdrawal of reservoir fluid (oil, gas or
initial water) will cause deformation in the bulk volumeV
b
, as well as deformation in the pore
volume V
p
. Generally, both the external stress σ and the pore pressure p may provoke changes
in the bulk or/and pore volume. The bulk and pore volume are therefore defined as function of
both external stress and pore pressure, i.e.
V
b
= V
b
(σ, p),
V
p
= V
p
(σ, p). (8.19)
Differentiation of Eqs. (8.19) gives the relative volume change,
dV
b
V
b
=
1
V
b

∂V
b
∂σ

dσ +
1
V
b

∂V
b
∂ p

dp,
dV
p
V
p
=
1
V
p

∂V
p
∂σ

dσ +
1
V
p

∂V
p
∂ p

dp. (8.20)
Using Eq. (8.1) the definition of isothermal compressibility, a set of four compressibilities
may be defined and Eq. (8.20) is written,
dV
b
V
b
= −c

dσ +c
bp
dp,
dV
p
V
p
= −c

dσ +c
pp
dp, (8.21)
where the "minus" sign demonstrates the fact that when σ increases, both the bulk and pore
volume will decrease, while when p increases, then the bulk and pore volume will increase.
The four compressibilites defined in Eqs. (8.21) are all not independent and through elastic
theory it is possible to resolve the relation between them. The purpose of this process is to
express the pore compressibility as function of the compressibilities of bulk volume and rock
material, c
p
= c
p
(c
b
, c
r
).
8.3.1 Compressibility Measurements.
If a porous rock sample is brought to the laboratory and the external stressσ, on the sample
is increase while the pore pressure is kept constant dp = 0, as seen in Fig. 8.6, left, Eqs. (8.21)
gives,
dV
b
V
b
=−c

dσ, (8.22)
Since c

depends on the elastic moduli of the matrix rock material and the geometry of
the pore space, it must in general be considered to be an independent parameter, characterised
as the bulk compressibility, i.e. c

= c
b
.
If, on the other hand, the rock sample is exposed to an external stress equal to the internal
pressure, such that dσ = dp, see Fig. 8.6, right, then Eqs. (8.21) is written,
130 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
σ σ = p
dp = 0
Figure 8.6: Stresses working on a porous rock.
dV
b
V
b
= (−c
b
+c
bp
)dσ,
dV
p
V
p
= (−c

+c
pp
)dσ, (8.23)
where dσ = dp and where c

= c
b
.
When the pore pressure increases/decreases equally to the confining stress, then the effect
of the pores with respect to the deformation of the porous rock, is only related to the rock matrix
material itself. Seen from the outside the material would behave as a completly solid rock.
Under these condition, the compressibility of the rock sample is equal to the compressibility
of the rock material c
r
. From Eqs. (8.23), the following relation between compressibilities are
deduced;
−c
b
+c
bp
= −c
r
,
−c

+c
pp
= −c
r
, (8.24)
where the minus sign for c
r
reflects the fact that the rock will compress under these conditions.
8.3.2 Betti’s Reciprocal Theorem of Elasticity.
If both the external stress and the pore pressure are changing, then the bulk and pore volume
are deformed accordingly,
dV
b
= dV
b
(σ) +dV
b
(p),
dV
p
= dV
p
(σ) +dV
p
(p), (8.25)
where dV(σ) is the volume change relative to the external stress and dV(p) is the volume
change relative to the pore pressure.
Betti’s theorem states that the hypothetical work given by the volume expansion of the bulk
volume due to the pore pressure dV
b
(p) times the change in the external stress dσ, is equal to
the work given by the volume expansion of the pore volume due to the external stressdV
p
(σ)
times the change in the pore pressure dp, i.e.
8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids 131
dV
b
(p) dσ = dV
p
(σ) dp. (8.26)
Using Eqs. (8.21) in Eq. (8.26), one gets,
−V
b
c
bp
dp dσ =−V
p
c

dσ dp, (8.27)
where c
bp
= c
b
. The minus sign for the first term reflects that the force and displacement are in
opposite directions. Since porosity is definedφ =V
p
/V
b
, the bulk compressibility is given,
c
bp
= φc

(8.28)
Combining Eqs. (8.24 and Eq. (8.28) on gets,
c
p
=
c
b
−(1+φ)c
r
φ
, (8.29)
where c
pp
= c
p
is the pore volume compressibility. This formula, developed by Geertsma [31],
relates the pore compressibility to the bulk and rock compressibilities which are the parameters
normally measured, like in experiments sketched in Fig. 8.6.
8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids
Compressibility of homogenous matter like the rock material c
r
and the contained saturations
of fluids, e.g. oil, water and/or gas, are all defined by Eq. (8.1). A discrete version of this
definition, where the pressure drop ∆p is sufficiently small, gives
c =
1
V
∆V
∆p
⇒ ∆V = cV∆p. (8.30)
The compressibility of the fluids c
f
contained in the pore volume is defined by the com-
pressibility of the different phases; c
w
, c
o
and c
g
. Since the pore volume is expanded by the
fluid phase volumes: V
f
= V
w
+V
o
+V
g
, a change in the pore pressure will cause the fluid
volume to change. The fluid compressibility is written,
∆V
f
= ∆V
w
+∆V
o
+∆V
g
,
c
f
= c
w
V
w
V
p
+c
o
V
o
V
p
+c
g
V
g
V
p
,
= c
w
S
w
+c
o
S
o
+c
g
S
g
, (8.31)
where S is the fluid phase saturation (S
w
+S
o
+S
g
= 1).
Of interest in relation to the production of oil and gas, is the total compressibility of the
rock - fluid system. This compressibility accounts for the expansion of fluid, given by the fluid
compressibility c
f
and the reduction of the pore volume when the pore pressure is reduced,
given by c
p
in Eq. (8.29),
132 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
c
t
= c
p
+c
f
,
=
c
b
−(1+φ)c
r
φ
+c
w
S
w
+c
o
S
o
+c
g
S
g
,
=
1
φ
[c
b
−(1+φ)c
r
+φ(c
w
S
w
+c
o
S
o
+c
g
S
g
)]. (8.32)
The effective HC compressibility is a useful term, related to the pore space occupied by the
hydrocarbons,
c
HC
= c
o
S
o
+c
g
S
g
.
An equally important term is the effective compressibility responsible for the expansion
of initial water and reduction of the pore volume, when pressure is released as a result of HC
production. This term, a non-HC compressibility is defined,
c
non−HC
=
c
b
−(1+φ)c
r
+φc
w
S
w
φ
.
Example: Porosity variation in the reservoir
When the reservoir pore pressure is reduced, due to oil or gas production, the
equilibrium of stresses in the reservoir is changed. This change in the effective
stress on the rock material will cause the porosityφ =V
p
/V
b
to change.
By differentiation the porosity one gets,

φ
=
dV
p
V
p

dV
b
V
b
. (8.33)
Substituting Eqs. (8.21) in Eq. (8.33) and remembering that c
pp
is the pore
compressibility c
p
and c

is the bulk compressibility c
b
,

φ
= (c
p
dp−c

dσ) −(c
bp
dp−c
b
dσ). (8.34)
Combining Eqs. (8.24) and Eq. (8.29) with Eq. (8.34) gives,
dφ =−c
b
(1−φ) −c
r
d(σ −p), (8.35)
where the porosity change dφ is proportional to the change in the effective stress.
It should be noted that in this case, the dependence on the effective stress is an
exact theoretical result.
Under reservoir conditions, the confinement stress is constant, i.e. dσ = 0 and
thus the change in porosity is,
∆φ = c
r

c
b
c
r
(1−φ) −1

∆p, (8.36)
where the pressure drop ∆p, due to fluid production from the reservoir is small
enough to keep the material within the elastic limit.
8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids 133
In a non-porous rock, i.e. when φ →0, the bulk compressibility will be equal
to the rock matrix compressibility, c
b
= c
r
, which then define the lower bound,
where by c
b
/c
r
≥ 1. In typical sandstone porous rocks, the ratio c
b
/c
r
is often
found to be between 4 to 100. For sandstone reservoirs with a typical porosity
larger than 5-10 %, the terms in the bracket in Eq. (8.36) will always be positive.
When the pore pressure is reduced, p
1
> p
2
(Fig. 8.7), a porosity deforma-
tion is observed, φ
1
> φ
2
, i.e. the porosity is reduced in the reservoir when the
pressure is reduced, which is an important drive mechanism for undersaturated oil
reservoirs.
p
1
p
2
V :
p
φ
1
φ
2
Figure 8.7: Constant confinement pressure and reduced pore pres-
sure leads to a reduction in the pore volume.
.
Example: Porosity variation in formation core samples
Reservoir porosity is seen to decrease with the pore pressure, under the assumption
of constant confinement stress. What about the porosity change in rock samples
which are brought to the surface for further experimental investigations? This
question is quite important since laboratory measurements on core material from
wells, is one of the very few direct sources of information available regarding
reservoir characteristics.
Eq. (8.35) gives the porosity change relative to the change in the pressure dif-
ference (σ − p). At initial conditions in the reservoir, the pressure difference is
normally such that the confinement pressure is larger than the pore pressure, i.e.
(σ −p)
R
> 0. In the laboratory or at normal atmospheric condition, the confine-
ment pressure and the pore pressure will be close to equal, i.e. (σ −p)
L
= 0.
For a porous rock sample, where the bulk and rock matrix compressibilities
are such that (c
b
(1 −φ) −c
r
) > o, which is the case for practically all porous
rock materials, the porosity will increase when the rock sample is brought to the
surface, i.e. φ
R
< φ
L
.
.
134 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids
p
R
p
L
φ
R
φ
L
Figure 8.8: Variation of bulk volume during surfacing of core mate-
rial.
8.5 Exercises
1. The reservoir pressure is 1923 psi, connate water saturation is 0.24 and gas saturation is
0.31.
Find the total compressibility and the effective hydrocarbon compressibility when the
following fluid and formation compressibility are known; c
o
= 10 10
−6
psi
−1
, c
w
= 3
10
−6
psi
−1
, c
g
= 1/p psi
−1
and c
r
= c
b
= 5 10
−6
psi
−1
.
2. A reservoir with an initial pressure of 6500 psia has an average porosity of 19 %. Bulk
compressibility is 3.810
−6
psi
−1
, and estimated abandonment pressure is 500 psia.
Find the formation porosity when the field is abandoned?
3. A gas reservoir has a gas deviation factor (at 150
o
F),
p [psia] 0 500 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000
z 1.00 0.92 0.86 0.80 0.82 0.89 1.00
Plot z versus p and graphically determine the slope at 1000 psia, 2200 psia and 4000
psia. Then, find the gas compressibility at these pressures.
Answers to questions:
1. 171.4 10
−6
psi
−1
, 224.6 10
−6
psi
−1
, 2. 18.6 %,
3. 1.11 10
−3
psi
−1
, 0.45 10
−3
psi
−1
, 0.14 10
−3
psi
−1
Chapter 9
Properties of Reservoir Fluids
9.1 Introduction
Production of oil and gas can be compared to a process where volumes of the reservoir fluids
are transformed to the stock tank volumes of oil and gas, see Fig. 9.1. During this process both
pressure and temperature are significantly changed. The reservoir production rates of oil and
gas will in the event of continuously decreasing pressure and temperature transform, where the
phase ratio of oil and gas is changed as well as the gas-oil ratio and the composition of both
phases.
Q = V / t
gn gn
∆ ∆
Q = V / t
g g
∆ ∆
Q = V / t
on on
∆ ∆
Q = V/ t
o o
∆ ∆
Reservoir
Sea
Figure 9.1: Volume transformation of oil and gas.
Primary reservoir production takes place without any temperature change, while the reser-
voir pressure drops substantially near the well. The composition of oil and/or gas will therefore
changed slightly during production. In an oil reservoir we may experience the shrinkage of oil
due to the solution gas liberation near the well and in a rich gas reservoir we expect condensa-
135
136 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
tion of liquid hydrocarbons (oil) when the pressure is reduced.
When the reservoir fluid is produced and brought to the surface, pressure is further reduced
through different stages of separation. In these processes, temperature is also reduced and
consequently the composition of oil and gas undergoes significant change.
In this chapter focus is put on some characteristic aspects of hydrocarbon mixtures and the
separation of oil and gas as function of pressure and temperature. We will look at how oil and
gas behave in the reservoir and their expansion to stock tank condition.
9.2 Definitions
The process by which the different hydrocarbon (HC) components form phases through various
chemical reactions is governed by a natural (entropy driven) development towards equilibrium
or the lowest energy level. This could be expressed more precisely referring to the Gibbs phase
rule.
The Gibbs phase rule shows a relationship among the number of componentsN
C
,
number of phases N
P
, number of chemical reactions N
R
, and degrees of freedom
N
F
, where;
N
F
= N
C
−N
P
+2−N
R
.
The number 2 accounts for the intensive properties p, T, and N
C
−N
R
defines the
number of independent components.
For a pure component (like H
2
O), then N
C
−N
R
= 1 and
N
F
= 3−N
P
.
For pure components the phase rule says that no more than three phases can form at any tem-
perature and pressure, i.e.
When N
P
= 1 N
F
= 2 Both intensive properties can be changed
arbitrarily
When N
P
= 2 N
F
= 1 Only one intensive property can be
independent – there are three lines
on a (p, T)-plot reflecting this occurrence
(sublimation line, melting point line, and
vapour pressure line)
When N
P
= 3 N
F
= 0 No degrees of freedom – a single triple
point in the phase diagram
We know that water may appear in different phases like ice, liquid and vapour, all depend-
ing on temperature and pressure. The co-existence of different phases, is shown in Fig. 9.2.
The different regions are separated by phase boundaries. The phase boundary between water
and vapour ends in a critical point where the two phases cease to co-exist. Beyond this point,
for temperatures T > T
C
and pressures p > p
C
, there is no distinct difference between water
and vapour, hence we call this state the fluid state. (For pure water, i.e. H
2
O, the critical
temperature is 374.1
o
C and the critical pressure is 218.3 atm.)
9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons 137
p
c
T
c
Critical
point
Ice
Water
Vapour
1 atm.
100 °C
Figure 9.2: PT-diagram for H
2
O.
9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons
Naturally occurring HC are complex in composition and contain a great many members of
paraffins (alkanes), naphthenes (cyclo-alkanes) and aromatic series and often some non-hydrocarbon
impurities.
Some of the components in the paraffin series are listed below:
Methane CH
4
C
1
Heptane C
7
H
16
Ethane C
2
H
6
C
2
Octane C
8
H
18
Propane C
3
H
8
C
3
Nonane C
9
H
20
Butane C
4
H
10
C
4
Decane C
10
H
22
Pentane C
5
H
12
C
5
Hexane C
6
H
14
C
6
Some typical non-hydrocarbon impurities are represented by,
Nitrogen N
2
Carbon Dioxide CO
2
Hydrogen Sulphide H
2
S
For mixtures of HC components, C
7
H
16
and higher, it is quite common to writeC
+
7
, mean-
ing all component in the series. The C
+
7
characteristic is then the average for all components
higher then C
6
.
In gases, typically light components likeC
1
, C
2
and C
3
dominate the composition. For light
oils, C
4
, C
5
and C
6
are the important components and for heavier oils the presence of various
decanes and asfaltenes are quit common. However, intermediate components likeC
4
−C
5
can be in both gaseous and liquid state depending on prevailing pressure and temperature.
Components C
+
7
are heavy and in most interesting cases of petroleum engineering, can not be
evaporized.
For pure components of oil, say, Ethane (C
2
H
6
) and Heptane (C
7
H
16
), and their mix-
ture (50% of C
2
H
6
and 50% of C
7
H
16
) the phase PT-diagram is shown in Fig. 9.3. The PT-
characteristics of the pure components are somewhat similar to theH
2
O case, shown in Fig. 9.2.
When two or more HC components are mixed, the phase boundaries form a closed boundary
138 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
area in the PT-diagram, where the two phases of oil and gas co-exists. This area is called the
two-phase region and has a characteristic shape for that particular composition.
p
T
Liquid
Gas
p
T
Liquid
Gas
p
T
Liquid
Gas
Liquid +
Gas
a) 100% Ethane b) 100% Heptane c) 50% Ethane 50% Heptane
C
C
C
Figure 9.3: PT-diargam for Ethane, Heptane and their mixture.
The equilibrium state is defined as function of p and T and consequently also the volume
ratio of oil and gas is PT-dependent. Volume is therefore a dependent function of p and T,
as shown by the law of real gases. These relations between pressure, volume and temperature
are often referred to as PVT-relations. For a mixture of hydrocarbons, a PVT-diagram can be
drawn, as shown in Fig. 9.4.
G
a
s
G
a
s
L
iq
u
id
L
i
q
u
i
d
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
V
a
p
o
r
-
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
C
u
r
v
e
C
r
i
t
i
c
a
l
p
o
i
n
t
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
B
u
b
b
l
e
p
o
i
n
t
c
u
r
v
e
D
e
w
p
o
i
n
t
c
u
r
v
e
V
o
l
u
m
e
Figure 9.4: PVT diagram for a mixed component system.
The existence of a super critical fluid region to the right of the critical point where phases
can not be distinguished, is seen in the PT-diagram in Fig. 9.4 (lower right).
The PV-diagram (upper left) shows how the oil volume is increasing when pressure is
9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons 139
decreasing. For a given temperature, we observe a monotonously volume increase or swelling
of the oil phase down to a certain pressure level. At this pressure the volume continues to
increase by separation into co-existing oil - and gas phases. Continued volume increase means
gradually increased gas-oil ratio at constant pressure. The two-phase region is left when the
pressure starts to decrease again and further volume increase is due to gas expansion only.
Another way of representing the PVT discontinuity, represented by the two-phase region,
is to present the intensive property of specific - or molar volume, see Fig. 9.5.
Gas
Gas
Liquid
Liquid
Temperature
P
r
e
s
s
u
r
e
T
1
T
1
T
2
T
2
T
3
T
3
T
4
T
4
Specific volume
Two-phase
region
Critical
point
Figure 9.5: Pressure-specific volume diagram for mixed component
system.
Specific volume is volume occupied by a unit of mass of a substance, i.e. [V
s
] = m
3
/kg
(ft
3
/lb). Molar volume is equal to volume occupied by one mole of a substance, i.e. [V
m
] =
m
3
/kg-mole or cm
3
/g-mole (ft
3
/lb-mole).
For temperatures higher than T
3
, in Fig. 9.5, there is no phase change when pressure is
decreased. For lower temperatures, however, a phase transformation will pass through a two-
phase region confined by a bubble point locus and a dew point locus where the oil and gas are
in equilibrium.
The PT-diagram for a more complex mixtures is presented in Fig. 9.6. It is important to
notice that the shape of an envelope A-CP-CT-B depends on the composition of HC mixture,
with the following definitions:
CP: Cricondenbar – a pressure point, above which a liquid can not be vaporised.
CT: Cricondentherm – a temperature point, above which a gas can not be condensed.
C: Critical Point – a pressure and temperature point, at which two phases become identical.
All the quality lines merge at this point, lines which defines the fractional oil-gas ratio.
A reservoir with initial conditions as indicated by position1 in Fig. 9.6 is what we would
call a gas reservoir. When this reservoir is produced at constant temperature, from1 to 2, no
phase boundary is crossed, i.e. only gas is produced. If, on the other hand, the production
follows the dotted line from 1 to x, then oil will gradually drop out of the gas both in the
reservoir and on the way to location x. The composition of the gas will have changed, where
the heavier components are condensed.
140 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
A reservoir located at point 3 in Fig. 9.6, should be called a gas condensate reservoir. When
this reservoir is produced at constant temperature, from 1 to 5, condensation of gas in the
reservoir starts as soon as the two-phase region is entered, at point 4. When the pressure
continues to decrease, and the dew point line is approached, vaporisation of residual oil can
happen and the gas composition may become richer until the dew point line is crossed. Form
that point onwards, no change in the composition will occur.
As we have mentioned before, the two-phase region is characterising the reservoir fluid,
such that an oil reservoir would have a different shaped two-phase region than seen in Fig. 9.6.
Having said this, we can imagine that an oil reservoir is located somewhere in the upper left
corner in Fig. 9.6. When this reservoir is produced at constant temperature, no gas will exist in
the reservoir until the bubbel point line is crossed. At this time, solution gas will slowly build
up to a continuous phase and flow towards the well with a considerably higher mobility than
the oil itself.
p
T
Liquid
Gas
CP
A
B
C
CT
80%
60%
40%
20%
1
2
3
4
x
5
Figure 9.6: PT- diagram for a complex HC mixture.
9.3.1 Ternary diagrams
Binary diagrams are often used for representing an overall behaviour of hydrocarbons and
for detailed analysis of phase behaviour when the number of components or groups of pure
components, do not exceed three . Natural hydrocarbons are complex mixtures of different
components and are usually represented by pseudo-components (normally 2 or 3). In order to
predict phase behaviour for such compositions ternary diagrams are often used, see Figs. 9.7
and 9.8.
One of the advantages of ternary diagrams is that they enable us to represent both the
phase compositions and the overall composition of mixture. Let us assume that the overall
composition is represented by point M. Then the overall compositions C
i
can be expressed
through the phase compositions C
i j
,
C
i
=C
i1
S
1
+C
i2
S
2
, i = 1, 2, 3
9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons 141
Plait point
Binodal
curve
Tie line
2-phase region
C
2
C
1
C
3
1-phase
region
Figure 9.7: Two-phase ternary diagram.
Plait
point
Tie line
C
2
C
1
C
3
2-phase
region
3-phase region
1-phase
region
a
b
c
d
e
f
- invariant point
Figure 9.8: Three-phase ternary diagram.
Note that the fraction of each component is 1 at their apex and 0 at the opposite edge. Any unit
can be used (mole-, weight- or volume fraction).
Using the fact that S
1
+S
2
= 1, we can obtain the following expression for the relative
amounts of phases S
i j
in the overall composition,
S
1
=
C
i
−C
i2
C
i1
−C
i2
, S
2
=
C
i
−C
i1
C
i2
−C
i1
,
which is called "the lever rule".
It follows from the Gibbs phase rule that in case of 3 (pseudo) components and 2 phases,
where (p and T are expected to be known), the system has only one degree of freedom. This
means that if one of the parameters is specified all the other can be easily evaluated.
Fig. 9.8 shows the case when the composition has a 3-phase region which is indicated by the
embedded smaller triangle. All sides of this triangle are surrounded by 2- phase regions. There
is no degrees of freedom in the three phase region. It means that the compositions of the three
phases are given by the apexes of the 3 phase triangle (invariant points). Any total composition
M within this triangle gives three phases with the same overall composition. Moving inside the
triangle we can only change the fraction of phases and not the overall composition. The lever
rule enables us to calculate the relative amounts of these phases,
142 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
S
1
=
a
a+b
, S
2
=
c
c +d
, S
3
=
e
e + f
.
In Figs. 9.7 and 9.8 both triangles have a common baseline, which is usually the case for
surfactant+oil+brine systems.
9.4 Natural gas and gas condensate fields
In a dry gas field, the reservoir temperature is always larger than the critical temperature of the
same gas, i.e. the following initial condition is important,
T
r
> T
CT
.
If initial conditions in the reservoir coincide with point 1 in Fig. 9.6 and gas recovery is
performed in such a way that the pressure will decline from1 to 2, than the dew point line will
never be crossed and only dry gas will exist in the reservoir at any pressure.
When producing the gas to the surface, however, both p and T will decrease and the final
state will be at some point x within the two-phase envelope, the position of the point being
dependent on surface separation.
Let us imagine initial pressure and temperature at point 3 in Fig. 9.6. During isothermal
depletion liquid will start to condense in the reservoir when the pressure has fallen below the
dew point at 4.
The maximum liquid saturation deposited in the reservoir is when the pressure is between
points 4 and 5 in the two-phase region. The condensation is generally rather small and fre-
quently below the critical saturation which must be exceeded before the liquid becomes mobile.
The process of condensation is called retrograde liquid condensation, where the retrograde liq-
uid condensate is not recovered and, since the heavier components tend to condense first, this
represents a loss of a valuable part of the hydrocarbon mixture.
Continued pressure depletion below the point of maximum condensation would lead to re-
vaporisation of the liquid condensate. However, this does not occur because once the pressure
falls below point 4 the overall composition and hence, the molecular weight of the HC remain-
ing in the reservoir increases and is left behind in the reservoir as retrograde condensate while
the light components are mobile and will be produce.
The composite phase envelope for the reservoir fluids tends to move downwards and to the
right, thus inhibiting re-vaporisation. Sometimes it is economically advantageous to produce
a gas condensate field by the process of gas re-cycling. Starting at point 3 in Fig. 9.9 and
separating the liquid condensate from the dry gas at the surface and re-injecting the latter into
the reservoir in such a way that the dry gas displaces the wet gas towards the producing wells.
However, in practical field developments this is not easily accomplished.
The reservoir pressure is kept almost at the initial level but the composition of the reservoir
gas is gradually changed in such a way, that the phase envelope moves to the left and upwards.
After breakthrough of the dry gas occurs, the injection is terminated and the remaining dry gas
produced. The objective of the gas re-cycling process is to keep reservoir conditions above/or
to the right from the dew point curve, as seen in Fig. 9.9.
9.5 Oil fields 143
p
T
Initial
composition
Intermediate
composition
Final
composition
3
Figure 9.9: Development of the gas field by the gas re-cycling pro-
cess.
9.5 Oil fields
Since the oil contains more of the heavier HC components, a phase diagram for oil will be
more elongated in horizontal direction, as compared with gas fields and as shown in Fig. 9.10.
Initial
composition
Intermediate
composition
Final
composition
p
T
A
B
X
Unfavourable conditions
of production
Figure 9.10: Development of the oil field.
If initial conditions in the reservoir coincide with pointA in Fig. 9.10, there will be only one
phase present, namely liquid oil containing dissolved gas. Reducing the pressure isothermally
will eventually bring the oil to the bubble point B. Further reduction in pressure will lead to
solution gas production and the presence of two phases in the reservoir;
• liquid oil, containing an amount of dissolved gas which commensurate with the pressure
and
• liberated gas, originally dissolved in the oil.
144 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
Keeping production at point X below the bubble point, in Fig. 9.10, the overall reservoir
HC composition will change due to the fact that the gas, being more mobile, will flow with a
much greater velocity than the oil towards the well.
The composition will change to such an extent, that the liquid phase is finally becoming
less and less mobile. The relative content of heavier components in oil will increase, and the
shape of the phase diagram will change towards more and more unfavourable conditions for oil
production. It is therefore preferable to maintain oil production close to, or above the bubble
point by using water flooding, gas injection or other enhanced oil recovery methods.
The phase diagram for an oil reservoir with a gas cap must necessarily have a phase enve-
lope which is characterised by both the gas and oil contained in the reservoir. The two-phase
area of the reservoir fluid is overlapping the appropriate oil and gas reservoir, as shown in Fig.
9.11.
p
T
A
Reservoir
gas
Reservoir
oil
Reservoir
fluid
Initial
reservoir
conditions
Figure 9.11: Phase diagram for the oil reservoir with a gas cap.
9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes
The amount of oil and gas produced form the reservoir, measured in standard volume quantities
(at normal pressure and temperature) are converted to reservoir volumes by the use of volume
factors; B
o
, B
g
, R
s
and R. These factors are defined in accordance to Fig. 9.12.
Volumes defined at reservoir conditions (or at the surface) are transformed to surface vol-
umes (or reservoir volumes) by use of volume factors. The volume factors are defined by lab-
oratory experiments performed on samples taken from the reservoir oil or gas. The definition
of these factors are [21]:
R
s
: The solution gas-oil ratio, which is the number of standard cubic meters (feet) of gas
which will dissolve in one stock tank cubic meter (barrel) of oil when both are measured
at surface conditions.
R
s
=
V
ogn
V
on
¸
Sm
3
Sm
3

.
9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes 145
V
p
V
g
V
ogn
V
on
V
gn
V
o
V
on
V
ggn
Reservoir: , p T Surface: , p T
n n
Figure 9.12: Stock tank production through expansion of reservoir
oil and -gas from an oil reservoir.
B
o
: The oil formation volume factor is defined as the volume of oil in cubic meters (or bar-
rels) occupied in the reservoir at the prevailing p and T divided by the volume of oil in
stock tank cubic meter (barrel),
B
o
=
V
o
V
on
¸
Rm
3
Sm
3

.
B
g
: The gas formation volume factor is defined as the volume of gas in cubic meters (or
barrels) in the reservoir divided by the volume of the same gas at standard cubic meter
(foot),
B
g
=
V
g
V
ggn
¸
Rm
3
Sm
3

.
R: The gas-oil ratio (GOR), is the volume of gas in standard cubic meters (feet) produced
divided by volume of stock tank cubic meter (barrel) of oil at surface conditions,
R =
V
gn
V
on
¸
Sm
3
Sm
3

.
The following useful relationships between the volume factors can be deduced, simply
using Fig. 9.12:
V
gn
= RV
on
(9.1)
V
g
= B
g
(R−R
s
)V
on
(9.2)
V
o
+V
g
= [B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
]V
on
(9.3)
146 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
V
g
= B
g
(1−
R
s
R
)V
gn
(9.4)
The volume factors B
o
, R
s
, B
g
and R are all pressure dependent functions, as seen from
Fig. 9.13.
p
p
p
p
B
o
B
g
p
b
p
b
p
b
p
b
R
s
R
Figure 9.13: Dependency of PVT volum parameters on pressure.
In order to explain the characteristic behaviour of the different volume factors it is natural
to follow a decreasing pressure development, i.e. from right to left in Fig. 9.13.
The oil volume factor B
o
is seen to increase linearly when pressure is decreasing towards
the bubble point pressure p
b
. This increase in B
o
is directly linked to the oil compressibility,
i.e. when pressure is released, then volume is increased. For pressure lower then the bubble
point, solution gas is gradually leaving the oil phase which leads to a shrinking volume of oil.
Finally all gas will evaporate and the oil is said to bedead and B
o
≈1. This process continues
until standard condition is reached.
The solution gas-oil ratio R
s
is constant for pressures higher than the bubble point pressure,
since no gas is produced in the reservoir. A unit sample of oil at different pressures (p > p
b
)
will therefore contain the same amount of gas and oil at standard condition. For pressures
lower than the bubble point pressure, we will find a decreasing amount of gas in the reservoir
oil sample because some gas has already evaporated and been produced as gas.
In the case of the volum factor for gas, gas in equilibrium with oil can only exist up to its
bubble point pressure. For pressure higher than p
b
, all free gas will be dissolve in the oil. For
decreasing pressure lower than the bubble point pressure, the volume of gas will expand as the
reciprocal pressure.
9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes 147
The gas-oil ratio R, shown in Fig. 9.13, is given as a function of decreasing reservoir pres-
sure. When the pressure is above the bubble point pressure, no change is observed in the gas-oil
ratio at surface condition. Shortly after the reservoir pressure has dropped below the bubble
point pressure, the process of solution gas vaporisation will take place, first near the wellbore.
For a short while, the gas is not mobile due to gas saturation below critical gas saturation. The
presence of discontinuous gas will block some of the path ways for the oil and consequently oil
with less gas are being produced. The minimum gas-oil ratio is reached as the gas saturation
becomes continuous and starts to flow. When pressure is further decreased, more gas than oil
is produced than initially, since gas liberated in the reservoir is more mobile and therefore is
produced faster than the oil it originally evaporated from.
Example: Importance of the GOR
The GOR is an important parameter, not only because it gives the gas-oil ratio as
function of pressure and time, but also because it carries important information
about the mobility ratio of gas and oil in the reservoir.
With reference to Figs. 9.1 and 9.12 we may define the gas-oil ratio for a satu-
rated oil reservoir, i.e. with a reservoir pressure lower than bubble point pressure,
R =
V
gn
V
on
=
Q
gn
Q
on
,
where Q
on
= Q
o
/B
o
and where Q
o
is the oil rate in the reservoir. Using the rela-
tions Eqs.(9.1) - (9.4) we find,
Q
gn
= RQ
on
,
Q
on
= Q
g
/[B
g
(R−R
s
)],
where Q
g
is the gas rate in the reservoir.
Using the GOR, defined above, and the two relations giving the gas- and oil
rate, we may write the following expression for the GOR factor,
R =
Q
g
B
g
B
o
Q
o
+R
s
.
For reservoir flow, we assume Darcy’s law to be valid, both for oil- and gas
flow, i.e.
Q
i
=
k
i
µ
i
A
dp
i
dr
, i = o, g.
where Q
i
are the reservoir flow rates.
For reservoir flowin the vicinity of the well, we may safely neglect all capillary
effects, and the reservoir gas-oil flow ratio is written,
Q
g
Q
o
=
k
g
µ
g
µ
o
k
o
.
Substituting this ratio in the GOR equation, we may express the GOR in terms
of reservoir parameters,
148 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
R =
k
g
µ
g
µ
o
k
o
B
o
B
g
+R
s
, (9.5)
where the mobility of oil- and gas is defined, λ
i
= k
i

i
, and i = o, g.
Eq.(9.5) gives the relation between gas - and oil mobility in the reservoir and
the observed gas-oil ration, where the volume factors B
o
, B
g
and R
s
are known
from laboratory measurements. The GOR as presented in Eq.(9.5) gives a ideal-
ized approximation of reservoir dependence and should therefore be interpretated
with care.
Example: Initial reservoir fluids
The definition of initial in place volumes are somewhat different for oil- and gas
reservoirs.
For a general reservoir we may define the following parameters,
V
R
Reservoir bulk volume.
φ Porosity.
B
o
, B
g
Formation factor.
R
s
Solution gas-oil ratio.
The hydrocarbon pore volume, HCPV = V
R
φ, is important in defining the
reserves in an oil reservoir,
Oil reserves: OIIP = HCPV/B
o
,
Gas reserves: GIIP = OIIP R
s
.
The reserves coming from a gas reservoir is defined,
Gas reserves: GIIP = HCPV/B
g
,
Oil reserves: OIIP = GIIP/R
s
.
9.7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters
Conventional analysis of basic PVT parameters follow well established procedures by which
the different volume factors are measured:
• Flash expansion of the fluid sample is used to determine the bubble point pressurep
b
.
• Differential expansion of the fluid sample is used to determine the basic parametersB
o
,
R
s
and B
g
.
• Flash expansion of fluid samples through various separator combinations is used to en-
able the modification of laboratory derived PVT data to match field separator conditions.
The process differential - and flash expansion, shown in Fig. 9.14, illustrates the difference
between flash and differential expansion of the fluid sample.
9.7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters 149
Initial
composition
Final
composition
p
T
p
T
Flash expansion Differential expansion
1
1
1 1
2 2
2 2
3
3
3 3
p > p
i b
p < p
b
p
b
p
b
p
b new
Hg
Gas
Gas
Oil
Oil
Oil
Oil
Oil Oil
Figure 9.14: Flash and differential expansion of fluid samples.
Note that the flash expansion experiment does not change the overall hydrocarbon compo-
sition in the cell while in the differential liberation experiment, at each stage, depletion gas is
liberated physically and removed from the cell. Therefore, there is a continous compositional
change in the PVT-cell. The remaining hydrocarbones are becoming progressively richer in
heavier components and the average molecular weight is increasing. Consequently flash ex-
pansion leaves smaller oil volumes then differential expansion.
Reservoir production is most likely reproduced by a non-isothermal differential expansion,
where multi-stage separation at the surface is commonly used because differential liberation
will normally yield a larger final volume of equilibrium oil than the corresponding flash expan-
sion.
150 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
9.8 Exercises
1. Calculate the density expressed in SI-units,
– for a crude oil API gravity of 57.2 and
– for a natural gas API gravity of 70.7,
when water density is 1000 kg/m
3
at standard condition (1 atm. and 20
0
C).
2. A gas consists of 50% – 50% mixture by weight of two hydrocarbons. The pressure
is increased isothermally until two phases appear. The liquid phase consists of 40%
by weight of the more volatile component and the vapour phase 65% by weight of this
component. What are the weight functions of the liquid and the vapour phase?
3. The following data are obtained in a PVT analysis at 90
0
C.
Pressure [bar] 276 207 172 138 103
Celle (system) volume [cm
3
] 404 408 410 430 450
a) Estimate the bubble point pressure.
The system is re-compressed, expanded to 138 bar and the free gas is removed at constant
pressure and then measured by further expansion to standard condition. The contained
liquid volume is 388 cm
3
and the measured gas volume (at 1 atm. and 15.6
0
C) is 5.275
litres.
The pressure is reduced to normal condition, as above, and residual liquid volume is
found to be 295 cm
3
and the liberated gas volume is 21 litres.
Estimate the following PVT parameters,
b) c
o
, liquid compressibility at 207 bar,
c) B
o
factor at 207 bar,
d) B
o
and R
s
at 172 bar and 138 bar and
e) B
g
and z at 138 bar.
4. Calculate the gas-oil capillary pressure for the following reservoir:
Gas saturation [%] Elevation [ft]
75 -5420
50 -5424
25 -5426
0 -5428
Additional data:
Oil API gravity; 45.1
Gas specific gravity; 0.65
Oil formation volume factor; 1.18 RB/STB
Gas formation volume factor; 0.0025 RB/SCF
Solution gas-oil ratio; 480 SCF/STB
9.8 Exercises 151
Answers to questions:
1. 749.5 kg/m
3
, 699.8 kg/m
3
, 2. 2/3, 3. a) 172 bar, b) 14.1 10
−5
bar
−1
,
c) 1.383 Rm
3
/Sm
3
, d)1.3898 Rm
3
/Sm
3
, 1.315 Rm
3
/Sm
3
,
89.07 Sm
3
/Sm
3
, 71.2 Sm
3
/Sm
3
, e) 0.0079 Rm
3
/Sm
3
, 0.887 4. ρ
o
= 735.5 kg/Rm
3
, ρ
g
= 55.7
kg/Rm
3
.
152 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids
Part II
Reservoir Parameter Estimation
Methods
153
Chapter 10
Material Balance Equation
10.1 Introduction
The basic principle behind the Material Balance Equation is very fundamental:
The mass of hydrocarbons (HC) initially in place is equal to sum of the mass
produced and the mass still remaining in the reservoir,
M
i
=∆M+M.
In material balance calculations we implicitly consider the reservoir as being a tank of
constant volume. The pressure in this tank is defined by the volumetric average pressure,
p =
1
V
i

V
i
pdV,
where V
i
is the initial hydrocarbone volume, i.e. the hydrocarbon pore volume (HCPV).
If we assume the fluid density in the reservoir to be constant during the depletion process,
i.e. ρ ∼constant, we may write the mass conservation law in terms of volume conservation,
V
i
−V =∆V when p
i
→p. (10.1)
Eq.(10.1) is often referred to as the golden principle, where
Expansion = Production.
Even though material balance techniques use crude approximations of the reservoir, with
limited reference to local information, their application and use have proven to be of great
importance in various situations. Being simple in principle, methods based on the material
balance equation are commonly used in the following cases:
• Extrapolation of production curves for oil, water and gas (production decline curve anal-
ysis).
• Identification of the drive mechanism.
• History matching.
In this chapter we will develop the Material Balance Equation for a general oil and gas
reservoir and illustrate the use of the equation by various examples.
155
156 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
10.2 Dry gas expansion
Let us consider a dry gas reservoir where the production is modelled using material balance
calculations. The HCPVis constant in absence of water influx. The production of gas at surface
conditions is G
p
.
The material balance equation given by Eq.(10.1) is slightly redefined where the volumeof
gas in the reservoir initially in place is obviously equal to the volumeof gas in the reservoir at
a given pressure p,
G B
gi
= (G−G
p
)B
g
, (10.2)
where the following definitions are used,
G: resources of gas initially in place, [Sm
3
],
G
p
: cumulative volume of gas produced, [Sm
3
],
B
gi
: initial gas formation volume factor, [Sm
3
/Rm
3
] and
B
g
: gas formation volume factor at current reservoir pressure, [Sm
3
/Rm
3
].
The relation presented in Eq.(10.2) is illustrated in Fig. 10.1, where the purpose is to visu-
alise the transformation of gas volume under reservoir condition to surface conditions. When
a surface volume of G
p
has been produced, the volume of gas left in the reservoir isG−G
p
,
in standard units. At a reservoir pressure p, the volume occupied by the gas in the reservoir, is
equal to (G−G
p
)B
gp
, i.e Eq.(10.2).
G B
gi G [Sm ]
3
p p
n
(G-G )B
p g
G-G
p
G
p
Figure 10.1: Volume transformation using volume formation factors.
It follows from Eq.(10.2) that,
B
gi
B
g
= 1−
G
p
G
. (10.3)
Using the equation of state for a real gas pV = znRT, and assuming isothermal conditions
of production one can obtain the relations,
B
gi
=
V
i
V
n
=

p
zT

n

zT
p

i
and
10.3 A general oil reservoir 157
B
g
=
V
p
V
n
=

p
zT

n

zT
p

p
,
where the indices i and p refer to the initial and current pressures respectively .
Eq.(10.3) can now be written,

p
z

=

p
z

i

1−
G
p
G

. (10.4)
Using Eq.(10.4), p/z vs. cumulative gas production exhibits a straight line trend, allowing
us to estimate the resources of gas, as shown in Fig. 10.2. Two important characteristics are
displayed by plotting the data as shown in the figure. When the data follows a linear trend, this
serves as a proof for the assumption of no or negligible water influx during gas production and
that the main driving force behind the production is gas expansion. Secondly, when a straight
line is fitted through the data, the intersection point with the x-axis gives us an estimate for
initial gas in place, G.
G
G
p
0
p
z
( )
i
Figure 10.2: Gas reservoir exhibiting a straight line trend in p/z vs.
cumulative gas production.
10.3 A general oil reservoir
In a general oil reservoir, hydrocarbons will be represented as oil and/or gas. Dependent on
the composition of the fluid, reservoir temperature and initial pressure, there may exist a gas
cap above the oil zone, as schematically indicated in Fig. 10.3. The gas in the gas cap is in
equilibrium with the oil in the oil zone and the volume part of the reservoir occupied by gas
relative to oil is constant.
The following nomenclature is used in the derivation of the material balance equation:
HCPV: Part of pore volume occupied by hydrocarbons.
N: Resources of oil (initial oil in place) inSm
3
.
m: Ratio between the resources of gas in the gas cap and resources of oil in the oil zone
measured at reservoir conditions.
158 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
Gas cap
Oil zone
Oil zone
mNB
oi
(Rm )
3
NB
oi
(Rm )
3
Gas cap
C
B
A
Initial reservoir
conditions
Current reservoir
conditions
A, B, C - produced volumes
Figure 10.3: Oil reservoir with a gas cap: Illustration of material bal-
ance.
mNB
oi
: Resources of gas (initial gas in place) inRm
3
.
N
p
: Volume of oil produced in Sm
3
.
Production from the oil reservoir (with a gas cap, see Fig. 10.3) is explained as expansion
of the oil zone, volume - A, expansion of the gas cap, volume - B and as expansion of initial
water present plus reduction of pore volume due to expansion of reservoir formation matrix and
possible reduction of bulk volume, volume - C. In dealing with the development of the material
balance equation, it is therefore convenient to break up the expansion term into its components.
Note that we are here considering underground withdrawal of hydrocarbon fluids, measured in
Rm
3
.
A1: Expansion of oil.
A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas.
B: Expansion of gas cap gas.
C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume.
Reservoir expansion is equal to production, hence: ∆V
prod
= A1 + A2 + B + C.
10.3.1 A1: Expansion of oil
The oil (liquid phase) expansion at reservoir condition can be defined as,
V
o
(p) −V
o
(p
i
) =∆V
o
(p).
Here V
o
(p
i
) is the oil volume at initial conditions andV
o
(p) is the volume of the oil initial in
place at pressure p, see Fig. 10.4. ∆V
o
is the volume oil produced at reservoir pressure p.
10.3 A general oil reservoir 159
p p
i
∆V
o
V
o
Figure 10.4: Expansion of oil at reservoir pressure.
Oil expansion is written,
∆V
o
= N B
o
−N B
oi
= N(B
o
−B
oi
), (10.5)
where ∆V
o
is measured in Rm
3
. N is the initial oil in place [Sm
3
] and is defined; N =V
p
(1−
S
w
)/B
oi
, where S
w
is the average water saturation andV
p
the pore volume.
10.3.2 A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas
At initial conditions oil and gas in the gas cap are in mutual equilibrium . Reducing the pressure
below the bubble point pressure, p
b
will cause the liberation of solution gas.
The total amount of solution gas in the oil is NR
si
, measured in surface volumes. The
amount of gas still dissolved in the oil at current reservoir pressure and temperature isNR
s
,
also in surface volumes. Therefore, the gas volume liberated during the pressure drop, fromp
i
to p, is,
NR
si
−NR
s
= N(R
si
−R
s
).
This gas volume is measured at surface condition, but since we want to express all expanded
volumes at reservoir condition, we have to multiply the surface volume by the volume factor
for gas at reservoir pressure, i.e. B
g
,
∆V
og
= N(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
. (10.6)
10.3.3 B: Expansion of gas cap gas
The expansion of gas cap gas follows the same principle as observed for the expansion/production
of dry gas given by Eq.(10.2),
GB
gi
= (G−G
p
)B
g
.
The total volume of the gas cap as part of the oil volume in the reservoir, measured at
reservoir condition,
GB
gi
= mNB
oi
.
The gas production at current reservoir pressure is then,
160 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
G
p
B
g
=
mNB
oi
B
gi
(B
g
−B
gi
).
The expansion of the gas cap (in reservoir volumes) is therefore written,
∆V
gg
= mNB
oi

B
g
B
gi
−1

. (10.7)
10.3.4 C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction
of pore volume
Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume is in
practice equal to the increased production by the same volume. Expansion of connate water
and reduction of pore volume are controlled by the compressibility of water and pore volumes,
i.e. c
w
and c
p
.
The HCPV compressibility as the compressibility for connate water and formation matrix
are defined in accordance with the general law of thermal compressibility,
c =
1
V
∆V
∆p
⇒ ∆V = cV∆p,
where the absolute volume change in the HC pore space due to expansion of connate water and
reduction of pore volume is,
∆V
HCPV
=∆V
w
+∆V
p
.
∆V
w
and ∆V
p
are the volume changes due to expansion of connate water and that due to
reduction in pore volume, respectively.
Using the definition of compressibility, we get,
∆V
HCPV
= c
w
V
w
∆p+c
p
V
p
∆p.
From previous considerations, we found that: V
w
= S
w
V
p
and V
p
=V
HCPV
/(1−S
w
) and we
get,
∆V
HCPV
=V
HCPV

c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w

∆p,
where the pore volume compressibility is; c
p
= (c
b
−(1+φ)c
r
)/φ and V
HCPV
=V
o
+V
g
=
NB
oi
+mNB
oi
= (1+m)NB
oi
.
The volume expansion due to initial water and reduction in the pore volume, gives the
expansion of the HCPV or volume -C,
∆V
HCPV
= (1+m)NB
oi

c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w

∆p. (10.8)
10.4 The material balance equation 161
10.3.5 Production terms
The production of oil and gas at surface conditions is, N
p
+G
p
. The expansion volumes,
A1, A2, B and C, are measured at reservoir conditions. In order to compare the two types of
volumes, we have to transform the production volumes to reservoir volumes, i.e. N
p
B
o
+G
p
B
g
.
Using the relation between gas and oil produced at standard condition, Eqs.(9.1) to (9.4),
G
p
= (R−R
s
)N
p
,
where R is the gas-oil ratio (GOR) and R
s
is the solution gas-oil ratio.
We can now write the overall production term as,
∆V
prod
= N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
]. (10.9)
10.4 The material balance equation
Combining Eqs.(10.5) to (10.9) we can write the material balance equation for a general oil
reservoir,
N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] = NB
oi
¸
(B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
B
oi
+
m(
B
g
B
gi
−1) +(1+m)(
c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w
)∆p

+(W
e
−W
p
)B
w
. (10.10)
(W
e
−W
p
)B
w
on the right-hand side of Eq.(10.10) accounts for water influx into the reservoir
and production of water, respectively.
It is important to notice under which circumstances the material balance equation is devel-
oped. The equation gives a static representation of the reservoir and does not include any terms
describing the energy loss in the reservoir due to fluid flow behaviour. The following features
of the MBE should be noted:
• MBE generally exhibits a lack of time dependence although the water influx has a time
dependence.
• Although the pressure only appears explicitly in the water and pore volume compress-
ibility terms, it is implicit in all the other terms of Eq.(10.10) since the PVT parameters
B
o
, R
s
and B
g
are functions of pressure. The water influx is also pressure dependent.
• Eq.(10.10) is evaluated, in the way it was derived, by comparing the current volumes at
pressure p to the original volumes at p
i
. Note that the material balance equation is not
evaluated in a step-wise or differential fashion.
10.5 Linearized material balance equation
The linearized material balance equation is particular interesting in connection with reservoir
parameter estimation. Results published in 1963-64 by Havlena and Odeh opened a wide range
162 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
of applications of the MBE to reservoir engineering [33, 34]. The linear form of equation
(10.10) is,
F = N(E
o
+mE
g
+E
c
) +W
e
B
w
, (10.11)
where the following definitions are used:
The underground withdrawal:
F = N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] +W
p
B
w
Expansion of oil and its originally dissolved gas:
E
o
= (B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
Expansion of the gas cap gas:
E
g
= B
oi

B
g
B
gi
−1

Expansion of the connate water and reduction of pore volume:
E
c
= (1+m)

c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w

B
oi
∆p
Eq.(10.11) is especially important for revealing the drive mechanism of the reservoir and
for estimation of initial oil and gas.
10.6 Dissolved gas expansion drive
Fluid samples taken from an oil reservoir, indicate a reservoir pressure larger than the bubble
point pressure, i.e. p > p
b
. From this information alone, important deductions are made:
1. The reservoir fluid exists in only one phase, as undersaturated oil.
2. Production is driven by expansion of undersaturated oil.
3. No gas cap can exist.
4. All produced gas comes from the oil, i.e. R
si
= R
s
= R.
5. Production of oil is controlled by compressibility of oil, -water and -formation.
With these restrictions in mind, a simplified material balance equation is written,
N
p
B
o
= NB
oi
¸
B
o
−B
oi
B
oi
+
c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w
∆p

.
We have seen earlier that the slow decline of the volume factorB
o
, for increasing pressures
higher than the bubble point pressure, is described by the law of compressibility,
10.6 Dissolved gas expansion drive 163
c
o
=
1
V
o
∆V
o
∆p
,
where we may use the definitions; ∆p = p
i
−p, V
o
=V
on
B
oi
and ∆V
o
=V
on
(B
o
−B
oi
). Note the
notation: N =V
on
, in accordance with Fig. 9.12.
Oil compressibility is therefore written,
c
o
=
1
V
on
B
oi
V
on
(B
o
−B
oi
)
∆p
=
B
o
−B
oi
B
oi
1
∆p
, (10.12)
and the simplified material balance equation above is therefore,
N
p
B
o
= NB
oi
¸
c
o
S
o
+c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w
∆p

.
By introducing a total compressibility; c
t
= c
o
S
o
+c
w
S
w
+c
p
, we may write the equation
above,
N
p
B
o
= N B
oi
c
t
1−S
w
∆p, (10.13)
and by introducing the reservoir pore volume using the expression,V
p
S
o
=N B
oi
, we may find
a simple relation between produced oil, N
p
and observed pressure drop, ∆p given by,
N
p
=
V
p
c
t
B
o
∆p.
The linear relationship between oil production N
p
and pressure drop ∆p can be used to
estimate unknown reservoir parameters such as pore volume V
p
or total compressibility c
t
.
Fig. 10.5 shows a linear representation of the data, used to determineV
p
and c
t
.
N
p
∆p
Figure 10.5: Reservoir parameter estimation for dissolved gas ex-
pansion data.
164 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
c
w
= 3 10
−6
psi
−1
p
i
= 4000 psi B
oi
= 1.2417 RB/STB
c
p
= 8.6 10
−6
psi
−1
p
b
= 3330 psi B
ob
= 1.2511 RB/STB
S
w
= 0.2
Example: Oil recovery factor at bubble point pressure
An undersaturated oil reservoir has been produced down to its bubble point pres-
sure. What is the oil recovery at this time when the following parameters are
given?
From Eq.(10.13) we may write,
N
p
N
=
B
oi
B
ob
c
t
∆p
1−S
w
,
where c
t
= c
o
S
o
+c
w
S
w
+c
p
. Using Eq.(10.12) we have the total compressibility,
c
t
=
B
ob
−B
oi
B
oi
∆p
(1−S
w
) +c
w
S
w
+c
p
.
Inserting for the numbers from the table above, we find the total compressibil-
ity; c
t
= 18.24 10
−6
psi
−1
, and the relative production becomes,

N
p
N

3330psi
= 0.01516,
which gives an oil recovery at the bubble point pressure equal to 1.5%.
.
After some time with continuous production, the reservoir pressure will finally decrease
below bubble point pressure. When this happens, gas is produced in the reservoir and the
expansion of this gas will become increasingly important for the process of oil production. The
material balance equation Eq.(10.10) can now be expressed as,
N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] = N
¸
(B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
+
c
w
S
w
+c
p
1−S
w
∆p

.
When we consider the significance of the different expansion factors, we may assume the
gas expansion to be gradually more important than the expansion due to compressibility of
initial water and the formation. Consequently, we may neglect the compressibility term and
write the simplified material balance equation as,
N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] ≈N[(B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
]. (10.14)
The use of this approximate equation is justified through a comparison of the different
volumes A and C in Fig. 10.3. For reservoir pressures p < p
b
, we will find that A C in all
practical cases.
10.7 Gas cap expansion drive 165
R
si
(4000psi) = 510 SCF/STB B
g
(900psi) = 0.00339 RB/SCF
R
s
(900psi) = 122 SCF/STB B
o
(900psi) = 1.0940 RB/STB
Example: Oil recovery below the bubble point pressure
Using the same example as above, we can now calculate the oil recovery down to
a pressure p = 900psi,where the volume factors are given:
The solution gas produced in the reservoir will change the compressibility in
the reservoir drastically. The formula for gas compressibility can be given by
c
g
= 1/V(∆V/∆p), indicating a gas compressibility of c
g
·300 10
−6
psi
−1
. This
is about 15 times larger than the total compressibility at pressures above the bubble
point pressure.
From this simple consideration we may assume all compressibility terms in the
material balance equation, Eq.(10.10), to be negligible compared to the solution
gas compressibility. We may therefore use the approximation Eq.(10.14),
N
p
N
=
(B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
,
where R is the gas-oil ratio (GOR).
Using the numbers from the tables above, we find the oil recovery equal to,

N
p
N

900psi
=
344.4
R+200.7
. (10.15)
In order to numerically define the oil recovery, information about the GOR is
necessary. On the other hand it is quite obvious that oil recovery is maximised
when R is kept as small as possible, i.e. gas should remain in the reservoir if oil
production is to be optimized.
.
From the example above we may state an improtant production strategy for oil reservoirs,
namely that:
All production should come from the oil zone.
Since the gas is considered as the driving force in the reservoir production, it should, if
possible be produced after the oil is produced. If the gas is produced first, we will not only
loose some of the driving force, but the oil will also be smeared out due to the withdrawal of
the gas zone. This oil, due to capillary effects, is most probably lost.
10.7 Gas cap expansion drive
The presence of a gas cap at initial conditions indicates a saturated oil in equilibrium with
the gas. As learned from the example above, production of gas should be minimised since
gas acts as the driving force behind oil production. The wells should therefore be drilled and
166 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
completed with the purposed of optimising oil production, keeping as much gas in the reservoir
as possible.
When a gas cap is discovered in connection with an oil reservoir, we can safely neglect
all terms in the material balance equation, Eq.(10.10), containing expansion of connate water
or formation matrix. In the case of gas cap expansion drive we therefore get the somewhat
simplified material balance equation,
N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] =
NB
oi
¸
(B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
B
oi
+m(
B
g
B
gi
−1)

+(W
e
−W
p
)B
w
,
where the linearized material balance equation is,
F = N(E
o
+mE
g
) +W
e
B
w
.
If we could assume no water influx during oil production, i.e. W
e
= 0, the linearized mate-
rial balance equation could then be written,
F
E
o
= N +mN
E
g
E
o
, (10.16)
which clearly indicates the advantage with linearization, wheremN is the slope and N is the
constant term (N is the intersection point with the y-axis). The assumption of negligible water
influx is rather plausible for reservoirs with a gas cap since the expansion of initial water and
formation matrix is small compared to the expansion of gas cap gas, unless the aquifer size is
large compared to the oil reservoir.
Example: Linearization of material balance equation
The pressure decline in a saturated oil reservoir with a gas cap is driven by ex-
pansion of liberated solution gas E
o
, and gas cap expansion E
g
, as presented in
Eq.(10.16).
In order to estimate initial oil in place N, and the size of the gas cap mN, we
need to know the production data, like produced oil volume at surface condition
N
p
, in addition to the gas-oil ratio R. Further information is also acquired with
respect to the different volume factors B
o
, B
g
and R
s
.
The linearized terms used in Eq.(10.16) are defined as below,
F = N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
],
E
o
= (B
o
−B
oi
) +(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
,
E
g
= B
oi
(
B
g
B
gi
−1),
where we assume no water production or water influx.
For an oil reservoir with a gas cap, we have the following data,
The data in the table above is plotted in Fig. 10.6 which shows a linearization fit
taking into account all data points. From the figure we find the initial oil volume
10.8 Water influx 167
p [psia] F/E
o
10
6
[STB] E
g
/E
o
3150 398.8 4.94
3000 371.8 4.51
2850 368.5 4.29
2700 355.7 4.25
2550 340.6 3.99
2400 340.7 3.93
0 1 2 3 4 5
E
g
/E
o
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
F/E
o
[STB]
Measurements
Linear fit
Figure 10.6: Extrapolation of lineraized gas cap expansion data.
Note that the units on the y- axis (F/E
o
) is given in
10
6
STB.
to be N = 109.5 10
6
STB and the slope or gas cap size mN = 58.7 10
6
STB,
indicating a fractional gas cap size of m = 0.54.
.
10.8 Water influx
Water influx is more the rule, than the exception for normal oil and gas production, i.e. we
expect some influx of water to be present in all situations where reservoir production takes
place over some period of time.
Generally we may expect the influx of water to be both time and pressure dependent and
we write,
W
e
= f (p, t),
where f is some function which will depend on the reservoir and the extent and volume of the
aquifer itself.
168 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
This picture could be clarified by considering a reservoir model, as shown in Fig. 10.7,
where the periphery pressure (pressure near the boundary) in the aquifer zone is equal top
e
.
The pressure difference induced, will then cause water to flow into the reservoir volume. This
flow will obey Darcy’s law,
q
w
=C(p
e
−p),
where C is a constant depending on the various reservoir parameters.
r
e
p
p
e
q
w
q
w
q
w
q
w
q
w
Figure 10.7: Water influx from external aquifer.
The cumulative water influx can be found by integrating over the time this process takes
place,
W
e
=

t
0
q
w
dt ·

i
q
i
∆t
i
=C

i
∆p
i
∆t
i
.
In the equation above we move from a continuous case to a discrete case by summing over
all pressure drops ∆p for all time periods ∆t.
The use of this equation is important when real data is supposed to be fitted in accordance
with a material balance model. The constant C is adjusted in such a way as to secure the match
between the model and the real data.
Example: Pressure maintenance through water injection
In an attempt to maintain the reservoir pressure we may inject water into the reser-
voir. Injection water rate will be proportional to the oil production rate and the
following simplified material balance equation is applied,
N
p
[B
o
+(R−R
s
)B
g
] =W
p
B
w
.
Key data for a typical oil reservoir is,
N
p
= 10000 STB B
o
= 1.2002 RB/STB R = 3000 SCF/STB
B
g
= 0.00107 RB/SCF R
s
= 401 SCF/STB
10.8 Water influx 169
If pressure is maintained, we can conclude from the data above that the relation
between produced oil and injected water has to be,
W
p
= 4.0N
p
,
measured in [STB].
.
170 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
10.9 Exercises
1. The following PVT-data is used in material balance calculations.
p [psia] B
o
R
s
B
g
4000 1.2417 510 –
3500 1.2480 510 –
3330 1.2511 510 0.00087
3000 1.2222 450 0.00096
2700 1.2022 401 0.00107
2400 1.1822 352 0.00119
2100 1.1633 304 0.00137
1800 1.1450 257 0.00161
1500 1.1115 214 0.00196
1200 1.0940 167 0.00249
900 1.0940 122 0.00339
600 1.0763 78 0.00519
300 1.0583 35 0.01066
a) Find the recovery N
p
/N, when the pressure decreases from p
i
= 4000 psia to the
bubble point, p = p
b
.
Compressibility is given; c
w
= 3.0 10
−6
psi
−1
, c
p
= 8.6 10
−6
psi
−1
and connate
water saturation is S
wc
= 0.2.
b) Calculate the recovery N
p
/N for declining pressure, from p
i
= 4000 psia to p =
600 psia.
What is the gas saturation at 600psia, when R = 1000 SCF/STB ?
c) The oil rate is 10000 STB/d at pressure p = 2700 psia and the gas-oil ratio is R =
3000SCF/STB.
What is the injection water rate necessary to maintain the production at p=2700
psia ? Use B
w
= 1.0RB/STB.
2. For an oil reservoir with gas cap, the water injection rate is not known. The material
balance equation with no water production is,
N =
N
p
[B
t
+B
g
(R−R
si
)] −W
i
B
w
(B
t
−B
oi
) +(B
g
−B
gi
)mB
oi
/B
gi
,
where B
t
= B
o
+(R
si
−R
s
)B
g
and W
i
is the water volume injected given in STB.
a) Calculate the initial oil in place and the size of the gas cap when the following PVT-
and production data is given.
The boiling point pressure is 1850 psia.
10.9 Exercises 171
p [psia] 1850 1600 1300 1000
R
s
[SCF/STB] 690 621 535 494
B
o
[RB/STB] 1.363 1.333 1.300 1.258
B
g
[RB/SCF] 0.00124 0.00150 0.00190 0.00250
B
t
[RB/STB] 1.363 1.437 1.594 1.748
ρ
o
[psi/ft] 0.3014 0.3049 0.3090 0.3132
N
p
[STB] – 3.1 10
8
5.5 10
8
5.9 10
8
R [SCF/STB] – 1100 1350 1800
W
i
[STB] – 1.594 10
8
2.614 10
8
3.12 10
8
Water saturation is 0.24, porosity is 0.17 and the water volume factor is approxi-
mately 1.0 RB/STB.
b) Geological information indicates that the reservoir could be approximated to a right
circular cone. Calculate the height of the cone when the pressure at the bottom
level of the oil zone (cone) is 1919 psia ( –the water-oil contact). [Volume of a
right circular cone is πr
2
h/3].
3. Define an expression giving the gas-oil ratio, GOR [SCF/STB] in a reservoir with super-
critical gas saturation.
Find the GOR using the following data;
µ
o
=0.8 cp B
o
=1.363 RB/STB
µ
g
=0.018 cp B
g
=0.001162 RB/SCF
k
o
=1000 mD R
s
= 500 SCF/STB
k
g
=96 mD
4. The data in the table below is taken form an oil reservoir.
p N
p
R B
o
R
s
B
g
[psia] [10
6
STB] [SCF/STB] [RB/STB] [SCF/STB] [RB/SCF]
3330 – – 1.2511 510 0.00087
3150 1.024 1050 1.2353 477 0.00092
3000 1.947 1060 1.2222 450 0.00096
2850 2.928 1160 1.2122 425 0.00101
2700 – – 1.2022 401 0.00107
a) First, assume there is no gas cap present and the production mechanism is dissolved
gas drive. Estimate the initial oil volume in the reservoir.
b) Estimate oil production at p = 2700 psia, by a method of comparing R, calculated
from the material balance equation and secondly calculated from the GOR– equa-
tion (as done in Exercise 1),
R = R
s
+
k
g
k
o
B
o
µ
o
B
g
µ
g
.
A relation k
g
/k
o
exists experimentaly and the gas saturation dependency has been
established:
172 Chapter 10. Material Balance Equation
log(k
g
/k
o
) = 34.5 S
g
−2.54,
where S
wc
=0.30, µ
o
=1.0 cp and µ
g
=0.1 cp.
c) Data from an other well indicates the existence of a small gas cap. Calculate the
initial oil volume, in view of this new information.
Answer to questions:
1. a) 1.52%, b) 46%, 0.43, c) 39830 STB/d 2. a) 2.22 10
9
STB, 0.49, b) 738 ft, 3. 5505
SCF/STB,
4. a) 122.8 10
6
STB, b) by iteration c) 108.6 10
6
STB
Chapter 11
Well Test Analysis
11.1 Introduction
In order to optimise a development strategy for an oil or gas field, we have to consider a reser-
voir model capable of realistically predicting the dynamic behaviour of the field in terms of
production rate and fluid recovery. Such a model is constructed using geological, geophysical
and well data. The necessary parameters are obtained from direct measurements (cores, cut-
tings, formation fluid samples, etc.) and from interpreted data (surface seismic, well logs, well
tests, PVT analysis, etc.). While seismic data and well logs provide a static description of the
reservoir, only well testing data provide information on dynamic reservoir response. The well
test data is therefore a key element in the reservoir model construction, see Fig.11.1.
Geophysics
Interpretation
Reservoir
Engineering
Electric Log PVT, Core Well Test
Geophysical
Model
Log
Model
Well Test
Model
Reservoir Model
Measurement
Figure 11.1: Stages of reservoir modelling.
Interpretation of these data leads to individual "models" (what the geophysicist, the petro-
physicist and well analyst think the reservoir looks like). A brief understanding of the fun-
damental aspects of well testing is necessary in order to incorporate dynamic well test data
into the reservoir model and it is the function of the reservoir engineer to incorporate these
173
174 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
individual models into a cohesive reservoir model [50].
In the initial phase of well tests, pressure measurements are dominated by wellbore storage
effects. During this time, fluid contained in the wellbore and its direct connected volumes are
produced. Then, as the production of the reservoir fluid starts, the fluid near the well expands
and moves towards the area of lower pressure. This movement will be retarded by friction
against the pore walls and the fluid’s own inertia and viscosity. However, as the fluid moves
it will, in turn, create a pressure imbalance and this will induce neighbouring fluid to move
towards the well. This process continues until the drop in pressure, created by the start-up
of production, is dissipated throughout the reservoir. The tail portion of the well test data for
the test of sufficient duration, is affected by the interference from other wells or by boundary
effects such as those that occur when the pressure disturbance reaches the edge of a reservoir.
From this time and onwards, the average pressure in the reservoir will decrease in a way similar
to emptying a confined volume, like a tank of gas.
In this chapter we will develop simple models that can explain the measured well test data.
The models give a rather simplified and idealistic view of the reservoir, characterised by:
• isotropic and homogenous reservoir volume,
• constant porosity, - absolute permeability, - viscosity and - reservoir height (reservoir
thickness),
• test production with relative small pressure gradients, i.e. c∇p ∇p is small (compress-
ibility times pressure gradient squared) ,
• horizontal radial flow paths (no cross flow) and
• constant flow rate.
Even though these items place tight restrictions on the reservoir itself, some important
information can be extracted from the models, explaining reservoir behaviour on basis of the
well test data.
The wellbore pressure data is subdivided into three different production periods, each de-
scribing characteristic well and reservoir pressure response profile:
1. Wellbore storage period. Production from the wellbore and nearby cavities.
2. Semi logarithmic period. Production from an infinite acting reservoir where no bound-
ary effects are observed.
3. Semi steady state period. Production from a confined reservoir (closed volume) where
the interference from the boundary dominates pressure decline.
11.1.1 Systems of Uunits Used in Well Test Analysis
The following systems of units are traditionally used in well test analysis: SI-Units and Field
Units, as presented in Table 11.1.
Some conversion factors mostly used in well test analysis are listed below:
11.2 Wellbore Storage Period 175
Table 11.1: System of units used in well test analysis
Parameter Nomenclature SI-units Field units
Flow rate q Sm
3
/d STB/d
Volume factor B Rm
3
/Sm
3
RB/STB
Thickness h m ft
Permeability k µm
2
mD
Viscosity µ mPas cp
Pressure p kPa psia
Radial distance r m ft
Compressibility c (kPa)
−1
psi
−1
Time t hrs hrs
1 STB/d = 0.159 Sm
3
/d
1 ft = 0.3048 m
1 mD = 0.98710
−3
µm
2
1 cp = 1 mPas
1 psi = 6.895 kPa
11.2 Wellbore Storage Period
Let us consider the initiation of well production at a constant rate at timet
0
=0. First, the fluids
contained in the wellbore itself and its continuous cavities will be produced. This production is
characterised by the expansion of oil and gas in the well, defined by the fluid compressibility,
c
f
and the well storage volume, V
w
.
The definition of the wellbore fluid compressibility is c
f
= ∆V
w
/(V
w
∆p) and the well
flowrate is qB = ∆V
w
/∆t, where the pressure drop in the well is, ∆p. (B is the wellbore fluid
volume factor, measured in reservoir volume pr. standard volume.)
∆p =
qB
c
f
V
w
t, (11.1)
where ∆p = p
i
−p
w
(t) is the difference between initial and wellbore pressure.
The compressibility is often redefined, where the wellbore storage, c
ws
= c
f
V
w
is used to
characterise particular wells.
Example: Wellbore storage effect
A well has a certain volume capacity for fluids. A real well, with an average well
radius of r
w
= 0.1m, at a well depth of H = 2000m has a volume V
w
, accessible to
fluids close to 17 m
3
.
176 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
t, hrs
10 10 10 10
-3 -2 -1 0
Slope = 1
l
o
g
(
-
)
p
p
i
w
f
Figure 11.2: Logarithmic analysis of the pressure drawdown data at
early times of well testing, i.e. in the wellbore storage
period
If well production is measured in standard cubic meter pr. day [Sm
3
/d] and
time in hours [hr], the well pressure is then given by,
p
i
−p
w
=
qB
24c
ws
t,
and the logarithmic pressure difference can be given by,
log(p
i
−p
w
(t)) = log(t) +log

qB
24c
ws

,
where p
w
is the wellbore pressure.
The latter equation, in a logarithmic scale, exhibits the linear relation between
time and pressure drop. This straight line behaviour seen in Fig. 11.2, has a slope
equal to unity.
The technique of using log-log plots is commonly used in well test analysis for
model recognition, but also as here, for estimation of the wellbore storage constant
c
ws
:
c
ws
=
qB
24(p
i
−p
w
(1hr))
, (11.2)
with p
w
(1 hr) picked from the unit slope line.
.
When the well is opened (shut-in) to flow, it is opened at the surface. Due to the wellbore
storage, where the well itself contains a certain volume of compressible fluid, there is a delay
in a flow-rate response at the sand-face (bottom of the well), as seen in Fig. 11.3. This effect
must be incorporated into the interpretation model of the pressure test data.
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 177
q
t
t ∆
Sandface
flow rate
Surface flow rate
∆t
q
t
Sandface
flow rate
t
p
Surface flow rate
∆t
Figure 11.3: The wellbore storage effect on flow-rate during the
drawdown (left) and build- up tests (right).
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period
In this section we will focus our attention on what happens in the reservoir when the fluid is
drawn towards the well due to the pressure drop in the wellbore. We shall develop a theory for
fluid flow in a cylindrical and somewhat idealistic reservoir (see introductory remarks). The
production profile in this period is characterised by a semi logarithmic pressure dependence,
hence the title of this section.
11.3.1 Diffusivity Equation
Transport of oil in porous media is generally described by the law of continuity and Darcy’s
law. If we consider a volume element, as shown in Fig.11.4, we may define the flow of oil in
the x-direction by the equations,
d(ρv
x
)
dx
= −
∂(φρ)
∂t
,
v
x
= −
k
µ
dp
dx
.
where ρ is density, φ is porosity, µ is viscosity, k is permeability and v
x
is flow velocity in
x-direction.
Using an independent co-ordinate system, we may write the same equations as,
∇ (ρv) = −
∂(φρ)
dt
,
v = −
k
µ
∇p,
Substituting these two equations gives us,

ρ
k
µ
∇p

=
∂(φρ)
∂t
. (11.3)
178 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
v
x
v
x+ x ∆
x x
x+ x ∆
p
x
p
x+ x ∆
Figure 11.4: Flow of oil in the x-direction through a volume element.
In accordance with an idealistic view of the reservoir, as mentioned above, we will consider
both permeability and viscosity to be constant, while oil density and reservoir porosity may
vary with pressure, i.e. ρ = ρ(p) and φ = φ(p). From these relations we can define the liquid
compressibility as well as the matrix compressibility as,
c
l
=
1
ρ
∂ρ
∂ p
and c
m
=
1
φ
∂φ
∂ p
.
Eq.(11.3) is further developed using the newly defined compressibilities, c
l
and c
m
, and we
write,
c
l
∇p∇p+∇
2
p =
1
η
∂ p
∂t
, (11.4)
where η = k/(φcµ) and c = c
l
+c
m
, where c is the total compressibility.
Further simplification of Eq.(11.4) rests on the assumption that c
l
∇p∇p <[∇
2
p[, which
is the case in almost all real cases. With this last simplification in mind, we can write the
Diffusitivity equation (independent of co-ordinate systems),

2
p =
1
η
∂ p
∂t
. (11.5)
The diffusitivity equation in cylindrical co-ordinates gives,
1
r

∂r

r
∂ p
∂r

+

2
∂z
2
=
1
η
∂ p
∂t
. (11.6)
With no crossflow in the reservoir, the linearized diffusitivity equation is written,
1
r

∂r

r
∂ p
∂r

=
1
η
∂ p
∂t
. (11.7)
11.3.2 Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation
The solution of the diffusivity equation can be simplified by usingthe linear source approxi-
mation implicating a zero wellbore radius. In case of a constant flow rate the following Initial-
and Boundary condition are defined. Initial conditions are described by the pressure start-up
conditions in the reservoir, while the boundary condition is deduced from Darcy’s law.
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 179
Initial condition:
i) p(r, 0) = p
i
, ∀r,
ii) lim
r→∞
= p
i
, ∀t.
Boundary condition:

r
∂ p
∂r

r=r
w
=
qBµ
2πhk
, ∀t > 0,
Line-source solution: lim
r→∞

r
∂ p
∂r

=
qBµ
2πhk
, ∀t. > 0
In solving the linear diffusitivity Eq.(11.7) we may use the well known Boltzmann trans-
formation,
y =
r
2
4t
,
which gives the following partial derivatives:
∂r = (r/2y)∂y and ∂t =−(t/y)∂y.
When the Boltzmann transformation is applied to Eq.(11.7), the variable of time is made
implicit and the diffusivity equation is reduced to only one variable,

∂y

y
∂ p
∂y

=
y
η
∂ p
∂y
. (11.8)
We may solve Eq.(11.8), by direct integration and we get,
y
∂ p
∂y
= K
3
e
−r
2
/(4ηt)
,
where K
3
is a constant that could be defined, using the boundary condition for the line-source
solution, i.e. K
3
= (qBµ)/(4πhk).
Second integration of Eq.(11.8), gives the following expression,
p
i
−p(r, t) =
qBµ
4πhk


r
2
/(4ηt)
e
−s
s
ds. (11.9)
The integral in Eq.(11.9) is known as the Exponential integral and is originally defined as,
Ei(ξ) ≡

ξ
−∞
e
s
s
ds,
−Ei(−ξ) =


ξ
e
−s
s
ds.
The general solution of the linear diffusitivity equation, Eq.(11.7), can then be presented
as,
p
i
−p(r, t) =
qBµ
4πhk
¸
−Ei


r
2
4ηt

, (11.10)
where η = k/(φµc).
Values of the function −Ei(−ξ) is tabulated in Table 11.2.
180 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
Table 11.2: Table of the function Ei(ξ) for 0.01 ≤ξ ≤ 10.
ξ [−Ei(−ξ)] ξ [−Ei(−ξ)] ξ [−Ei(−ξ)] ξ [−Ei(−ξ)]
0.01 4.0379 0.12 1.6595 0.35 0.7942 0.90 0.2602
0.02 3.3547 0.14 1.5241 0.40 0.7024 1.00 0.2194
0.03 2.9591 0.16 1.4092 0.45 0.6253 1.50 0.1000
0.04 2.6813 0.18 1.3098 0.50 0.5598 2.00 0.0489
0.05 2.4679 0.20 1.2227 0.55 0.5034 2.50 0.0249
0.06 2.2953 0.22 1.1454 0.60 0.4544 3.00 0.0130
0.07 2.1508 0.24 1.0762 0.65 0.4115 4.00 0.0038
0.08 2.0269 0.26 1.0139 0.70 0.3738 5.00 0.0011
0.09 1.9187 0.28 0.9573 0.75 0.3403 7.00 0.0001
0.10 1.8229 0.30 0.9057 0.80 0.3106 10.00 0.0000
11.3.3 Gas Reservoir
The general form of the basic (material balance) equation, given by Eq. (11.7), is valid for both
liquid and gas flow. In the case of more compressible fluids, like gases, some modifications are
necessary in order to use the diffusivity equation.
Attempting to obtain a linear type of the diffusivity equation for a highly compressible gas
flow, Al-Hussainy, Ramey and Crawford (1966), replaced the dependent variable p by the real
gas pseudo pressure m(p) in the following manner,
m(p) = 2

p
p
b
p
µz
dp, (11.11)
where p
b
is an arbitrary (datum) pressure.
Using the equation of state for a real gas,
ρ =
Mp
zRT
,
and a pseudo pressure function m(p) from Eq.(11.11) they derived a simplified linear equation
for a real gas flow:
1
r

∂r
(r
∂m(p)
∂r
) =
1
η
∂m(p)
∂t
, (11.12)
which is precisely the same as Eq.(11.7) where the term p is replaced by a pseudo pressure
function m(p).
It follows from Eq.(11.12) that the behaviour of m(p) vs. time in gas well testing should
have identical trends as pressure vs. time in oil well testing. This fact is commonly used in a
gas well test analysis.
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 181
11.3.4 The Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation in Dimensionless Form
In connection with model recognition and practical application of the well test data it is quite
often advantageous to plot the measured data in such a way as to initially compare it with
a standard and well known function. It is therefore convenient to introduce dimensionless
variables, such as,
r
D
=
r
r
w
,
t
D
=
kt
φµcr
2
w
,
p
D
=
2πhk
qBµ
[p
i
−p(r, t)].
Depending on the units preferred; standard- or field units, the above normalisation can be
written,
SI- units:
r
D
=
r
r
w
, t
D
=
0.0036kt
φµcr
2
w
and p
D
=
πhk
1.842qBµ
[p
i
−p(r, t)],
Field units:
r
D
=
r
r
w
, t
D
=
0.000264kt
φµcr
2
w
and p
D
=
πhk
141.2qBµ
[p
i
−p(r, t)],
Using dimensionless variables for the solution of the linear diffusivity equation, as pre-
sented in Eq.(11.10), we get,
p
D
(r
D
, t
D
) =−
1
2
Ei


r
2
D
4t
D

, (11.13)
where the factor 1/2 in front of the exponential function is of purely historical reasons, related
to the presentation of semi logarithmic data.
11.3.5 Wellbore Pressure for Semi Logarithmic Data
The wellbore pressure (r
D
= 1) is given by,
p
wD
(t
D
) =−
1
2
Ei

−1
4t
D

.
From mathematical tables we have the following approximation,
−Ei(−ξ) =


ξ
e
−s
s
ds ≈(−lnξ −γ) +ξ −
ξ
2
2 2!
+
ξ
3
3 3!
− ,
where γ ·0.5772157 is Euler’s constant.
The interesting question now is related to the validity of the approximation: −Ei(−ξ) ≈
−lnξ −γ, i.e.
p
wD
(t
D
) =−
1
2
Ei


1
4t
D

≈−
1
2

ln
1
4t
D

. (11.14)
182 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
We may write the dimensionless wellbore pressure as,
p
wD
(t
D
) ≈ −
1
2
(ln1−ln4−lnt
D
+γ),

1
2
(lnt
D
+0.80907),
where the next term in the series expansion of Eq. (11.14), is 1/(4t
D
), is thought to be insignif-
icant.
In order to check the accuracy of this approximation we may look at the relative importance
of the next term not included in the approximation Eq.(11.14), i.e.
Error =
1/(4t
D
)
lnt
D
+0.80907
. (11.15)
If we assume the dimensionless time; t
D
≥25, then we would expect the Error always to
be less then 0.25 %.
In order to illustrate the implication of the restrictiont
D
≥25, we can consider the constraint
on time (in hours), for a "typical" oil reservoir with the following parameters (in field units),
k = 100 mD φ = 25 % µ = 1.0 cP
c = 5 10
−6
psi
−1
r
w
= 1 ft
Using the definition of the dimensionless time in field units from above, we find that the
real time that passes before the approximation, Eq.(11.14) is valid, is not more than 0.0012 hrs,
or 4.3 seconds. We therefore conclude that the error done in applying the approximation in
Eq.(11.14), is insignificant for all practical purposes.
In cases where the pressure drop observed in one well is induced by an other well a certain
lateral distance apart from the observation well, we have to consider the restriction imposed
above very carefully. In these cases the approximation may usually not hold.
Generally we may therefore use the following approximation,
p
wD
(r
D
, t
D
) =
1
2

ln
t
D
r
2
D
+0.80907

, (11.16)
with the restriction of t
D
/r
2
D
≥25.
Example: Semi logarithmic analysis of pressure drawdown data
The wellbore pressure is given by the approximation (in dimensionless form),
p
wD
(t
D
) =
1
2
(lnt
D
+0.80907)
Using the definition of dimensionless variables, given above, we may write,
p
i
−p
w
(t) =
qBµ
2πhk
1
2

ln
kt
φµcr
2
w
+0.80907

.
Rewriting this equation using log term instead of ln and standard units,
11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 183
p
i
−p
w
(t) =
2.1208qBµ
hk

logt +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−2.0923

,
and in field units,
p
i
−p
w
(t) =
162.6qBµ
hk

logt +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−3.2275

.
When the well test data is presented in a semi logarithmic plot as shown in
Figure 11.5, we may use one of the two equations above in order to extract vital
information about the reservoir. In the figure, some early data originates from
the wellbore storage period and some late data originates from the period when
boundary effects starts to mask the pressure data. These data does not comply with
the straight line and should therefore be disregarded when the semi logarithmic
data is matched.
p
,

k
P
a
t, hrs
10 10 10 10 10 10
-3 -2 -1 0 1 2
Wellbore storage
effect
Outer boundary
effect
Slope m
Figure 11.5: Pressure drawdown data.
The straight line through the semi logarithmic data points in Figure 11.5, is
defined by the equation,
p(t) ∼−mlogt,
where m is the slope of the straight line. This line is compared with the model
above, and from this comparison we get the following equality (using SI - units),
m = 2.1208
qBµ
hk
.
The reservoir permeability, k could be estimated when information about reser-
voir height, oil viscosity, oil volume factor and oil rate are known.
.
184 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
11.4 Semi Steady State Period
After a period of reservoir production from an infinite reservoir, there comes a period of pro-
duction where the influence from neighbouring wells or reservoir boundaries, such as lateral
extension, faults or sands thinning out, are going to play an increasingly important role. This
period is called the semi steady state period and a steadily decreasing reservoir pressure is
observed (decreased average pressure in a confined reservoir volume). Simultaneously, the
pressure profile in the reservoir is maintained unchanged.
It should be emphasised that this is an idealised model of how we think the reservoir re-
sponds to boundaries effects, and as such, prudent interpretation of steady state data is highly
recommendable.
In Figure 11.6, several pressure profiles are plotted. At constant well production, the draw-
down pressure profile is assumed to be constant, i.e. ∂ p(r)/∂t = constant, in the reservoir.
p
e
p
r
w
r
e
Figure 11.6: Steady state pressure profiles.
Since the pressure profile is assumed to be constant, we expect the diffusitivity equation to
be time independent, i.e. a constant K
1
balances the diffusitivity equation,
1
r

∂r

r
∂ p
∂r

= K
1
.
Integration of the time independent diffusivity equation gives,
r
∂ p
∂r
=
1
2
K
1
r
2
+K
2
, (11.17)
where K
2
is also a constant.
The boundary conditions in the semi steady state are partly defined as for the case of the
logarithmic period, but in addition we have assumed that the pressure profile does not signifi-
cantly vary after the reservoir boundary limit is reached. At this limit, the reservoir pressure is
steadily decreasing while the pressure profile is conserved.
11.4 Semi Steady State Period 185
Boundary condition in the well:

r
∂ p
∂r

r=r
w
=
qBµ
2πhk
.
Boundary condition at infinite reservoir radius:

r
∂ p
∂r

r=r
e
= 0.
Using the boundary conditions to define the constantsK
1
and K
2
, and integrating Eq.(11.17)
from the well (r = r
w
), gives,
p(r) = p(r
w
) +
qBµ
2πhk

ln
r
r
w

1
2
r
2
r
2
e

, (11.18)
where r
e
is the radial distance to the boundary of the confined reservoir, i.e. r
e
r
w
and so
r
w
/r
e
→0.
11.4.1 Average Reservoir Pressure
The average reservoir pressure is not an observable quantity. The average pressure is a weighted
function of the pressure in the whole reservoir and could be defined as,
p =

r
e
r
w
pdV

r
e
r
w
dV
.
Substituting for p given by Eq.(11.18) and integrating, we find the average reservoir pres-
sure,
p = p(r
w
) +
qBµ
2πhk

ln
r
e
r
w

3
4

, (11.19)
Eq.(11.19) gives the average pressure in a cylindrical reservoir with an outer radius equal
to r
e
and where the well is located in the centre. In real cases, however, the reservoir shape is
seldom cylindrical and more so, the well position is most frequently off centred. In these real
cases we may not use Eq.(11.19) directly. Instead a slight modified version given by Eq.(11.20)
is used, where A is the top area of the reservoir andC
A
is a parameter characterising the shape
and relative position of the well.
The average pressure for a general reservoir is then written,
p = p(r
w
) +
qBµ
2πhk

1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w

, (11.20)
where γ is Euler’s constant.
In the case of a cylindrical reservoir, with a centred well location, i.e. A = π(r
2
e
−r
2
w
), we
find the shape-factor C
A
·4πe
(3/2−γ)
= 31.6206 (Dietz,1965).
186 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
11.4.2 Well Skin Factor
When a well is drilled it is always necessary to have a positive differential pressure acting from
the wellbore to the formation to prevent inflowof the reservoir fluids (blow-out). Consequently,
some of the drilling fluid penetrates the formation and particles suspended in the mud can
partially penetrate the pore spaces, reducing permeability, and creating a so-calleddamaged
zone next to the wellbore.
Assuming modification of the permeability in the damaged zone (r
w
< r < r
s
) is k
s
, and
within the rest of the reservoir (r
s
< r < r
e
) is k, as shown in Fig. 11.7.
p
e
p
s
p
wf
r
e
r
s
r
w
Figure 11.7: Skin effect caused by formation damage.
For the steady state inflow we can write the following equations for a cylindrical reservoir
with a centred well, as stated for formation beds in series,
p
s
−p
w

qBµ
2πk
s
h
ln
r
s
r
w
,
p
e
−p
s

qBµ
2πkh
ln
r
e
r
s
.
Note the approximation made due to the fact that r
e
r
w
and r
e
r
s
.
The total pressure drop from the wellbore through the reservoir is given by,
p
e
−p
w
= p
e
−p
s
+ p
s
−p
w
=
qBµ
2πkh
¸
ln
r
e
r
w
+(
k
k
s
−1)ln
r
s
r
w

, (11.21)
where the last term is called the mechanical skin factor S,
S = (
k
k
s
−1)ln
r
s
r
w
. (11.22)
Hence,
p
e
−p
w
=
qBµ
2πkh
(ln
r
e
r
w
+S), (11.23)
11.4 Semi Steady State Period 187
where the skin is a number characterising the cylindrical volume next to the wellbore.
As seen from Eq.(11.23), the skin may be associated with a characteristic pressure drop
∆p
skin
caused by the reduction in permeability in the skin zone,
∆p
skin
=
qBµ
2πkh
S. (11.24)
From this equation it is evident that when the skin S is positive, an increased pressure drop
towards the well is observed, while when S is negative the pressure drop is less than expected.
Skin is associated with the condition of reservoir permeability in the closed volume next to
the well. If the permeability in the skin zone is reduced, due to drilling or well treatments, then
the well will experience an increased pressure drop in this region while the skin is positive. If
the well, on the other hand, has a permeability higher than expected, then the skin is negative,
i.e.
• Skin factor is positive, S > 0 when k
s
< k and
• Skin factor is negative, S < 0 when k
s
> k.
11.4.3 Wellbore Pressure at Semi Steady State
The reservoir pressure development in a closed reservoir could be compared to the production
from a pressurised closed tank of oil. Production is maintained through volume expansion
where the combined compressibility of oil and reservoir rock ,c, is the important parameter.
The total compressibility of oil and reservoir rock is defined by, c = −dV/(Vdp), which
can be rewritten as,
dp
dt
=−
qB
cV
,
where qB is the oil flow in the reservoir andV = φAh is the reservoir pore volume.
At constant reservoir flow rate, we may integrate from initial pressure, p
i
to the average
pressure p and we get the following simple relation between reservoir pressure and time,
p
i
−p(t) =
qB
cV
t. (11.25)
Combining Eq.(11.19) which describes the semi steady state analysis, with Eq.(11.25), we
get,
p
i
−p(r
w
) =
qBµ
2πhk

1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
+S

+
qB
cV
t (11.26)
Note that we in Eq.(11.26) have introduced the skinS as an extra term in the equation, account-
ing for a partly damaged zone around the well.
Dimensionless variables are introduced, following the same definitions as for the case of
semi steady state, with the exception of the dimensionless timet
DA
, which is defined,
t
DA
=
kt
φAcµ
. (11.27)
In t
DA
dimensionless time is referenced to the reservoir drainage areaA.
188 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
Hence, Eq.(11.26) can be rewritten using dimensionless variables and we get,
p
wD
=

2πt
DA
+
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
+S

. (11.28)
11.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions
To this time we have developed the pressure function for the three periods of reservoir produc-
tion, referring to the wellbore storage period, the semi logarithmic period and the semi steady
state period, as if they were independent sequences reservoir production. In reality, well test
data, originating from the different periods are not easily distinguishable and quite a lot of
effort is spent identifying which data belongs to which period of production.
Summing up what we already know, we may write the following three pressure equations,
Well storage period:
p
i
−p
w
=
qB
c
ws
t.
Semi logarithmic period:
p
i
−p
w
=
qBµ
2πhk
1
2

ln
kt
φµcr
2
w
+0.80907+2S

.
Semi steady state period:
p
i
−p
w
=
qBµ
2πhk

2πk
φAcµ
t +
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
+S

.
Using the following set of dimensionless variables,
SI- units:
r
D
=
r
r
w
, t
DA
=
0.0036kt
φAcµ
, p
D
=
hk
1.842qBµ
(p
i
−p(r, t)),
Field units:
r
D
=
r
r
w
, t
DA
=
0.000264kt
φAcµ
, p
D
=
hk
141.2qBµ
(p
i
−p(r, t),
we get the three wellbore pressure equations in dimensionless form,
Well storage period:
p
WS
wD
=
A
c
D
t
DA
, where c
D
=
c
st
2πhφc
.
Semi logarithmic period:
p
SL
wD
=
1
2

ln
4A
r
2
w
e
γ
t
DA
+2S

.
Semi steady state period:
p
SS
wD
=

2πt
DA
+
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
+S

.
11.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions 189
11.5.1 Transition Time Between Semi Logarithmic Period and Semi Steady State
Period
The difficulties in recognising the semi logarithmic data is primarily related to identification
of the time when the wellbore pressure, changes from being semi logarithmic to being semi
steady state dominated.
p
wD
p
wD
SL
p
wD
SS
t
DA
semi
logaritmic state
semi
steady state
Figure 11.8: Transition between semi logarithmic period and semi
steady state period.
Since the wellbore pressure development in the two periods are principally different, as
seen in the Fig.11.8, we may define the transient time when one period is followed by the
other, by the minimum pressure difference min¦p
SS
wD
−p
SL
wD
¦, such that
d(p
SS
wD
(t
DA
) −p
SL
wD
(t
DA
))
dt
DA
= 0.
Carrying out the derivation we find the transition time, t
DA
= 1/(4π), which can be transferred
to real time by using the definition of dimenisonless time.
11.5.2 Recognition of Semi Logarithmic Data
Appropriate plotting of the well test data is an important tool in the process of differentiating
the different reservoir production periods.
In a linear-linear plot as shown in Fig. 11.9, we can identify the semi logarithmic data,
following a non linear time development. For real data, such identification could be rather
difficult to perform and therefore of less practical importance.
The purpose of plotting data is partly to be able to identify the different production periods,
but equally important, to facilitate quantitative data analysis. This analysis is mainly performed
by plotting the interesting data linearly, i.e. data plotted as a straight line. This technique is
shown in Fig. 11.10 where we have plotted the semi logarithmic data as shown in Fig. 11.9, in
a linear-log plot. The semi logarithmic data is plotted as a straight line and from the slope of
this line, we can get important reservoir information.
190 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
p
wD
p
wD
SL
p
wD
SS
p
wD
WS
t
DA
1/4π
Figure 11.9: Linear-linear plot of well test data..
p
wD
p
wD
SL
p
wD
SS
p
wD
WS
log(t )
DA
1/4π
Figure 11.10: Linear-log plot of well test data.
11.6 Exercises
1. Claculate the dimensionless time t
D
for the following cases,
a) with data:
φ = 0.15 r = 10cm
µ = 0.3cp t = 10s
c = 15 10
−5
atm
−1
k = 0.1D
b) with data: φ, µ and c as above and
r = 10cm t = 1000s k = 0.01D
2. Find the exponential intergrals and pressure drops for the following cases,
a) with data:
φ = 0.12 r = 10cm
µ = 0.7cp t = 1s
c = 10 10
−5
atm
−1
k = 0.05D
h = 2400cm q = 10000cm
3
/s
11.6 Exercises 191
b) with data: φ, µ, c and h as above and
r = 30000cm t = 24h
3. In a reservoir at initial pressure, a well with a flow rate of 400 STB/D is shut-in. The
reservoir is characterised by the following parameters:
k= 50 mD φ = 0.3 c= 10 10
−6
psi
−1
h= 30 ft µ = 3.0 cp B
o
= 1.25 RB/STB
r
w
= 0.5 ft
a) At what time, after the shut-in, will the approximationEi(−x) =−ln(xe
γ
) be valid
? (Eulers constant γ=0.5772.
b) What is the pressure draw-down in the well after 3 hours of production?
c) For how long must the well produce, at constant flow rate, until a pressure drop of
1 psi is observed in a neighbouring well 2000 f t away?
4. Use the diffusivity equation,
3

i=1
d
dx
i

ρ
dp
dx
i

=
φµ
k

dt
,
and the expression for the compressibility at constant temperature,
c =
1
ρ

dp
,
to derive the diffusivity equation for one phase liquid flow. (Assume the liquid com-
pressibility to be small and constant for the pressures in mind.) Show that:
3

i=1
d
2
p
dx
2
i
=
φµc
k
dp
dt
.
5. For a reservoir at initial pressure with 3 wells (W1, W2 and W3) where W1 is an obser-
vation well, the following data is given:
P
i
= 4483 psia B
o
= 1.15 RB/STB h=30 ft
k
o
= 7.5 mD S
o
= 0.80 c
o
= 8.0 10
−6
psi
−1
µ
o
= 1.15 cp S
w
= 0.20 c
w
= 3.0 10
−6
psi
−1
c
f
= 4.0 10
−6
psi
−1
r
w
= 0.276 ft
Use the total compressibility c
t
= S
o
c
o
+S
w
c
w
+c
f
in the calculations.
A pressure drop of 4439 psi is observed in well W1 after 1600 hours of production at a
constant flow rate of 190 STB/D from well W2 and after 1550 hours of production of 80
STB/D from W3. Well W2 is located 2000 f t north of W1 and W3 is 1900 f t west of
W1.
Estimate the average reservoir porosity between the wells.
192 Chapter 11. Well Test Analysis
Answers to questions:
1. a) 1481, b) 14815, 2. a) 4.895, b) 0.62, 3. a) 15.4 s, b) 51.3 bar, c) 227 hr, 5. 0.175
Chapter 12
Methods of Well Testing
12.1 Pressure Tests
Well testing has become a widely used tool for reservoir characterisation and parameter identi-
fication. The development of well testing has accelerated from rudimentary productivity tests
into a powerful technique which is strengthening the understanding of complex reservoir char-
acteristics. Analysis of pressure trends enables us to evaluate several important reservoir pa-
rameters and to appraise the drainage zone.
Pressure tests are classified in accordance with their operation.
• Pressure drawdown test (Fig. 12.1,upper left): The well is opened to flow at a constant
rate causing pressure drawdown.
• Pressure build-up test (Fig. 12.1,upper right): Production of constant flow rate well is
shut-in, causing pressure build-up.
• Falloff test (Fig. 12.1,lower left): Injecting at constant rate and injection well shut-in,
causing pressure falloff.
• Multiple rate (Fig. 12.1,lower right): Well tested at different flow rates, each lasting until
the flowing pressure stabilises. This is followed by a shut-in period, which again lasts
until the pressure stabilises.
Drawdown and build-up tests are the two most common types of well tests and the selection
of which one to use depends on the practical field requirements.
A drawdown test simply involves flow rate measurements and pressure decline in a flowing
well. In a conventional drawdown test, the well is first shut-in until wellbore pressures stabilise,
and then opened and produced at a steady rate while the pressure decrease within the well bore
is monitored.
Unfortunately, flowrates are still measured at the surface in most well tests. Such flowrates
do not reflect the true downhole conditions as they are considerably affected by wellbore stor-
age, fluid segregation and gas liberation. This poses a problem as well testing theory requires
downhole flow rates.
Build-up tests are basically the opposite of drawdown tests. Instead of measuring pressures
in a flowing well, as in drawdown testing, the well is shut-in and the increase or build-up in
193
194 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
q
t
t
0
0
p
q
t
t
0
0
p
q
t
t
0
0
p
q
t
t
0
0
p
Figure 12.1: Methods of well testing.
pressure is monitored. Nevertheless, as with drawdown tests, build-up tests are still affected
by wellbore storage effects during the initial stages or "early time"-part of the test. Therefore
pressure readings taken from the beginning of the test has to be ignored and all analysis is done
on the later part of the pressure response, even though it has been realised that this discarded
early time data contains a considerable amount of information.
In practice, it is not so easy to carry out a "pure" drawdown or build-up test as the produc-
tion schedule prior to the test, is usually complex. For example, a Drill-Stem Test (DST) is per-
formed by carrying out a series of build-up and drawdown tests in relatively quick succession.
The observed pressure build-up/drawdown response, within a given time, incorporates all the
pressure transient effects caused by every previous step-change in production rate. However,
multiple rate tests are not as simple as it might appear, while it relies on additional reservoir in-
formation as well as complex interpretation of pressure data using analysis based on theoretical
models.
12.2 Pressure Drawdown Test
Drawdown test analysis are done by direct application of the wellbore pressure solutions, pre-
sented in the previous chapter.
12.2 Pressure Drawdown Test 195
A plot of pressure versus the log of time (p, log(t)), will show the radial flow solution as a
straight line, see Fig. 12.2. This fact provides us with an easy and seemingly precise graphical
procedure for interpretation of the pressure data. The slope and intercept of the portion of the
curve forming a straight line is used for permeability and skin factor calculations.
The early portion of the data is unfortunately, distorted by wellbore storage and skin effects
as indicated in Fig. 12.2. Well tests have therefore to be made long enough to overcome both
effects and to produce a straight line in a semi logaritmic plot.
But even this approach presents drawbacks. Sometimes more than one "apparent" straight
line appears and analysis finds it difficult to decide which one to use. An alternative straight
line could be the signature of a fault located near the well.
The latter portion of the pressure transient is affected by the interference from other wells
or by boundary effects such as those that occur when the pressure response reaches the edge of
the reservoir.
12.2.1 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Logarithmic Conditions
From the previous chapter in section "Wellbore pressure solutions", we may formulate the semi
logarithmic pressure solutions inSI-units and Field-units as:
SI-units:
p
w
= p
i
−2.1208
qBµ
kh
(logt +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−2.0923+
S
1.151
). (12.1)
Field-units:
p
w
= p
i
−162.6
qBµ
kh
(logt +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−3.2275+
S
1.151
). (12.2)
p
,

k
P
a
t, hrs
10 10 10 10 10 10
-3 -2 -1 0 1 2
Wellbore storage
effect
Outer boundary
effect
Slope m
Figure 12.2: Semi-logarithmic plot of pressure drawdown test data.
196 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
In Fig. 12.2 we recognise the semi logarithmic data, as the data points being plotted on
a straight line, where m is the slope of the straight line. If we define the slope as a positive
number,
m =
(p
i
−p
w
(t
1
)) −(p
i
−p
w
(t
2
))
log(t
1
) −log(t
2
)
> 0,
we may use Eqs. (12.1) or (12.2), to define the reservoir permeability, k. The known m-value
yields a permeability value.
SI-units: Field-units:
k =
2.1208qBµ
mh
[µm
2
], k =
162.6qBµ
mh
[mD].
The skin factor S is conventionally identified from the same plot, see Fig. 12.2. The linear
pressure at time t = 1 hr is used in Eqs. (12.1) or (12.2) and the skin is directly calculated.
(Note that p
w
(1hr) in the equations below, is a data point on the straight line which needs not
necessarily correspond to an observed pressure.)
SI-units:
S = 1.151
¸
p
i
−p
w
(1hr)
m
−log
k
φµcr
2
w
+2.0923

.
Field-units:
S = 1.151
¸
p
i
−p
w
(1hr)
m
−log
k
φµcr
2
w
+3.2275

.
12.2.2 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Steady State Conditions
When the pressure transient is affected by the interference from boundary effects or other
wells, the pressure curve deviates downwards from the straight line behaviour. Sometimes
such disturbances overlap with other kinds of "early time" effects like large scale reservoir
inhomogeneity, neighbouring sealing faults or other pressure disturbing zones. These effects
can completely mask the all-important pressure response such that proper pressure analysis
becomes impossible.
Under semi steady state test conditions we are investigating a sealed-off reservoir, where
the well is producing from its own drained area. At these late times in the development of
the well test procedure we may likely observe complicated pressure data which is masked
by several effects. Semi steady state tests are therefore normally not preferred when typical
reservoir parameters like permeability, productivity and skin are estimated. The analysis of
semi steady state data is more rigorous than might possible be interpreted by the wellbore
pressure equation.
The semi steady state equation is written,
p
w
(t) = p
i

qBµ
2πkh

2πkt
φcµA
+
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
+S

, (12.3)
12.3 Pressure Build-Up Test 197
where the pressure is a linear function of time.
Semi steady state data is plotted as a straight line in a line-line plot, as seen in Fig. 12.3.
The asymptotic pressure value p
0
= p
w
(t = 0), in the figure, enables us to define the Dietz
shape factor C
A
. In Field Units, Eq. (12.3) can re-written,
p
0
= p
i

162.6qBµ
kh

log
4A
e
γ
r
2
w
−logC
A
+
S
1.151

. (12.4)
t, hrs
0
p
w
f
,
p
s
i
p
o
Figure 12.3: Semi steady state analysis of pressure drawdown data.
12.3 Pressure Build-Up Test
In analysing drawdown data, we could directly apply the "Wellbore pressure solutions" from
the previous chapter, since pressure is decreasing with time, at constant wellbore rate. In the
case of pressure build-up, when the well is closed, the "Wellbore pressure solutions" may not be
used directly. Fortunately, the same equations can be applied since the process, the bottomhole
pressure drawdown is, in principle, similar too the process of pressure build-up.
Normally, the build-up pressure data is considered to be more reliable than the pressure
drawdown data, since the influence fromdynamical effects near the well is of lesser importance.
If a well is shut-in at a certain time t, the no-flow conditions, as shown in Fig. 12.4, can be
described by a superposition technique.
As a theoretical assumption we may consider the wellbore rate to be both positive,
+q and negative, −q, as indicated in Fig. 12.4. The no-flow condition is obtained
when the positive and negative well rate are summed, i.e. (+q) +(−q) = 0. Con-
sequently, the no-flow condition can be described by adding the pressure solutions
for the positive flow rate and the pressure solution for the negative flow rate, using
the "Wellbore pressure solutions" (drawdown pressure analysis).
The technique of superposition is depicted in Fig. 12.5. At timet when the well is shut-in,
the wellbore pressure is influenced by the continuos production at positive rate+q causing
the pressure to decrease. The influence by the negative rate −q is to increase the wellbore
pressure. For times greater than t, we will observe a combined pressure development caused
198 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
q
q = 0
+q
-q
time
∆t t
0
Figure 12.4: Pressure build-up test. Representation of a non-flowing
well performance by a superposition technique.
by a decreasing pressure due to the positive well rate (−q) and a increasing pressure due to the
negative well rate (−q).
p
i
p ( t)
w

p (t+ t)
w

0
0
t t+∆t
∆t ∆t
∆t
∆t
t
A
A"
B
B"
Figure 12.5: Pressure formation by superposition in build-up tests.
Using wellbore pressure, we define,
p
w
(∆t): Pressure in the well after shut-in.
p
w
(t +∆t): Pressure in the well given by continuos production at
positive well rate.
p
i
−p
w
(∆t): Pressure in the well given by start-up of continuos
production at negative well rate (increasing pressure contribution).
12.4 Pressure Test Analysis 199
The superposition principle gives,
p
w
(∆t) = p
w
(t +∆t) + p
i
−p
w
(∆t),
where p
w
on the left side of the equallity is the well shut-in pressure, whilep
w
on the right side
is the well flow pressure. Using dimensionless pressures, the well shut-in pressure is given,
p
i
−p
w
(∆t) =
qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) −p
wD
(∆t
D
)].
If skin is included and the wellbore pressure at shut-in is p
w
(∆t
D
= 0) = p
ws
, we have
p
i
−p
ws
=
qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(t
D
) +S].
From the above equations, we may derive the following expressions for the wellbore pres-
sure.
p
w
(∆t) = p
i

qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) −p
wD
(∆t
D
)], (12.5)
p
w
(∆t) = p
ws
+
qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(t
D
) −p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) + p
wD
(∆t
D
) +S], (12.6)
p
w
(∆t) = p−
qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) −p
wD
(∆t
D
) −2πt
DA
]. (12.7)
Pressure build-up data is analysed using the three equations above, where Eq. (12.6) is
applied to estimate the reservoir permeability and skin, while Eq. (12.7) is used to determine
the average pressure p. Eq. (12.7) is derived on the basis of average pressure development,
where
p
i
−p =
qB
c
t
V
t =
qBµ
2πhk
2πt
DA
, t
DA
=
k
φAcµ
t.
It is important to notice that the dimensionless pressures p
D
in Eqs. (12.5) to (12.7) could
represent the equations describing both semi logarithmic period as well as semi steady state
period, i.e. depending on the analysis to be performed, we may chose which set of equations
we think will fit the data best.
12.4 Pressure Test Analysis
Based on Eqs. (12.5) to (12.7), we may perform different analysis, where certain assumptions
are made about the nature of pressure test data. In the following, two examples are give on how
pressure build-up data might be analysed.
12.4.1 Miller - Dyes - Hutchinson (MDH) Analysis
In this analysis [43] we will assume that the semi logarithmic period is long enough to recognise
a straight line behaviour in a semi logarithmic plot, i.e. we need to be able to differentiate
between the three different periods, described in the previous chapter.
200 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
p
i
p(t+ t)~ p(t) ∆
t t+∆t
Figure 12.6: Pressure approximation in MDH-analysis.
Shortly after the well is shut-in, at timet, we start to monitor the wellbore pressure p
w
(∆t).
For some period of time we may assumet ∆t and during this period the dimensional pressure
approximation p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) · p
wD
(t
D
) is valid, as depicted in Fig. 12.6.
Combining Eq. (12.6) and the above assumption, gives the wellbore pressure
p
w
(∆t) = p
ws
+
qBµ
2πhk
[p
wD
(∆t
D
) +S]. (12.8)
If the pressure development is assumed to have reached the semi logarithmic state, after
shut-in of the well, we may write: p
wD
(∆t) = p
SL
wD
(∆t
D
), with reference to the definitions of
semi logarithmic solutions in the previous chapter.
Using the definitions of dimensionless time and pressure for semi logarithmic data, we get
the following pressure expression,
p
w
(∆t) = p
ws
+m
¸
log∆t +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−2.0923+
S
1.151

,
where m is the slope of the linearized semi logarithmic data (see Fig. 12.7) and the number
2.0923 is a conversion factor to SI-units.
SI-units or Field units depends on preference and the following definitions.
SI-units: m =
2.1208qBµ
hk
and −2.0923
Field units: m =
162.6qBµ
hk
and −3.2275
From Eq. (12.8), we find the skin factor by direct substitution, see also Fig. 12.7,
S = 1.151
¸
p
w
(∆t = 1hr) −p
ws
m
−log
k
φµcr
2
w
+2.0923

.
The average reservoir pressure p, could be evaluated on the basis of Eq. (12.7), using the
same approximation as above, namely; p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) · p
wD
(t
D
).
p
w
(∆t) = p−
m
1.151
[p
wD
(t
D
) −p
wD
(∆t
D
) −2πt
DA
].
12.4 Pressure Test Analysis 201
p
w
p
w
( =1hr) ∆t
0.1 1 10 100
∆t
∆t =
φ µ c A
k C 0.0036
A
p
Figure 12.7: MDH analysis of semi logarithmic pressure data.
We shall now assume that the reservoir had reached its semi steady state period before or
shortly after the well was shut-in. The interpretation of the different dimensionless pressures
are accordingly,
p
wD
(t
D
) = p
SS
wD
(t
D
) and p
wD
(∆t
D
) = p
SL
wD
(∆t
D
),
and the wellbore pressure is the written,
p
w
(∆t) = p−
m
1.151
[p
SS
wD
(t
D
) −p
SL
wD
(∆t
D
) −2πt
DA
],
= p−
m
1.151
¸
2πt
DA
+
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w

1
2
ln
4∆t
D
e
γ
−2πt
DA

,
= p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
A
C
A
r
2
w
∆t
D

.
Using SI-units we get,
p
w
(∆t) = p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
φµcA
0.0036kC
A
∆t

.
If the reservoir has reached its semi steady state period before (or shortly after) the well
was shut-in, the average reservoir pressure p is found by following the semi logarithmic line to
the time ∆t = φµcA/(0.0036kC
A
), as shown in Fig. 12.7, where the average pressure is,
p = p
w

∆t =
φµcA
0.0036kC
A

.
12.4.2 Matthews - Brons - Hazebroek (MBH) Analysis (Horner plot)
Following the same approach as in the above section, we have assumed the pressure difference
p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) −p
wD
(t
D
) to be small but finite, i.e.,
202 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) −p
wD
(t
D
) =
1
2
ln
t +∆t
t
. (12.9)
In practical terms, compared to MDH - analysis, this means that the well could be closed
somewhat earlier in the MBH - analysis [36]. The pressure difference is depicted in Fig. 12.8,
which points out that the time of shut-in t
D
, may come earlier and further up on the pressure
decline curve. In Fig. 12.8 we have p
w
(t) ≥ p
w
(t +∆t), while for dimension less pressures
p
wD
(t
D
+∆t
D
) ≥ p
wD
(t
D
), since p
wD
∝ (p
i
−p
w
).
p
i
p(t+ t) ∆
p(t)
t t+∆t
Figure 12.8: Wellbore pressure difference at the shut-in time, in
MBH - analysis.
Combining the approximation given by Eq. (12.9) and the wellbore pressure solution Eq. (12.6),
we get
p
w
(∆t) = p
ws
+
m
1.151
¸

1
2
ln
t +∆t
t
+ p
wD
(∆t
D
) +S

, (12.10)
where p
wD
(∆t
D
) = p
SL
wD
(∆t
D
), is considered to be in the semi logarithmic period.
Using SI-units this gives,
p
w
(∆t) = p
ws
+m
¸
−log
t +∆t
t
+log∆t +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−2.0923+
S
1.151

,
= p
ws
+m
¸
log
∆t
t +∆t
+logt +log
k
φµcr
2
w
−2.0923+
S
1.151

. (12.11)
Permeability and skin are estimated by plotting the build-up pressures p
w
(∆t) against the
time function ∆t/(t +∆t) on a semi logarithmic plot, as indicated by Eq. (12.11). The slope of
the linear data is m and hence k or kh are found by substitution. The skin is calculated at the
time ∆t = 1, where t +1 ·t is assumed, i.e.,
S = 1.151
¸
p
w
(∆t = 1hr) −p
ws
m
−log
k
φµcr
2
w
+2.0923

.
The pressure p
w
(∆t = 1) is read directly from the plot, as shown in Fig. 12.9.
12.4 Pressure Test Analysis 203
p
w
p
w
( =1) ∆t
1
10
-2
10
-3
10
-4
10
-1
p


t
t+ t


t
t+ t
1
C t
A DA
=
p
i
Figure 12.9: Horner plot. Wellbore pressure data plotted for MBH -
analysis.
The pressure approximation Eq. (12.9) may be applied in a similar way as done above, for
defining the average reservoir pressure p. Substituting Eq. (12.9) in Eq. (12.7), we get
p
w
(∆t) = p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
t
+−p
wD
(∆t
D
) −2πt
DA

,
= p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
t
+ p
wD
(t
D
) −
1
2
(ln∆t
D
+0.80907) −2πt
DA

,
= p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
∆t
+ p
wD
(t
D
) −
1
2
(lnt
D
+0.80907) −2πt
DA

,
= p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
∆t
+ p
wD
(t
D
) −p
SL
wD
(t
D
) −2πt
DA

. (12.12)
If we then assume that the well is in its semi steady state at the time of shut-in, i.e.
p
wD
(t
D
) = p
SS
wD
(t
D
), the we get
p
w
(∆t) = p−
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
∆t

1
2
ln
4t
D
e
γ
+2πt
DA
+
1
2
ln
4A
e
γ
C
A
r
2
w
−2πt
DA

,
= p−m
¸
log

t +∆t
∆t
A
C
A
r
2
w
1
t
D

. (12.13)
Since t
D
in Eq. (12.13) is a well defined time (time of shut-in), we may estimate the average
reservoir pressure as the pressure on the straight line (see Fig. 12.9) at the time,
∆t
t +∆t
=
A
C
A
r
2
w
t
D
=
1
C
A
t
DA
.
If we now assume that the well is in its semi logarithmic state at the time of shut-in, i.e.
p
wD
(t
D
) = p
SL
wD
(t
D
), we then get by substitution into Eq. (12.12),
204 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
p
w
(∆t) = p
m
1.151
¸
1
2
ln
t +∆t
∆t
−2πt
DA

At the time ∆t/(t +∆t) = 1, we get
p
w

∆t
t +∆t
= 1

= p+
m
1.151
[2πt
DA
],
= p
qBµ
2πhk
¸

kt
φAcµ

,
= p+
qBt
Vc
, where V = φAh (12.14)
Under semi steady state conditions we have seen that,
p
i
−p =
qBt
Vc
,
and consequently we may write,
p
w

∆t
t +∆t
= 1

= p+(p
i
−p) = p
i
.
The initial reservoir pressure is defined in Fig. 12.9 on the straight line at time∆t/(t +∆t) =
1.
12.5 Exercises 205
12.5 Exercises
1. A well is tested by exploiting it at a constant rate of 1500 STB/d for a period of 100
hours. It is suspected, from seismic and geological evidence, that the well is draining
an isolated reservoir block which has approximately a 2:1 rectangular geometrical shape
and the extended drawdown test is intended to confirm this. The reservoir data and the
flowing bottom hole pressures recorded during the test are detailed below.
h = 20 f t c = 15 10
−6
psi
−1
r
w
= 0.33 f t µ
o
= 1cp
φ = 0.18 B
o
= 1.20RB/STB
Time p
w
Time p
w
Time p
w
(hours) (psi) (hours) (psi) (hours) (psi)
0 3500 (p
i
) 7.5 2848 50 2597
1 2917 10 2830 60 2545
2 2900 15 2794 70 2495
3 2888 20 2762 80 2443
4 2879 30 2703 90 2392
5 2869 40 2650 100 2341
a) Calculate the effective permeability and skin factor of the well.
b) Make an estimate of the area being drained by the well and the Dietz shape factor.
(after L.P.Dake)
2. A discovery well is produced for a period of approximately 100 hours proir to closure
for an initial pressure buildup survey. The production data and estimated reservoir and
fluid properties are listed below.
q = 123STB/d φ = 0.2
N
p
= 500STB µ = 1cp
h = 20 f t B
oi
= 1.22RB/STB
r
w
= 0.3 f t c = 20 10
−6
psi
−1
(c
o
S
o
+c
w
S
w
+c
f
)
A = 300acers
Time p
w
Time p
w
Time p
w
(hours) (psi) (hours) (psi) (hours) (psi)
0.0 4506 1.5 4750 4.0 4766
0.5 4675 2.0 4757 6.0 4770
0.66 4705 2.5 4761 8.0 4773
1.0 4733 3.0 4763 10.0 4775
a) What is the initial reservoir pressure?
b) If the well is completed across the entire formation thickness, calculated the effec-
tive permeability.
206 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
c) Calculate the value of the mechanical skin factor.
d) What is the additional pressure drop in the wellbore due to the skin?
e) If it is initially assumed that the well is draining from the centre of a circle, is it
valid to equate p
i
to the asymptotic value log(t +∆t)/(∆t) = 0?
(after L.P.Dake)
3. A reservoir has 3 wells; W1, W2 and W3. Well W1 has been producing at a constant
flow rate of 120 STB/D for 70 hours and is then converted to an observation well. Well
W2, located 2500 f t straight north of well W1, is producing at a flow rate of 190 STB/D.
Well W3, located 1900 f t west of W1, is producing at a rate of 80 STB/D. At the time
when well W1 was shut-down, well W2 had produced for 100 hours and well W3 for 50
hours.
Pressure data from well W1 is given in the table:
∆t [hours] 0 5 10 20 30 40 50 100 150
P
ws
[psia] 4213 4380 4413 4433 4443 4450 4455 4466 4472
∆t 200 250 300 400 500 800 1200 1500 –
P
ws
4473 4474 4478 4480 4470 4461 4448 4439 –
Additional reservoir data:
µ
o
= 0.8 cp B
o
= 1.15 RB/STB c
f
= 4.0 10
−6
psi
−1
S
o
= 0.80 S
w
= 0.20 c
o
= 8.0 10
−6
psi
−1
h = 30 ft r
w
= 0.276 ft c
w
= 3.0 10
−6
psi
−1
Assume that the pressure development in well W1 can be expressed by the formula
below:
P
ws
= P
i
−162.6
Q
1
µB
kh
log

t
1
+∆t
∆t

−70.6
Q
1
µB
kh
¸
Q
2
Q
1
Ei(x
1
) +
Q
3
Q
1
Ei(x
2
)

where
x
1
=
φµc
t
d
2
12
0.00105kt
2
x
2
=
φµc
t
d
2
13
0.00105kt
3
and where d
12
and d
13
is the distance between W1 and W2 and W1 and W3, respectively.
t
1
is the time of production for well W1.
a) Calculate the average reservoir compressibilityc
t
.
b) Estimate the initial pressure P
i
, assuming the interference between well W2 and
W3 is negligible for early pressure data.
c) Calculate the average reservoir oil permeability ,k
o
.
d) Calculate the mechanical skin, S.
e) Use the pressure observation form∆t = 1500 hours to find the average reservoir
porosity between the wells.
12.5 Exercises 207
4. An oil well has been producing 1484 STB at a flow rate of 124 STB/D, when it was shut
down. The pressure build-up data is given in the table below:
∆t [hours] 4 8 12 16 20 24
P
ws
[psia] 2857 3027 3144 3252 3283 3298
∆t 28 32 36 40 44 48
P
ws
3308 3315 3323 3331 3338 3342
Additional reservoir data:
µ = 3.2 cp B
o
= 1.21 RB/STB
h = 8.4 ft c
t
= 12 10
−6
psia
−1
φ = 0.02
a) Find the reservoir pressure at the outer boundary, P
e
.
b) Calculate the average reservoir oil permeability, k
o
.
Answers to questions:
1. a) 240 mD, b) 4.5, 2. a) 4800 psi, b) 50 mD, c) 6.0, d) 128 psi, 3. a) 11 10
−6
psi
−1
, b) 4485
psi, c) 7.6 mD, d) -3.5, e) 0.135, 4. a) 3475 psi, b)58 mD.
208 Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing
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4.3 4.4

4.5 4.6 4.7 5

Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Cubic-Packed Spheres 47 4.2.3 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Orthorhombic-Packed spheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.4 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Rhombohedral-Packed spheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.5 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Irregular-Packed Spheres with Different Radii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Porosity Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Measurement of Porosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.1 Full-Diameter Core Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.2 Grain-Volume Measurements Based on Boyle’s Law . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.3 Bulk-Volume Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.4 Pore-Volume Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4.5 Fluid-Summation Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Porosity Estimation from Well Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.2

47 48 48 50 50 50 51 53 54 55 57 58 60 63 63 63 68 69 71 74 76 76 79

Permeability 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2 Darcy’s Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 Conditions for Liquid Permeability Measurements. 5.4 Units of Permeability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.5 Gas Permeability Measurements . . . . . . . . . . 5.5.1 Turbulent Gas Flow in a Core Sample . . . 5.6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values . . . . . . . 5.6.1 The Klinkenberg Effect . . . . . . . . . . . 5.7 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wettability and Capillary Pressure 6.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2 Surface and Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . . . . . 6.3 Rock Wettability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . 6.5 Capillary Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5.1 Capillary Pressure Across Curved Surfaces 6.5.2 Interfacial Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.5.3 Capillary Pressure in a Cylindrical Tube . . 6.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation . . . . . . 6.7 Pore Size Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs . . . . . . . . 6.9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure . . 6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. . . . . . . . . 6.10.1 Hysterisis in Contact Angle . . . . . . . . 6.10.2 Capillary Hysterisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

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83 83 83 84 86 88 88 90 90 93 95 98 101 103 105 105

6.11 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 7 Relative Permeability 7.1 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities . . . . . . 7.3 Drainage/Imbibition Relative Permeability Curves . . . . 7.4 Residual Phase Saturations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data 7.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 . 111 . 113 . 114 . 115 . 116 . 118 121 . 121 . 121 . 122 . 125 . 126 . 128 . 129 . 130 . 131 . 134 135 . 135 . 136 . 137 . 140 . 142 . 143 . 144 . 148 . 150

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8

Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids 8.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2 Compressibility of Solids, Liquids and Gases . . . . . . . 8.2.1 Rock Stresses and Compressibility . . . . . . . . . 8.2.2 Compressibility of Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2.3 Compressibility of Gases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3 Deformation of Porous Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3.1 Compressibility Measurements. . . . . . . . . . . 8.3.2 Betti’s Reciprocal Theorem of Elasticity. . . . . . 8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids . 8.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Properties of Reservoir Fluids 9.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.2 Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.3 Representation of hydrocarbons . . . . . . . . 9.3.1 Ternary diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.4 Natural gas and gas condensate fields . . . . . 9.5 Oil fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes 9.7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters . . 9.8 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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II Reservoir Parameter Estimation Methods
10 Material Balance Equation 10.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.2 Dry gas expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3 A general oil reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3.1 A1: Expansion of oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3.2 A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas . . . . . . . . . 10.3.3 B: Expansion of gas cap gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3.4 C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water tion of pore volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.3.5 Production terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.4 The material balance equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii

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10.5 10.6 10.7 10.8 10.9

Linearized material balance equation Dissolved gas expansion drive . . . Gas cap expansion drive . . . . . . Water influx . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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11 Well Test Analysis 173 11.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 11.1.1 Systems of Uunits Used in Well Test Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 11.2 Wellbore Storage Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 11.3 Semi Logarithmic Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 11.3.1 Diffusivity Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 11.3.2 Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 11.3.3 Gas Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 11.3.4 The Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation in Dimensionless Form . . . 181 11.3.5 Wellbore Pressure for Semi Logarithmic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 11.4 Semi Steady State Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 11.4.1 Average Reservoir Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 11.4.2 Well Skin Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 11.4.3 Wellbore Pressure at Semi Steady State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 11.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 11.5.1 Transition Time Between Semi Logarithmic Period and Semi Steady State Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 11.5.2 Recognition of Semi Logarithmic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 11.6 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 12 Methods of Well Testing 12.1 Pressure Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.2 Pressure Drawdown Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.2.1 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Logarithmic Conditions 12.2.2 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Steady State Conditions 12.3 Pressure Build-Up Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4 Pressure Test Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4.1 Miller - Dyes - Hutchinson (MDH) Analysis . . . . . . . . . 12.4.2 Matthews - Brons - Hazebroek (MBH) Analysis (Horner plot) 12.5 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 . 193 . 194 . 195 . 196 . 197 . 199 . 199 . 201 . 205

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iv

The two main parts of the book is related to petro-physics (Chapter 2 to 10). Chapter 4 introduces porosity and some examples of experimental techniques used to estimate porosity. A short deduction of Darcy’s law is given and some examples of its use is described. This chapter contains some basic concepts and definitions related to the origin. The subjects presented. Measurements of gas permeability is exemplified and together with laminar and turbulent gas flow. In Chapter 6. Examples of different viscosity measuring techniques are discusses and some flow characteristics are mentioned. describing laminar fluid flow are derived. Classification and description of several methods used in enhanced oil recovery are associated with examples for oil and gas fields in the North Sea (Chapter 21 to 27) The Preface contains a list of some of the most commonly used parameters and systems of units used in petroleum engineering. namely Material Balance (Chapter 11) and Well Testing (Chapter 12. The last part VProjects Exercises presents quite a few exercises of the type students are asked to solve at their examination test.Preface The topics covered in this book represent a review of modern approaches and practical methods for analysing various problems related to reservoir engineering. This textbook. constitutes the main content of the book. 13 and 14). some additional factors affecting permeability are discussed. Part III Fluid Flow in Porous Media and part IV Enhanced Oil Recovery are a collection of subjects extending the fundamental knowledge into areas of more advanced theoretical description. part I Fundamentals and part II Reservoir Parameter Estimation Methods. are based on the course of lectures in Reservoir Engineering 1 held by the authors at the Rogaland University Centre in the period from 1989 to 1995. Permeability is introduced in Chapter 5. The book contains a short introduction to important definitions for oil and gas reservoirs (Chapter 1). 1 . A short description of reservoir pressure distribution is also presented. habitat and trapping of petroleum In Chapter 3 some basic concepts and definitions used in Reservoir Engineering are presented. Chapter 2 is a brief introduction to the basics of petroleum geology. Some laboratory techniques are explained and examples of equipment are shown. Some examples describing the method of error propagation are also given. viscosity is introduced and some basic equations. Modelling of fluid flow in porous media is presented through different examples using various mathematical techniques (Chapter 15 to 20). and related to two important methods in Reservoir Engineering. In Chapter 1 some basic definitions of gas and oil reserves are given and the methods of their evaluation. with some illustrative examples relevant to the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

Dimension-less parameters are used and the set of pressure solutions are presented. some basic aspects of compressibility related to reservoir rock and fluids are introduced. Some few exercises are included at the end of this part. This part presents a broad classification of models describing fluid flow in porous media. Basic principles behind equations of Buckley. The chapter is meant as an introduction to basic concepts of relative permeability and possibly an inspiration for further reading. nor is the reference list intended to be a complete bibliography. Most chapters in part I and II contain several exercises. Volumefactors and other important relations are explained and examples of their use are given. as well as various analytical solution techniques..Leverett theory and their application are presented. Relative permeability is introduced briefly in Chapter 8. This book does not contain complicated mathematical equations or calculus. The student should know the elements of matrix and linear algebra.e. probability theory and statistics. like drawdown test.2 Wettability and capillary pressure are discussed in Chapter 7. In Chapter 9. build-up test and combinations of the two. Part III Fluid Flow in Porous Media gives an introduction to mathematical modelling of oil displacement by water-flooding. There has been no attempt made. Enhanced Oil Recovery is presented in part IV. Examples of two "classical" well test analysis is also included. Examples of polymer flooding is presented as well as EOR related to surfactants and different solvents. Well test analysis is introduced in Chapter 12. to give a broad and consistent description of relative permeability in this book. such as gas-reservoir and oil. In part III and IV. The equation is applied in several examples. Examples are related to the behaviour of porous reservoir rocks and core samples under laboratory conditions. the wellbore storage period. Chapter 13 introduces some basic methods of well testing. describing different types of reservoirs. A reference list is given at the end of the book. foams and Microbial methods are also briefly described. while all exercises in part III and IV are added at the end. A basic mathematical description of EOR methods are given and various methods are classified. however some slightly more advanced mathematical formalism is used. Only some necessary references and key publications are included in the reference list. In this chapter we introduce the term surface energy to replace interfacial tension and an important relation between surface energies are derived. . illustrating the concepts and methods presented.reservoirs with and without a gas cap. are presented. is presented in Chapter 14. i. The mathematical prerequisite required are minimal. Modern well test analysis. Examples of the effect of capillary forces are given and different experimental techniques are discussed. The Material Balance Equation is deduced in Chapter 11. Use of type curves and matching techniques are shortly presented. Various techniques using WAG. A somewhat simplified derivation of the pressure solution for three important production periods are presented. though necessary. and also be acquainted with single and partial-differential equations and methods of their solution. like transient testing techniques. the semi-logaritmic period and the semi-steady state period. Chapter 10 lists some basic definitions and properties related to reservoir fluids. The book does not cover all the relevant literature.

B. 1997 .-R. Ursin & A.3 J. Zolotukhin Stavanger.

4 Units and conversion factors The basic knowledge of units and conversion factors is absolutely necessary in reservoir engineering. A selection of some of the most frequently used parameters are listed in the table below. Metric unit = Conversion factor × Industry unit. Since both set of units are widely used in the oil industry. it is important to be confident with both systems. metric unit is found by multiplying a given industry unit by an appropriate conversion factor. especially in the practice of the Norwegian and the other European oil companies.e. i. country or simply tradition. but there is a tendency to turn to SI-units or practical SI-units. the knowledge of conversion factors is practical necessary. . Since the choice of units has been largely a question of preference. The Metric unit is seen as a practical SI-unit. English and American units are most commonly used in the petroleum industry. often used in displaying data or calculations. In this book we will use both SI-units and industrial units in explaining the theory as well as in examples and in exercises. although the choice of industrial units depend on company. -simply due to practical reasons.

5/(131. . Pa Mass.5 + o API) 0.01846 141. m3 dyne/cm cp (poise) acre-ft cu ft bbl U. kg/m3 Flow rate. m2 Industry unit sq mile acre sq ft sq in.0 Metric unit km2 m2 m2 cm2 kPa−1 kg/m3 kg/m3 (γsg )∗ m3 /d m3 /d N mN mN km cm cm kPa kPa kPa kPa Pa kg kg K oC Compressibility.54 101.02831685 4.333224 0.856 0. K R Surface tension.8 5/9 1. Pa−1 Density.2550 0.489 0.0 6.589988 4046.001 1233.894757 1. gal liter K mN/m Pa·s m3 m3 m3 dm3 dm3 ∗ Spesific gravity of oil.1450377 1000.4535924 + 273. kg Temperature. psi−1 g/cm3 lbm/ft3 o API bbl/d ft3 /d lbf pdl dyne mile ft in.0 16.609344 30. m Pressure.5 Parameter (SI unit) Area.4516 0.1589873 0. N/m Viscosity.48 2.0 0.448222 138.02831685 0.01 1.1 1000 0.09290304 6.1589873 3.2 (psi) mm Hg (0o C) dyne/cm2 ton lbm oC oF Conversion factor 2.325 100.15 (o F-32)/1.785412 1. m3 /s Force. Pa·s Volume. atm bar lbf/in.S. N Length.

6 .

where the following definitions are used [2]: Reserves are estimated volumes of crude oil. Reserve estimates are based on geologic and/or engineering data available at the time of estimate. the U. and associated substances anticipated to be commercially recoverable from known accumulations from a given date forward. They were presented in a joint publication of API and the American Gas Association (AGA). by established operating practices. but when technical.1 shows a conceptual scheme of the oil and gas resources and reserves. Fig. 7 . under existing economic conditions. Reserves are considered proved is commercial producibility of the reservoir is supported by actual engineering tests. natural gas liquids. Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued a newer set of definitions. "Proved reserves of crude oil. In 1979. condensate.S. whereby also the SPE definitions were updated in 1981. natural gas. the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) recommended reserve definitions following the revised API definitions. contractual.1 Terminology and Definitions In the period from 1936 to 1964. In 1983. the American Petroleum Institute (API) set some guiding standards for the definition of proved reserves. They may be estimated assuming future economic conditions different from those prevailing at the time of the estimate. The relative degree of an estimated uncertainty is reflected by the categorisation of reserves as either "proved" or "unproved" Proved Reserves can be estimated with reasonable certainty to be recoverable under current economic conditions. Current economic conditions include prices and costs prevailing at the time of the estimate. which included categories ranging from proved to speculative reserves [2].Chapter 1 Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves 1. natural gas liquids and natural gas". in 1946. Unproved Reserves are based on geological and/or engineering data similar to those used in the estimates of proved reserves. economic or regulatory uncertainties preclude such reserves being classified as proved. the World Petroleum Congress issued a set of petroleum reserve definitions. and under current government regulations. In 1964. 1.

Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves Total Oil and Gas Resource Discovered Undiscoveed Nonrecoverable Resources Recoverable Resources Reserves Cumulative Production Unproved Reserves Possible Reserves Proved Reserves Probable Reserves Figure 1. see Fig.1: Conceptual scheme for oil and gas resources and reserves. which may involve either a natural-drive mechanism improved by water or gas injection. but may not be productive at a commercial level.1. 1. • Incremental reserves based on infill drilling are subject to technical uncertainty. Probable Reserves are less certain than proved reserves and can be estimated with a degree of certainty sufficient to indicate they are more likely to be recovered than not. • Reserves in rock formations that appear to be hydrocarbon-bearing based on logs or cores. Possible Reserves are less certain than proved reserves and can be estimated with a low degree of certainty. . or some special technique of enhanced oil recovery (EOR). insufficient to indicate whether they are more likely to be recovered than not. "possible" reserves may include: • Reserves suggested by structural and/or stratigraphic extrapolation beyond areas classified as probable. based on geological and/or geophysical interpretation. In general. Unproved reserves may further be classifiedprobable and possible.8 Chapter 1. The estimation of reserves will depend upon the actual mode of petroleum recovery.

2 Volumetric Estimates The methods of reserve estimation based on reservoir data are volumetric and can be divided into deterministic and probabilistic (stocastic) estimates.1 Analogy-Based Approach Another producing reservoir with comparable characteristics can be used as a possible analogue for the reservoir under consideration. 100. either by a direct well-to-well comparison or on a unitrecovery basis.1. which means the bulk thickness of the reservoir rocks (formation).e. The Net-to-Gross ratio (N/G) is an important parameter indicating the productive portion of the reservoir.2. reservoir rock lithofacies. The use of an analogue may be the only method available to estimate the reserves in a situation where there are no solid data on well performance or reservoir characteristics.. 1. • Reserves in a rock formation that has proved to be productive in other areas of the field. temperature. All possible differences between the analogue reservoir and the reservoir in question need to be considered to make a realistic adjustment of the recovery estimates. which means the cumulative thickness of the permeable rock units only. one has to consider similarities of well spacing. etc. Deterministic Methods The principle of a deterministic approach to resources/reserve estimates is to "upscale" the information derived from the wells and supported by seismic survey. However. The main parameters used for a volumetric estimate in this approach are: • The reservoir "gross" isopach map. rock and fluid properties. lithofacies data. The unit-recovery approach refers to a recovery calculated in barrels per acre-foot or Mcf per acre-foot.g. indicates a relatively low structurally position. an analogue-based approach is also the least accurate and little reliable method of petroleum reserve estimation. In an analogue approach.) into a much larger scale ( i.000 bbl/well) and applying a similar or adjusted recovery factor to the wells in the reservoir considered. but appears to be separated from those areas by faults and the geological interpretation. simply because perfect analogues can seldom be found. • The reservoir "net" isopach map. pay thickness and drive mechanism.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 1. This can be done by determining an average oil or gas recovery per well in the analogue reservoir (e. 1. The main difficulty in a volumetric estimate of resources/reserves is in the transfer of data obtained at a small scale (core analysis. . data "upscaling" for interwell space).2. pressure. reservoir depth. into the interwell space by using an interpolation technique. fluid and reservoir characteristics are such that a reasonable doubt exists whether the estimated reserves will be commercial.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 9 • Reserves attributable to an improved or enhanced recovery method when a pilot project is planned (but not in operation) and the rock. well logs.

∑i φi Ai hi Plotting these parameters as contoured maps (isopachs. which takes more account of the estimate uncertainty. In common usage [8] we have: – An estimate with 90 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven value. permeability. isopermeability. Different realisations lead to different volumetric estimates. N/G. Ai is a subarea and hi is a subthickness (of permeable rock). with different probabilities attached. ∑i Ai hi where φ is the local porosity. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves • The reservoir rock porosity (as a volume-based weighed average): φ= ∑i φi Ai hi . possibly normal. Each numerical realisation bears an uncertainty for the reservoir characterisation. – An estimate with 50 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven + probable value.) all have random. that is used to asses their likelihood will be a very unclear formulation.2. G i ∑i hi where ki is the local permeability (other symbols as above).) provides the crucial information on their variation and distribution in the reservoir and makes it possible to evaluate the reservoir pore volume and its fractions saturated with oil and gas (hydrocarbon volume). gas and oil. isoporosity. Stochastic Methods An alternative approach is a probabilistic estimation of resources/reserves. . This numerical technique assumes that the main reservoir properties (porosity. 1. The maximum and minimum values are specified for each of the reservoir parameters and the random number generator then "drowns data". with the range of values included by core and well-log data. ect. • The permeability and net-thickness product (khN ) is important for the estimation of well production capacity: ∑ ki hi N (khN ) = hN i = ∑ ki hi . it is necessary to repeat the stochastic simulation for different "seeds" (initial boundary values) in order to asses and quantify the actual variation of a given parameter. The numerical value of hydrocarbon resources/reserve estimate their represents an outcome of "integrated" map analysis. and then simulates their actual density distribution in the whole reservoir. frequency distributions.10 Chapter 1. etc. Stochastic reservoir description is usually based on the procedure of random-number generator. For example water saturation: Sw = ∑i Swi φi Ai hi . See Fig. where the probabilistic rather than deterministic. is an estimate of resources/reserves. In practice. so to speak. • Volume-based average saturation of water. The cumulative frequency distributions of these estimates.

The range in the possible values of the reservoir parameters would then be narrower.e. At the very early stages of field appraisal. compared to a fuzzy assessment. 1. When more data have been collected and statistical analysis becomes possible.1. the problem of certainty can be considered in terms of "fuzzy" [61].3 Performance Analysis The methods of performance analysis presently used include: • Analysis based on Material Balance Equation (MBE) [33. More generally. that a given value of resources will be at least as great as shown 0. 1. the cumulative frequency graph may change its shape and the uncertainty of our resource/reserve estimates may decrease. A rectangular distribution means no preference and a triangular distribution means that strong preference distributions are used. as seen in Fig. see Fig. • Reservoir Simulation Models (RSM) [10. hence. 45]. As more information on the reservoir becomes available. – An estimate with 10 % or higher probability is the level regarded as aproven +probable + possible value.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 11 1. 56]. When the data available are abadundant.2: Example of stochastic volumetric estimate based on a series of random-number simulations.3. the shape of the distribution and the maximum and minimum values of a given reservoir parameter). . probabilistic and deterministic estimates based on the data available at a particular time. a deterministic estimate can be made based on a well.4.2. 34].specified value of a particular parameter for a particular part (zone. 1. Based on the knowledge from other reservoirs or simply a theoretical guess. subunit or layer) of the reservoir.0 Frequency of cumulative probability Frequency Probability. a fuzzy estimate of the resources/reserves may be best or only option [22. A comparison of these estimates may be more revealing that each of them is in isolation. The lack or scarsity of data in such cases is compensated by a subjective assessment of the reservoir characteristics (i.0 Min Value Max Min Value Max Figure 1. aprobabilistic estimate can be made. 28. the data are usually too limited for using statistical analysis and.

The DCA method is to predict future performance of the reservoir by matching the observed trend of the production decline with one or several standard mathematical methods of the production rate-time (hyperbolic. ect. Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves Frequency of cumulative probability Frequency of cumulative probability 0. The aim of all of these methods is to obtain the best reservoir performance prediction on the basis of available data.0 Appraisal Max 0. – Production rate vs.0 Min Value Max Figure 1.3: Changes in the uncertainty resources estimate with increasing data acquisition (after Archer and Wall. The method is thus adjusted differently to reservoirs containing oil. The RSM method involves a numerical simulation technique. exponential. . The following "decline curves" from production wells are commonly used in the DCA: – Production rate vs. – Water cut vs.0 Pre-drilling 1.0 Frequency of cumulative probability 1. cumulative oil production.0 Min Value Frequency of cumulative probability 1. but involves some assumptions for the reservoir driving mechanism in order to minimise the range of possible predictions from the dataset.0 Mature production 1. If successful.). cumulative oil production. The discrepancy between the simulation results (prediction) and the available data is minimised by adjusting the reservoir parameters and taking into account the most likely reservoir drive mechanism (history match ).12 Chapter 1.0 Min Value Max 0.0 Min Value Max Frequency of cumulative probability Frequency of cumulative probability 0.0 Delineation/ early production 1. The MBE method is based on the data obtained from previous reservoir performance and PVT analysis. with the matching of the production and the reservoir’s previous performance (history). such a performance analysis allows to estimate both the reserves and the future performance of the reservoir.0 Discovery 1. time. 1992). harmonic. • Decline Curve Analysis (DCA) [53].0 Min Value Max 0. gas or oil with a gas cap (primary or secondary).0 Late time depletion Min Value Max 0.

L.V V.4: The concept of uncertainty in resources/reserves estimation illustrated by fuzzy.P. . – Gas-oil ratio vs. Some of these decline curves are shown in Fig.V M.O.1. – The (p/z) ratio vs.2 Methods for Resources/Reserve Estimation 13 1.0 Deterministic Frequency of cumulative probability Probabilistic Fuzzy 0. 1. cumulative gas production.0 V. probabilistic and deterministic approach (data set). – Percentage oil production vs.V Value Figure 1.5. cumulative oil production. cumulative production.

Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves q q Np Np 0 Economic limit Cumulative oil producction 0 Economic limit Time 100 p (z ) Oil production.5: Different ways of data representation for a decline curve analysis. % Np Gp 0 Economic limit Cumulative oil producction 0 Economic limit G Cumulative oil producction Figure 1. .14 Chapter 1.

Part I Fundamentals 15 .

Chapter 2

Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology
2.1 Introduction
Reservoir Engineering is a part of Petroleum Science that provides the technical basis for the recovery of petroleum fluids from subsurface sedimentary-rock reservoirs. The Fig. 2.1 below indicates the place and role of Reservoir Engineering in the broad field of Petroleum Science.
Reservoir characterization

Geology and Geophysics

Reserve estimates for well proposal evaluation

Reservoir correlation

Geochemical studies Reserve estimates, material balance calculations, fluid flow equations, reservoir simulation, pressure transient analysis, well test design and evaluation
Reservoir screening for improved recovery projects Improved recovery project design and maintenance

Reservoir Engineering

Production Engineering

Workover reserve analysis, well completion design, production facility design, production log interpretation, prediction of production schedules

Facilities Engineering

Design proposals for separation, treating, metering and pipeline facilities

Final facility design and operation

Figure 2.1: Reservoir engineering and petroleum science. This chapter pertains to the basic concepts of Petroleum Geology and covers the following 17

18

Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology

main topics: • The source rock of hydrocarbons. • The generation, maturation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons.

2.2 The Basic Concepts
Petroleum is a mineral substance composed of hydrocarbons and produced from the natural accumulations of organic matter of a faunal and/or floral provenance. Petroleum is a gaseous, liquid or semisolid substance, present in the pore space of porous rocks, referred to as reservoir rocks, which are mainly of sedimentary origin.

2.2.1 Clastic Sedimentary Rocks
Sedimentary rocks results from the deposition of sedimentary particles, known as clastic material or detritus (from the Latin "worn down"), consisting of mineral grains and rock fragments. Sedimentary particles are derived from weathered and fragmented older rocks, igneous, metamorphic or sedimentary, usually with some chemical changes. Sediment comprising loose mineral detritus or debris is referred to as clastic sediment (from the Greek word "klastos", meaning broken). Some clastic sediments consist of the accumulations of skeletal parts or shells of dead organisms, commonly fragmented, and are referred to as bioclastic rocks (see next section). The particles of clastic sediment may range widely in size, and the predominant grain-size fraction is the primary basis for classifying clastic sediments and clastic sedimentary rocks. As shown in Table 2.1 clastic sediments can be divided into 4 main classes: gravel, sand, silt, and clay [49], where mud is a mixture of clay and silt, possibly including also some very fine sand. The narrower the grain-size range of a given sediment, the better its "sorting". Both the grain size and sorting have direct implications for the sediment permeability to fluids. Table 2.1: Definition of grain-size and the terminology for sediments and sedimentary rocks.
Sediment grain-size fraction Boulder Cobble Pebble Granule Sand Silt Clay Clay & slit mixture

Grain-size limits in mm More than 256 64 to 256 4 to 64 2 to 4 1/16 to 2 1/256 to 1/16 Less than 1/256

Unconsolidated sediment Boulder gravel Cobble gravel Pebble gravel Granule grawel Sand Silt Clay Mud

Consolidated rock Boulder conglomerate ∗ Cobble conglomerate ∗ Pebble conglomerate ∗ Granule coglomerate ∗ Sandstone Siltstone Claystone (clayshale, if fissile) Mudstone (mudshale, if fissile)

The term "gravelstone" is preferred by some authors on semantic basis [51].

2.2 The Basic Concepts

19

2.2.2 Nonclastic Sedimentary Rocks
Chemical Deposits Some sedimentary rocks contain little or no clastic particles. Such a sediment, formed by the precipitation of minerals from solution in water, is a chemical sediment. It forms by means of either biochemical or purely chemical (inorganic) reactions [51]. The primary porosity of such rocks is practically zero, and their possible porosity is totally dependent on the development of secondary porosity, chiefly in the form of microfractures. Biogenic Deposits Sedimentary rocks commonly contain fossils, the remains of plants and animals that died and were buried and preserved in the sediment as it accumulated. A sediment composed mainly or entirely of fossil remains is called a biogenic sediment. If the fossil debris has not been homogenised by chemical processes, the deposit can be regarded as a bioclastic sediment [51]. Main nonclastic rocks are: limestone, dolomite, salt, gypsum, chert, and coal. Chalk is a special type of biogenic limestone, composed of the sheletal parts of pleagic coccolithophorid algea, called coccoliths. The main types of sedimentary rocks and their chemical compositions are shown in list below, containing main sedimentary rock types and their chemical composition of categories [37]. Sandstone a siliciclastic rock formed of sand, commonly quartzose or arhosic, cemented with silica, calcium carbonate, iron oxide or clay. Chemical composition: SiO2 . Density: ∼ 2.65 g/cm3 . Shale a fissile rock, commonly with a laminated structure, formed by consolidation of clay or mud ( mainly siliciclastic) Argillite (mud rock) – any compact sedimentary rock composed mainly of siliciclastic mud. Chemical composition: SiO2 . Dolomite a carbonate rock, consisting largely of the mineral dolomite (calcium magnesium carbonate) Chemical composition: CaMg(CO3 )2 . Density: ∼ 2.87 g/cm3 . Limestone a carbonate rock consisting wholly or mainly of the mineral calcite. Chemical composition: CaCO3 . Density: ∼ 2.71 g/cm3 . Calcarenite a sandstone composed of carbonate grains, typically a clastic variety of limestone. Chemical composition: CaCO3 . Density: ∼ 2.70 g/cm3 . Marl a friable rock consisting of calcium carbonate and siliciclastic mud/clay. Chemical composition: SiO2 +CaCO3 . Density: ∼ 2.68 g/cm3 . Salt (rock salt) – a chemical rock composed of the mineral halite. Chemical composition: NaCl.

Many organic carbon-rich marine and lake shales never reach the burial temperature level at which the original organic molecules are converted into hydrocarbons forming oil and natural gas. rather than petroleum. Most of organic matter is trapped in clay mud that is slowly converted into shale under burial. Usually this is ashale or mudrock which itself is a very common rock type. the generation of liquid petroleum ceases and the foro mation of gas becomes dominant.3. which usually require temperatures greater than 60 C. See Fig 2.as illustrated by Fig. and grasses that contribute to most of the buried organic matter in mud rocks and shales.1 Source Rock and Generation of Petroleum Local large concentrations of organic matter in sedimentary rocks. 2. and is the organic substance of so-called oil shales.3 . . and is commonly called the oil window. because it is capable of releasing large amounts of hydrocarbons in natural burial conditions. Many hypotheses concerning the origin of petroleum have been advanced over the last years. The alteration of kerogen to petroleum is similar to other o thermal-cracking reactions. the most favoured one is that oil and gas are formed from marine phytoplankton (microscopic floating plants) and to a lesser degree from algae and foraminifera [51].3. When the formation rock temperature exceeds 225 C.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 2. In the ocean. Chemical composition: CaSO4 . In terrestrial sedimentary basins. These large plants are rich in resins. Currently. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology Gypsum a chemical. and lignins. the alteration process is limited to certain wax-like substances with large molecules. waxes. it is plants such as trees. most of the kerogen will have lost its petroleum-generating capacity [49]. Instead. evaporitic rock composed of the mineral anhydrite. Kerogen can be converted into oil and gas by further burial by mining the shale and subjecting it to heat it in a retort. A rock rich in primary organic matter is called a source rock. in the form of coal. liquid or semisolid natural substances that consist mainly of hydrocarbons.20 Chapter 2. During this conversion. phytoplankton and bacteria are the principal of organic matter buried in sediment. At lower temperatures. which remains solid. A temperature range between about 60oC and 175oC is most favourable for the generation of hydrocarbons. Anhydrite a chemical. oil or natural gas are called the fossil fuels. Petroleum is generated when the kerogen is subjected to a sufficient high temperature in the process of the sediment burial. consisting about 80% of the world’s sedimentary rock volume. At temperatures much above 175oC.2 2. is called kerogen. bushes. which indicates a non-oxidised primary organic matter. during the early diagenesis. 2. Some of the typical reservoir rocks are shown in Fig. Organic carbon-rich shale and mudrock are characteristically black or dark greyish in colour. which tend to remain solid and form coal. defined as gaseous. the organic compounds are transformed (mainly by the geothermal heat) into petroleum. a natural biogenic methane called marsh gas. is generated through the action of microorganisms that live near the ground surface. This material. evaporitic rock composed of the mineral gypsum Chemical composition: CaSO4 2H2 O.

Likewise. primary differences in the source composition may be reflected in the chemistry of the petroleum.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 21 Figure 2. This explains. .2. The long and complex chain of chemical reactions involved in the conversion of raw organic matter into crude petroleum is called maturation. Additional chemical changes may occur in the oil and gas even after these have been generated or accumulated. despite a common source rock.2: Typical reservoir rocks. why the petroleum taken from different oil fields has different properties. for example.

Sampling of mud on the continental shelves and along the bases of continental slopes has shown that the shallowly buried mud contains up to 8% organic matter.4 shows the distribution of the world’s sedimentary basin and petroleum accumulations (from [51]). Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology Generation Intensity Immature Zone 60 Heavy Oil Zone 100 Light Biogenic Methane Oil Wet Gas 175 Temperature. as geological strata). Two types of evidence support the hypothesis that petroleum is a product of the decomposition of natural organic matter [51]. The fact is that most of the world’s largest hydrocarbon fields are found in marine sedimentary rock successions representing ancient continental shelves. Oil source rocks are chiefly marine shales and mudrocks.3: Generation of petroleum vs. .22 Chapter 2. • oil has the optical properties of hydrocarbons that are known only to derive from organic matter and • oil contains nitrogen and certain other compounds that are known to originate from living organic matter only. burial temperature. However. 2. Fig. Similar or even higher total organic-carbon (TOC) content characterizes many ancient marine shales. °C Wet Gas Zone Dry Gas 225 Dry Gas Zone 315 Figure 2. some lake sediments may be just as oil-prone as marine source rocks. Geologists conclude therefore that oil is originated primarily from the organic matter deposited in marine sediments. Many oil fields in various parts of the world are in ancient lacustrine deposits (formed at the bottom or along the shore of lakes.

such that these accumulate in separate reservoirs. The top may be imperfectly sealed. Water generally underlines the hydrocarbons in a trap. The water bearing part of the trap is called an aquifer.4: World’s main sedimentary basins and petroleum accumulations.2. 2. Once released from the source rock. or an impervious barrier. they thus tend to migrate upwards in the direction of the minimum pressure. . and is hydrolically connected with the reservoir. This means that any pressure change in the aquifer will also affect the reservoir.Areas of ocean deeper than 2000m underlain by thick accumulations of sedimentary rock Figure 2. In a trap. The part of the trap that contains hydrocarbons is called a petroleum reservoir. Both oil and gas are generated together. the oil and gas accumulate by displacing pore water from the porous rock.Areas where major amounts of oil and gas have been found . a secondary gas cap may develop when the reservoir pressure has decreased and the lightest hydrocarbon begin to bubble out from the oil.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum 23 Legend: . called atrap.3.2 Petroleum Migration and Accumulation The accumulation of petroleum occur in only those areas. which means that gas and possibly also some oil may "leak" to yet higher lying traps or up to the ground surface. from a source rock which results in a primary gas cap above the oil in the reservoir. until they either escape at the ground surface. where geological conditions have provided the unique combination of both hydrocarbon prone source rocks and hydrocarbon traps. Hydrocarbons are less dense than water. and the depletion of the reservoir will make the aquifer expand into this space. Some "leaky" or limited-capacity traps may segregate oil and gas that have been generated together. Likewise. in varying proportions.

24

Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology

In summary, several factors are required for the formation of a petroleum reservoir [49]: 1. There must be a source rock, preferably rich in primary organic matter (carbon- rich marine or lacustrine shale). This source rock must be deeply buried to reach efficient temperatures to cause the organic matter to mature and turn into petroleum. 2. There has to be a migration pathway that enables the shale-released petroleum to migrate in a preferential direction. 3. There must be a reservoir rock that is sufficiently porous and permeable to accumulate the petroleum in large quantities. 4. There must be a trap that is sealed sufficiently to withhold the petroleum. Otherwise, the majority of petroleum will bypass the porous rock and be dispersed or escape to the ground surface. 5. An impermeable seal or caprock, is critical in preventing the petroleum from leaking out from the reservoir or escaping to the surface. If any of these key factors is missing or inadequate, a petroleum reservoir field cannot be formed. A large isolated reservoir or group of closely adjacent reservoirs is referred to as an oil field.

2.3.3 Classification of Petroleum Reservoir-Forming Traps
In this section, a general classification of petroleum reservoir-forming traps is discussed (after [1]). In broad terms, one may distinguish between structual traps (related to tectonic structures) and sratigraphic traps (related to the sealing effect of unconformities and rock-type, or lithofacies, changes). Domes and Anticlines Domes and anticlines are structures formed by the tectonic uplift and/or folding of sedimentary rocks. When viewed from above, a dome is circular in shape as in Fig. 2.5, whereas an anticline is an elongate fold as in Fig. 2.6. Salt Domes This type of geological structure is caused by the upward intrusion of a diapiric body of salt, volcanic rock, or serpentine. In pushing up or piercing through the overlaying sedimentary rocks, the diapir may cause the formation of numerous traps on its flanks, in which petroleum may accumulate, as seen in Fig. 2.7. Some salt domes may be highly elongated, rather than cylindrical, and are called salt walls (e.g. southern North Sea region). Salt itself is a perfect sealing rock.

2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum

25

d ble Be mea GAS r Impe

OIL
TE WA R

Porous Strata

Figure 2.5: Oil and gas accumulation in a dome structure.

Im

le eab perm

Be d
GAS
OIL

e Imp

ab rme

rata l e St

TE WA

R

Porous Strata

Figure 2.6: Oil and gas accumulation in an anticline structure.

Fault Structures Many petroleum traps are related to faults, which commonly displace permeable rocks against the impervious one. The fault plane, where lined with a shear-produced gouge or heavily cemented by the percolating groundwater fragments of rock, acts on impermeable barrier that further increases the trapping effect on the migration of oil and gas. See Fig. 2.8.

Structures Unconformity This type of structure is a sealing unconformity, with the permeable rocks tilted, erosionally truncated and covered by younger impermeable deposits. A reservoir may be formed where the petroleum is trapped in the updip part of the bluntly truncated and sealed, porous rock unit, as seen in Fig. 2.9.

26

Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology

Gas Oil

Water

Oil Oil Salt Mass Water

Figure 2.7: Hydrocarbon accumulation associated with a salt dome.
Fault

Gas Oil Water

Figure 2.8: Hydrocarbon accumulation related to a fault. Lenticular Traps Oil and gas may accumulate in traps formed by the bodies of porous lithofacies (rock types) embedded in impermeable lithofacies, or by the pinch-outs of porous lithofacies within impermeable ones, as seen in Fig. 2.10. Examples of such lenticular traps include: fluvial sandstone bodies embedded in floodbasin mudrocks, deltaic or mouth-bar sandstone wedges pinching out within offshore mudrocks, and turbiditic sandstone lobes embedded in deep marine mudrocks. Similar traps occur in various limestones, where their porous lithofacies (e.g. oolithic limestone or other calcarenites) are embedded in impermeable massive lithofacies; or where porous bioclastic reefal limestones pinch out in marls or in mudrocks. The approximate percentages of the world’s petroleum reservoirs associated with those

2.3 The Origin and Habitat of Petroleum

27

Gas Oil Water

Impermeable Beds

Figure 2.9: Oil and gas trapped below an unconformity.
Tight-increasing Shale Content

Oil

Water

Figure 2.10: Petroleum trap formed by lithofacies change (Sandstone pinch-out). major trap types are given in Fig. 2.11. On of the present-day Earth’s surface, over half of the continental areas and adjacent marine shelves have sediment covers either absent or too thin to make prospects for petroleum accumulation. Even in an area where the buried organic matter can mature, not all of it results in petroleum accumulations. The following statistical data may serve as a fairly realistic illustration [49]: • Only 1% by vol. of a source rock is organic matter, • < 30% by vol. of organic matter matured to petroleum, • > 70% by vol. of organic matter remains as residue and • 99% by vol. of petroleum is dispersed or lost at the ground surface in the process of migration, and only 1% by vol. is trapped. These data lead to the following estimate: only 0.003 vol.% of the world’s source rocks actually turn into petroleum that can be trapped and thus generate our petroleum resources.

25 Salt Diapirs Combination Anticlines Faults .11: Percentages of world’s petroleum accumulations associated with the major traps types. particularly fault and dome structures.28 Chapter 2.4 Types of Hydrocarbon Traps on the Norwegian Continental Shelf Structural traps.50 Unconformity Other Stratigraphic 0 Structural Traps Stratigraphic Combination Traps Traps Figure 2. fluvial sandstone in the Snorre filed and turbiditic sandstone in the Frigg and Balder fields).2 summarises the regional information about some of the hydrocarbon fields belonging to the most common types of traps in the Norwegian continental shelf [4]. 2.75 0. are the most common type of trap in the Norwegian Continental Shelf [4]. Stratigraphic traps are far less common for this region. Reef 0. although there are several reservoirs associated with unconformities or porous lithofacies pinchouts (e. Table 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology 0.g.

Field AGAT BALDER DRAUGEN EKOFISK ELDFISK EMBLA FRIGG GULLFAKS HEIDRUN MIDGARD OSEBERG SNORRE ˙ SNIHVIT STATFJORD TROLL VALHALL Type of Trap Stratigraphic Stratigraphic Stratigraphic Dome Dome Structural Stratigraphic Structural Structural Structural Structural Structural Structural Structural Structural Dome Reservoir Rock Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Chalk Chalk Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Sandstone Chalk Rock Age Cretaceous Tertiary Jurassic Cretaceous Cretaceous Carboniferous Tertiary Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Jurassic Cretaceous .4 Types of Hydrocarbon Traps on the Norwegian Continental Shelf 29 Table 2.2.2: Types of petroleum trap in the main fields of the Norwegian Continental Shelf [4].

30 Chapter 2. Basic Concepts of Petroleum Geology .

Likewise. This condition makes the average parameters of the porous medium sufficiently representative for a description of the fluid flow processes occurring in the rock. However there are some regularities in the behaviour of the "rock-fluids" systems that can be described by continuum mechanics. FRAGOR. with the elementary volumes considered on the order of 10 − 104 m. even if very small. In Fig. or volumetric part.1. 2 At a large scale. The flow of fluids that occurs in the partial volume of a porous rock. For the purpose of the filtration theory. whereas all microheterogeneities on a scale comparable to the grain size are being considered as constants in 31 . All of the most important numerical simulation programs (ECLIPSE. the effect of the micro-scale phenomena "average" and can more readily be parameterizied. the laws of continuum mechanics are considered to be effective only if the elementary volume is sufficiently large to render the number of pores and rock grains very large or "innumerable". etc. Let us consider the flow of liquids and gas in a natural reservoir. ect. even if the elementary volume considered is very small and approaches zero. many physical phenomena (capillary effects. bedding. the concepts of continuum mechanics can be applied if the reservoir heterogeneity is considered at a macro-scale level (lithofaces variation. FRANLAB. as seen in Fig.). If the elementary volumes are too small and comparable to the rock’s pore or grain size. which means that all the components involved (rock. because of the great complexity of the phenomenon. This conceptual approach allows us to develop a useful theory for the flow of liquid and gas through a porous medium. a porous rock formation saturated with fluids forms a continuum.) occur at a scale comparable to the rock’s grain size or the dimension of a fractured rock’s fragment (10−4 − 100 m). can only be described qualitatively. The need for this concept assumption can be explained as follows. with the scale of the flow phenomenon varying from very small to large. the filtration theory cannot be successfully applied. 3. MORE. fluid adhesion effects associated.Chapter 3 Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering 3.) are based on this theory.1 Continuum Mechanics The present understanding of the subsurface processes relevant to reservoir engineering is based on the physical concepts of continuum mechanics [12]. UTCHEM. etc. oil and/or gas) are present in every element. water. of the reservoir space.1. called the filtration theory. According to these concepts. 3.

the pore volume percent occupied by water.e. to the bulk volume Vb of a rock sample. In volumetric terms. unlike permeability which makes sense only if liquid or gas is moving in porous medium. Absolute porosity is defined as the ratio of the total void volume Vpa . the equations of flow (parametrized connate-water saturation. oil and gas.2) Effective porosity depends on several factors like rock type.1: Structure of a fractured-rock reservoir at different scales of observation. The fundamental definitions in the filtration theory include the distribution between porosity (i. heterogeneity of grain sizes and their packing.3 Saturation Let us consider a representative elementary volume of the reservoir. Absolute and effective porosity are distinguished by their access capabilities to reservoir fluids.e. this can be written as follows: .2 Porosity The porosity constitute the part of the total porous rock volume which is not occupied by rock grains or fine mud rock. residual-oil saturation. as well as the consideration offluid saturation (i. etc. respectively). the rock’s fluid flow capacity). Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering A Fracture B C D B A C Well ~ 10 m -3 ~ 10 m 0 ~ 10 m 2 ~ 10 m 4 Figure 3. with the pores filled with oil. It should be noted that porosity is a static parameter. weathering. φ= def Vp . type of clay.) or described by some empirical relationships (functions). φa = def Vpa .32 Chapter 3. Vb (3. 3.e. leaching. etc.1) Effective porosity implies the ratio of the total volume of interconnected voidsVp to the bulk volume of rock. acting as cement between grain particles. Vb (3. cementation. 3. gas and water. whether the voids are interconnected or not. the rock’s fluid storage capacity) and permeability (i. its content and hydration.

or the actual "drive mechanism" of the petroleum displacement. n If two fluids coexist (say.recovery factor may be as low as 5-10% and is rarely higher than 70%. the adhesive forces of one fluid against the pore walls (rock-grain surface) are always stronger than those of the other fluid.3. i=1 ∑ Si = 1.3) which leads to the definition of saturation. Sg and Sw ) in a reservoir varies in space. S. In short. and also the saturation in any elementary volume of the reservoir changes progressively during the production.. n Vp where n denotes the total number of fluid phases present in the porous medium. See Fig. as a fraction of the pore volume occupied by a particular fluid: Si = def Vi . 3. different parts of the reservoir may have quite different fluid saturations. Part of the oil will remain as residue. In the vast majority of petroleum reservoirs. and the residual saturation .3 Saturation 33 Vp = Vo +Vg +Vw . this is called the residual oil. .. i = 1. the oil.. Consequently. both siliclastic and carbonate. One has to distinguish between the residual oil and possibly gas saturation reached in a reservoir after the production stage. Depending on the production method. Simply. they are distributed unevenly in the pore space due to the wettability preferences. the pore water is the wetting phase and oil is a non-wetting phase. most notably from the water-oil contact to the reservoir top (see figures in previous chapter). oil and water). (3.1 Residual Saturation Not all the oil can be removed from the reservoir during production. the fluid saturation (So . 3.2. Water Oil Rock Figure 3.3. and also in time during the production. Importantly.2: Distribution of water and oil phases in a water-wet porous medium.

Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering of fluid phases in a reservoir-rock sample after a well coring operation.) that are assumed to reflect: • The fluid saturation at the reservoir conditions.3. .2 Laboratory Determination of Residual Oil and Water Saturation The cores recovered from wells contain residual fluids (depleted due to the drilling-fluid invasion.) Two laboratory techniques are commonly used for determining the residual oil and water saturation. • The possible alterations due to the drilling-fluid invasion into the core. The laboratory process is illustrated in Fig. 3. • The efficiency of possible oil displacement from the reservoir rock represented by the core. • a high temperature retort distillation method and • the Dean-Stark method. If the pore volume Vp of the core sample in known. where the reservoir saturation and the oil-recovery factor are estimated.4) where Voi is the initial volume of trapped oil in the core sample.3. etc. where water is displacing the initial oil in the core sample. then Sor = Voi −Vo . and Vo is the displaced or produced oil. deep freezing of retrieved cores. etc. 3. (foam-based drilling fluid. The modern techniques of core-samples collection prevent dramatic alterations of the rock fluid characteristics. "peel-sealed" core sample is taken to the laboratory. Vp (3. Water Core sample Oil Sample holder Water Figure 3. the changes in pressure and temperature.3: Evaluation of residual oil saturation Sor by a laboratory displacement from a core sample. A fresh.34 Chapter 3. rubber sleeves containing the core samples and maintaining their reservoir pressure.

The following parameter values are derived from the laboratory test: . Termocouple Insulated oven Heating elements Sample cup Screen Condensing tube Water bath Water inlet Receiving tube Oil Water Temperatur controller Figure 3. The sample is then placed in a cylindrical metal holder with a screw cup at the top and a hollow stem projecting from the bottom.4.3 Saturation 35 The Retort Distillation Method The core sample is weighed and its bulk volume measured or calculated. The temperature is then increased to ∼ 650o C (1200o F) to vaporise and then distil oil from the sample. See Fig. are normally used. N.3. The vaporised fluids are first collected in the sample holder and then released vertically downwards through the hollow stem ( ownd draft retort).4: The high temperature retort distillation method. The calculation of the oil and water saturation is straightforward.B. 3. They are subsequently condensed and measured in a calibrated receiving tube. A thermostat controller raises the temperature of the core to a selected level. The top is sealed and the sample holder is placed in a retort oven.! Samples are usually destroyed in this test due to the high temperature and for this reason small-diameter samples or "plugs" (small cores from the well core). at which point the water within the core is vaporised and recovered.

it is dried and weighed again. condenses therein and falls back into the calibrated tube. ρr – the sample bulk volume and rock density. Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering • Vb . it collects at the bottom of the tube. which might otherwise lead to an erroneously high oil saturation!) and this unit is suspended above a flask containing a solvent. Frequently. the volumes of the oil and water can be converted into percent pore-space fraction (saturation). Because it is heavier than the solvent. with a density of 1. At that point. the measurement includes the weight of rock grains. determined prior to the experiment. • it must have a boiling temperature higher than that of water. which is calculated. See Fig. The Dean-Stark Apparatus for Measuring Initial Fluids When the core to be analysed is weighed. the weight of oil in the sample can be calculated.5.36 Chapter 3. The solvent mixes with the oil in the sample and both are returned to the solvent flask below. and So = . After all the oil and water have been recovered from the sample. registered during the test. When successive readings indicate no additional water recovery. The water and residual oil saturation are calculated as follows: Sw = Vw Vo . Toluene satisfies all of those requirements. This information is subsequently combined with the estimated porosity of the clean. There are several requirements for choosing a proper solvent. The hot solvent vapour rises. 3. • it must be immiscible with water and • it must also be lighter than water.Vw – the recovered oil and water volumes.. saturation are also given in %. it vaporises. such as toluene.0 g/cm3 and a known volume. The condensate collects into the calibrated tube until the fluid there reaches the spill point. as shown in Fig. rises in the condensing tube. • Vp – the pore volume. 3. dry sample.5) where the saturation are fractional parts of the pore volume. Vp Vp (3. the water volume is recorded for further calculations. where it is cooled and condensed. The sample is then placed in the tare apparatus (to be sure that no sand grains are lost from the core sample during its analysis. When heat is applied to the solvent. Because the water collected in the calibrated tube is distilled. surrounds the sample and moves up to the condensing tube. The process continues until the sample’s temperature has risen above the boiling point of water. . where its volume can be directly measured. where upon the solvent condensate drips back onto the sample containing the reservoir fluids. The difference between the original and final weights equals to the weight of the oil and water originally present in the sample. and the pore fluid.5. the water vaporises. • Vo .

determined after the tests. The calculation of the oil and water saturation is straightforward. • Vw – the reservoir volume of water. determined directly after the tests.5). . The samples in the process are not destroyed and can be further used in other measurements. ect.3. registered during the test. pore volume pycnometry or perhaps capillary measurements.5: The Dean-Stark apparatus. (3. • Vo – the recovered volume of oil.e. • φ . The following parameters are derived from the laboratory test: • Wi – the initial weight of the core sample. clean core sample. Vb – the rock’s porosity and the core sample’s bulk volume.. where both the retort distillation method and the Dean-Stark method are capable of yielding fluid saturation values within ±5% of the true values. Water and oil (residual) saturation is calculated according to Eqs. determined prior to the tests. • Wd – the weight of the dry. . i. N.B.3 Saturation 37 Condensing tube Offset calibrated tube Solvent Water Sample Tare Flask Solvent Figure 3. which is calculated.

4 Reservoir Pressure and Distribution of Fluid Phases. Gas Gas cap crest GOC Oil zone Depth Oil Water OWC c FWL Water zone Water zone 0.e.(Sw is the water saturation.6: The distribution of fluid phases in a reservoir. Below the GOC. In most reservoirs. this is the . 70%.0 Figure 3. this is the level where So exceeds ca. even though the rock pores remain "water-wet" (i. See Fig. gas can be present only as a dissolved phase in oil. • The Free-Water Level (FWL) – an imaginary surface at which the pressure in the oil zone equals to that in the water zone. In most reservoirs.) The following fluid interfaces in the reservoir are important: • The Gas-Oil Contact (GOC) – a surface separating the gas cap from the underlying oil zone (also referred to as the oil "leg" or oil "column"). unique meaning in reservoir engineering considerations. po = pw . In other words. • The Oil-Water Contact (OWC) – a surface separating the oil zone from the underlying water zone. but is continuously distributed throughout the reservoir as the wetting fluid. the term "oil-water contact" does not have a single. i.0 SW 1. Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering 3. The density difference makes the gas accumulate at the top of the reservoir. • The Economic OWC – the level above which enough oil will be mobile. as an aquifer. 3. in a well. The migration and accumulation of petroleum in a reservoir leads to the replacement of the original pore water by gas and oil . i. their walls are covered with a thin film of water). Water underlies the petroleum. 3.e.e. oil is generally absent. which in turn makes it necessary to distinguish the following saturation interfaces: • The Free-Oil Level (FOL) – the level above which the oil saturation is sufficiently high to allow full oil mobility (100% oil productivity) and the water saturation is low enough to make water immobile. Below the OWC.6) affects strongly the relative mobility of the oil phase.6. The continuos distribution of water saturation in the reservoir zone (see Sw in Fig. rendering the whole overlying part of the reservoir economical viable. which means Sw < 30%.38 Chapter 3. FWL is the oil-water contact in the absence of the capillary forces associated with a porous medium. However. and the oil directly below.

• The Edge-Water Level – which is the OWC as defined earlier (level of Sw = 100%). as our common terminology refers to it. or "imbibed". The total pressure at any reservoir depth. . Therefore. the distribution of these surfaces is of crucial importance when it comes to physical (fluid dynamics) and economical (oil recovery) considerations.6. and thus. as shown in Fig. The total pressure at any depth is the sum of the overlaying fluid-column pressure (p f ) and the overlaying grain.7. pov . The interfaces are usually determined on the basis of analysis and well (drill-stem) tests. as sketched in Fig. although the actual threshold value may vary. The FWL would then appear to be the only rock-independent OWC.or matrix-column pressure (pm ). because the oil saturation may still be in the order of some percent. Needless to add. 3. representing the absolute base of the oil column.4 Reservoir Pressure and Distribution of Fluid Phases. is called the overburden pressure. This is the base of the reservoir. located below the productive oil-water contact. or the oil. This may mean Sw as high as 80-85% and So of merely 15-20%. by the rock pores (such that only thermal distribution can possibly remove the oil from the "dead-end" pores). Pressure Overburden pressure (OP) FP GP overpressure Depth underpressure normal hydrostatic pressure Figure 3. this is not always the "100% water level". 50%.7: Overburden pressure as the combined grain.3. some engineers prefer to refer to this surface as the capillary oil displacement level or threshold pressure level. 39 level where So exceeds ca. • The Productive OWC – The level above which oil become mobility.and fluid column pressure. 3.column level below which the capillary forces render oil completely arrested. depending upon reservoir conditions. In strict terms. pov = p f + pm . due to the weight of the overlying fluid saturated rock column.

This means that any reduction of the fluid pressure. will lead to a corresponding increase in the grain pressure.8) Typical "normal" pressure gradients for the water.2kPa/m.e. [21]: d p f = −d pm . i. by using a constant ( ) in the above pressure C equations. (d p/dD)o = 0.9 kPa/m.7 (in psia). or dD dp pw (D) = ( )w D + 1. dz (3. (in psia. where the pressure in the reservoir is somewhat higher or lower than otherwise expected.) dD (3. as long as there is a continous phase contact in the water. oil and gas phases are: (d p/dD)w = 0.08 psi/ft = 1.8 kPa/m Abnormally high or low reservoir pressure can appear when the reservoir is "sealed" off from the surrounding aquifer. all the way up to the sea surface. (d p/dD)g = 0.7 +C.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs The hydrostatic water pressure at any depth D. the pressure at the sea bottom or the pressure at the sea surface). dD and if D0 is taken at the sea level.35 psi/ft = 7.6) where (d p/dz)w denotes the pressure gradient of the water phase at depthz. relative the hydrostatic pressure. pw (D) = ( dp )w D + 14. The constant C accounts for the fact that the reservoir pressure is not in hydrostatic equilibrium.9) .45 psi/ft = 10. Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering Because the overburden pressure pov is constant at any particular depth D. at any reservoir depth. dp )w (D − D0 ) + pw (D0 ). The hydrostatic pressure is therefore identical to the water pressure. pw (D) = ( dp )w D + 14.7) pw (D) = ( (3. Rock compressibility is therefore an important parameter to be considered when petroleum (preferably oil) production is estimated. and D0 is an arbitrary depth with a known pressure (for instance. The reservoir pressure can then be corrected. 3. If the hydrostatic pressure gradient considered to be constant we can write. The water pressure for a general reservoir is then as follows.40 Chapter 3. the equation becomes. can be calculated as follows: D pw (D) = ( D0 dp )w dz + pw (D0 ).0 (in bar) dD (3. then the differential overburden pressure is zero. as a result of geological processes. as it occurs during production.

35 · 5500 + 565.7 = 2403.2 = 2383.7 psia (pw )GOC = 0.45 · 5250 + 14.7 = 2264. let us consider the reservoir which cross-section.35 · 5000 + 565. 3. • Water phase: (pw )FW L = 0. At this level there is no pressure difference .35 · 5250 + 565.8 (see also [21]).08 · 5250 +Cg = 2403. 5000 Gas 5250 GOC Oil Depth.8: Cross-section of a reservoir.08 · 5000 + 1983.2psia (po )top = 0.7 = 2377.7psia • Oil phase: (po )FW L = = 0.7psia (po )OWC = 0. In order to evaluate the pressure distribution in a reservoir. ft 5500 OWC Water FWL 5510 Figure 3.2psia (pg )top = 0.35 · 5510 +Co = 2494.2psia which gives: Co = 565.45 · 5510 + 14.2 psia The different phase pressures (water. as shown in Fig.7psia (po )GOC = 0.2 psia (pw )top = 0. oil and gas) are derived from a common reference which normally is the FWL pressure. we can evaluate the fluid-phase pressures at the different reservoir "key" levels.2psia which gives: Cg = 1983.7 = 2489.3.2 psia (pw )OWC = 0. Assuming normal pressure condition.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs 41 where C is positive when over-pressure is observed and negative for a under-pressured reservoir.45 · 5500 + 14.7psia • Gas phase: (pg )GOC = 0.45 · 5000 + 14.7 = 2315.7 = 2494. (pw )FW L .7 = 2490.

6 bar go (Pc )top = (pg )top − (pw )top = 2383. can be evaluated as follows.9. show that the phase pressures are different at the same elevation in the reservoir.. where the subscripts i and j refer to oil-water. 3.7 = 51.7 = 118.7 − 2264.42 Chapter 3. since the oil pressure is too low to allow the oil phase to enter the pore space (the largest pore throats). and that the capillary pressure is additive. as seen in Fig 3.0 psi(a) = 3.2 − 2264. The capillary pressure at the top of the reservoir.9. Different phase pressures are observed at the same elevation in the reservoir.8 and 3. [7]: (Pc )gw = (Pc )ow + (Pc)go . (3.9: Pressure distribution in a reservoir (hypothetical example). shown in Figs. Accordingly.1 bar gw The capillary calculations and the Fig.5 bar ow (Pc )top = (pg )top − (po )top = 2383. While gravity forces tend to separate . the distribution of phases within a reservoir is governed by counteracting gravity and capillary forces. Often this pressure is referred to as thereservoir pressure.e.10) At static (initial reservoir) conditions. (Pc )top = (po )top − (pw )topt = 2315.5 psi(a) = 4.5 psi(a) = 8.9. i. psia 2250 5000 Gas 5250 Oil Depth. 3. Pressure. ft 2375 O G 2500 5000 W GOC 5250 5500 Water 5510 OWC FWL 5500 5510 Treshold capillary pressure Figure 3.2 − 2315.7 = 67. the definition of the GOC. (pw )FW L = (po )FW L . Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering between water and oil and the two pressures are identical. is the level in the reservoir where the pressures in the oil and gas phases are identical. gas-oil or gas-water. Ideally there is no oil present in the zone between the FWL and the OWC. The pressure difference between two coexisting phases is calledcapillary pressure and denoted (Pc )i j .e. the OWC becomes the level in the reservoir where the water saturation becomes less than one and consequently the water saturation is ideally considered to be 100% in this zone. Similar to the FWL. i.

3. ρw is the water density. patm. 3. g is the gravitational constant and D is the water depth. We may therefore write the pressure change as. p= F A ⇒ dp = d F . The balance of these two forces result in an equilibrium distribution of phases within the reservoir prior to its development. as shown in Fig. Substituting the last results into Eq. . . D pw (D) = 0 ρw g dD + patm. 3. . The water pressure at any depth is.6 we obtain the following general formula for water pressure at depth D.5 Pressure Distribution in Reservoirs 43 reservoir fluids accordingly to their densities. acting within and between immiscible fluids and their confining solid substance. the capillary forces.6. where pw (D0 ) is the atmospheric pressure. . dp = d mg =d A ρw gVw A =d ρw gAD A = ρw g dD In the equation above.6 Example: Water pressure in a vertical cylindrical tube The water pressure at a depth D is found using Eq. resist separation. A where F/A is force due to water weight per cross-section area.3. NB! The pressure variation in a reservoir is determined by the fluid densities alone (when the gravitational coefficient is considered constant).

(answ. Given that uncertainty in salinity may lead to an uncertainty in water density of ∆ρ = 1.d p/dz = 10. A laboratory cylindrical cup contains 500 cm3 water and weighs 800 g. Basic Concepts and Definitions in Reservoir Engineering 3. effective.44 Chapter 3. 4. Evaluate the pressure situation in the reservoir and determind whether there is an over.2 kPa/m. Calculate and characterise the sand’s porosity. sandstone. Estimate numerically the change in carbonate-rock porosity caused by a complete dolomitization of calcite. 8.1 bar.1. Formation water salinity will influence hydrostatic pressure estimation.2 kPa/m.4 g Define the terms absolute and effective porosity and decide which term to use when characterising the core sample. 20%. 34%. 1. when the water pressure gradient is 10. absolute. Calculate the density of formation water when the pressure gradient is measured.2 g Weight of 100% water-saturated core sample: 297 g (the density of water is 1. Sand grain density: 2.0 g/cm3 ) Weight of core sample in water: 161. 2. Calculate the bulk volume and porosity of this saturated porous medium knowing that the total weight of cup and its content (water and limestone) is 2734 g./underburden pressure. 9. 6.11 . 3 bar) . 41%. Calculate the porosity of a sandstone core sample given the data from core analysis: Bulk volume of dried sample: 8. 6. 2. Determine the porosity and lithology of a core sample. determine the pressure change inside a reservoir where the depth from the top down to the FWL is 150 m. 2. 8.6 Exercises 1. 8. 4.67 g/cm3 . Weight of dried sample: 17. 28%. Carbonate sand (limestone.65 g/cm3 .3 g. CaCO3 ) is poured into the cup until the level of sand and water coincide. accounting to the chemical reaction. A reservoir water pressure of 213 bar is measured at a sub-sea depth of 2000 m. 1.4 g/cm3 . given the following data: Weight of dried core sample: 259.1 cm3 . 2CaCO3 + Mg2+ = CaMg(CO3 )2 +Ca2+ . will yield a carbonate rock’s porosity of 13% . absolute. A glass cylinder has been filled with dolomite grains up to the 2500cm3 mark. The mass of dolomite is 4714 g. 5. 4%. How do you define the porosity ? 3. 7.31 g/cm3 . 3. 7.

to their shape (volume) after the removal of the overburden pressure. the porosity is the fluid-storage capacity of a porous medium. A consolidated medium means a rock whose grains have been sufficiently compacted and are held together by cementing material. which means the part of the rock’s total volume that is not occupied by solid particles. An important characteristic of consolidated porous media is the ability to restore elastically. it is impossible to counter the 45 . the following types of porosity can be distinguished : • Intergranular porosity.1). • Fracture porosity. • Vugular porosity. 4. From the point of view of pores susceptibility to mechanical changes one should distinguish between consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. to a great extent. Porosity is a statistical property dependent on the rock volume taken into consideration. It should also be noted that porosity is astatic parameter. defined locally as an average over the representative elementary volume of porous rock media considered. • Intragranular porosity. and may vary greatly from one rock type to another.2 Models of Porous Media The geometric character of rock’s permeable pore space is in reality quite complicated.1 General Aspects According to the definition. 4. If the volume selected is too small. Genetically. Rock media having both fracture and intergranular pores are called double-porous or fractureporous media. already presented. • Micro-porosity. the calculated porosity can deviate greatly from the "true" statistical average value [35]. Only a volume selected large enough (a representative volume) will result in a representative and correct statistical average (see Fig. In practice.Chapter 4 Porosity 4.

4. Estimation of porosity accounting to this model. pore-system geometry in a detailed and faithful way.0 Domain of porous medium Inhomogeneous medium Bulk volume Homogeneous medium 0.785. is as follows: φ= Vp π r 2 · n · m π = = = 0.2: Idealised porous medium represented by a system of parallel cylindrical pores (pipes). Porosity Domain of microscopic effects 1.5%. .0 0 Vb Grain Figure 4. be used in some situations where fluid flow under simplified conditions is modelled.1: Definition of a representative elementary volume for porosity measurements [35].2. Vb 2rn · 2rm 4 where r is the pipe radius and m · n is the number of cylinders contained in the bulk volume. 4. It is rather obvious that rocks do not have pores like this and that this model gives a unrealistically high porosity value.46 Chapter 4. see Fig.2. This model may though. or 78. several idealised models have been developed to approximate porous rock media and their varied characteristics.1 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Parallel Cylindrical Pores Vb Vp Figure 4. Therefore.

4.2 Models of Porous Media 47 4. 4.476 or 47. 8 3 3 and π Vb −Vm 8r3 − 4 π r3 3 φ= = = 1 − = 0.2.3 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Orthorhombic-Packed spheres 60o 2r Figure 4. see Fig. is as follows: √ 4 Vb = 2r · 2r · h = 4r2 · 2r sin(60o ) = 4 3 r3 and Vm = π r3 .6% Vb 8r3 6 where Vm is the "matrix" volume or the volume of bulk space occupied by the rock. The matrix volume is unchanged and thus. .3: Idealised porous medium represented by a regular system of cubic-packed spheres.2. see Fig. is as follows: 1 4 4 Vb = (2r)3 and Vm = ( π r3 ) · 8 = π r3 .2 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Cubic-Packed Spheres 2r Figure 4.4. 3 where h is the height of the orthorhombic-packed spheres. 4.4.4: Idealised porous medium represented by a regular system of orthorhombic-packed spheres.3. The estimation of porosity according to this model. The estimation of porosity according to this model.

5 and it follows from Fig.5 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Irregular-Packed Spheres with Different Radii Real reservoir rock exhibits a complex structure and a substantial variation in grain sizes and their packing. Fig. h= 4r2 − 2r2 = √ 2 r.5: Idealised porous medium represented by regular system of rhombohedral-packed spheres. . 4.48 Chapter 4. The estimation of porosity according to this model.6 shows an example of an idealised porous medium represented by four populations of spheres (I . Porosity φ = 1− π Vm 4π r3 = 1− √ = 1 − √ = 0.0% 12 2r3 3 2 4.2.4 Idealised Porous Medium Represented by Regular Rhombohedral-Packed spheres 45 o 2r Figure 4. 3 which gives φ = 1− π 4π r3 √ = 1 − √ = 1 − 0. often associated with the hetrogeniety of porous medium.IV) sorted by different radii and the histogram showing the hypothetical grain -size distribution. see Fig.5% 3 Vb 12 3 r 3 3 4. 4.395 or 39. which results in variation of porosity and other important reservoir properties. where h is the height in the tetrahedron and √ √ 4 Vb = 2r · 2r · 2 r = 4 2 r3 and Vm = π r3 . one can obtain a histogram of distribution of particles (spheres) in sizes.2.26 or 26.74 = 0.5 that. By drawing a graph with radii of the spheres plotted on the horizontal axis and heights equal to the corresponding frequencies of their appearance plotted on the vertical axis. 4.

037.38) and fine sand (φ f . V f . the following table is listed: Volume of sand: Volume of fine sand: Vsand = φ pebbleVpebble . The three sediments are mixed in such proportions that the sand fills the pore volume of the fine pebbles and that the fine sand fills the pore volume of the sand. Vpebble = 0.sand = φsand Vsand . The porosity of the porous medium is ∼ 4%.4..sand φsand φ pebbleVpebble . may serve as a "mental image" or idealised concretization of a rather complex porous structure of porous rocks. The advantage of idealised models. of the rock porosity. The total porosity is then defined. . The volume of fine pebble gravel is equal to the bulk volume.sand .33 = 0.33).e. is the opportunity they offer for simple quantification and representation of characteristic parameters.sand V f . . in general and in particular in the case of porous media. Example: Porous medium of irregular system of spheres A porous medium is blended with three types of sediment fractions: fine pebble gravel with porosity (φ pebble = 0.Vb = Vpebble .6: Idealised porous medium represented by an irregular system of spheres with different radii. Vp Vb φ= = φ f .30). The different models. Since rock porosity has so many representations.sand = 0. described above. sand (φsand = 0. i. it is important to maintain a representative image. Since the sand fills the pore volume of the pebble and the fine sand the pore volume of the sand. though idealized. for further analysis and improved undersanding. Pore volume of fine sand: Vp = φ f .3 · 0.2 Models of Porous Media 49 I III IV Frequency II IV III II I r Figure 4.38 · 0.

4.3 Porosity Distribution The multiple sampling of porosity measurements for reservoir rocks at different depths and in different wells gives a data set that can then be plotted as a histogram. etc. depth profile or graphical co-ordination. may reveal spatial trends in the porosity variation . In heterogeneous rocks. or units.4 Measurement of Porosity 4. The distribution may appear to be unimodal (left) or polymodal (right). Such histograms may be constructed separately for the individual zones. lateral correlation. require a realistic picture of the rock porosity and its variation throughout the reservoir. distinguished within the reservoir. 4.1 Full-Diameter Core Analysis A full-diameter core analysis is used to measure the porosity of rocks that are distinctly heterogeneous. numerical modelling. 4. the local porosity may be highly variable. for which a standard core-plug analyse is unsuitable. intergranular porosity. etc.50 Chapter 4. 4.4. Frequency Frequency Min Porosity Max Min Porosity Max Figure 4. The grouping of porosity data according to the reservoir zones.) Mechanical diagenesis (compaction) and chemical diagenesis (cementation) have a profound effect on a sedimentary rock’s porosity. This picture is not easily obtainable since porosity is measured locally (in the well) and porosity extrapolations introduce large uncertainty in the estimated average values. This burial effect is illustrated by the two typical examples of sand and clay deposits in Fig. Numerical simulation of fluid flow in porous media.7: Unimodal and polymodal porosity distributions. The same core-plug is a non-representative elementary volume for this type of rock. and fissured. . such as some carbonates. standard deviations. See Fig. Porosity 4. The recognition of such trends is very important for the development of a bulk picture of the reservoir as a porous medium and representation of the reservoir porosity in mathematical simulation models (reservoir characterisation.7. The porosity measurement in such rocks requires samples that are as large as can be obtained (portions of full-diameter drilling cores).8. vugues. vugular rocks. related to laboratory tests on core samples as well as full field production estimation. and thus give a good basis for statistical estimates (mean porosity values. to reveal the porosity’s frequency distribution.). as it may include micro-porosity. see Fig.9.

and the procedure is generally similar for full-diameter cores and core "plugs". m Figure 4.4 Porosity sand 0.4. Several laboratory techniques used for porosity measurements. .9: Sediment compaction burial and porosity change. 4. A full-diameter core sample usually has a diameter of 5 inches (12. depending upon the instrumentation and procedures used. The full-diameter core technique does not differentiate between the actual types of porosity involved.4.2 0. Either the pore volume or the grain volume can be determined. fractures.8: Examples of trends of porosity distribution in the depth profiles of two reservoir sandstone. see Fig. but yields a singe porosity value that represents their effective combination.0 0 300 600 900 clay 1200 1500 1800 Depth. or various combinations of these.1 0.4 Measurement of Porosity 51 Porosity + + + + + + + + + Depth + + + + + Figure 4. dry core sample. 4.3 0. 0.5 cm) and the length of 10 inches (25 cm).5 0.10.2 Grain-Volume Measurements Based on Boyle’s Law This gas transfer technique involves the injection and decompression of gas into the pores of a fluid-free (vacuum).

10.10: Porosity measurements based on the Boyle’s law. • helium is an inert gas that and will not be absorbed on the rock surfaces and thus yield erroneous results. The Calculation of the Grain Volume Using the ideal gas law. Assuming adiabatic conditions. p2 (4. Other gases. . and p2 the final pressure in the system. which increase the effect of dehydrating the core sample. See Fig. and in the case of vacuum inside the sample chamber (Fig. • the very small size of helium molecules makes the gas rapidly penetrate small pores. 4. To perform the laboratory measurement. due to effects of dehydration of the porous core sample. T = const. 4.1) where p1 denotes initial pressure in the reference cell. p1Vre f = p2 (Vre f +Vs −Vg ). N2 is also used. simply due to its availability.10. pV = nRT where the temperature. Helium gas is often used due to its following properties. Porosity Sample Chamber Reference volume Pressure gauge Valve To gas pressure source Pressure regulator Valve Figure 4. where Vre f . might be good alternatives to Helium. Vg = p2Vre f + p2Vs − p1Vre f . one obtains p1V1 = p2V2 . Successive measurements will increase the accuracy. the volume of the sample chamber and the grain volume. respectively. The advantage of CO2 is it’s hydrophilic ability. such as N2 and CO2 . Vs and Vg are the reference volume. one obtains.52 Chapter 4.

• mercury which normally not enters the pore space in a core sample due to its non-wetting capability and its large interfacial energy against air. 2. The bulk volume is then written.e. The the sample is then submerged in the same fluid and its submerged weight is measured. • water which can easily be evaporated afterwards..4 Measurement of Porosity 53 4. m1 (assuming 100% water saturation) and then weighing the sample in air as it is removed from the cup. ρw Differentiating the equation above gives us. . is considered to be independent measurements. using this technique. − − ρw m2 − m1 m2 − m1 ρw If the density measurement as well as the two mass-measurements above. is normally obtained.2%. Fluids that are normally used are. i.m2 . Example: Uncertainty analysis in measuring the bulk volume using Archimedes’ principle. where uncertainties in the order of ± 0. ∂ m2 ∂ m1 ∂ ρw dVb = dm2 m2 − m1 dm1 d ρw . Vb = m2 − m1 . first by weighing the sample in a cup of water. ∆m = ∆m1 = ∆m2 . ∆Vb Vb 2 =2 ∆m (m2 − m1 ) 2 + ∆ ρw ρw 2 .3 Bulk-Volume Measurements This technique utilizes the Archimedes’ principle of mass displacement: 1. where the uncertainty introduced in the process of weighing the two masses is considered to be identical.4. The laboratory measurements. are very accurate. The bulk volume is the difference between the two weights divided by the density of the fluid. dVb = ∂ Vb ∂ Vb ∂ Vb dm2 + dm1 + d ρw . the relative uncertainty in the bulk volume is written.4. The bulk volume of a porous core sample can be measured in two steps. The core sample is first saturated with a wetting fluid and then weighed.

2) (4. Porosity The uncertainty equation above may also be written.11.4. or a hydrostatic load cell. as seen in Fig. Hydrostatic pressure Core sample Flow into core To flow meter Rubber tubing Figure 4.4 Pore-Volume Measurement Pore volume measurements can be done by using the Boyle’s law. Helium or one of its substitutes is injected into the core plug through the end stem.5%. see Fig. in some experimental tests could be larger than the effective uncertainty related to the measuring technique. The calculation of the pore volume Vp is as follows: p0Vp + p1Vre f and Vp = (p1 − p2 ) Vre f where (p1 > p2 > p0 ) (p2 − p0 ) = nRT (4. we find a relative uncertainty in the bulk volume of approximately 0.1 g.11: Hydrostatic load cell (Hassler holder) used for a direct measurement of pore volume. when the pore volume Vp .) .3) p2 (Vp +Vre f ) = nRT It is important to notice that the Hassler core holder has to be coupled to a volume of known reference Vre f . 4. If the relative uncertainty in determined the water density is estimated to 0. 4. is measured. . (Note that the uncertainty related to the assumption of 100% water saturation prior to the first mass measurement. 4. where the sample is placed in a rubber sleeve holder that has no voids space around the periphery of the core and on the ends. ∆Vb Vb 2 ∆m =2 ρwVb 2 ∆ ρw + ρw 2 . The bulk volume of the core sample is approximately 30 cm3 and water density is assumed equal to 1 g/cm3 .54 Chapter 4.10. Such a holder is called the Hassler holder.1% and the weighing accuracy is equal to 0.

is raised to 70 bar (1000 psi). and φ . = φ Sw . Vo1 Vb1 Vw fw = 1 Vb1 fo = = φ So . pHg . Then the pressure of the mercury. The oil. filling the pore space originally occupied with the gas. water and gas volumes are each calculated as fractions of the bulk volume of the rock sample and the three values are added to yield the porosity value . If the core has been exposed to the open air for some time. the volume of the mercury "imbibed" in the rock gives the gas volumeVg .4. fg = Vg2 = φ Sg Vb2 where the subscript 2 is omitted for fg . some of the oil and water can evaporate and the saturation will be measured inaccurately. 100 g) is crushed and placed in a fluid-extraction retort (see figure in previous chapter). the fraction of the gas-bulk volume) can be calculated. the fraction of the bulk volume occupied by gas (i. One part (ca. we can write. the mercury enters the sample and compresses the gas.e. The second part of the rock sample (ca. The bulk volume and weight of the fresh sample allow the computation of the effective bulk density of the rock. • Second subsample gives the volume of gasVg2 and the rock’s bulk volume Vb2 . The vaporised water and oil originally contained in the pores. Denoting the apparent bulk density of the fluid-saturated rock sample asρapp . Sg .5 Fluid-Summation Method This technique is to measure the volume of gas.4 Measurement of Porosity 55 4. The volumes of the extracted oil. . where the metal-holder unit has a cap to prevent the evaporation of gases at the top. oil and water present in the pore space of a fresh or preserved (peel-sealed) core of known bulk volume. is weighed and then placed in a pump chamber filled with mercury (a pycnometer) in which its bulk volume is determined. At this pressure. This in turn is used to convert the weight of the first part of the sample.4. The core sample is divided into two parts. 30 g) with a roughly cylindrical shape. measuring the volume of the displaced mercury. With an appropriate calculation.. move down and are subsequently condensed and collected in a calibrated glassware. because these values are representative for both parts of the sample. From the second subsample. where their volumes are measured.and water-volume factor are calculated as follow. Ws1 = Vb1 · ρapp and Ws2 = Vb2 · ρapp → Vb1 = Vb2 Ws1 Ws2 The formation oil. into an equivalent bulk volume. gas and water are added to obtain the pore volume and hence the core porosity. The laboratory procedure provides the following information: • First subsample gives the rock’s weightWs1 and the volumes of oil Vo1 and water Vw1 are recorded. which was 100 g (to be retorted).

p0 (V0 −Vm ). In order to define the matrix volume.56 Chapter 4. (Mercury. as laboratory fluid. The core sample is placed in the cell. and the cell volume is sealed. The sketch below illustrates the working principle of the pycnometer. Finally. The pycnometer is a lab-tool occasionally used for measuring bulk. Hg V0 Figure 4. p1 is measured. 4. Mercury is injected into the cell and a new gas volume.V1 and gas pressure. Vm of a core sample. A pycnometer is in principle a contained volume. The pycnometer piston is withdrawn and a gas (air) volume of V0 is measured.12: Sketch of the pycnometer. Porosity and the sum of the fluid-volume factor then gives the porosity value: fo + fw + fg = φ (So + Sw + Sg ) = φ Example: Use of pycnometer in matrix volume calculation.and pore volumes of core samples.) 5. The pycnometer cell is fully saturated with mercury. The equilibrium condition inside the cell is written. p1 (V1 −Vm ). . 3. New equilibrium is reached and we write. a cell. p1 − p0 . the following measuring steps are carried out: 1. the matrix volume is found as follows: Vm = p1V1 − p0V0 . where a defined amount of mercury can be injected or withdrawn. 2. has become less popular due to its toxic characteristics and is quite often replaced by other fluids. due to its high interfacial tension. where p0 is the atmospheric pressure and Vm is the matrix of the sample (the rock’s grain volume). NB: The mercury does not enter the pore system of the core sample.

For characteristic parameter estimation.5). Vb = Vp +Vm . Porosity will normally be a function of Vp . Example: Error propagation From laboratory measurements one has estimated the relative uncertainty related to the pore volume to be. If we define porosity as. dVp dVb dφ = − . The relative error or uncertainty in the porosity is then given by ∆φ = φ ∆Vp Vp 2 + ∆Vb Vb 2 . (4. we will expect the uncertainty in the measured parameters to introduce an error in the estimate of the porosity found. (4. since the total relative uncertainty is mainly influenced by the largest relative uncertainty. Vb we may differentiate the equation and we obtain.5) In laboratory experiments we wish to reduce uncertainties to a minimum.e. only two of them should appear in the uncertainty analysis. Vm and/or Vb .4) and then substitute the results into Eq. the resultsVp and Vb are independent parameters and so are their uncertainties. Since the three parameters are dependent. leaving the other unchanged. (4.4) gives. Vb Vb 2 = Vp Vp +Vm 2 + Vm Vp +Vm 2 . The porosity is defined. (4. Differentiation of Eq. i.0% and the relative uncertainty related to the matrix is.. Vm /Vm = 7%. like determination of the porosity. φ Vp Vb The pore.e.4) φ= Vp .5 Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation Experimental data is always contaminated with measuring uncertainty. Eq.5 Uncertainty in Porosity Estimation 57 4. Vb Vp +Vm We could start to differentiate the porosity with respect toVp and Vm .and bulk volumes are independent measurements. φ= Vp Vp = . i. (4. .5) tells us that it is not sufficient to reduce the uncertainty in only one of the measured parameters. (4. but instead we intend to differentiate Eq. given the equation above. Vp /Vp = 5.4. ∆Vp and ∆Vm .

Once these logs are obtained and converted into a porosity log.6 Porosity Estimation from Well Logs Porosity of reservoir rock can be estimated not only by using methods. then the relative uncertainty in the porosity is ∼ 7.58 Chapter 4. 4.e. Porosity can be estimated from: • Formation resistivity factor (F).5)%.5) gives. The Formation resistivity factor is defined as the ratio of the resistivity of the porous sample saturated with an ionic solution Ro of the bulk resistivity of the same solution Rw . but also from geophysical well logs. Porosity and substitution in Eq. (4. [23] Ro . φ = φ (1 + φ 2 ) Vp Vp 2 + (1 − φ )2 Vm Vm 2 .gamma) log. compared to the process above where a two step differentiation is performed.6) Rw The Formation resistivity factor measures the influence of pore structure on the resistance of the core sample. (4. φ = φ or written differently. • Neutron . • Density (gamma . Every extra operation in the error propagation increases the final uncertainty. φ = 0. often called wireline logs.57% and the porosity with uncertainty is written.2 (or 20%). as has been described above. Note that if the equation φ = Vp /(Vp +Vm ) is differentiated directly. . Vp Vp 2 + Vp Vp +Vm 2 + Vm Vp +Vm 2 . There are several relationships which can be used for the porosity evaluation using F-values [23]. • Microresistivity log (from which F can be derived). This method of porosity evaluation is not very accurate. If the porosity is. φ± φ = (20 ± 1. but has the advantage of providing continous porosity data. the result would be slightly different because the differentiation was used only once. i. • Acoustic (sonic) log.gamma log. F= . they can be calibrated using core-sample porisity data and serve as additional reliable source of porosity distribution evaluation.

• F = X /φ . • F = (3 − φ )/2φ (Maxwell.4. 1881).6 Porosity Estimation from Well Logs 59 • F = φ −m . . For more information regarding porosity evaluation using geophysical well logs. 37]. 23. 1957). see reference [7. where X is the electric tortuosity of the sample (Wyllie. 1942). where m is the cementation constant (Archie.

where 80 g of the sample is placed in a mercury pycnometer and the volume of gas found is 0. A piece of the same sample. Another core sample is brought to the laboratory for compositional analysis. the weight is increased to 225. given the following data: weight of dry sample in air: 20 g. given the following data: weight of crushed dry sample in air: 16 g.7 Exercises 1.60 Chapter 4. 3.90 g. assuming a sand-grain density of 2. density of mercury: 13.9 g/cc).4/(131.1 g. Calculate the bulk volume of a dry core sample immersed in mercury pycnometer. weight of crushed sample plus absorbed water: 16. weight of saturated sample in water: 12. (Notice that the oil density is ρ [g/cm3 ] = 141. The sample is the placed in aSoxhlet distillation apparatus.8 cm3 and 4. and 4. Determine the sandstone’s grain density and porosity. 2. Determine the sandstone’s grain volume and porosity using Boyl’s law. Calculate the bulk volume of a preserved (paraffin-coated) core sample immersed in water.14 g. 95 cm3 is measured in a mercury pycnometer. Calculate the effective porosity of a sandstone sample using the following data: weight of dry sample in air: 20 g. 235. After drying the core sample.9 g (density of paraffin is : 0. given the following data: volume of chamber containing the core sample: 15 cc. 6. when the water density at that particular temperature and pressure is 1g/cm3 ) 7. water saturation. bulk volume of core sample: 10 cc 5. respectively. volume of chamber containing air: 7 cc.5 + ρ [o API]). weight of mercury-filled pycnometer at 20 oC: 350 g.53 cm3 . weight of dry sample coated with paraffin: 20.4 m3 . oil saturation. A core sample is saturated with an oil (ρo = 35o API).75 g. Porosity 4.0 g/cc). 4. weight of saturated sample in air: 22.546 g/cc.6 g. weighing 120 g is placed in a retorte. weight of water-filled pycnometer with the sample: 75 g. weight of coated sample immersed in water: 10 g (density of water is: 1g/cc) Determine the rock’s porosity. A third piece of the . weight of water-filled pycnometer: 65 g. the weight is now 209. given the following data: weight of dry sample in air: 20 g. where the water and oil volume is measured to 2. gas and water. After the gas is displaced by water (ρw = 1 g/cm3 ). gas saturation and lithology of the core sample.67 g/cc. The sample bulk volume. density of water is : 1.5 g. Find the porosity.4 cm3 water is extracted. weight of mercury-filled pycnometer with the sample at 20 o C. The initial weight of the sample is 224.9 g.

6%. mass of water saturated sample: 120.10%.67 g/cm3 . if the core described in the excercise above is representative of the reservoir? Answer to questions: 1.5%. 19%. mas of saturated sample immersed in water: 64.54 cm in diameter has a porosity of 22%. 3. 2. 5. 9.1%.54 cm long and 2. 24. If a formation is 2. weighing 90 g is placed in a pycnometer and the bulk volume is measured to be 37. 738235.7 Exercises 61 sample. 4.95 cm3 .7 g.73 g/cm3 . Assume oil and water densities as in the exercise above and find the same characteristic parameters. Calculate the porosity of the sample described below: mass of dry sample: 104. 29%.47 hectare large area. a) What is the pore volume of the core? b) What are the oil and water saturations of the core? 10. Is this effective porosity or the total porosity of the sample? What is the most probable lithology of the matrix material? Explain . what is the volume of oil-in-place (in m3 and in bbl) of a 40. 75. 9.69 g/cm3 . where the oil content is 1. 16%.6%. 20%. 9. 2. 2. 25%.001 g/cm3 . 7.1%. 8. density of water 1. 1.8%.2 g. 6.64 g/cm3 .831 cm3 . 55.6 bbl . A core. 47%.3%.2 g. 35. 14. 2. 2.5 cm3 . 8. 10.5 m thick.4. 2. 2. It is saturated with oil and water. 53%.4 cm3 . 9.

Porosity .62 Chapter 4.

communication of interstices. all pore channels are included in the averaging process when permeability is measured. ∆l q = K ·A 63 (5. were reported by Dupuit in 1854.e. however. it is natural to assume that there exists certain correlations between permeability and effective porosity.2 Darcy’s Law The first important experiments of fluid flow through porous media. porosity correlated permeabilities are often used in extrapolating reservoir permeability between wells.. the permeability is a tensor. If there were no interconnected pores. Absolute permeability could be determined in the laboratory by using inert gas (nitrogen is frequently used) that fills the porous rock sample completely and limits the possibility of chemical interaction with the rock material to a minimum. the rock would be impermeable. since the resistance towards fluid flow will vary. In general terms. In practical terms. each fluid phase will counteract the free flow of the other phase’s and a reduced phase permeability (relative to absolute) is measured.e. i. depending on the flow direction.1 Introduction Permeability in a reservoir rock is associated with it’s capacity to transport fluids through a system of interconnected pores. obeys the following relationship: h . effective permeability. i. All factors affecting porosity will affect permeability and since rock permeability is difficult to measure in the reservoir.Chapter 5 Permeability 5. When several phases or mixtures of fluids are passing through a rock locally and simultaneously.1) . i.e. In 1856 Henry Darcy proved that flow of water through sand filters. using water-filters. even though this is only correct for isotropic porous media. Since the gas molecules will penetrate even the smallest pore-throats. His results showed that the pressure drop across the filter is proportional to the water filtration velocity. permeability is often considered to be a scalar. 5.

e.1: Orientation of the sand filter with respect to the direction of gravitation. 5. the flow velocity is proportional to.1). i. a reduced flow velocity is expected and similarly if the water is replaced by a fluid of higher viscosity. have proved that if the manometric level. is kept constant.1.64 Chapter 5. Experiments repeated after Darcy. for the 3 cases are given. the same flow rate (or flow velocity) is measured. is thickness of the filter in the flow direction and is a proportionality coefficient. (5. II : ∆pII = ρ g(h − ∆l · sin θ ). where ∆l is the thickness or length of the sand filter in the flow direction. a reduced flow velocity is expected.) If the sand filter is made longer. 5. The pressure difference across the sand filter in Fig. the effects of fluid density and viscosity had no real experimental significance. was not included because only water filters were investigated and hence. III : ∆pIII = ρ gh. θ Datum plane I o θ = 90 II o o 0 < θ < 90 III o θ = 90 Figure 5.1). (∆z accounts for the inclined flow direction relative to horizontal flow. v ∝ (∆p + ρ g∆z). . hydrostatic height difference. h. as in Eq. Permeability where h A ∆l K is a difference in manometer levels. I : ∆pI = ρ g(h − ∆l). In Darcy’s experimental results. Since the water velocity is proportional to the manometric level (observation made by Darcy). is cross-sectional area of the filter. where ∆z is the elevation in the gravitational field. irrespective of the orientation of the sand filter (see Fig. viscosity µ .

µ ∆l (5. where ∆z = z − z0 and e. i. µ ∆l The proportionality. in front of the pressure gradient term. ∆l→0 µ dl µ ∆l (5. compensates for a negative pressure gradient in the direction of flow (since fluids move from high to low potential). as a proportionality constant and not as a physical parameter. Φ= def p + gz.5. above.2). (5. as observed in any reservoir where the fluid pressure increases with depth. not carry any characteristic information about the porous medium. At this point it is important to notice that the permeability.4) where the minus sign "-". The Darcy’s law in differential form is. the sum of pressure difference and elevation in the gravity field. can be replaced by equality. definition positive parameters (see the example below). z0 = 0 at a level where the reference pressure is 1 atm. k ∆Φ q=A ρ µ ∆l where k is the permeability of the porous medium (filter. the pressure potential has been associated with the energy potential (energy pr.e.4) and (5. the elevation is constant. i. ρ Substituting the pressure potential difference ∆Φ in Eq. dz/dx = 0. µ dx (5. A pressure difference ∆(p + ρ gz) = (p + ρ gz)2 − (p + ρ gz)1 will create a fluid flow between the two points. v= k ∆p + ρ g∆z .3) For linear and horizontal flow (parallel to the x-axis) of incompressible fluid. In these cases no flow is expected and static equilibrium is established.e. When . In a historical context. Velocity and flow rate are pr.g. is volume pr. time. q = −A k dp . Fluid flow in a porous rock is therefore given by the pressure potential difference ∆(p + ρ gz). The permeability does pr. one can rewrite the equality equation based on Darcy’s deduction.2 Darcy’s Law 65 v∝ 1 ∆p + ρ g∆z . The flow rate q = dV /dt.3). unless the pressure p is equal to the static pressure −ρ gh. (5. by introducing a proportionality coefficient k. etc. µ is the viscosity of the fluid and l is the length of the porous medium in the direction of flow andΦ is the pressure potential. is introduced in Eqs.). k dΦ k ∆Φ q=A ρ = lim A ρ . k. definition.2) where k is the permeability. and Dracy’s law is written. mass) and the following definition has been used. The pressure at any point along the flow path is related to a reference height or datum plane z0 . core sample/plug.

4 is justified by considering linear core flow. describes not only the porous medium transport capability. filtration) or bulk velocity. x2 are labelled according to standard numbering and orientation.e. 5. v pore and is necessarily higher than the bulk velocity.2. is often overlooked. The fluid velocity related to the cross-section area A is called the superficial (i. (5.. through a core sample. on average. e. i. Since x2 obviously is larger than x1 . dp p1 − p2 p2 − p1 =− . The pressures p1 . the minus sign "-" is needed to balance the equation. the porous medium contains a residual saturation of a non-flowing phase. the pressure term is written as follows. the fact that this information about the porous medium is missing in Eq. and the linear flow velocity is written. definition negative. as illustrated in Fig. as such. Example: Linear horizontal core flow The minus sign "-" in the horizontal flow equation Eq.3. If. (5. 5. as often is the case in practical situations.4). which is otherwise not described by any of the other parameters in Eq.5) The real velocity of fluid flow in the pores is called the interstitial (true) velocity.g.φ times smaller than the bulk cross-section A. . the value of d p/dx is pr. Assuming a homogeneous porous medium and integration from position 1 to 2. The proportionality constant k. A µ dx (5. 5. Permeability permeability is related to the transport capability of the porous medium.e.4). p1 q x1 x2 x p2 q Figure 5.66 Chapter 5. the pore flow velocity is affected through the reduction of the . as shown in Fig. called permeability. = dx x2 − x1 x2 − x1 where p1 > p2 in positive flow direction. but represents all information about the porous medium etc. a connate water saturation Swc . This effect will increase the pore velocity even more. since the flow cross-section area is.2: Horizontal flow in a core sample. Let’s assume a constant liquid flow rate q. p2 and the positions x1 . in addition. u= q k dp =− . The directions of pore flow are inclined relative to the general flow direction and a characteristic inclination angle α is assigned to describe this effect.

Experimental tests from different porous rocks have shown that an average inclination angle.6) z vpore α α x vq y Figure 5. then the pore velocity will be about 7 times higher than the bulk velocity. q = −A k d(p + ρ gz) .3: Pore flow velocity in a porous medium. with an angle θ to the horizontal flow direction. through a porous medium of length ∆l.2 Darcy’s Law 67 flow cross-section area. The sum of these effects will cause the pore flow velocity to become considerably higher than the bulk velocity. If a typical porosity of 25% and a connate water saturation of 10% are assumed. In order to keep a constant flow rate q. µ dl . a pressure difference ∆p is applied. α 36o and that this angle may vary between 12o to 45o .4: Core flow at a dip angle θ to the horizontal axis Flow at an angle to the horizontal direction is described by Eq. p2 p1 l2 q l1 r q l g θ x Figure 5. (5. since the fluids are moving up or down in the gravitational field.5.3). See Fig. A φ 1 − Swc cos2 α (5. where the minus sign is describing linear flow. the gravitational force has to be considered.4. Example: Linear inclined core flow When the direction of flow is inclined. v pore = 1 q1 1 . 5.

4. gives k k q + A ρ g sin θ ∆l = A ∆p.4). These conditions are the following: • Horizontal flow. In these tests. the pressure difference has to be larger relative to the horizontal case. • Incompressible fluid. Permeability z is the elevation in the gravitational field and from Fig. q = −A k dp k − A ρ g sin θ . some important conditions have to be satisfied before permeability could be estimated from the measured data.e. In a up-dip situation.4 it’s evident that z = l sin θ . The flow equation becomes. • 100% fluid saturation in the porous medium.. . the pressure difference needs to be adjusted relative to the inclination angle (dip angle). µ µ The pressure difference is given. µ dl µ Integration from position 1 to 2.68 Chapter 5.5.3 Conditions for Liquid Permeability Measurements. Permeability in core samples is measured in the laboratory using Darcy’s law for horizontal flow. • Stationary flow current. constant cross-section in flow direction.e. • No chemical exchange or . ∆p = µ ∆l q + ρ g∆l sin θ . Ak where horizontal linear flow is ∆pθ =0 = q(µ ∆l)/(Ak). 0 ≤ θ < 90o ⇒ ∆p ≥ ∆p0 −90o < θ < 0 ⇒ ∆p < ∆p0 . In order to maintain a constant flow rate through the core sample. since the fluid is pushed upwards in the gravitational fields. where l is the direction of flow.reactions between fluid and porous medium. as in Fig. Eq. 5. i. 5. i. • Laminar flow current (satisfied in most liquid flow cases). (5.

The importance of linear representation of the measured data is the advantage of visual inspection.g.5: Experimental determination of liquid permeability. It is not convenient to measure permeability of porous media in cm2 or in m2 . e.7) [54]. There are two systems of units which are widely used in petroleum field engineering. e. Permeability is found by plotting the measured data as shown in Fig. (5. (5. The linear best fit through all experimental data-points will give a slope. 5. large spread in data around the linear fit. Having satisfied all the above conditions.5.4 Units of Permeability Dimensional analysis applied to the Darcy’s law. 5.5. or uncertainty in laboratory measurements. • SI units (international system of units). which may reveal non-linear effects in the data. µ ∆l (5. q= Ak ∆p. • Field units. By convention the unit for the permeability is called theDarcy.g. permeability is found by integrating the linear flow equation where the permeability is experimentally determined using the formula.7) where the flow rate q and the pressure difference ∆p are the measured data.4 Units of Permeability 69 q slope. a = Ak / µ∆ l ∆p Figure 5. we get the following equality: 1 cm3 1D 1atm = −1cm2 − . . creating a pressure difference of 1 atm/cm. The following definition of the Darcy has been accepted: The permeability is 1 Darcy if a fluid with viscosity of 1cp is flowing at a rate of 1 cm3 /s through a porous medium with a cross-section of 1cm2 . L2 . from which the permeability can be calculated using Eq. s 1cp 1cm where the Darcy-units are preferably used in connection with laboratory tests.4). at high or low flow rates. shows that permeability has the dimension of surface area. Applying Darcy-units to Eq.

as shown in Fig.0 24. It is important to remember that permeability is a tensor. Example: Core sample liquid permeability. normal to the bedding of formations) is usually much lower in comparison than the horizontal permeability (measured along the bedding of formations). is measured for three different flow-rates and permeability is calculated using the above formula. The core is saturated with water and then flushed horizontally. it’s diameter is 5 cm and the water viscosity is 1. The pressure drop ∆p.987µ m2 . It follows from these evaluations that. by calculating the permeability value for each data-pair. In its turn. A ∆p where A = π (d/2)2 and d is the core sample diameter. the 1/1000 fraction is used.0 7.5 0. s kg .101 . Instead of the unit 1 Darcy. The core length is 15 cm.e. k= µ ∆l q . the horizontal permeability can be different in different directions. Vertical permeability (i.0 76.0 0.093 10.2 0.0 cp. These permeability features should be taken into account while measuring permeability. qw [cm3 /s] ∆p [atm] k [D] 1.01 · 105 = 1. using the formula.01 · 107 2 2 and dl cm cm m s −4 2 A = 10 m qµ k = = 0. The permeability might be determined by plotting the data in a "rate/pressure" diagram.70 Chapter 5. A · d p/dl Here: µ m2 = (µ m)2 . Permeability The value 1 Darcy is defined in SI-units by substitution: m3 . ms q = 10−6 µ = 1 cp = 10−3 dp Pa kg atm = 1 = 1. 5. or more directly.987 µ m2 . which means that permeability might have different values in different directions. which then is called millidarcy (mD).987 · 10−12 m2 = 0.106 3. 1 D = 0.5. A cylindrical core sample is properly cleaned and all remains of hydrocarbons are removed from the pore space.

5. .5 Gas Permeability Measurements Due to certain interactions between the liquids and the porous rock. µ p0 dx (5. as in this example. for instance. one can write. It follows from the perfect gas law (pV = nRT ) that.8) Here the subscript "0" refers to a certain pressure value. µ dx where ρ is the density of the gas at certain pressure. 2µ p0 ∆l k p ∆p . qρ = −A kρ d p . ρ (p) = ρ (p0 ) ρ0 p. Taking into account the invariant quantity. qρ = q0 ρ0 .10) Another useful form in which Eq. is the opportunity to verify that the data used in the averaging process are "good" or representative .1 D or 100 mD. absolute permeability is routinely measured in the laboratory by flowing gas (usually inert gas) through the core sample. e. the Darcy’s law may not be utilised directly. as shown in Fig.11) . the gas rate is pressure dependent. the pressure at normal or standard conditions. or simply ρ = p.e. p0 p0 which when substituted into the previous equation equation yields. (5. q0 = A (5. µ po ∆l (5. Because gas is a highly compressible substance. This uncertainty could be examined by plotting the data-pairs in an appropriate way.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 71 The average or representative permeability is k = 0.5.10) can be written is. i. Considering mass flow of gasqρ . The advantage of data-plotting.9) k p2 − p2 1 2 . qρ = −A k ρ0 p d p . Laboratory measurements. compared to straight forward calculations. q0 = −A or integrated from p1 to p2 . always contain uncertainty related to the technology used to obtain the lab-data. µ p0 dx (5. q0 = A kp d p .5. 5.g. one finally obtains.

(5. .6. and then flows vertically through the screen. Under high air pressure the rubber tubing is collapsed around the core. right). The air then flows through the full diameter sample along its full height and emerges on the opposite side. (5. Horizontal permeability measurements require a sealing of the top surfaces of the core with non-permeable rubber disks (see Fig.12) where q is the mean or average flow rate. Permeability where p = (p1 + p2 )/2 is a mean (average) pressure in the core during the measurements.6. ρ p = ρ p with Eq. The area of cylindrical surface at the inflow and outflow openings is covered with a screen and the sample is then placed into the core holder. The second measurement is made at the right angles to the first. It provides measurements of permeability in both vertical and horizontal directions. Combining the invariant mass flow. 5. The Hassler core holder is commonly used for permeability measurements. Eq. left). 1991). and the cross-sectional area of flow is a function of the length and diameter of the core sample. The core plug is placed in an impermeable rubber sleeve protecting the gas flow at the outer-face of the core plug. the mean flow rate is equal to the gas rate at the centre of the core sample. In most cases the circumference of the core is divided into four equal quadrants. For permeability measurements in the vertical direction gas is injected through the core plug in the axial direction (see Fig. Metal plug Screen Core sample Low air pressure High air pressure Screen To flow Low air meter pressure Rubber disk To flow meter Flow directions High air pressure Rubber tubing Figure 5. In a homogeneous porous rock. 5. It is common to furnish two horizontal permeability measurements on all full diameter samples. except for the fact that the flow rate is the mean flow rate. one obtains. k ∆p .6: Full diameter vertical and horizontal permeability measurement apparatus (from IHRDC.11).12) has exactly the same form as Darcy’s law for horizontal liquid flow.72 Chapter 5. Low pressure air is introduced into the center of the holder and passes through the rubber boot and intersects with the screen. qρ = qρ and the results generated from the perfect gas law. µ ∆l q = −A (5. In this test the flow length is actually a function of the core diameter. The screen are selected to cover designated outer segments of the full diameter sample. where the screen again allows free flow of the air to exit.

) . Note that the gas permeability is pressure dependent. will start to behave as a liquid.8 6.0 7 6 Permeability: k [mD] 5 4 3 2 0 0. p and the pressure drop across the core.7: Gas permeability plotted as the reciprocal of mean pressure.6. e. the mean pressure in the core sample.10). i.3 5. 2µ p2 ∆l Given the pressure p1 and the gas rate q2 . The core has been cleaned and dried and mounted in a Hassler core holder. p2 = 1atm.5. at one end of the core sample.066 1.4 0. 1in in diameter and length.33 2.00 k [mD] 6. The gas permeability could be estimated using Eq. (5.6 132. p1 measured. The gas is injected and the pressure.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 73 Example: Core sample gas permeability. in air.] Figure 5.133 0.6 0. The gas permeability k is found as a function of the mean core pressure. A gas permeability test has been carried out on a core sample. The following data is given: p1 [mmHg] 861 1276 2280 q2 [cm3 /min] 6. since at such high pressure the gas itself. at atmospheric pressure. ∆p. 5.(This asymptotic limit is not reached unless the pressure. are calculated from the equation above.] 0. written as follows.00 ∆p [atm. while the gas rate.g..667 2. q2 = A k p2 − p2 1 2 .] 1. As the mean pressure in the core sample increases it is expected that the gas permeability will approach the absolute (liquid) permeability.8 p [atm.2 0. of the type seen in Fig.4 35.8 1 Reciprocal pressure: 1/p m [1/atm.e. q2 is measured at the other end. is more than 1000 bar.

. turbulent flow may be experienced in parts of the pore system. the horizontal flow equation can be expanded by adding a term particularly describing the turbulent flow situation. A ∆pp 1 β p0 q0 = + . (5. special care has to be taken to how data is plotted.13) ρ F ∆x where R is the tube radius. Instead the gas rate is measured at the exhaust end. (5. The data.5.14). preferably in the larger pores and pore channels. (5. q0 . roughness. is used describing turbulent flow in a circular tube [7]. ∆p A 1 1 β q.14) is a linear equation where 1/k is the constant term. Since p = (p1 + p2 )/2 and ∆p = (p1 − p2 ). According to the Fanning equation one may assume that pressure drop across a pore channel is proportional to the square of the average gas velocity in the pore. 2 and 3. For each set there are three measurements.14) ∆xµ p0 q0 k Aµ p Eq. including a turbulent term can be written as.). ∆p µ = v + β v2 . ∆x k where v is the average or mean flow velocity and β is the turbulent constant . (5.7.5.1 Turbulent Gas Flow in a Core Sample When gas permeability in core samples are measured. . are both functions of p1 . v2 = The horizontal flow equation. one gets. p Substituting for average gas rate in the horizontal flow equation one gets an equation particularly adapted for experimental application. In order to use Eq. R ∆p . taken from the table is plotted and the absolute permeability is found kliquid = 3. when p → ∞ or more conveniently. when 1/p → 0. 5.0 mD.e. ρ is the gas density and F is the Fanning friction factor characterising the tube (i. Assuming there are three sets of data. Permeability The absolute gas permeability of the core sample is therefore found as the asymptotic value of permeability. b and c. p0 q = q0 . Recall from above the relation. v = q/A and rearranging the above equation somewhat. Considering the average gas flow velocity. In order to adjust for the occurance of turbulence. set a. all together nine measurements. as seen in Fig.13). etc. wetting. 1.74 Chapter 5. (5. = + ∆x µ q k Aµ In an experimental situation one normally do not know the average core rateq. For this purpose the Fanning Eq. one of them has to be kept fixed when producing linear plots.

(5.D ka kc kb kL 1/pm Figure 5.c.3 q0. p = pm When turbulence is considered. from where the absolute (liquid) permeability is found.8: Plotting linear data where the average pressure p = pm is kept constant. as shown in the Fig. b and c.b.2 q0. kb and kc are now plotted.3 ∆pc.5. a straight line is plotted through the measured data points and the constant 1/k is evaluated.9: Absolute permeability as function of inverse average pressure. k. The three permeability values found form Fig.5 Gas Permeability Measurements 75 pa pa pa pb pb pb pc pc pc ∆pa.a. where data having the same average core pressure are plotted together in the first step.2 q0. ka . as shown in the Fig.2 ∆pa.3 ∆pb.1 ∆pc. 5.1 q0.c.c.1 q0. 5.8. permeabilities are plotted as functions of the inverse average pressure. 5.b.2 ∆pc.9.a.1 ∆pb.1 ∆pa. a. in accordance with the linear Eq.a.3 q0. gas permeability is found using a step like plotting process. .2 ∆pb.8.b. Secondly. A ∆ppm ∆xνp0 q0 pmc pmb pma 1/kc 1/kb 1/ka q0 /pm Figure 5.1 q0.3 q0.3 For each data set.2 q0.14).

At higher pressures. used in laboratory tests. e. when 1/p → 0. 5.15) where the latter statement means that different average core pressures p. yield a increased flow velocity or flow rate. In the case of overburden pressure. due to some interaction between the fluid and the porous medium. since gas permeability is pressure dependent. the Klinkenberg dominated flow will yield a higher gas rate than laminar flow. theKlinkenberg effect. To avoid this effect. k= qo µ po ∆l . (5. Experiments show that when gas permeability is plotted versus the reciprocal average pressure p. it is evident that other characteristics than the porous medium have important influence on the numeric value of the permeability. gas molecules are often so far apart.e. that the rock permeability to gas is not the same as for liquids. at a constant pressure difference. that they slip through the pore channels almost without interactions (no friction loss) and hence. Permeability 5. i. in combination with small (diameter) pore channels. experiments have shown that the permeability is even more dependent on the overburden pressure than the porosity. i. that the fluid behaves "classically" with respect to intermolecular interactions in the gas. Compared to laminar flow. At low gas pressure. in the core. Klinkenberg found that the gas permeability of a core sample varied with both the type of gas used in the measurements and the average pressure p. (5. This effect is known as the gas slippage effect or as the Klinkenberg effect. At low p.g. the gas molecules are closer together and interact more strongly as molecules in a liquid. carbon-dioxide and air) are often used for permeability measurements.11).1 The Klinkenberg Effect It has been observed that at low average pressures. The use of gases introduce other problems. One of the conditions for the validity of Darcy’s law. this condition is broken. a straight line can be fitted through the data points. These facts should be considered when permeability from laboratory measurements is related to reservoir permeability. It follows from Eq. such as turbulent flow behaviour. The permeability . as presented in Eqs. k = k(p).6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values General considerations show that permeability is a characteristic parameter describing flow behaviour in porous media. A p ∆p (5. is the requirement of laminar flow. Extrapolation of this line to infinite mean pressure. gives the absolute (liquid) permeability. provide different values of the rock permeability to gas.e. increased uncertainty in gas rate measurements and at low pressure. gases (helium. as compared to the non-reactive liquid permeability measurements (absolute permeability). qKlinkenberg > qlaminar .7) or (5.11). measurements of gas permeability give erroneously high results.6. Permeability measurements are also (sometimes strongly) affected by the fluid. nitrogen.76 Chapter 5. investigated by Klinkenberg in 1941. i. Since the permeability is introduced as a proportional coefficient in Darcy’s law.e.

5. Corrections to measured gas permeability due to the Klinkenberg effect are normally moderate to small corrections. . using Poiseuille’s law for tube flow. The parameter b depends on the type of gas used and reflects. 5.0 Gas Permeability. 1/bar 2.6 Factors Affecting Permeability Values 77 8. at different mean pressures p. value at 1/p → 0 is comparable to the permeability obtained if the core were saturated with a non-reactive liquid (see Fig. Non-corrected permeability. properties of the rock (Fig. as seen for the table below. p (5.0 He N2 CO2 Liquid or absolute permeability.0 In most laboratory measurements of gas permeability.0 1000.8 88.10).0 4. [mD] 1.0 100.and the absolute (liquid) permeability.8 0. [mD] 0. it is safe to neglect the Klinkenberg effect if the gas pressure is higher than 10 bar. respectively.0 0.2 Reciprocal Mean Pressure. to some extent. km = kL 1 + b .6 1.0 10.0 Figure 5.0 Klinkenberg corrected permeability.0 0. In reservoirs. kL 0.10. Example: Onset of the Klinkenberg effect The onset of the Klinkenberg effect is considered in a system comprised of a bundle of identical capillary tubes. it is shown that the permeability can be written. 5.10: Klinkenberg permeability determination. For such a system.16) where km and kL are the measured.0 2.7 7.4 1. In early core analysis the Klinkenberg permeability was estimated by using a steady-state technique for permeability measurements. or by using the following correlation’s.0 950. the pressure will be much higher and consequently the significance of the Klinkenberg effect of no importance. mD 6.

8 mD. Irrespective of the fact that a bundle of cylindrical tubes is far from being a realistic model of a porous medium. i.01 to 0. λ < λHe .18) 4 8 Using helium gas. kHe = . (5.04 µ m and 0.17). the expected mean free paths are shorter and consequently the permeability limits are lower than in theHe case. lower mean free paths are observed. it follows. Substituting the helium mean free path for the diameter of the tube radius in Eq. At higher pressures. π (λHe /2)2 . whereas the mean free paths of CO2 and N2 are respectively 0. as above. Since the Klinkenberg effect is said to become important when the mean free path of the gas and the size (diameter) of the pore channels are comparable. r = λHe /2.e. As an example helium gas might be chosen in the flow experiment. . In an experiment where N2 or CO2 is used. there is a maximum permeability limit. below which the Klinkenberg effect becomes active. the mean free paths of their molecules at standard conditions (room temperature and atmospheric pressure) are in the range: 0. the Klinkenberg effect would be active at standard conditions in a "porous" medium. (5. Helium has a mean free path. For many gases.06 µ m. Permeability k= π r2 .1 µ m. for permeabilities less thankHe = 0. 4 8 (5.17) where r is the individual tube radius. one can estimate the permeability at which the Klinkenberg effect starts to become a significant effect.78 Chapter 5. λHe = 0.18 · 10−6 m at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20o C [59].

Prove that the numeric constant for converting dyn/cm2 to atm. pe [atm] pw [atm] rw [cm] re [cm] h [cm] Pressure at the outer boundary Pressure in the well Well radius Radius at the outer boundary Reservoir height Use Darcy’s law to derive a general equation for a cylindrical reservoir in the cases of horizontal flow. 2.5. 8µ ∆l a) Calculate the porosity of the cylindrical pore model φ . . k:[Darcy]. c) Consider the average permeability of a serial coupling of two tubes with tube radius R and r. A:[ f t 2 ]. Darcy’s law is given. is equal to 1. L:[cm] and p:[atm]. as shown in the figure below.[cp]. µ .7 Exercises 1. when we have. b) Show that the permeability is written as k = φ r2 /8. Assuming a tube radius equal to r and that the fluid flow velocity through the tubes. The cylindrical pore model consists of cylindrical tubes stacked on top of each other. a) incompressible fluid and b) ideal gas. is given by Poiseuilles equation. q:[bbl/d]. µ ∆L where. 3. r2 ∆p v= . where R r. L:[ft] and p:[psi]. q:[cm3 /s]. k:[mD].. Convert this equation to "Oil Field Units" where. µ :[cp]. q=A k ∆p .0133×106 . A:[cm2 ]. Find an expression for the average permeability and evaluate the consequences of relative increase/decrease in the pore radius.7 Exercises 79 5. A reservoir has cylindrical geometry where the following parameters are defined. r R ∆l ∆l 4.

in percentage of the total pressure difference in the reservoir? ¯ 8. An oil well is producing from a cylindrical reservoir with a drainage area of 20 acres. Use the laws of Darcy and Poiseuilles to estimate the lowest measurable permeability of a sandstone core sample. Calculate the pressure in the reservoir at a distance 5 ft from the well. is given by the formula [8] (see Figure below). Show that the average permeability k for n horizontal layers. What is the pressure drop from the well to this position. Linear flow in horizontal layers. Permeability 5. 14. 13 psia. in two ways. The measurements are done under laboratory conditions. 20 psig. where the following data is given: . without detecting the Klinkenberg effect. 1. for a cylindrical core sample where the following data is given.65 psia. stacked on top of each other (in parallel). 75 cm3 /s. 0. 75 mD. k= n ∑ j=1 h j where k j and h j are the permeability and thickness of the layers. using N2 . respectively. BOPD is short for "Barrel of Oil Produced per Day". 6.80 Chapter 5. (Use the equation for gas rate at the effluent end qo and the equation for the average gas rate q.0185 cP. p1 p2 Atm.5 in. pressure µ 55 psig. 10 ft. Calculate the total flow rate in f t 3 /d at the pressure pb for gas flow through parallel layers. 5000 psia. n kh ¯ ∑ j=1 j j .pressure ) 7. µ h q = = = 5 cP. given the following data: rw k pe = = = 6 in. q k1 k2 k3 h1 h2 h3 q 9.0 in.) Length Diameter qb pb 3. Verify that the two approaches used above give the same answer. Calculate the well pressure. 175 BOPD. (NB: p psia = p psig + patm. Calculate the air permeability. qb and pb is the flow rate and back pressure.

height k1 k2 k3 50 ft. 150 mD. length k1 k2 k3 400 ft. Radial and horizontal flow through cylindrical layers. 200 mD. Show that the average permeability for n radial layers in a cylindrical reservoir is given by the formula [8] (see Figure below). 100 ft. ) 10. 330 ft. Show that the average permeability of rectangular porous media coupled in series is given by the formula [8] (see Figure below). Gas viscosity µg = 0. k1 k2 50 mD.0 psia. µo pin pout patm. 4 ft. n L ¯ = ∑ j=1 j . 400 psig. 10 ft. 5 cp. 50 mD. ¯ k= ln(re /rw ) . 200 ft. 6 ft.5. 12. 400 mD. k n ∑ j=1 L j /k j where L j is the length of the media in the direction of flow. 100 psig. 500 psig. Calculate the pressure at the outer boundary pe when the oil rate is 100 bbl/d and the following data is given: rw r1 k3 6 in. pin pout pb 15. 15. 2 ft.7 Exercises 81 width h1 h2 h3 200 ft. 100 mD. Calculate the total oil rate bbl/d through all media. 50 psig. An oil well has a intermediate zone with reduced reservoir permeability k1 . .0 psia. q k1 k2 k3 q L1 L2 L3 L 11. 200 mD.65 psia. n ln(r j /r j−1 )/k j ∑ j=1 where re and rw is the radius to the outer boundary of the reservoir and the well radius. Are the formulas above valid both for gas. 14. 200 mD. when the following data is given: width L1 L2 L3 100 ft. 20 ft. (Notice: p psia = p psig + patm. Linear and horizontal flow through linear beds in series. pw µo h 2000 psia. 200 ft.0185cp.and liquid flow? 13. patm. respectively. k j is permeability to the layer with outer radius r j . 10 cP.

9. 1 D. Water 100 cm Core sample 82 cm 2 cm q Additional data.1 mD. The tube is placed in a vertical position and the water is assumed to flow through the whole core sample. 13. and the air-water surface is monitored as function of time.1 D. 4710 bbl/d. as shown in the figure below.57 · 106 f t 3 /d. 5. Density of water Water viscosity Gravitational constant Thickness of core sample Answers to questions: 3. Permeability What is the pressure at outside the damaged zone (r1 ) ? 14. The core sample is mounted in a transparent cylindrical tube. π /4. 7. 1. 14.82 Chapter 5. Calculate the absolute permeability of the sample when the air–water surface uses 400 seconds to move 18 cm. Absolute permeability of a core sample is being measured by water flooding. 1 g/cm3 1 cp 980 cm/s2 2 cm . 0. 2272 psi. 0. 288 atm. 262 atm. 6. 11. evenly distributed over the surface.

no interfacial tension is observed between gases. on average. For curved interfaces. This property is very sensitive to chemical changes at the interface. water/rock and. • Solid-vapor (SV). Due to the great significance of the surface/interfacial tension. The surface tension. when giving an overall picture of the interfacial conditions. several experimental methods have been developed in order to measure this physical property. leads to the concept ofsurface tension.1.Chapter 6 Wettability and Capillary Pressure 6. The molecules on or close to the interface may not move with the same degree of freedom and speed. say water and oil is forming an interface. is the surface or interfacial tension (or more correctly the surface or interfacial energy). due to the constraint put on them by the interface. gas and rock formations. water. the molecules attached to the oil-water interface do necessarily have less kinetic energy than the bulk molecules. In this chapter. Some of the most commonly used techniques are reviewed. in combination.) Any surface that is in the state of lateral tension. Since the total energy of 83 .1 Introduction The exploitation of hydrocarbons is a complex process of controlling interactions in systems involving crude oil. In such complicated systems. The equilibrium bulk phases can be: • Liquid-vapor (LV). as seen in Fig. the interface oil/water. the definition is similar but slightly more complex. • Liquid-solid (LS). If two fluids.2 Surface and Interfacial Tension An interface is known as the boundary region between two adjacent bulk phases. (Gases are basically miscible and thus. it is important to recognise the effect of the surface properties of oil/rock. • Liquid-liquid (LL). 6. the interaction between wettability and surface tension is revealed. can be related to the work or energy required to establish the surface area. 6. denoted by σ . A central property.

The evaluation of reservoir wettability can be made through measurements of interfacial tensions.84 Chapter 6..ni (6. Since a proportionality exist between surface area and potential energy of the system of molecules and since equilibrium is reached at minimum potential energy (actually minimum Gibbs energy). i.1 some typical values for surface . This means that energy is required to move a molecule from the interior to the surface of a phase. area. Note. pressure and amount of material in the system constant. the greater is the work needed to bring bulk molecules to the surface. The stronger the intermolecular attractions in the liquid. oil water Figure 6. the following expression for surface tension may be written..e. i.and interfacial tensions are listed. In Table 6. The term wettability can be defined as "the tendency of one fluid to spread or to adhere to a solid surface in the presence of other immiscible fluids" [29]. the unit of energy pr. the surface area of a system is always minimised. to increase the surface area of the system. the potential energy of molecules attached to the interface is greater than the potential energy of the bulk molecules. i. due to anisotropy and intermolecular interactions.e. J/m2 or more commonly N/m.1: Molecular motion in bulk and close to the oil-water interface. i. that has to be measured by using micro-scale laboratory investigation techniques.. Wettability and Capillary Pressure the molecules is mainly a function of temperature. a molecule at a surface is in a state of higher potential energy than a bulk molecule. T.e.3 Rock Wettability Laboratory experiments have proved that rock wettability affects oil displacement.1) Here G is the Gibbs free energy and A is the surface area. Generally speaking. that what is called surface or interface tension is in fact surface or interface energy and quite often it is more advantageous to use the energy perspective than it is to deal with tension and forces. The surface tension between a pure liquid and its vapour phase is usually in the range of 10 to 80 mN/m. the larger is the interfacial tension σ .e. and thecontact angle. tensions acting at the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interfaces. The unit of surface tension is therefore. 6. Note that wettability itself is a microscopic characteristic. σ= ∂G ∂A .p. . Keeping the temperature..

T. The presence of certain authigenic clays.7 35. System Wetting Non-wetting phase phase Brine Brine Brine Brine Oil Gas Oil Oil Gas Gas Gas Mercury Conditions T = temperature P = pressure Reservoir. A table of typical fluid pairs of interest in reservoir engineering is shown in the Table 6. P Laboratory. σLW for some liquids at temperature.4 27. Liquid Water n-octane n-dodecane n-hexadecane dichoromethane benzene mercury σLV (mN/m) 72. together with contact angles and interfacial tensions [8].2: Fluid pair wettability under reservoir and laboratory conditions. T = 293o K.7 52.9 53. Contact angles are measured. P Laboratory.8 21. T. Note: Surface tension σLV . may promote oil wet character. by convention. particularly the asphaltine content of the oil.8 27.e. T. P θ σ (dynes/cm) 30 48 72 (50) 4 480 30 30 0 0 0 140 The degree of wettability exhibited. water.2. T.7 25.9 28. The differences in contact angle somehow indicate different wettability preferences which .9 476. T. to spread on the pore wall surface in preference to the other (oil).5 28.0 375. T. is here defined as the interfacial tension between a liquid and its vapor. through the fluid whose wettability is studied or through the fluid which is wetting the solid surface. particularly chamosite. P Laboratory.6. and the fluid which spreads more is said to be the wetting phase fluid.3 Rock Wettability 85 Table 6. depends both on the chemical compositions of the fluid pair. Pure quartz sandstone or calcite surfaces are likely to be wetted preferentially by water. of the immiscible pair. The qualitative recognition of preferred spread is called a wettability preference. and on the nature of the pore wall.0 σLW (mN/m) – 51. P Reservoir. σLV and interfacial tension to water.1: Surface tension. i. Table 6. P Reservoir.0 The angle θ is influenced by the tendency of one of the fluids.

placed in a contact with a water-wet reservoir rock.3: Wettability preference expressed by contact angle. r Oil h R θ Water θ Rock Figure 6. Table 6. placed in a contact with a water-wet reservoir rock. Contact angle values 0 – 30 30 – 90 90 90 – 150 150 – 180 Wettability preference Strongly water wet Preferentially water wet Neutral wettability Preferentially oil wet Strongly oil wet o o w s θ=0 w s θ = 90 o w s θ ~ 180 Figure 6. 6. The three interfacial tension are not independent parameters. 6.3: Geometry of the water droplet in oil.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension With two immisible fluids (oil and water) present in the reservoir. there are three interfacial tension parameters to be assessed. σos . surrounded by oil.3 and in Fig. σos . The following definitions will be used: • surface tension between the oil and solid. and in order to reveal the relationship between them a "gedanken" experiment is carried out on a droplet of water. Wettability and Capillary Pressure can be illustrated by the following rule of thumb presented in Table 6. as seen in Fig.2 [19]. 6.86 Chapter 6. .2: Example of wetting preference.3. σws and σwo .

The water droplet is assumed to be in equilibrium with the surrounding medium. which is known as the Young-Dupre equation [15].6. θ . 6. 2h2 h2 + r2 ) = cos θ . • interfacial tension between the oil and water phases.2). (6. σws . the following relationships are valid (see also Fig. • contact angle at the oil-water-solid interface measured through the water.4 Contact Angle and Interfacial Tension 87 • surface tension between the water and solid. dVw = which leads to dh = − Using these results. will deform the droplet slightly and force the droplet to expand on the solid surface. Eq. As = π r 2 Aw = π (r2 + h2 ) Vw = π6h (3r2 + h2 ) Incompressible liquids give. σws dAs + (−σos dAs ) + σow dAd = 0 Elaborating on Eq. 2h2 h2 + r2 = 0. σos − σws = σow cos θ .2) ∂ Vw ∂ Vw dr + dh = 0. 2rh dr. (6. • surface area of the water droplet.4) . A small deformation of the surface area. ∂r ∂h σws − σos + σow 1 − and taking into account that (see Fig. 6.As . • area of the reservoir rock occupied by the water droplet. The deformation is described by the equilibrium equation.3). Ad . (6. σow .3) R sin θ = r R cos θ = R − h and (1 − a final result is obtained. h2 + r2 ⇒ ⇒ dAs = 2π rdr dAw = 2π (rdr + hdh) (6. (6. expressing the change in energy due to the change in area.3).2) is rewritten.

i. The equilibrium condition is ecpressed as the change in potential and surface energy. since the surface area is minimised.5 Capillary Pressure Capillary pressure may be defined as the pressure difference across a curved interface between two immiscible fluids. one may assume the interfacial tension to be far more important than the gravitational force acting on the droplet and thus.5 bar m2 ·104 6. one we successively obtain. is described by an equation taking into account the energy change due to the volume and the surface change. since this is the energy needed to form a droplet that can pass through a porous channel . a spherical interface is an odd observation. 6. as seen in Fig. ** Pw Po Water Oil Figure 6. the capillary pressure can be obtained by the following evaluation: r ∼ 1µ m and σow = 0.5. the capillary pressure is written. If the droplet is small.e.1 Capillary Pressure Across Curved Surfaces For two immiscible liquids as part of a real physical system.4: Pressure difference across a curved (spherical) interface.wetting and the wetting phase. as seen in Fig 6. . Taking typical values of a pore radius and an interfacial tension of oil and water.025 N ⇒ Pc m N = 0. Wettability and Capillary Pressure 6. By convention. 2 4π r r Capillary pressure can be of significant magnitude.5. Using an example with an oil drop floating in water where the density of oil and water are assumed similar. the droplet takes the form of a perfect sphere. a curved surface is characterised by two radii of curvature. a small reduction of the sphere volume.88 Chapter 6. in the latter equation.R1 and R2 . where Pc is defined as the pressure difference between the non. the Pc term is positive for unconfined immiscible fluid pairs. A small perturbation. Substituting definition of the capillary pressure pc . Normally.4. Pc = σow dA dA = σow dV dr dV dr −1 = σow 8π r 2 = σow . Pc = po − pw . pw dV + σow dA = po dV.

1). which can be expressed by Eq. Vd r where the droplet area and volume are respectively. 4π r2 and (4/3)π r3 .w ∆A = σair.073 mN/m? The energy in question.22J is found.6. (6. Pc = σ 1 1 . With a pressure difference across the interface in the two phases. Example: Surface tension and surface energy The process of displacing water through a porous medium is comparable to the formation of droplets of sizes equal to the capillary pore throats. The relationship between the pressure difference ∆p = Pc and the curvature is given by Laplace equation. r If the initial water area is considered to be small (or negligible) to the area of the droplets.5: Curved surface and radii of curvature.Vd . For a spherical droplet R1 = R2 = r and ∆p = 2σ /r. ∆E p = σair. Across a planar interface/surface R1 = R2 = ∞ and ∆p = 0. The area increase is. of the initial volume V to N number of droplets with area. + R1 R2 (6. when the surface tension of water to vapor is 0.w 3 V −A . . is the energy needed to increase the initial water surface A. a potential energy equal to about 0. What is then the energy needed to transform 1 cm3 of pure water to droplets with an average radius of 1 µ m.5) where R1 and R2 are the principal radii of curvature and σ is the interfacial tension. Since the increased area ∆A is directly proportional to the increase in potential energy ∆E p .5 Capillary Pressure 89 R2 R1 Figure 6. ∆A = N · Ad − A = V 3 Ad − A = V − A. the interface will show a net curvature with the larger pressure on the concave side. Ad and volume .

An example of such a process is the hydrophilic ability of pure ethanol to mix with air more or less instantaneously.2 Interfacial Tension Assuming pairs of immicsible unconfined fluids the following phenomena. σ > 0. 6. Using the Eq. (6.5. as shown in Fig. as illustrated in Fig. a curved interface is formed in the capillary tube. molecules of one type will prefer (have affinity for) the company of the second type of molecules. diffusion will lead to mixing of the two fluids. 6.) • When the surface tension is negative. have a preference for keeping their own company.90 Chapter 6.6 can be observed. 6. In these cases no preference with respect to mixing of the two fluids is observed.5. (However. To reveal the relation between the capillary pressure. confined molecules. 6.6: Formation of interface as function of the sign of the interfacial tension in pairs of immicsible unconfined fluids. σ < 0.5) for the pressure difference between the two sides of the interface. as is the case when oil is displacing water in a water-wet porous rock. liquids are classified as "truely" miscible. • When the surface tension is positive.7. Wettability and Capillary Pressure .3 Capillary Pressure in a Cylindrical Tube When a non-wetting fluid is displacing a wetting fluid. spherical interfaces are formed. . two immiscible fluids (oil + water) are confined in a cylindrical capillary of radiusrc . We may observe a chemical reaction where the final state is stable in time. the interfacial tension and the radius in a cylindrical tube. • In the cases when σ ≈ 0. The surface against the second type of molecules is minimised and in the case of small droplets. depending on the sign of interfacial tension: σ>0 σ~0 σ<0 Figure 6.

Pc across the oil-water interface: ∆pV = ∆po + ∆pw = 2σow cos θ .6. the process by which oil displaces water in a cylindrical tube is considered in analogy with the production of oil from a water-wet reservoir where oil is forced through capillary pores which initially contained water. Ak Pc = .6) is the capillary pressure in a cylindrical tube of radiusr.and water zone and partly the capillary pressure drop. + R1 R2 where R1 and R2 are main radii of the curvature. (6. po − pw = σow 1 1 . expressing the radius of the interfacial surface R by means of the contact angle θc and the capillary radius rc in the cylindrical tube. rc (6.water displacement in a capillary tube Displacement processes in porous media are very often a competition between viscous. Consider a dynamical situation. In this example. cos θc where Eq.7: Idealised model of a pore channel filled with two immiscible fluids forming a curved interface between them. When R1 = R2 = R and R= the capillary pressure is written.6) rc . in the oil. 6. Pc = po − pw = σow 1 1 + R1 R2 = 2σow · cos θc . Example: Oil .5 Capillary Pressure 91 θc rc Water θc R Oil Figure 6.and capillary forces.8 where the oil front has reached a position x in to the cylinder (pore). The pressure drop along the cylindrical tube is partly the viscous pressure drop ∆po + ∆pw . as sketch in Fig. r q [µo x + µw (L − x)] .

where A and v is respectively the cross-section area and the pore velocity. day. capillary forces are totally predominant and that viscous forces play a minor role when microscopic flow pattern is considered. a dimension-less number could be defined.5 µ m/s. which is equal to 3.e. in the reservoir. The permeability of the tube is known as.3 m/s. ∆pV vµo x vµw L − x =4 + .8: Cross-section view of a cylindrical "pore channel".5 · 10−5 (using the numbers above).  ∆pV /Pc = 1     θ = 60o  L/r = 5 v pore ≈ 1. The Capillary number for reservoir flow becomes Nc = 1. From this comparison . Nc = vµ . i. σ cos θ The Capillary number Nc . The strength between the two forces is considered by simply comparing their pressure drops. while the Capillary number at the "breaking point" when the viscous force becomes equally important to the capillary force is 8· 10−3 . ∆pv /Pc ∼ 1.92 Chapter 6. The flow rate is q = Av. the relation vµ /(σ · cos θ ) is the only term containing dynamical parameters. In analogy with the definition of Reynolds number. In a situation where the two forces are assumed to be equally important. describes the competition between the viscous. This means that the capillary forces alone decide which pore channels are going to be swept and which are not. Pc σow cos θ r σow cos θ r In the equation above. a set of "typical values" could be chosen and the average pore velocity is found. Wettability and Capillary Pressure ∆po ∆pc ∆pw Oil 0 x Water L Figure 6.and the capillary force. and r is the tube radius. . it is obvious (even when the appropriate bulk velocity u = v pore /(φ (1 − Sr ) cos2 α ) is taken into account) that under reservoir flow conditions.k = r2 /8.   µo ≈ µw = 1 mPa · s    σow = 50 mN/m Reservoir flow is commonly considered to be of the order of 1 foot pr.

9: Wettability of oil-water-solid system. θc . (6. σow . . σos . . Relying upon the data obtained. σow · cos θc . Sw and Sw Oil σow Oil θc Water σws Water-wet σow σos σos θc Water σws Oil-wet Figure 6. • contact angle measured through the water phase.7) σos − σws = σow · cos θc . So . So = 1 − Sw . Laboratory studies have shown that the value of the Capillary number is directly related to the ultimate recovery of oil. • rock permeability.6. (6. being responsible for the numeric variation of the capillary pressure in the experiments. k.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation 93 The capillary number for field water-floods ranges from 10−6 to 10−4 . Sw ) Since some of the parameters are dependent on others. mentioned above. Pc = f (φ . φ .9): • surface tensions. The task is to define (if possible) a correlation between capillary pressurePc and the parameters. • rock porosity. • fluid saturations.7) is written.6 Capillary Pressure and Fluid Saturation Results from drainage and imbibiation laboratory experiments have shown that the capillary pressure Pc = po − pw is dependent on the following parameters (see Fig. σos . θc . σws . Sw ) (6. σws and σow . 6. (6. where an increase in the Capillary number implies an increase in the oil recovery. the following dependency can be expressed. k.8) can be carried out using the following notation for dimensions. Pc = f (φ . the list of independent parameters is shortened and Eq.8) A dimensional analysis of Eq. The Capillary number is generally varied by increasing the flow rate (pore velocity) and/or lowering the interfacial tension. 6. k.

. (6. Thus. which gives the following dimensions for all the parameters in Eq.8) can be rewritten in dimension-less form. This means that dimension of the capillary pressure can be defined through dimensions of those parameters. the number of independent variable parameters is reduced and an almost exact form of the correlation between the capillary pressure Pc .8). M · L−1 · T −2 = L2α · M β · T −2β . 15]. The following correlation is widely used for reservoir simulation tasks [13. or using the initial notation. (6. T : −2 = −2β . (6. k It can be shown that parameters φ and Sw and their functions.11) where J(Sw ) is known as the J-function (after Leverett). σow · cos θc and by making use of this result. the last relation is written in the form. it appears that both dimension parameters k and σow have independent dimensions. [Sw ] = 1 (6. Sw ).94 Chapter 6. [Pc ] = [k]α · [σow · cos θc ]β . F = F(φ .e. (k/φ ) (6. a dimension-less parameter F can be composed. [k] = L2 . Using notation (6. M: 1 = β. fluids and rock parameters is obtained. Pc = Pc = σow · cos θc · J(Sw ). [φ ] = 1. Eq. ⇒ α = −1/2 and β = 1.9) Comparing all the parameters of the right-hand side of Eq. and T – time. which is followed by. L : −1 = 2α . L – length.8): [Pc ] = M · L−1 · T −2 . Wettability and Capillary Pressure M – mass.10) · F1 (φ ) · F2 (Sw ) k Thus by using the dimension analysis (the π -theorem) [11].9). F= √ Pc · k. [σow · cos θc ] = M · T −2 . σow · cos θc √ (6. Sw ). can only appear in correlations where they form a product. Pc = σow · cos θc √ · F(φ . . i.

which satisfy the condition. the pressure in the oil phase po . Then gradually decreasing the outlet pressure (pressure in the oil phase). i. is the capillary pressure characteristic of the reservoir heterogeneity. The capillary pressure does also represent the response of interfacial tensions and rock wettability. the following example is considered: An idealised model of the porous medium consisting of cylindrical capillaries with different radii ri .6. as shown in Fig.7 Pore Size Distribution It is obvious that the capillary pressure is strongly affected by the distribution of pore channel sizes. To reveal the relation between the capillary pressure and the microscopic heterogeneity of the reservoir. i=1 N Now let us consider a process of imbibition for a strongly water-wet rock initially saturated with oil.. Hence. 6. .e. is high enough to protect the water invading the pore channels. r + dr) .7 Pore Size Distribution 95 6. Let Vi be the pore volume of a single capillary with radiusri and V be the total pore volume of the porous medium considered. χ (r) = n(r.10: Illustration of imbibition process in an idealised model of porous medium. Assume that at the starting point. a fixed contact angle θc . Rock Water Oil Figure 6. the water will invade the pores. N where N is the total number of pore channels. Pc ≥ ∆po (t). Generally. It is also assumed. represented by the 1/r relationship. as a consequence. where all pore channels have the same type of wettability and. at a certain time only those channels will be filled with water. that a certain invariant distribution-function χ (r) defines a fraction of pore channels with capillary radii belonging to the interval (r. r + dr) as. V = ∑ Vi .10. It is quite obvious that the water enters only those capillary channels with capillary pressurePc . exceeding the difference between the outlet and inlet pressure ∆po (t).

where l is the length of a single pore channel. Defining the total pore volume as. and the capillary pressure Pc . and the gas pressure in the core sample pg .96 Chapter 6. ∞ V =N 0 χ (r)π r2 ldr. This phenomenon is frequently observed in laboratory tests. it will be shown how data from a mercury drainage experiment could be used to produce a capillary pressure curve and how these data could be used further. Example: Pore size distribution and capillary pressure curve In this example. The experimental data is as follows: pHg VHg p0 V0 p1 V1 p2 V2 p3 V3 ··· ··· pN VN The capillary pressure Pc . Wettability and Capillary Pressure or. ∆po (t) Then the volume of water which has invaded the porous medium can be defined as. First. representative pressure measurements pi . by using a mercury injection technique. is recorded inside the pycnometer and the injection volume Vi is read as the pore sample is invaded by more and more mercury. is here the pressure difference between the mercury pressure pHg . ∞ 2 0 χ (r)r dr Sw = Pc = and 2σow · cos θc . before it is sealed in a mercury pycnometer. rc ≤ 2σow cos θc . (6. r . rc Vc = N 0 χ (r)π r2 ldr. the relations between the water saturation Sw . rc (6. the core sample is properly cleaned. on core samples taken from different elevations in the same well. A series ofN + 1. to define the pore size distribution for the core sample tested. it is expected that the capillary pressure curve shape will also vary from layer to layer. dried and placed in vacuum for some time. is Vc = V rc 2 0 χ (r)r dr . Since the pore size distribution varies between the different layers in a reservoir. Pc = pHg − pg = 2σ cos θ .12) which explicitly indicates that microscopic reservoir heterogeneity strongly affects the capillary pressure. substituting Eq.6) into the last inequality.

6. ∂S 1 =− ∂V ∆V ⇒ ∂V = −∆V. ∆V dr where ∆V = VN −V0 and dV = Vi −Vi−1 . D(r) = − Pc 1 . ∆V dr ∂ S ∂ Pc Remembering the definition of the wetting phase saturation Sg = (VN −V )/(VN −V0 ). The wetting saturation is therefore written. D(r) = − de f 1 dV . For a certain gas saturation Sg . the corresponding capillary pressure Pc (Sg ) is calculated. one gets. The pore size distribution is then rewritten. dr (∂ Pc /∂ S) Using the definition of the capillary pressure Pc = 2σ cos θ /r. D(r) = − 1 1 ∂V ∂ S dPc . gives dPc = ∂ Pc Pc dr = − dr. D(r) = 1 dPc . ∂S and by substituting in the pore size distribution equation. one may write.3 ··· ··· ··· 0 rN Pc. Sg r Pc 1 r0 Pc. ∂r r Substituting this last expression into the pore size distribution.2 S3 r3 Pc.0 S1 r1 Pc. .11 shows the two curves for the capillary pressure and the pore size distribution. When Pc (Sg ) is known.N The pore size distribution D(r) is representing the relative increase in pore volume as function of the pore throat radius. 1. taken from the above tabulated data.6.7 Pore Size Distribution 97 The gas is the wetting phase since mercury definitely does not wet any core sample. the following parameters are calculated. using the following steps. Sg = 1 − SHg = VN −Vi . respectively. one gets. VN −V0 Based on the data in the table above. r (∂ Pc /∂ S) Fig.1 S2 r2 Pc. The minus sign "-" is added due to convenience. then D(r) can be calculated.

11 the pore size distribution is drawn in accordance with the enumerated list. during migration of hydrocarbons from a source rock region into a reservoir trap.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs The equilibrium fluid saturation distribution in a petroleum reservoir. Wettability and Capillary Pressure Pore radius distribution. prior to production is governed by the pore space characteristics. the following relation exist. Sw Figure 6. A pressure differential is required for the non-wetting phase to displace wetting phase and this is equivalent to a minimum threshold capillary pressure and is dependent on pore size. found in reservoir is proportional to the height above the free water level (FWL). Since Pc ∝ 1/r it is observed that entry of the non-wetting phase should be most difficult in the smallest tube (highest threshold pressure). 6.12. normally hydrocarbons.98 Chapter 6. Pc = gρw h. while an oil-water contact observed in a particular well will depend on the threshold pressure of the rock type present in the vicinity of the well. In Fig. 6. This is as a result of the non-wetting phase. . r Water saturation. normally water. The physical significance of threshold pressure in an oil reservoir may be appreciated by the analogy with a capillary rise of water in different vertical glass tubes suspended in an open tray of water. The FWL is a property of the reservoir system. as seen in Fig. 2. Pc (Sg )) gives the slope defined by ∂ Pc /∂ S. 3. where a 100% water saturation is found. D(r) Capillary Pressure.11: Capillary pressure curve and corresponding pore size distribution [8]. entering pore space initially occupied by the wetting fluid. For a water-air system. The threshold capillary pressure. The tangent to the curve Pc (Sg ) through the co-ordinate (Sg . 6. Pc Incremental Mercury Injection P d Sw D(r) = rc d Pc Pore radius. The pore radius related to this pressure is r = 2σ cos θ /Pc . . ⇒ Pc(3) > Pc(2) > Pc(1) where r3 < r2 < r1 .

this height is given. h = h(Sw . The relation between height above the free water level and the capillary pressure is derived from consideration of the gravity-capillary pressure force equilibrium. ht = Pct . Using a free water level as the datum plane and defining its position in the reservoir as the place where the oil phase pressure po equals the water phase pressure pw . the capillary pressure at a depth equivalent toh above the FWL is. above FWL.6. Each unit can have its own capillary pressure characteristic and the static saturation distribution in the reservoir will be a superposition of all units. the threshold height ht is equivalent to the height of an observed water-oil contact above FWL. . the pressures are.12: Capillary water elevation in cylindrical tubes as function of tube radii. will depend on both the water saturation and the pore radius (see example: "Equilibrium in a capillary channel"). as seen in Fig. At some height h. po = pFW L − ρo gh pw = pFW L − ρw gh Therefore. hSw = 2σow cos θc . r) there exist a dependence. rg(ρw − ρo ) Similarly. one obtains. In a particular rock type. r). Pc(FW L) = po − pw = 0.13.8 Saturation Distribution in Reservoirs 99 h3 h2 h1 Figure 6. g(ρw − ρo ) In real reservoir systems it is expected that a number of rock type units or layers will be encountered. 6. Pc = po − pw = (pFW L − ρo gh) − (pFW L − ρw gh) = gh(ρw − ρo ) Since Pc = Pc (Sw . which indicated that saturation at height h.

Equilibrium in a vertical water wet capillary tube. the relation between elevation of water above FWL in reservoirs is coupled to the pore dimension (pore radius). when oil is replacing water as being the contact fluid. caused by oil displacing water in a small fraction of the capillary tube (see close up in Fig. 6. . Wettability and Capillary Pressure k1 Well k2 k3 OWC OWC OWC k4 OWC FWL k1 > k 4 > k 3 > k 2 Figure 6. For a small perturbation ∆h. is related to the saturation of water in a reservoir.14). 6. ∆Es = 2π r(σos − σws )∆h. The change in surface energy.14: Perturbation around equilibrium in a water-wet capillary tube.100 Chapter 6.13: Observed water-oil contacts and their relationship with free water level (FWL) in a layered reservoir with a common aquifer [8]. Example: Equilibrium in a capillary tube In this example. is given by the difference in surface tension (or surface energy). r Oil o ∆h h w Water Figure 6. a small part of the tube surface will experience a change in fluid coverage. as shown in Fig. where oil is the non-wetting fluid.14.

Using the Young. and at the same time. .9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure Laboratory measurements of capillary pressure are based on the fact thatPc ∝ σ cos θ /r.e.9 Laboratory Measurements of Capillary Pressure 101 The corresponding potential energy change. The relationship for the reservoir oil-brine pair capillary pressure is obtained using the appropriate value of (σ cos θc )res =26 dynes/cm. where. ∆Es = ∆E p . For example. This dual characteristic of the capillary pressure gives the condition for the coexistence of oil and water in porous rock. This implies that for any given porous medium and any pairs of fluids. Pc. Pc = g(ρw − ρo )h = 2σow cos θ .lab (σ cos θc )res .6. r where the capillary pressure is the pressure difference between oil. This means that the saturation of initial water present in the reservoir above a certain height h is localised in those pores having a radii less than r. air and brine with a (σ cos θc )lab value of 72 dynes/cm may be used to measure capillary pressure for air. where the densities and the oil. the capillary pressure has a "dual" characteristic. g σow cos θ = (ρw − ρo )rh. the pore radiusr and the height above FWL h are reciprocal variables.res = Pc.water interfacial tension are known parameters. the pressure difference across a curved surface in inside a pore channel of radiusr. where r characterizes the porous medium with respect to the pore throats and the pore size distribution . due to change in elevation is written. i. Pc1 Pc2 = .and water phase at a certain elevation h in the reservoir. i.and the potential energy changes is expected to be equal. the surface. (σ cos θc )lab . If small perturbations close to equilibrium are considered. 2 In a oil reservoir where the fluids are well defined . 6. (σ cos θc )1 (σ cos θc )2 Practical use is made of this relationship in conducting laboratory tests with fluids other than reservoir condition fluids. the following relation is given.brine in the laboratory. the following relationship is valid.Dupre equation.e. ∆E p = π r2 ∆h(ρw − ρo )gh. From the above consideration.

. The apparatus layout is shown in Fig. the non-wetting phase with respect to air.15. can be forced into very small pores. A laboratory air-brine capillary pressure of 1.022 N/m. 6.25 bar has been measured in a reservoir core sample at residual water saturation.102 Chapter 6.070 N/m and the brine-oil interfacial tension for the reservoir fluids is 0.oil transition zone. where mercury. Portion of liquid in saturated core is displaced at a particular pressure level by either gas or liquid. In laboratory tests the final irreducible wetting phase saturation value is often beyond the breakdown pressure of the porous plate and is sometimes obtained by centrifuge spinning at a rotational force equivalent to about 150 psi (10. Wettability and Capillary Pressure The migration of hydrocarbons into an initially water filled reservoir rock and subsequent equilibrium vertical saturation distribution is modelled in the laboratory by a non-wetting phase displacing a wetting phase (drainage capillary pressure test). Repetition for several successive pressure levels [8]. As a result of an increase in pressure (equivalent to Pc since Pc = pair − pbrine ) the water saturation decreases and its value is established by weighting the core plugs. The pore size distribution in a given rock type is usually determined by a mercury injection test.15: Gas-liquid drainage capillary pressure measurement. Air and brine are frequently used as the pseudo reservoir fluids. Although this test is destructive. The air-brine interfacial tension is 0. it has the advantage that high pressures can be attained. and measuring the quantity of any produced wetting phase. Liquid saturation measured after equilibrium saturation has been reached.34 bar). The height of the water-oil transition zone is the height from FWL and up to the point in the reservoir where connate water saturation is reached. Air pressure Capillary contact powder Core plug Neoprene diaphragm Screen Porous plate Figure 6. in the sense that the sample cannot be used again. Example: Height of water . and the displacement is affected by increasing air pressure in a series of discrete steps in water saturated core plugs sitting on a semi-permeable porous diaphragm.

res . The difference between the phase pressures of two coexisting phases is defined as the capillary pressure. as illustrated in Fig. In the case of identical wetting preferences for the core sample and the reservoir. are not identical.res = Pc. . g(ρbrine − ρoil ) where Pc. An idealised permeable medium is considered by the arrangements of decreasing pore sizes (a single pore bounded by the decreasing sizes sphere assemblage) and initially saturated with a wetting phase (w) into which a non-wetting phase (nw) is alternatively injected and then . 6.lab σres . one may assume proportionality between capillary pressure and the interfacial tension in the two situations. Pc. σlab Combining these two equation. generally speaking. hres = which gives. Pc.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes.6. σlab g(ρbrine − ρoil ) 6.16: Local curvature of the interface of two coexisting liquids. hres = 12. When two or more fluids flow through a porous medium simultaneously.res is the capillary pressure in the reservoir at this water saturation.lab σres . which is usually dominated by the smallest local curvature (radius) of the interface.5 m. the height of the transition zone is found. ρbrine and ρoil is respectively 1074 kg/m3 and 752 kg/m3 .16. the phase pressures pi . The capillary pressure is inversely proportional to a generalised interfacial curvature. 103 hres = Pc.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. rock water r R oil Figure 6.

The capillary pressure curve from condition 1 to condition 2 is an imbibition curve that is different from the drainage curve because it terminates (Pc = 0) at a different saturation. the pressure difference between the exit and entrance of the assemblage is the capillary pressure at that saturation. We imagine the pores have an exit for the wetting fluid somewhere on the right. the entrance . but the difference shrinks at high non-wetting phase saturations where more of the originally disconnected globs . all pores of the subtracted volume contain the non. The reverse (wetting saturation increasing) is animbibition process. Note.104 Chapter 6. Wettability and Capillary Pressure withdrawn. injection up to the saturation shown incondition 1 in Fig. a higher capillary pressure. The capillary pressure curve going from the largest non-wetting phase saturation to the largest trapped non-wetting phase saturation is the imbibition curve ( ondition c 6). At static conditions. 6.17. When the wetting fluid is introduced into the pore from the right. The forcing of a non-wetting phase into a pore (non-wetting saturation increasing) is a drainage process. This representation. the non-wetting fluid disconnects leaving a trapped or non-flowing glob in the largest pore (condition 2).wetting phase. that the termination of any imbibition curve is at zero capillary pressure.17: The distribution of a non-wetting phase at various saturations. At the static condition 2.imbibition trapped saturation is maximum. being quite simple. 1 2 5 Oil 3 Water Capillary pressure 4 Rock 5 6 3 1 6 4 2 Non-wetting phase saturation Figure 6.exit pressure difference is zero since both pressures are being measured in the same wetting phase. is first considered. Beginning at zero non-wetting saturation. Imbibition curves are generally different from drainage curves. Going from condition 2 to condition 3 is a second drainage process. explains many features of actual capillary pressure curves. At the highest capillary pressure (condition 5). and a post . that results in even higher non-wetting saturation. and a higher trapped non-wetting phase saturation after imbibition (condition).

the hysterics has two important effects: • One is to stabilise the capillary surfaces (interfaces) between the fluids in the pore system. One plate is fixed and the other can move smoothly to either side. When the mobile plate is moved. This effect is called the hysterisis in contact angle and has to do with the inherent memory of a physical system. where the receding angle is smaller than the advancing angle. The hysterics observed. 105 are connected.10.18. typical for non-reversible systems. .1 Hysterisis in Contact Angle When oil is moving to cover a rock surface which previously has been wetted by water. quartz or calcite) submerged in water. unless a finite capillary pressure difference is imposed. when the interface is advancing through the pore. The test is repeated after some time.6. This phenomenon is called trapping hysteresis or drag hysteresis and is caused by differences in advancing and receding contact angles. 6. which then becomes practically immobile. when the two angles have stabilised. A typical curve of the capillary pressure in case of two-phase flow. In relation to multiphase flow in porous media.19.10. 6. it has been experimental proven that the contact angle is smaller than in the case when water is replacing oil. such as to preserve the fluid distribution in the reservoir. θr oil water θa s Figure 6. which relates prehistoric events to present experience. The hysterisis is detected by measuring the advancing θa . is shown in the Fig. over the same surface. as shown in Fig. 6. In practical terms this means that the back and forth movement is energy dependent. the two contact angles are measured. is an expression of the fact that energy is lost in cyclic systems. until the two contact angles are equal. • The second effect is related to the dissipation of energy towards the capillary walls. The effect of this dissipation of energy is experienced as a resistance towards flow and is often materialised through "rip off" of small droplets.18: Measurement of hysterics in contact angle. 6.10 Drainage and Imbibition Processes. The oil drop is left to age between the plates for some time.2 Capillary Hysterisis It is seen that capillary pressure depends both on wetting phase saturation and the direction of its variation. and residing θr contact angles of an oil drop suspended between two horizontal plates (made of polished rock material.

6.106 Chapter 6.19: Typical type of capillary pressure curve for a two-phase flow problem: 1 drainage. The presence of the negative capillary pressure near the saturation pointSw = Snc was first discovered by Welge (1949). which is different from the curve 1. Two ways in which one phase can be substituted by the other in a porous medium are usually considered. The first is the process of displacement where the wetting phase is displaced by the non-wetting one.19.19. where the non-wetting phase is displaced by the wetting one. Wettability and Capillary Pressure P (Sw ) c 1 Swc 2 0.0 Sw Figure 6. 2 imbibition and 3 secondary drainage. The value Pcb is defined as threshold capillary pressure which should be exceeded to provide displacement. The hysteresis effect i demonstrated by the two curves 2 and 3 in Fig. . The presence of two different curves of imbibition and displacement is called capillary hysteresis. and the second is the process of imbibition. If displacement is preceded by imbibition the capillary pressure curve is as the curve 3 in the Fig. 6.0 3 Snc Pcb 1.

assuming the same flow velocity as above. In analogy with displacement processes in porous media. assume an interfacial tension σo.11 Exercises 1. 2. when the average flow velocity is found to be 0.w = 0. At a rotation frequency ω . Find the diameter. A capillary glass-cylinder is positioned vertically in a cup of water. In order to displace water by air form a porous plate. What is the pressure drop along the cylinder. The advancing contact angle is 40o and the receding angle is 20o . a) Show that the pressure difference for one phase is given by: 1 2 2 P2 − P1 = ρω 2 (r2 − r1 ). filled with oil. 5. A core sample is placed in a core holder in a centrifuge.1 cm. of the largest pore channel disconnecting the porous plate. Show that the general expression for capillary pressure Pc = σ could be written Pc = 2σ cos θ .01 mm. Calculate the pressure drop through the tube. Calculate the height of water inside the cylinder when the inner diameter is 0.w is 72 dyn/cm. A horizontal cylinder. r.03mm pr. 1 m Pa · s. 3. θ and σ . The interfacial tension between water and oil is 25 mN/m.1 m long and has a inner diameter of 0. a pressure of 25 psig is needed.11 Exercises 107 6. given in µ m. The surface tension between water and air is 72 dyn/cm.6. Define the parameters. corresponds to the threshold pressure Pd at that particular rotation frequency. + R1 R2 for a cylindrical tube.025 N/m.2 . The oil has a viscosity similar to water. r2 − r1 . air will displace some of the water in the sample. with an average length of 0. is 0. The radial distance rd . P1 = P(r1 ) . See the figure below. r 1 1 . 6. The length of the sample is therefore. and the water is assumed to wet the glass 100 %. R1. 4. 2 b) Show that 1 2 Pc(r) = ∆ρω 2 (r2 − r2 ) 2 when P2 = P(r2 ). The radial distance to the core sample is given by the two position vectors r1 and r2 . Calculate the energy needed to transform 1 cm3 of water into droplets with an average radius of 1 µ m. droplet.01mm/s ? An equal amount of water and oil is pumped through the cylinder and the water and oil is assumed to move through the tube as droplets. when the surface tension σair.

09 g/cm3 8.) Use the equations above to derive the a formula giving the capillary pressure as function of the water saturation (Pc –curve).30 3135 4. The following data is given for a core sample. assuming the length of core sample to be short compared to the radius of rotation.00 1835 2.90 4.20 765 0. c) The water saturation can be written.46 cm 9. when the capillary pressure is given in kPa.10 4850 5.00 1550 2.50 3920 5. (This is an approximation. . only partly true.38 cm 1.23 cm3 850 0.21 1005 0. saturated with sea-water and rotated in air. Wettability and Capillary Pressure r2 r1 ω 1.15 2655 4.24 1305 1.108 Chapter 6.72 1110 0. r1 = r2 = ∆ρ = Vp = RPM∗ ∆V [cm3 ] RPM ∆V [cm3 ] 415 0.10 2200 3.75 RPM∗ : Rotation pr.0 r rd when its known that 1 2 2 Pc1 = Pc(r1 ) = ∆ρω 2 (r2 − r1 ) 2 and when 1 2 2 Pd = ∆ρω 2 (r2 − rd ) 2 It is assumed that Pc2 = Pc (r2 ) = 0.61 915 0.0 Sw 0. Minute and ∆V : produced volume. Sw1 = Sw (r1 ) = d(S¯w Pc1 ) dPc1 when r1 ∼ r2 .

12 ft 4 ft 6 ft 3 ft 4 ft 5 ft FWL Additional data: Laboratory: Reservoir: σw/air = 50 dyn/cm σo/w = 23 dyn/cm ρo = 0.40 2.6.01 g/cm3 9.5 0.e.81 g/cm3 ρw = 1. when the following information is given (assume capillary pressure at the OWC to be zero).0 g/cm3 Reservoir σ = 25 dyn/cm ∆ρo/w = 0.water capillary pressure curve for laboratory conditions. In a laboratory experiment.2 0.0 0.0 0. to calculate the saturations.0 1.0 0.5 0.2 g/cm3 8. Laboratory σ = 75dyn/cm ∆ρw/air = 1.30 5.0 0.12 200 mD core sample Pc [psi] Sw 3. below. So . 1000 mD core sample Pc [psi] Sw 1. Calculate the corresponding height above the OWC in the reservoir from where the core originates. i.11 Exercises 109 7.0 1.18 Calculate the distribution of vertical water saturation in the stratified reservoir given by the figure below.0 0. determine Sw as function hight in the reservoir.8 0.12 5.20 7.6 0.90 4.0 0.80 1.60 4. capillary data from two water saturated core samples was obtained by using air as the displacing fluid.20 3. Additional data: .00 1.00 3.13 4. The distance between the contacts (OWC and GOC) is 70 f t. Sg and Sw at the reservoir level (hight) 120 f t above the oil-water contact (assume Pc = 0 at this level). a capillary pressure difference of 5 psi has been measured between water and air in a core sample. In the laboratory.18 10.5 0. Use the air .

9.8 m. Find laboratory capillary curve when the interfacial tension to mercury is 370 dyne/cm. Answers to questions: 1. 7. in the exercise above. h = 3 cm.4 10. 3. 5. An oil water capillary pressure experiment on a core sample gives the following results: Pc.5 µ m. 4. Sw = 0.4 100 5.41.5 43.6 82.2 m bar. what is the expected water saturation at that elevation? If the hydrocarbon bearing thickness from the crest (top) of the structure to the oil-water contact in 175 ft. . Sw = 0.110 Chapter 6.1 5. but the permeability and porosity to be respectively 25 mD and 13 %. 11.2 35.7 15. we may construct the capillary curve for a laboratory experiment using mercury as non-wetting phase.7 32. h = 5. ∆p = 3.0 29. If we assume an interfacial tension.62 . σ cos θ = 25 dyn/cm and a permeability and porosity respectively 100 mD and 18 %. what is the average water saturation over this interval? (ρw = 64 lbs/ f t 3 and ρo = 45 lbs/ f t 3 ) 11. d = 0.36.3 90. ∆p = 29bar. In the laboratory experiments one assume the lithology to be unchanged. So = 0.8 Given that the sample was taken from a point 100 ft above the oil-water contact. ∆E = 0.o/w [psi] Sw [%] 0 100 4. Sg = 0.2. Wettability and Capillary Pressure Laboratory: Reservoir: σw/air = 72 dyn/cm σo/g = 50 dyn/cm σw/o = 25 dyn/cm ρo = 53 lb/ f t 3 ρw = 68 lb/ f t 3 ρg = 7 lb/ f t 3 90 80 70 Capillary pressure [psi] 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Water saturation [%] 10.075J.

S2 . effective (phase) permeability was noticed to be a function of quite a number of parameters. such as: fluid saturation. 111 . According to the last equation we can obtain.e. ke = k. rock property. . µ x and qµ x ke = . ∑ k je < k. A p Here ke is called effective permeability. to the effective permeability of a particular fluid in the system. x where j denotes a fluid phase j. . we can obtain (single phase flow). Sn . i. . q j = k je A µj pj . fluid property. k je = f (k. k je = qj µj x . .Chapter 7 Relative Permeability 7.1 Definitions Relative permeability is a concept used to relate the absolute permeability (100% saturation with a single fluid) of a porous system. T.. A pj In a vast number of laboratory experiments it has been observed that a sum of effective permeability’s is less than the total or absolute permeability. n]. For 100% saturation.e. i. S1 . when that fluid occupies only a fraction of the total pore volume. j=1 n Moreover. . . p. . temperature). and reservoir conditions (pressure. absolute permeability. In multiphase flow a generalisation of Darcy law has been accepted [12]. and k je is called the effective (phase) permeability. the effective permeability is identical to the absolute permeability. When measuring a flow-rate of a fluid versus the pressure difference in a core sample. ke A p q= .) j ∈ [1.

has been experimental measurements.0 Figure 7. the typical curves of relative permeability are as shown in Fig. phase permeability and relative permeability separate and clear. where Sw is the wetting phase and Sn is the non-wetting phase. This assumption considerably simplifies the task of laboratory experiments carried out in order to determine relative permeabilities. This implicates that it is important to keep definitions of mobility.0 kw Snc Sw 1.0 0. Functions k j (S j ) depend both on the structure of the porous medium and on the saturation distribution of the phases. then the corresponding relative permeability for that phase becomes zero and the phase becomes immobile. a strong correlation between relative permeability and fluid properties.1: Typical type of relative permeability characteristics for a two-phase flow. If saturation of one of the phases becomes less than some definite value: Sw < Swc or Sn < Snc . Though there have been attempts to calculate relative permeability on theoretical grounds. wetting) saturation. by far the most common source of them. The effective permeability can be decomposed into the absolute permeability and the relative permeability.perm.-curves should be emphasised.0 kc Swc 0. pore size distribution) and wettability. as shown below. It is not. relative permeability can be affected [40]. One important feature in the behaviour of the rel. ke j = kr j · k. 7. It is important to note that the phase permeability is a tensorial function (as the absolute permeability) and that the relative permeability is not. though when certain properties (e. This means that continuity of the phase is broken or disturbed and the phase . The relative permeability is a strong function of the saturation of phaseS j . 1. in general.112 Chapter 7.g.1. Being a rockfluid property. However in mathematical modelling of two-phase and multi-phase flow it is conventional to assume that relative permeabilities are the functions of saturation only. In the presence of two coexisting phases. the functionality between kr j and S j is also a function of rock properties (e.g. Relative Permeability In two phase systems the latter relationship is expressed as functions of a single (by convention. interfacial tension) change drastically.

Let us note that those values depend on thermodynamic condition of the reservoir (reservoir pressure. 1.8 Oil 0.0 Water 0. etc.0 Figure 7. j = w. .4 Sw 0. 7.0 0. 7. number of phases.6 kr 0. respectively.8 0. Because of certain links between them.2 0.2 (right). where Sw is the wetting phase and Sn is the non-wetting phase (left: a water-wet formation and right: an oil-wet formations). where n1 are defined as residual saturation of the i-th phase.8 1.8 1.). we would expect micro-heterogeneity and rock wettability to have a certain influence on relative (phase) permeability.0 Water 0.2 0. type of rock.0 0.7.4 0.6 0.2 0.2 (left) and 7.0 0. which shows the evidence of strong correlation between them.6 0. The values S jc . temperature. Typical water-oil relative permeabilities are presented for strongly water-wet and oil-wet formations in Fig.4 0.0 Oil kr 1.and relative permeabilities can be done through measurements of capillary pressure.6 Sw 0.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities 113 remains in a passive or loose state.2 Rock Wettability and Relative Permeabilities It should be noted that evaluations of phase.2 0.2: Characteristics of typical relative permeability for a twophase flow. respectively. The difference in the flow properties that indicates different wettability preferences can be illustrated by the following rule of thumb [29]: 1 Here w and n denote wetting and non-wetting phase.0 0.4 0.

For extreme cases of preferential wetting. The relation is based on a definition of liquid saturation.3 Drainage/Imbibition Relative Permeability Curves In a gas-oil systems.05 or less. Thus we would expect the trapped non-wetting phase to be a bigger obstacle to the wetting phase. above). Movement of an aquifer into receding depleting gas cap. which is always present in the reservoir.114 Chapter 7. several pore diameters in length. of the relative permeabilities is a more appropriate indicator of wettability. i. SL = So + Sw = 1 − Sg . water. such as gas drive (gas displacing oil immiscibily) or an imbibition process. In gas-oil systems the third phase. that occupy the center of the pores. on the other hand. The ratio of wetting to non-wetting endpoints proves to be a good qualitative measure of the wettability of the medium. The non-wetting phase occurs in isolated globules. the endpoint relative permeability to the wetting phase can be 0. Others view the crossover saturation (kr2 = kr1 ). 2. rather than gas saturation. flood-out Usually greater than 20 to 25 percent PV Greater than 50 percent water saturation Oil-wet Generally less than 15 percent PV. the direction of displacement is particularly important. frequently less than 10 percent Less than 50 percent water saturation Generally less than 30 percent Greater than 50 percent and approaching 100 percent Let us note that the endpoint values of the relative permeabilities are usually (if not always) less than 1 and which are measures of wettability. perhaps because it is less sensitive to the value of the residual saturations (see the rule of thumb. as the process can represent a drainage process. Relative Permeability Water-wet Connate water saturation Saturation at which oil and water permeabilities are equal (crossover saturation) Relative permeabilities to water at maximum water saturation. It is therefore argued that experiments in the laboratory can be conducted with or without irreducible water present and that effective permeabilities could be correlated to total liquid saturation (SL ). Movement of an oil zone into receding depleting gas cap. occupies the cavities between rock the grains and coats the rock surfaces. . is considered to stay at irreducible saturation and play no part in the displacement processes. be smaller than the non-wetting phase endpoint. Trapped wetting phase. then the trapped wetting phase is to the non-wetting phase. The wetting phase endpoint relative permeability will.e. 7. therefore. such as: 1.

7. This is attributed to the physical process of the gas phase becoming continuous through the system.4 Residual Phase Saturations As we know from the previous discussion. these curves are plots of percent residual (non-flowing) saturation for the non-wetting ( nwr ) or wetting (Swr ) phases S on the y axis versus a capillary number on a logarithmic x axis.4 Residual Phase Saturations 115 1.0 Sgr Sg Sgmax 1. At very high pressure differences.0 Figure 7. According to experimental observations there is a strict evidence of a relationship between residual non-wetting or wetting phase saturations and the so-called local capillary number.3: Gas-oil relative permeabilities [8]. as in a liquid drainage process.0 0.7.3. the Snwr could be as large as Swr . as a condition for gas flow. and can be variously defined. 7. The capillary number Nc is a dimension-less ratio of viscous forces to local capillary forces. it is observed that gas does not flow until some critical gas saturation (Sgc ) has been attained.0 1. The residual non-wetting phase is trapped in the large pores in globules several pore diameters in length. increasing pressure gradients force the non-wetting phase into the pore channels. This relationship is called the capillary de-saturation curve (CDC). causing the wetting phase to retreat into the concave contacts between the rock grains and other cavities in the pore body. Typically. One of the examples is shown below (after Dombrovsky and Brownell): Nc = k | ∇Φ | σow · cos θc . the wetting phase approaches mono-layer coverage and a low saturation.0 Sgc Sg Sgmax 1. See Fig.0 kr = k o / k kr = k o / k kro krg krg kro 0. In liquid imbibition processes (gas saturation decreasing from a maximum initial value) the gas permeability goes to zero when the residual or trapped gas saturation (Sgr ) is reached. Repeated experimental evidence has shown that under most conditions. In a system where gas saturation increases from zero.

The steady state process provides simultaneous flow of displacing and displaced fluids through the core sample at a number of equilibrium ratios. and with homogeneous samples. Flow rates are determined according to the method of Rappoport and Leas in order to minimize the effect of capillary pressure forces in retaining wetting phase fluid at the outlet end face discontinuity. The detection of the breakthrough time of the displacing phase at the outlet core face is critical in the representation of relative permeability.116 Chapter 7. Different equipment arrangements for those test are shown in Figs. The displacement theory of Buckley and Leverett is combined with that of Weldge in a technique described by Johnson.5 and 7. or steady state conditions. Such reservoir condition tests may model displacement under unsteady state. At each . being either wetting or non-wetting phase. The unsteady state or dynamic displacement test is most frequently applied in reservoir analysis of strong wetting preference. 7. The determination of rel. It is important to mention that chemical additives reduce capillary forces at the interface of the oil/water system. The reduction of interfacial tension at the interface allows the trapped oil to become mobile and be displaced by the water.6. For reservoirs with more core-scale heterogeneity and with mixed wettability.4: Schematic capillary de-saturation curve [40]. Bossler and Naumann [38]. the steady state laboratory test is preferred. Unsteady state rel. perm. test simulate the flooding of a reservoir with an immiscible fluid (gas or water). Normal range waterfloods Residual non-wetting or wetting saturation. and severe errors can occur with heterogeneous samples.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data Laboratory determination of effective permeability is generally conducted as a special core analysis test on representative and carefully preserved core plug samples. resulting in increased capillary number Nc and reduced residual oil saturation. 7.perm. is based on observation of the fractional flow of displacing phase fluid from the outlet end of the core plug and its relationship with saturation. % 30 Wetting phase 20 Nonwetting phase 10 Nonwetting critical Nc -6 Wetting critical Nc 10 -5 010-7 10 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 Capillary number Nc Figure 7. A reservoir condition test is conducted at reservoir pore pressure conditions and reservoir temperatures with real or simulated reservoir fluids. Relative Permeability where Φ is the potential of flow.

and at which the pressure difference between inlet and outlet is constant. Capillary pressure tends to be ignored and a major difficulty is the determination of saturation at each stage. ratio from 100% displaced phase to 100% displacing phase an equilibrium condition must be reached at which the inflow ratio of fluids equals to the outflow ratio.perm. At such a condition the Darcy law equation is applied to each phase to calculate effective permeability at the given steady state saturation. Ruska pump Brine Oil Chart recorder Hg Oil colector Hg Oil Soltrol Hg Soltrol 1000 cc Oil Brine Sample Brine colector 0 . .7.5: Unsteady state relative permeability measurement at constant rate (above) and at constant pressure (below). Between five and ten stages are usually needed to establish rel. curves.5 Laboratory Determination of Relative Permeability Data 117 Oil colector 3 way valve Sample Brine colector Hg res.50 psig Transducer Chart recorder 3 way valve 300 cc 300 cc Figure 7.

00 krw 1.09 0. The following laboratory data is given: Sw 1.60 0. 7. = 22dyn/cm σlab = 75dyn/cm µo = 15.05 and the data above to construct a graph showing the water fraction as function of height above the WOC.00 0.00 0.4 18.00 0. fw .00 lab Pc [psi] 1.90 0. Constant displacement Ruska pumps Brine Figure 7.00 0.6 Exercises 1.0cp Use critical oil saturation.0 3.5 5. can be written: qw 1 fw = = qw + qo 1 + kro µw /krw µo Assume the capillary forces to be negligible and dPo /dr = dPw/dr.49 0.39 0.0 ∞ ρo = 0. Oil Pressure transducer Chart recorder Oil res.85g/cm3 ρw = 1.73 1.78 0.14 0.70 0.118 Chapter 7.58 0.00 1.80 0.6: Steady state relative permeability measurement [8]. Soc = 0.9 4.00g/cm3 σres.4 3.7 8. Relative Permeability Oil Hg Sample Hg res.0cp µw = 1.04 0.50 0. Use Darcy’s law for radial flow and show that the fractional flow for water.30 kro 0. What is the water fraction at 15 m above the WOC ? .29 0.23 0.40 0.

measuring the relative permeability for a oil-water injection experiment. qo and qw is the oil.95 9. determined by weighing.29 109. qo [cm3 /time] 90 75 60 45 30 15 0 qw [cm3 /time] 0 5 9 20 34 85 122 ∆P [psi] 49. Answers to questions: 1.20 Draw the rel.63 4.2 cm 1.86 Vw is the volume of water in the core sample.25 91.and water rate through the sample.65 5.65 psi 16. ∆P is the pressure drop.05 164.perm.17 2. respectively.30 147.6 Exercises 119 2.30 137. equals 14. Additional data is given: Absolute permeability Diameter of core sample Water viscosity 1 atm. curves for kro and krw using the data above.93 7.52 123.1 cp length of core sample Oil viscosity Porosity 9 cm 2. The laboratory data below is recorded at stationary conditions.0 cp 0.7 mD 3. 25% .7.00 Vw [cm3 ] 2.87 3.

120 Chapter 7. Relative Permeability .

as physical phenomenon. since the reservoir temperature changes slightly or remain constant in most cases. The fluid remaining in the reservoir at any stage of depletion undergoes physical changes as the pressure is reduced due to removal of quantities of oil. some more compressible than others. Oil and gas are naturally existing hydrocarbon (HC) mixtures. Compressibility. of significant importance where all substances are compressible.1 Introduction Compressibility is a universal phenomenon. the temperature and pressure of the mixture are reduced. gas and initial water from the reservoir. their variation with pressure and temperature. 8. Volumes of reservoir fluid brought to the surface will experience change in both 121 . Compressibility is therefore an important "drive mechanism" in underground petroleum production. in order to fully understand and control the production process.e.2 Compressibility of Solids. Liquids and Gases For a mixture of HC it is quite obvious that pressure and temperature are essential parameters. pore volume and fluid changes due to the pressure decline is the dominating phenomenon. It is necessary to study the physical properties of these naturally existing HC and in particular. the fractional volume of oil and gas.Chapter 8 Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids 8. When produced to the surface. i. responsabile for reservoir fluid production. Nearly all production of oil. quite complex in chemical composition which exist at elevated temperatures and pressures in the reservoir. The state of equilibrium is defined by these two parameters and consequently also the phase behaviour of the fluid. plays a key role in general underground petroleum production. This information is important in estimating the performance of the fluids in the reservoir. where the state of the HC mixture at the surface depends upon the composition of the HC fluid found in the reservoir. In the case of formation rock and the saturation of fluids contained therein. gas and formation water is related to volume expansion when the reservoir pressure decreases due to removeal of reservoir fluids.

the final state of oil and gas is characterised by volume changes due to both drop in pressure and in temperature. cb . i. cg . The stress tensor is often written in matrix form.1. the stress tensor will be symmetric around the diagonal. conditions are composed of a normal stress vector (perpendicular to the plane) and two shear stresses. The stresses on any plane surface through a rock sample under in situ.2. which means that τxy = τyx and so on. • Rock bulk compressibility. 1 V c = − β = 1 V ∂V .122 Chapter 8. 8. In practice. It is possible to show that there exist one set of ortogonal axis with .e. deformation such as volume and shape changes of the rock will be the result. τzx . β ≥ 0. 8. it is normal to use an average compressibility factor of the different HC components. • Gas compressibility.1) (8. There are thus only six independent stress components in the stress tensor: 3 normal stresses: σx . The general stress condition may be characterised by a stress tensor. with nine components as shown in Fig. 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids pressure and temperature. internal stresses are developed and if the stresses are sufficiently strong. parallel to the plane surface.   σx τxy τxz  τyx σy τyz  τzx τzy σz Due to the general conditions of equilibrium. τyz . cr . The general behaviour of materials can be described by the compressibility and expansion terms. c ≥ 0 and β is the isobaric thermal expansion.2) where c is the isothermal compressibility.1 Rock Stresses and Compressibility When rocks are subjected to external load or force. σy and σz and 3 tangential (shear stresses): τxy . co and cw . it is common practise to distinguish between the following definitions of compressibility: • Rock matrix compressibility.2. ∂T p (8. • Liquid compressibility (oil or initial water). see Fig. Underground gas and oil reservoirs experience stresses due to the overload of rock material and water and the lateral confinement stresses exerted on the reservoir from the surrounding rock masses. In relation to reservoir production. ∂p T ∂V .

while the two lateral stresses σx and σy are acting in the horizontal plane. where εV = ∆V /V .) The stress . 8. Liquids and Gases 123 σz z τzx τzx τxy τzy τzy σy τxy y x σx Figure 8. l is the length after deformation.strain relationship is dependent on several parameters of which the following are the most important. the degree of cementation of the rock material. where i = x. The relative longitudinal deformation is given by theprincipal strain. σz σy σx Figure 8. the porosity of the rock material and the pressure and temperature in the reservoir. (In case of non-zero shear stresses.3) 3 The collective action of the principal stresses will cause the rock material to deform. The sum of principal strains will give the relative volume change∆ε = (εx + εy + εz ). respect to which all shear stresses are zero and the normal stresses have their extreme values. . z. the type of cementing material.8.2: Principal stresses on reservoir rock. σz > σx .g. the compressibility of the rock matrix. 1 σ = (σx + σy + σz ). (8.1: Stress conditions of formation rock media. the principal normal stresses are orientated as shown in Fig. εi = ∆li li − li = . These stresses are called the principal stresses For most reservoirs. the composition and lithology of the rocks. e. a displacement or rotation of the rock may be experienced. y.. li li (8. where the major principle stress σz is acting parallel to the force of gravity.2.2 Compressibility of Solids.4) where li is the initial length of the rock in the i’th direction. σy . The average normal stress is generally defined by.

Hooke’s law states that there exist a proportionality between stress.124 Chapter 8. Using Hooke’s law. The total deformation due to all three principal stresses acting on the rock material is given by ∆V = (εx + εy + εz )V . If the transverse strain is defined by ε2 and ε3 . The ratio of transverse strain to the axial strain is expressed by the Poisson ratio ν . (8.10) and Eq. σ2 and σ3 are the principar stress directions. ∆V = cr ∆σ .10) Relative volume deformation of the rock is also described by the compressibility Eq. where σ1 . Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids In the following. ε . Combining equation Eq. parallel to its long axis.5) where E is the Young’s modulus of elasticity and the subscript indicate change in stress and strain in the same direction and where the stresses normal to this direction are constant. The significance of Poisson’s ratio. Within the elastic limit of volume deformation of any rock material. (8. the rock will be assumed to be isotropic. (8. σ and strain. coupling axial and transverse strain. it will shorten. one assumes that the rock is completely solid with no pores or cracks within it. (8.1) on differential from.9) In writing Hooke’s law this way. Eqs. the strains are reddered to the condition of zero stresses. ε1 and the diameter will increase. For simplicity.7) (8. σ 1 = E ε1 .7) to (8. V (8. σ1 . the relative volume change is given. (8. . If a cylindrical rock sample is subjected to a compressive stress. E εy = σy − ν (σx + σz ). This observation is presented in Hooke’s law in three dimensions: E εx = σx − ν (σy + σz ). It is often convenient to write Hooke’s law in changes of stresses.9). ∆σx etc. (8.8) (8.11) In introducing cr . which means equal properties in all directions. ν= ε2 ε3 = . indicates that deformation along one principal axis is caused by a combination of all three principal stresses. In that case srain are refered to the initial conditions. then the transverse deformation is given. it is also assumed that the stresses are refered to the principal stress directions.6) where ε1 is the principal strain direction.11) proves that the compressibility and the elasticity are "two sides of the same case". E εz = σz − ν (σx + σy ). ε1 ε1 (8. ∆V 3σ (1 − 2ν ) = V E (8.

8. refer to the solid rock material.e. following the same chain of arguments as seen for solid (rock) material. dV = −cr d σ . one can expect the compressibility to be constant and in accordance to Eq.12) In Eq.e.e. 1. as follows from Eq. Under the assumption that the deformation of the rock is within the range of the elasticity (see Fig. i.1) or (8. (8.(8.15) .14). The dimension of compressibility cr is reciprocal pressure.cquarts ∼ 2.5 · 10−6 bar−1 .2.(8. i.14) The approximation is valid when cr ∆σ is small. [cr ] = [σ ]−1 For normal reservoir rock like quarts. Vl = Vl0 e−cl (p−p0 ) Vl0 [1 − cl (p − p0 )]. V according to Eq. the compressibility is. cr (σ − σ0 ) V V0 Within the range of elasticity 0 p0 p Figure 8. i.(8. (8. Liquids and Gases 125 3(1 − 2ν ) . cr = (8.1) and in analogy with Eq.14).1) the deformed volumeV is equal to. compressibility is constant.3).8. Within the elastic limit of the liquid. E where also the elastic constants E and ν .13) (8.2 Compressibility of Liquids Deformation of liquids can be explained.3: Deformation of rock bulk volume under conditions of elastic behaviour (constant compressibility factor). V = V0 e−cr (σ −σ0 ) V0 [1 − cr (σ − σ0 )].(8. 8.12) the important relation between the compressibility and the elastic properties of the rock material is established.(8.2 Compressibility of Solids.

depending on the content of the solution gas. z). volume which it occupies. in an attempt to consistently describe the nature of compressibility as a universal characteristic. cg = − Example: Compressibility of real gas The real gas law is. but varies as the reciprocal pressure (under the assumption of constant temperature). 1 ∂V 1 = . we may assume the volume to be a function of pressure. Since compressibility describes the volume deformation. 8. Water is not particularly compressible and has a compressibility factorcw ∼ 4. using the definition in Eq. depending on the composition of oil. T. Black oils may have a compressibility ∼ 25 · 10−5 bar−1 .16) p: V: T: where n: R: Combining Eqs. Differentiation of the volum function. also valid for gases.e. pV = znRT.6 · 10−5 bar−1 .1) and (8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids where the last approximation is valid when cl (p − po ) 1. p T z = . V = V (p. Gas compressibility can be defined equally to solids and liquids. In the case of a perfect gas. i. absolute temperature of gas.3 Compressibility of Gases Experience tells us that gases are very compressible.16) one obtain. (8.1). the mixture of light and heavy HC and the amount of gas contained in the oil. while light oils can have substantially higher compressibility.e. Various liquids may behave quite differently depending on the composition of that liquid. may have a varying compressibility factor.(8.126 Chapter 8.17) V ∂p p Form this deduction it must be conclude that compressibility of gases is notconstant. (8. ∂p ∂T ∂z V V V = − d p + dT + dz. pV = nRT. number of moles of gas equal to its mass divided by its gaseous molecular weight and the gas constant. expressing the non-ideal deviation from perfect gas behaviour. Oil. temperature and a non-ideal factor. on the other hand.(8.2. where z is the deviation factor. absolute pressure of the gas phase. i. dV ∂V ∂V ∂V dp+ dT + dz.

. i m Tpc = ∑ ni Tci . Z Tpr Tpr 1. respectively. Liquids and Gases 127 At reservoir condition.0 n 1 Tpr 0 ppr Figure 8. Tpc where p pc and Tpc are pseudo critical pressure and pseudo critical temperature.8. T is constant and consequently. V dp p z dp Compressibility for real gases in the reservoir is then given by.2 Compressibility of Solids. z = z(p pr .e. p pc = ∑ ni pci . i m where pci and Tci are critical pressure and temperature of the different HC components and ni is the volume fraction or the mole fraction of each component given by Avogadro’s law.4: z-factor as a function of pseudo reduced pressure p pr and temperature Tpr . p pc Tpr = T . p z dp The deviaton factor z. The z-factor is usually expressed as a function of the so-called pseudo reduced pressure ppr and pseudo reduced temperature Tpr . Tpr ). − 1 dV 1 1 dz = − . where pseudo reduced pressure and temperature are defined as. Critical pressure and temperature for a mixture of m numbers of HC components are defined.4. . i. p pr = p . cg = 1 1 dz − . as seen in Fig. 8. is a non-trivial function of pressure and temperature.

Effective stress was originally introduced by Terzaghi and is defined as. σ = σ − p. Experience in rock and soil mechanics has shown that the deformation of porous and premeable materials depend on the effective stress which is the difference between the applied total stress and the pore pressure. For porous rocks. The volumetric changes are given by the average applied stress and one will therefore for simplicity in the following assume a hydrostatic applied stress field on the porous rock.128 Chapter 8. When a reservoir is produced the reservoir pressure will in most cases be reduced. For most reservoir rocks α will become close to one and may be neglected. acting on the surface of the pore walls. 8. (8.5: Stresses working on a porous rock. This is depicted in Fig. The overburden load will however remain more or less constant and thus the vertical effective stress will increase.5. the stresses in Hooke’s law should be replaced by effective stresses. α ≤ 1. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids 8. For reservoir engineering.3 Deformation of Porous Rock The elastic deformation or compressibility of porous rock is complicated by the fact that it is subjected to an external confining stress σ . later the defineition of effective stress has been generalized to. and in addition to an internal pore pressure p. while the pore pressure and the forces acting through the rock matrix are the counteracting pressures [62]. The horizontal stresses may also change with pore pressure and the development of complete stress conditions may be difficult to determine. where the constant α .18) σ = σ − α p. The total external stress acting on the porous rock is partly counterbalanced by the pore presssure and the forces acting through the rock matrix. it is first of all the volumetric behaviour that is important. It should be noted however that the consept of effective stress does not follow from strictly theoretical considerations. but must be regarded as a close approximation. . σ p p σ σ Figure 8. causing compaction of the reservoir rock. where the total stress will be the pressure acting on the outer surface. often called the Biot constant is a number equal or less than one.

∂σ Vb ∂ p ∂ Vp 1 ∂ Vp dσ + d p. . (8.22) Since cbσ depends on the elastic moduli of the matrix rock material and the geometry of the pore space.1) the definition of isothermal compressibility. The four compressibilites defined in Eqs. cr ).e. i. Vp = Vp (σ . while when p increases. dVb Vb dVp Vp = −cbσ d σ + cbp d p. the rock sample is exposed to an external stress equal to the internal pressure. Differentiation of Eqs. Vb (8.19) gives the relative volume change.21) are all not independent and through elastic theory it is possible to resolve the relation between them. both the external stress σ and the pore pressure p may provoke changes in the bulk or/and pore volume. right. (8.8. 8. (8.6. on the sample is increase while the pore pressure is kept constant d p = 0. The bulk and pore volume are therefore defined as function of both external stress and pore pressure. Generally. p). see Fig. = −c pσ d σ + c pp d p. i. (8. p). (8. characterised as the bulk compressibility. If a porous rock sample is brought to the laboratory and the external stress σ . (8.1 Compressibility Measurements. 8.6.3.3 Deformation of Porous Rock 129 Variation of the effective stress on the rock due to withdrawal of reservoir fluid (oil. as well as deformation in the pore volume Vp . as seen in Fig. then the bulk and pore volume will increase.19) ∂ Vb 1 ∂ Vb dσ + d p. (8. left. If. cbσ = cb . it must in general be considered to be an independent parameter.21) gives.21) is written. The purpose of this process is to express the pore compressibility as function of the compressibilities of bulk volume and rock material.21) where the "minus" sign demonstrates the fact that when σ increases. both the bulk and pore volume will decrease. gas or initial water) will cause deformation in the bulk volumeVb . a set of four compressibilities may be defined and Eq.e.20) Using Eq. Eqs. such that d σ = d p. on the other hand. dVb Vb dVp Vp 1 Vb 1 = Vp = (8.20) is written. c p = c p (cb . dVb = −cbσ d σ . Vb = Vb (σ . then Eqs. ∂σ Vp ∂ p (8. 8.

Seen from the outside the material would behave as a completly solid rock. (8.2 Betti’s Reciprocal Theorem of Elasticity. is only related to the rock matrix material itself. −c pσ + c pp = −cr .e. Betti’s theorem states that the hypothetical work given by the volume expansion of the bulk volume due to the pore pressure dVb (p) times the change in the external stress d σ . (8. −cb + cbp = −cr . dVp = dVp (σ ) + dVp (p).24) where the minus sign for cr reflects the fact that the rock will compress under these conditions. i.3. Under these condition. From Eqs. When the pore pressure increases/decreases equally to the confining stress.23). Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids σ dp = 0 σ=p Figure 8.25) where dV (σ ) is the volume change relative to the external stress and dV (p) is the volume change relative to the pore pressure. 8. dVb Vb dVp Vp = (−cb + cbp )d σ . then the effect of the pores with respect to the deformation of the porous rock. (8. . (8. If both the external stress and the pore pressure are changing. is equal to the work given by the volume expansion of the pore volume due to the external stressdVp (σ ) times the change in the pore pressure d p. the following relation between compressibilities are deduced. then the bulk and pore volume are deformed accordingly. = (−c pσ + c pp )d σ .6: Stresses working on a porous rock.23) where d σ = d p and where cbσ = cb . dVb = dVb (σ ) + dVb (p). the compressibility of the rock sample is equal to the compressibility of the rock material cr .130 Chapter 8.

The fluid compressibility is written. A discrete version of this definition. (8.29). gives c= 1 ∆V V ∆p ⇒ ∆V = cV ∆p.28) where c pp = c p is the pore volume compressibility.26). (8.31) where S is the fluid phase saturation (Sw + So + Sg = 1). φ (8. ∆V f cf = ∆Vw + ∆Vo + ∆Vg . (8.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids 131 dVb (p) · d σ = dVp (σ ) · d p.30) The compressibility of the fluids c f contained in the pore volume is defined by the compressibility of the different phases. This formula. where the pressure drop ∆p is sufficiently small. (8.6.1). oil. −Vb cbp d p · d σ = −Vp c pσ d σ · d p. are all defined by Eq. Since porosity is defined φ = Vp /Vb . This compressibility accounts for the expansion of fluid.27) where cbp = cb . is the total compressibility of the rock . cw . Using Eqs. cbp = φ c pσ Combining Eqs.28) on gets.29) (8. one gets.26) (8. cp = cb − (1 + φ )cr . (8. a change in the pore pressure will cause the fluid volume to change. water and/or gas.21) in Eq. given by c p in Eq. co and cg . (8. The minus sign for the first term reflects that the force and displacement are in opposite directions. (8. . e. Of interest in relation to the production of oil and gas. the bulk compressibility is given.24 and Eq. Since the pore volume is expanded by the fluid phase volumes: V f = Vw + Vo + Vg . like in experiments sketched in Fig.fluid system.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids Compressibility of homogenous matter like the rock material cr and the contained saturations of fluids. given by the fluid compressibility c f and the reduction of the pore volume when the pore pressure is reduced.g. 8. relates the pore compressibility to the bulk and rock compressibilities which are the parameters normally measured. developed by Geertsma [31]. (8. 8. Vg Vw Vo = cw + co + cg . (8.8. Vp Vp Vp = cw Sw + co So + cg Sg .

. d σ = 0 and thus the change in porosity is.33) Substituting Eqs. (8. cb − (1 + φ )cr = + cw Sw + co So + cg Sg . dVp dVb dφ = − . (8. ∆φ = cr cb (1 − φ ) − 1 ∆p. An equally important term is the effective compressibility responsible for the expansion of initial water and reduction of the pore volume. (8. (8. φ 1 = [cb − (1 + φ )cr + φ (cw Sw + co So + cg Sg )]. cnon−HC = cb − (1 + φ )cr + φ cw Sw .24) and Eq. Under reservoir conditions. φ Combining Eqs. It should be noted that in this case. due to oil or gas production. dφ = (c p d p − c pσ d σ ) − (cbp d p − cb d σ ). (8.34) gives. the equilibrium of stresses in the reservoir is changed.36) where the pressure drop ∆p. due to fluid production from the reservoir is small enough to keep the material within the elastic limit. This term. when pressure is released as a result of HC production.e.29) with Eq.132 Chapter 8. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids ct = cp + c f . φ (8.32) The effective HC compressibility is a useful term. the confinement stress is constant. cr (8.21) in Eq. By differentiation the porosity one gets. φ Example: Porosity variation in the reservoir When the reservoir pore pressure is reduced. a non-HC compressibility is defined. related to the pore space occupied by the hydrocarbons.34) where the porosity change d φ is proportional to the change in the effective stress. cHC = co So + cg Sg .33) and remembering that c pp is the pore compressibility c p and cbσ is the bulk compressibility cb . φ Vp Vb (8.35) (8. d φ = −cb (1 − φ ) − cr d(σ − p). This change in the effective stress on the rock material will cause the porosity φ = Vp /Vb to change. the dependence on the effective stress is an exact theoretical result. (8. i.

which is the case for practically all porous rock materials.8. the terms in the bracket in Eq.36) will always be positive. the confinement pressure and the pore pressure will be close to equal. . is one of the very few direct sources of information available regarding reservoir characteristics. For sandstone reservoirs with a typical porosity larger than 5-10 %.e. 8. (σ − p)R > 0. i. .e. when φ → 0. which is an important drive mechanism for undersaturated oil reservoirs. the porosity is reduced in the reservoir when the pressure is reduced. φR < φL . which then define the lower bound.7). (8. i. a porosity deformation is observed. (σ − p)L = 0. (8. the bulk compressibility will be equal to the rock matrix compressibility. Example: Porosity variation in formation core samples Reservoir porosity is seen to decrease with the pore pressure.e. under the assumption of constant confinement stress. Eq.7: Constant confinement pressure and reduced pore pressure leads to a reduction in the pore volume. the ratio cb /cr is often found to be between 4 to 100. where the bulk and rock matrix compressibilities are such that (cb (1 − φ ) − cr ) > o. For a porous rock sample. When the pore pressure is reduced. cb = cr . p1 > p2 (Fig.35) gives the porosity change relative to the change in the pressure difference (σ − p). In typical sandstone porous rocks. . where by cb /cr ≥ 1. the pressure difference is normally such that the confinement pressure is larger than the pore pressure. i.e. At initial conditions in the reservoir. What about the porosity change in rock samples which are brought to the surface for further experimental investigations? This question is quite important since laboratory measurements on core material from wells. p1 Vp : φ1 p2 φ2 Figure 8. In the laboratory or at normal atmospheric condition.4 Compressibility for Reservoir Rock Saturated with Fluids 133 In a non-porous rock. the porosity will increase when the rock sample is brought to the surface. φ1 > φ2 . i. i.e.

18.4 · 10−6 psi−1 . Then.82 4000 0.31. p [psia] z 0 1. Answers to questions: 1. 2.24 and gas saturation is 0. 0. co = 10 ×10−6 psi−1 . connate water saturation is 0. A gas reservoir has a gas deviation factor (at 150 o F). find the gas compressibility at these pressures.6 · 10−6 psi−1 .6 %.86 2000 0.00 500 0.14 · 10−3 psi−1 . 8. 2200 psia and 4000 psia.11 · 10−3 psi−1 . The reservoir pressure is 1923 psi.00 Plot z versus p and graphically determine the slope at 1000 psia. cw = 3 ×10−6 psi−1 . 171. 2. 0. Find the formation porosity when the field is abandoned? 3. 224. Find the total compressibility and the effective hydrocarbon compressibility when the following fluid and formation compressibility are known.89 5000 1. cg = 1/p psi−1 and cr = cb = 5 ×10−6 psi−1 .92 1000 0. A reservoir with an initial pressure of 6500 psia has an average porosity of 19 %. 1. Bulk compressibility is 3.134 Chapter 8.8×10−6 psi−1 .8: Variation of bulk volume during surfacing of core material.5 Exercises 1. 3. Compressibility of Reservoir Rock and Fluids pR φR pL φL Figure 8.45 · 10−3 psi−1 . and estimated abandonment pressure is 500 psia.80 3000 0.

The composition of oil and/or gas will therefore changed slightly during production. The reservoir production rates of oil and gas will in the event of continuously decreasing pressure and temperature transform.1: Volume transformation of oil and gas. Qgn=∆V /∆t gn Qon=∆Von /∆t Sea Reservoir Qg=∆V /∆t g Qo=∆Vo /∆t Figure 9. Primary reservoir production takes place without any temperature change.Chapter 9 Properties of Reservoir Fluids 9. see Fig. 9.1 Introduction Production of oil and gas can be compared to a process where volumes of the reservoir fluids are transformed to the stock tank volumes of oil and gas. In an oil reservoir we may experience the shrinkage of oil due to the solution gas liberation near the well and in a rich gas reservoir we expect condensa135 . During this process both pressure and temperature are significantly changed. where the phase ratio of oil and gas is changed as well as the gas-oil ratio and the composition of both phases.1. while the reservoir pressure drops substantially near the well.

1 oC and the critical pressure is 218. The phase boundary between water and vapour ends in a critical point where the two phases cease to co-exist. The co-existence of different phases. Properties of Reservoir Fluids tion of liquid hydrocarbons (oil) when the pressure is reduced. is shown in Fig. T)-plot reflecting this occurrence (sublimation line. number of chemical reactions NR . 9.e. Beyond this point. for temperatures T > TC and pressures p > pC . In this chapter focus is put on some characteristic aspects of hydrocarbon mixtures and the separation of oil and gas as function of pressure and temperature. and vapour pressure line) No degrees of freedom – a single triple point in the phase diagram When NP = 3 NF = 0 We know that water may appear in different phases like ice.3 atm. This could be expressed more precisely referring to the Gibbs phase rule. where.e. NF = NC − NP + 2 − NR. For pure components the phase rule says that no more than three phases can form at any temperature and pressure. The different regions are separated by phase boundaries. For a pure component (like H2 O). number of phases NP . melting point line. the critical temperature is 374.2 Definitions The process by which the different hydrocarbon (HC) components form phases through various chemical reactions is governed by a natural (entropy driven) development towards equilibrium or the lowest energy level. i. there is no distinct difference between water and vapour. and degrees of freedom NF . When the reservoir fluid is produced and brought to the surface.) . 9. hence we call this state the fluid state. In these processes. H2 O. The Gibbs phase rule shows a relationship among the number of componentsNC . and NC − NR defines the number of independent components. T . pressure is further reduced through different stages of separation. (For pure water.2. all depending on temperature and pressure.136 Chapter 9. The number 2 accounts for the intensive properties p. temperature is also reduced and consequently the composition of oil and gas undergoes significant change. liquid and vapour. When NP = 1 When NP = 2 NF = 2 NF = 1 Both intensive properties can be changed arbitrarily Only one intensive property can be independent – there are three lines on a (p. i. We will look at how oil and gas behave in the reservoir and their expansion to stock tank condition. then NC − NR = 1 and NF = 3 − NP.

3 Representation of hydrocarbons 137 pc Ice 1 atm. 9. naphthenes (cyclo-alkanes) and aromatic series and often some non-hydrocarbon impurities. For light oils.2. the phase boundaries form a closed boundary . The C7 characteristic is then the average for all components higher then C6 . and their mixture (50% of C2 H6 and 50% of C7 H16 ) the phase PT-diagram is shown in Fig. shown in Fig. 9. However. C4 . + Components C7 are heavy and in most interesting cases of petroleum engineering.9. mean+ ing all component in the series. intermediate components like C4 − C5 can be in both gaseous and liquid state depending on prevailing pressure and temperature. Ethane (C2 H6 ) and Heptane (C7 H16 ). In gases. Some of the components in the paraffin series are listed below: Methane Ethane Propane Butane Pentane Hexane CH4 C2 H6 C3 H8 C4 H10 C5 H12 C6 H14 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 Heptane Octane Nonane Decane C7 H16 C8 H18 C9 H20 C10 H22 Some typical non-hydrocarbon impurities are represented by.3 Representation of hydrocarbons Naturally occurring HC are complex in composition and contain a great many members of paraffins (alkanes). can not be evaporized. Nitrogen Carbon Dioxide Hydrogen Sulphide N2 CO2 H2 S + For mixtures of HC components. say. 9. When two or more HC components are mixed. C5 and C6 are the important components and for heavier oils the presence of various decanes and asfaltenes are quit common. C2 and C3 dominate the composition. it is quite common to write C7 .3. typically light components likeC1 .2: PT-diagram for H2 O. Water Critical point Vapour 100 °C Tc Figure 9. The PTcharacteristics of the pure components are somewhat similar to theH2 O case. C7 H16 and higher. For pure components of oil.

138 Chapter 9. 9. The equilibrium state is defined as function of p and T and consequently also the volume ratio of oil and gas is PT-dependent. Heptane and their mixture. The existence of a super critical fluid region to the right of the critical point where phases can not be distinguished. where the two phases of oil and gas co-exists. These relations between pressure.4: PVT diagram for a mixed component system. a PVT-diagram can be drawn. Volume is therefore a dependent function of p and T . For a mixture of hydrocarbons.4 (lower right). The PV-diagram (upper left) shows how the oil volume is increasing when pressure is . volume and temperature are often referred to as PVT-relations. 9. a) 100% Ethane p p b) 100% Heptane c) 50% Ethane 50% Heptane p Liquid C Liquid C Gas T Liquid C Liquid + Gas Gas T Gas T Figure 9.4. is seen in the PT-diagram in Fig. as shown in Fig.3: PT-diargam for Ethane. Properties of Reservoir Fluids area in the PT-diagram. Liqu id u tc rv e Pressure poi n t cu Bu bb rve p le oi n Vo lu G as l tica Cri int po uid orVap sure s Pre rve Cu me Pressure Liq Dew s Ga re atu per Tem Figure 9. This area is called the two-phase region and has a characteristic shape for that particular composition. as shown by the law of real gases.

At this pressure the volume continues to increase by separation into co-existing oil . only gas is produced. lines which defines the fractional oil-gas ratio. 9.e. represented by the two-phase region.or molar volume. The PT-diagram for a more complex mixtures is presented in Fig.9. . A reservoir with initial conditions as indicated by position 1 in Fig.and gas phases.e.6 is what we would call a gas reservoir. [Vm ] = m3 /kg-mole or cm3 /g-mole (ft3 /lb-mole). see Fig. in Fig.5. Specific volume is volume occupied by a unit of mass of a substance. there is no phase change when pressure is decreased.5: Pressure-specific volume diagram for mixed component system. For a given temperature. a phase transformation will pass through a twophase region confined by a bubble point locus and a dew point locus where the oil and gas are in equilibrium. Another way of representing the PVT discontinuity. above which a gas can not be condensed. Molar volume is equal to volume occupied by one mole of a substance. It is important to notice that the shape of an envelope A-CP-CT-B depends on the composition of HC mixture. the production follows the dotted line from 1 to x. however.5. C: Critical Point – a pressure and temperature point. no phase boundary is crossed. i. i.e. The two-phase region is left when the pressure starts to decrease again and further volume increase is due to gas expansion only.3 Representation of hydrocarbons 139 decreasing. above which a liquid can not be vaporised. For temperatures higher than T3 . i. on the other hand. 9. Continued volume increase means gradually increased gas-oil ratio at constant pressure. we observe a monotonously volume increase or swelling of the oil phase down to a certain pressure level. [Vs ] = m3 /kg (ft3 /lb). T1 T2 T3 T4 Liquid Liquid Pressure Critical point Gas T4 T3 T2 T1 Gas Two-phase region Specific volume Temperature Figure 9. at which two phases become identical.6. from1 to 2. where the heavier components are condensed. If. When this reservoir is produced at constant temperature. is to present the intensive property of specific . with the following definitions: CP: Cricondenbar – a pressure point. 9. then oil will gradually drop out of the gas both in the reservoir and on the way to location x. 9. CT: Cricondentherm – a temperature point. All the quality lines merge at this point. For lower temperatures. The composition of the gas will have changed.

9. 9.3.6. see Figs. When the pressure continues to decrease. Form that point onwards. 2. 9. Ci = Ci1 S1 +Ci2 S2 . In order to predict phase behaviour for such compositions ternary diagrams are often used. Properties of Reservoir Fluids A reservoir located at point 3 in Fig. 9. 9. we can imagine that an oil reservoir is located somewhere in the upper left corner in Fig.6. such that an oil reservoir would have a different shaped two-phase region than seen in Fig. from 1 to 5. no change in the composition will occur. Then the overall compositions Ci can be expressed through the phase compositions Ci j .140 Chapter 9. 1 CP p Liquid C 3 4 CT A 80% 60% 40% 20% x 5 B Gas T 2 Figure 9. no gas will exist in the reservoir until the bubbel point line is crossed. Natural hydrocarbons are complex mixtures of different components and are usually represented by pseudo-components (normally 2 or 3). should be called a gas condensate reservoir. at point 4. When this reservoir is produced at constant temperature. the two-phase region is characterising the reservoir fluid. Having said this. condensation of gas in the reservoir starts as soon as the two-phase region is entered.6. One of the advantages of ternary diagrams is that they enable us to represent both the phase compositions and the overall composition of mixture. do not exceed three . solution gas will slowly build up to a continuous phase and flow towards the well with a considerably higher mobility than the oil itself. Let us assume that the overall composition is represented by point M.8. vaporisation of residual oil can happen and the gas composition may become richer until the dew point line is crossed. i = 1. As we have mentioned before.diagram for a complex HC mixture. 3 .7 and 9.6: PT. When this reservoir is produced at constant temperature.1 Ternary diagrams Binary diagrams are often used for representing an overall behaviour of hydrocarbons and for detailed analysis of phase behaviour when the number of components or groups of pure components. and the dew point line is approached. At this time.

8 shows the case when the composition has a 3-phase region which is indicated by the embedded smaller triangle. we can obtain the following expression for the relative amounts of phases Si j in the overall composition.7: Two-phase ternary diagram. Ci1 −Ci2 S2 = Ci −Ci1 . where (p and T are expected to be known). S1 = Ci −Ci2 . . Moving inside the triangle we can only change the fraction of phases and not the overall composition. It follows from the Gibbs phase rule that in case of 3 (pseudo) components and 2 phases.9. All sides of this triangle are surrounded by 2. the system has only one degree of freedom. This means that if one of the parameters is specified all the other can be easily evaluated. Ci2 −Ci1 which is called "the lever rule".invariant point 2-phase region a b e C3 d C2 3-phase region Figure 9. The lever rule enables us to calculate the relative amounts of these phases. Any total composition M within this triangle gives three phases with the same overall composition.8: Three-phase ternary diagram.or volume fraction). Any unit can be used (mole-. There is no degrees of freedom in the three phase region. Fig. Using the fact that S1 + S2 = 1. weight.3 Representation of hydrocarbons 141 C1 1-phase region Plait point Tie line C3 Binodal curve 2-phase region C2 Figure 9.phase regions. C1 1-phase region Plait point Tie line f c . It means that the compositions of the three phases are given by the apexes of the 3 phase triangle (invariant points). 9. Note that the fraction of each component is 1 at their apex and 0 at the opposite edge.

however. The process of condensation is called retrograde liquid condensation. Sometimes it is economically advantageous to produce a gas condensate field by the process of gas re-cycling. Starting at point 3 in Fig. . 9. as seen in Fig. which is usually the case for surfactant+oil+brine systems. The objective of the gas re-cycling process is to keep reservoir conditions above/or to the right from the dew point curve.7 and 9. The maximum liquid saturation deposited in the reservoir is when the pressure is between points 4 and 5 in the two-phase region. than the dew point line will never be crossed and only dry gas will exist in the reservoir at any pressure. 9. the following initial condition is important.142 Chapter 9. the position of the point being dependent on surface separation. During isothermal depletion liquid will start to condense in the reservoir when the pressure has fallen below the dew point at 4. After breakthrough of the dry gas occurs. However. c+d S3 = e . in practical field developments this is not easily accomplished. where the retrograde liquid condensate is not recovered and. this does not occur because once the pressure falls below point 4 the overall composition and hence.9 and separating the liquid condensate from the dry gas at the surface and re-injecting the latter into the reservoir in such a way that the dry gas displaces the wet gas towards the producing wells. both p and T will decrease and the final state will be at some point x within the two-phase envelope. thus inhibiting re-vaporisation. the reservoir temperature is always larger than the critical temperature of the same gas. 9.4 Natural gas and gas condensate fields In a dry gas field. a+b S2 = c . The condensation is generally rather small and frequently below the critical saturation which must be exceeded before the liquid becomes mobile. 9. The reservoir pressure is kept almost at the initial level but the composition of the reservoir gas is gradually changed in such a way.e.9. the molecular weight of the HC remaining in the reservoir increases and is left behind in the reservoir as retrograde condensate while the light components are mobile and will be produce. 9. If initial conditions in the reservoir coincide with point 1 in Fig.6. When producing the gas to the surface. The composite phase envelope for the reservoir fluids tends to move downwards and to the right. Let us imagine initial pressure and temperature at point 3 in Fig. Continued pressure depletion below the point of maximum condensation would lead to revaporisation of the liquid condensate. i. 9. Tr > TCT . the injection is terminated and the remaining dry gas produced. that the phase envelope moves to the left and upwards. Properties of Reservoir Fluids S1 = a .8 both triangles have a common baseline. e+ f In Figs.6 and gas recovery is performed in such a way that the pressure will decline from1 to 2. this represents a loss of a valuable part of the hydrocarbon mixture. since the heavier components tend to condense first. However.

If initial conditions in the reservoir coincide with pointA in Fig.5 Oil fields 143 3 p Initial composition Intermediate composition Final composition T Figure 9.10: Development of the oil field. 9. a phase diagram for oil will be more elongated in horizontal direction. Reducing the pressure isothermally will eventually bring the oil to the bubble point B.10. 9. Unfavourable conditions of production p A B X Initial composition Intermediate composition Final composition T Figure 9. originally dissolved in the oil. Further reduction in pressure will lead to solution gas production and the presence of two phases in the reservoir. there will be only one phase present.5 Oil fields Since the oil contains more of the heavier HC components.10. . as compared with gas fields and as shown in Fig. containing an amount of dissolved gas which commensurate with the pressure and • liberated gas.9: Development of the gas field by the gas re-cycling process. • liquid oil. namely liquid oil containing dissolved gas. 9.9.

11. will flow with a much greater velocity than the oil towards the well. Vogn Sm3 Rs = . in Fig. The definition of these factors are [21]: Rs : The solution gas-oil ratio.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes The amount of oil and gas produced form the reservoir. being more mobile. gas injection or other enhanced oil recovery methods. The two-phase area of the reservoir fluid is overlapping the appropriate oil and gas reservoir. The volume factors are defined by laboratory experiments performed on samples taken from the reservoir oil or gas. or above the bubble point by using water flooding. 9. 9. that the liquid phase is finally becoming less and less mobile.10. It is therefore preferable to maintain oil production close to. Volumes defined at reservoir conditions (or at the surface) are transformed to surface volumes (or reservoir volumes) by use of volume factors. 9. the overall reservoir HC composition will change due to the fact that the gas. Bo . which is the number of standard cubic meters (feet) of gas which will dissolve in one stock tank cubic meter (barrel) of oil when both are measured at surface conditions. The composition will change to such an extent.12. The phase diagram for an oil reservoir with a gas cap must necessarily have a phase envelope which is characterised by both the gas and oil contained in the reservoir. 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids Keeping production at point X below the bubble point. These factors are defined in accordance to Fig. measured in standard volume quantities (at normal pressure and temperature) are converted to reservoir volumes by the use of volume factors.11: Phase diagram for the oil reservoir with a gas cap. Rs and R. as shown in Fig. Von Sm3 . Bg .144 Chapter 9. and the shape of the phase diagram will change towards more and more unfavourable conditions for oil production. The relative content of heavier components in oil will increase. Reservoir gas p A Reservoir fluid Reservoir oil Initial reservoir conditions T Figure 9.

2) (9. Vg Rm3 Bg = .1) (9. Sm3 The following useful relationships between the volume factors can be deduced.9. Bo = Vo Von Rm3 . simply using Fig. Vggn Sm3 R: The gas-oil ratio (GOR). 9. Tn Vg Vp Vo Vggn Vgn Vogn Von Von Figure 9. R= Vgn Von Sm3 .T Surface: pn . Bo : The oil formation volume factor is defined as the volume of oil in cubic meters (or barrels) occupied in the reservoir at the prevailing p and T divided by the volume of oil in stock tank cubic meter (barrel). is the volume of gas in standard cubic meters (feet) produced divided by volume of stock tank cubic meter (barrel) of oil at surface conditions.12: Vgn = RVon Vg = Bg (R − Rs)Von Vo +Vg = [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ]Von (9.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes 145 Reservoir: p. Sm3 Bg : The gas formation volume factor is defined as the volume of gas in cubic meters (or barrels) in the reservoir divided by the volume of the same gas at standard cubic meter (foot).12: Stock tank production through expansion of reservoir oil and -gas from an oil reservoir.3) .

when pressure is released.13. Bo Rs pb p R pb p Bg pb p pb p Figure 9. gas in equilibrium with oil can only exist up to its bubble point pressure.e. For pressures lower than the bubble point pressure. since no gas is produced in the reservoir. For pressure higher than pb . Rs . Bg and R are all pressure dependent functions. For decreasing pressure lower than the bubble point pressure. In order to explain the characteristic behaviour of the different volume factors it is natural to follow a decreasing pressure development. A unit sample of oil at different pressures (p > pb ) will therefore contain the same amount of gas and oil at standard condition.4) The volume factors Bo . i. 9. from right to left in Fig. This process continues until standard condition is reached. i. then volume is increased. In the case of the volum factor for gas. all free gas will be dissolve in the oil. 9. the volume of gas will expand as the reciprocal pressure. For pressure lower then the bubble point. Properties of Reservoir Fluids Vg = Bg (1 − Rs )Vgn R (9. . we will find a decreasing amount of gas in the reservoir oil sample because some gas has already evaporated and been produced as gas. as seen from Fig. The oil volume factor Bo is seen to increase linearly when pressure is decreasing towards the bubble point pressure pb . Finally all gas will evaporate and the oil is said to be dead and Bo ≈ 1.e. solution gas is gradually leaving the oil phase which leads to a shrinking volume of oil.13.146 Chapter 9.13: Dependency of PVT volum parameters on pressure. The solution gas-oil ratio Rs is constant for pressures higher than the bubble point pressure. This increase in Bo is directly linked to the oil compressibility.

e.9. Qon = Qg /[Bg (R − Rs)]. the process of solution gas vaporisation will take place. with a reservoir pressure lower than bubble point pressure.1) . we may express the GOR in terms of reservoir parameters. and the two relations giving the gas. When pressure is further decreased.(9.4) we find. The minimum gas-oil ratio is reached as the gas saturation becomes continuous and starts to flow. i.and gas flow. no change is observed in the gas-oil ratio at surface condition. we may write the following expression for the GOR factor. Qgn = RQon.(9. Example: Importance of the GOR The GOR is an important parameter. Using the relations Eqs.12 we may define the gas-oil ratio for a saturated oil reservoir. i. first near the wellbore. we assume Darcy’s law to be valid.e. .13. Qo µg ko Substituting this ratio in the GOR equation. Using the GOR. both for oil.1 and 9. With reference to Figs. For reservoir flow in the vicinity of the well. Shortly after the reservoir pressure has dropped below the bubble point pressure. Qg kg µo = . shown in Fig. R= Vgn Qgn = . The presence of discontinuous gas will block some of the path ways for the oil and consequently oil with less gas are being produced. and the reservoir gas-oil flow ratio is written. µi dr i = o. not only because it gives the gas-oil ratio as function of pressure and time. is given as a function of decreasing reservoir pressure.6 Relation between reservoir and surface volumes 147 The gas-oil ratio R.and oil rate. where Qi are the reservoir flow rates. g. 9. we may safely neglect all capillary effects. Von Qon where Qon = Qo /Bo and where Qo is the oil rate in the reservoir. When the pressure is above the bubble point pressure. since gas liberated in the reservoir is more mobile and therefore is produced faster than the oil it originally evaporated from. Bg Qo For reservoir flow. more gas than oil is produced than initially. where Qg is the gas rate in the reservoir. For a short while. R= Qg Bo + Rs . defined above. the gas is not mobile due to gas saturation below critical gas saturation. Qi = ki d pi A . but also because it carries important information about the mobility ratio of gas and oil in the reservoir. 9.

For a general reservoir we may define the following parameters. Solution gas-oil ratio. Bg and Rs are known from laboratory measurements.and gas is defined. Gas reserves: Oil reserves: GIIP = HCPV /Bg . The process differential . where the volume factors Bo . HCPV = VR · φ . Formation factor.5) gives a idealized approximation of reservoir dependence and should therefore be interpretated with care. The reserves coming from a gas reservoir is defined. λi = ki /µi . illustrates the difference between flash and differential expansion of the fluid sample. µg ko Bg (9.5) gives the relation between gas .(9.and flash expansion. OIIP = GIIP/Rs . Rs and Bg . The hydrocarbon pore volume. Eq. shown in Fig. Properties of Reservoir Fluids R= kg µo Bo + Rs . VR φ Bo . • Flash expansion of fluid samples through various separator combinations is used to enable the modification of laboratory derived PVT data to match field separator conditions. .5) where the mobility of oil. and i = o. 9. The GOR as presented in Eq. Example: Initial reservoir fluids The definition of initial in place volumes are somewhat different for oil.and gas reservoirs.14. • Differential expansion of the fluid sample is used to determine the basic parametersBo .7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters Conventional analysis of basic PVT parameters follow well established procedures by which the different volume factors are measured: • Flash expansion of the fluid sample is used to determine the bubble point pressure pb . g.148 Chapter 9. is important in defining the reserves in an oil reservoir. 9.and oil mobility in the reservoir and the observed gas-oil ration.(9. Porosity. Bg Rs Reservoir bulk volume. GIIP = OIIP · Rs . Oil reserves: Gas reserves: OIIP = HCPV /Bo .

14: Flash and differential expansion of fluid samples. Therefore. Consequently flash expansion leaves smaller oil volumes then differential expansion. Note that the flash expansion experiment does not change the overall hydrocarbon composition in the cell while in the differential liberation experiment. where multi-stage separation at the surface is commonly used because differential liberation will normally yield a larger final volume of equilibrium oil than the corresponding flash expansion. . there is a continous compositional change in the PVT-cell.9. at each stage. The remaining hydrocarbones are becoming progressively richer in heavier components and the average molecular weight is increasing. depletion gas is liberated physically and removed from the cell.7 Determination of the basic PVT parameters 149 pi > pb pb p < pb pb pb new Oil Oil Gas Oil Oil Gas Oil Oil Hg 1 p 2 3 p 1 2 3 Flash expansion 1 2 3 Differential expansion 1 2 Initial composition Final composition 3 T T Figure 9. Reservoir production is most likely reproduced by a non-isothermal differential expansion.

0025 RB/SCF Solution gas-oil ratio. and residual liquid volume is found to be 295 cm3 and the liberated gas volume is 21 litres.275 litres. The following data are obtained in a PVT analysis at 900C.1 Gas specific gravity. 0. Calculate the density expressed in SI-units.2 and – for a natural gas API gravity of 70. Estimate the following PVT parameters. b) c) d) e) co . What are the weight functions of the liquid and the vapour phase? 3. – for a crude oil API gravity of 57. 4. when water density is 1000 kg/m3 at standard condition (1 atm. The pressure is reduced to normal condition.8 Exercises 1.150 Chapter 9.18 RB/STB Gas formation volume factor. and 15. liquid compressibility at 207 bar. The system is re-compressed.7. 480 SCF/STB Elevation [ft] -5420 -5424 -5426 -5428 . 1. 0. Bo and Rs at 172 bar and 138 bar and Bg and z at 138 bar. 45.65 Oil formation volume factor. 2. Properties of Reservoir Fluids 9. Calculate the gas-oil capillary pressure for the following reservoir: Gas saturation [%] 75 50 25 0 Additional data: Oil API gravity.60C) is 5. The contained liquid volume is 388 cm3 and the measured gas volume (at 1 atm. and 200C). as above. A gas consists of 50% – 50% mixture by weight of two hydrocarbons. Pressure [bar] Celle (system) volume [cm3 ] 276 404 207 408 172 410 138 430 103 450 a) Estimate the bubble point pressure. Bo factor at 207 bar. expanded to 138 bar and the free gas is removed at constant pressure and then measured by further expansion to standard condition. The liquid phase consists of 40% by weight of the more volatile component and the vapour phase 65% by weight of this component. The pressure is increased isothermally until two phases appear.

5 kg/m3 . ρo = 735. 699. b) 14. 2/3. a) 172 bar. e) 0.0079 Rm3 /Sm3 . d)1.9.5 kg/Rm3 . 1. 3.315 Rm3 /Sm3 .1 · 10−5 bar−1 .383 Rm3 /Sm3 . ρg = 55. 0.3898 Rm3 /Sm3 .887 4. .8 kg/m3 . 2. 71.07 Sm3 /Sm3 .7 kg/Rm3 . c) 1.8 Exercises 151 Answers to questions: 1. 89. 749.2 Sm3 /Sm3 .

152 Chapter 9. Properties of Reservoir Fluids .

Part II Reservoir Parameter Estimation Methods 153 .

.

e. Vi −V = ∆V when pi → p. In this chapter we will develop the Material Balance Equation for a general oil and gas reservoir and illustrate the use of the equation by various examples. methods based on the material balance equation are commonly used in the following cases: • Extrapolation of production curves for oil. water and gas (production decline curve analysis).1) is often referred to as the golden principle. their application and use have proven to be of great importance in various situations.(10. Vi where Vi is the initial hydrocarbone volume. where Expansion = Production. 155 (10. Eq. • History matching. If we assume the fluid density in the reservoir to be constant during the depletion process.1 Introduction The basic principle behind the Material Balance Equation is very fundamental: The mass of hydrocarbons (HC) initially in place is equal to sum of the mass produced and the mass still remaining in the reservoir.e. i. Being simple in principle. Mi = ∆M + M. ρ ∼ constant.1) . the hydrocarbon pore volume (HCPV). In material balance calculations we implicitly consider the reservoir as being a tank of constant volume. with limited reference to local information. i. Even though material balance techniques use crude approximations of the reservoir. p= 1 Vi pdV. we may write the mass conservation law in terms of volume conservation. The pressure in this tank is defined by the volumetric average pressure.Chapter 10 Material Balance Equation 10. • Identification of the drive mechanism.

p G Bgi pn G [Sm ] 3 (10. Bgi = Vi = Vn p zT · n zT p and i . G · Bgi = (G − G p )Bg . The material balance equation given by Eq. is equal to (G − G p )Bgp . i. Bgi Gp = 1− . the volume occupied by the gas in the reservoir.2) that.2 Dry gas expansion Let us consider a dry gas reservoir where the production is modelled using material balance calculations. The HCPV is constant in absence of water influx.3) Using the equation of state for a real gas pV = znRT .156 Chapter 10. [Sm3 /Rm3 ]. G p : cumulative volume of gas produced. and assuming isothermal conditions of production one can obtain the relations.1: Volume transformation using volume formation factors. [Sm3 ]. It follows from Eq.2) (G-Gp)Bg G-Gp Gp Figure 10. Bgi : initial gas formation volume factor. Bg G (10. in standard units. [Sm3 ].(10.(10. At a reservoir pressure p. Material Balance Equation 10.2) is illustrated in Fig. where the following definitions are used. [Sm3 /Rm3 ] and Bg : gas formation volume factor at current reservoir pressure. G: resources of gas initially in place.2).1) is slightly redefined where the volumeof gas in the reservoir initially in place is obviously equal to the volumeof gas in the reservoir at a given pressure p. The production of gas at surface conditions is G p . The relation presented in Eq. When a surface volume of G p has been produced.1. the volume of gas left in the reservoir is G − G p . where the purpose is to visualise the transformation of gas volume under reservoir condition to surface conditions.(10. 10.e Eq.(10.

this serves as a proof for the assumption of no or negligible water influx during gas production and that the main driving force behind the production is gas expansion. G (10. when a straight line is fitted through the data. reservoir temperature and initial pressure.3 A general oil reservoir 157 Bg = Vp = Vn p zT · n zT p . G. N: Resources of oil (initial oil in place) in Sm3 . as schematically indicated in Fig. Secondly. When the data follows a linear trend. 10.4).3) can now be written. allowing us to estimate the resources of gas. p where the indices i and p refer to the initial and current pressures respectively .4) Using Eq. p/z vs. cumulative gas production. the intersection point with the x-axis gives us an estimate for initial gas in place.(10.2: Gas reservoir exhibiting a straight line trend in p/z vs. The gas in the gas cap is in equilibrium with the oil in the oil zone and the volume part of the reservoir occupied by gas relative to oil is constant.3 A general oil reservoir In a general oil reservoir. there may exist a gas cap above the oil zone.2.3. Dependent on the composition of the fluid. . m: Ratio between the resources of gas in the gas cap and resources of oil in the oil zone measured at reservoir conditions. 10.10. p z = p z 1− i Gp . hydrocarbons will be represented as oil and/or gas. as shown in Fig. The following nomenclature is used in the derivation of the material balance equation: HCPV : Part of pore volume occupied by hydrocarbons. 10. (p) z i G 0 Gp Figure 10. Eq. Two important characteristics are displayed by plotting the data as shown in the figure. cumulative gas production exhibits a straight line trend.(10.

it is therefore convenient to break up the expansion term into its components. C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume. Material Balance Equation Initial reservoir conditions Current reservoir conditions Gas cap 3 mNBoi (Rm ) Gas cap B Oil zone NBoi (Rm ) 3 C Oil zone A A. Note that we are here considering underground withdrawal of hydrocarbon fluids. B. 10. ∆Vo is the volume oil produced at reservoir pressure p.3: Oil reservoir with a gas cap: Illustration of material balance. volume .1 A1: Expansion of oil The oil (liquid phase) expansion at reservoir condition can be defined as. expansion of the gas cap. see Fig. measured in Rm3 .4. N p : Volume of oil produced in Sm3 . mNBoi: Resources of gas (initial gas in place) in Rm3 . see Fig.3.C. C . Vo (p) −Vo (pi ) = ∆Vo (p). volume . In dealing with the development of the material balance equation. . 10. Reservoir expansion is equal to production.A. volume .3) is explained as expansion of the oil zone. A1: Expansion of oil.158 Chapter 10. 10. A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas. hence: ∆Vprod = A1 + A2 + B + C.produced volumes Figure 10.B and as expansion of initial water present plus reduction of pore volume due to expansion of reservoir formation matrix and possible reduction of bulk volume. B: Expansion of gas cap gas. Here Vo (pi ) is the oil volume at initial conditions and Vo (p) is the volume of the oil initial in place at pressure p. Production from the oil reservoir (with a gas cap.

where Sw is the average water saturation andVp the pore volume. The total volume of the gas cap as part of the oil volume in the reservoir.3 B: Expansion of gas cap gas The expansion of gas cap gas follows the same principle as observed for the expansion/production of dry gas given by Eq. (10.6) 10. Oil expansion is written. The total amount of solution gas in the oil is NRsi. The gas production at current reservoir pressure is then. but since we want to express all expanded volumes at reservoir condition. ∆Vo = N · Bo − N · Boi = N(Bo − Boi).10. (10.3. also in surface volumes.3 A general oil reservoir 159 pi p ∆Vo Vo Figure 10. .2 A2: Expansion of originally dissolved gas At initial conditions oil and gas in the gas cap are in mutual equilibrium .2). 10. we have to multiply the surface volume by the volume factor for gas at reservoir pressure.(10.4: Expansion of oil at reservoir pressure. pb will cause the liberation of solution gas. is.e. ∆Vog = N(Rsi − Rs)Bg . NRsi − NRs = N(Rsi − Rs ). N is the initial oil in place [Sm3 ] and is defined. This gas volume is measured at surface condition. The amount of gas still dissolved in the oil at current reservoir pressure and temperature isNRs . measured in surface volumes. GBgi = mNBoi.5) where ∆Vo is measured in Rm3 . Therefore. Reducing the pressure below the bubble point pressure. i. frompi to p. the gas volume liberated during the pressure drop.3. measured at reservoir condition. GBgi = (G − G p )Bg . N = Vp (1 − Sw )/Boi . Bg .

cw and c p . gives the expansion of the HCPV or volume -C.3.160 Chapter 10. c= 1 ∆V V ∆p ⇒ ∆V = cV ∆p. Using the definition of compressibility. respectively. where the absolute volume change in the HC pore space due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume is. ∆VHCPV = cwVw ∆p + c pVp ∆p. From previous considerations. i. 1 − Sw where the pore volume compressibility is. The HCPV compressibility as the compressibility for connate water and formation matrix are defined in accordance with the general law of thermal compressibility. we found that: Vw = SwVp and Vp = VHCPV /(1 − Sw ) and we get. ∆VHCPV = (1 + m)NBoi cw Sw + c p ∆p. ∆VHCPV = VHCPV cw Sw + c p ∆p. ∆Vw and ∆Vp are the volume changes due to expansion of connate water and that due to reduction in pore volume.8) . ∆VHCPV = ∆Vw + ∆Vp . c p = (cb − (1 + φ )cr )/φ and VHCPV = Vo +Vg = NBoi + mNBoi = (1 + m)NBoi.7) 10. 1 − Sw (10. Expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume are controlled by the compressibility of water and pore volumes.4 C: Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume Reduction in HCPV due to expansion of connate water and reduction of pore volume is in practice equal to the increased production by the same volume. ∆Vgg = mNBoi Bg −1 . Bgi (10.e. Material Balance Equation G p Bg = mNBoi (Bg − Bgi ). we get. Bgi The expansion of the gas cap (in reservoir volumes) is therefore written. The volume expansion due to initial water and reduction in the pore volume.

10. i. it is implicit in all the other terms of Eq. The water influx is also pressure dependent. A1. The equation gives a static representation of the reservoir and does not include any terms describing the energy loss in the reservoir due to fluid flow behaviour. where R is the gas-oil ratio (GOR) and Rs is the solution gas-oil ratio.4 The material balance equation 161 10. In order to compare the two types of volumes. Eqs.4).1) to (9. N p + G p .(10.10.9) we can write the material balance equation for a general oil reservoir. Bgi 1 − Sw N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] = NBoi (10. Rs and Bg are functions of pressure.5 Production terms The production of oil and gas at surface conditions is.10) is evaluated. Results published in 1963-64 by Havlena and Odeh opened a wide range .5) to (10.10) (We −Wp )Bw on the right-hand side of Eq.5 Linearized material balance equation The linearized material balance equation is particular interesting in connection with reservoir parameter estimation. • Although the pressure only appears explicitly in the water and pore volume compressibility terms. The expansion volumes.(10. Using the relation between gas and oil produced at standard condition. (Bo − Boi ) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg + Boi Bg cwSw + c p m( − 1) + (1 + m)( )∆p + (We −Wp )Bw .(10.(10. in the way it was derived.3. B and C. The following features of the MBE should be noted: • MBE generally exhibits a lack of time dependence although the water influx has a time dependence. Note that the material balance equation is not evaluated in a step-wise or differential fashion.4 The material balance equation Combining Eqs. ∆Vprod = N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ].9) 10. by comparing the current volumes at pressure p to the original volumes at pi . We can now write the overall production term as. • Eq. we have to transform the production volumes to reservoir volumes.N p Bo + G p Bg .10) since the PVT parameters Bo . G p = (R − Rs)N p . It is important to notice under which circumstances the material balance equation is developed.10) accounts for water influx into the reservoir and production of water. (10. are measured at reservoir conditions.(9.e. respectively. A2.

Production is driven by expansion of undersaturated oil. where the following definitions are used: The underground withdrawal: F = N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] +Wp Bw Expansion of oil and its originally dissolved gas: Eo = (Bo − Boi) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg Expansion of the gas cap gas: Eg = Boi Bg −1 Bgi (10.6 Dissolved gas expansion drive Fluid samples taken from an oil reservoir. -water and -formation.11) Expansion of the connate water and reduction of pore volume: Ec = (1 + m) cw Sw + c p Boi ∆p 1 − Sw Eq. Rsi = Rs = R. N p Bo = NBoi Bo − Boi cw Sw + c p + ∆p . Material Balance Equation of applications of the MBE to reservoir engineering [33. 3. 5. important deductions are made: 1. From this information alone. No gas cap can exist.10) is. 4. is described by the law of compressibility. i. The linear form of equation (10.162 Chapter 10. p > pb . i. 34]. 2. . indicate a reservoir pressure larger than the bubble point pressure. a simplified material balance equation is written.11) is especially important for revealing the drive mechanism of the reservoir and for estimation of initial oil and gas.e.e. Production of oil is controlled by compressibility of oil. for increasing pressures higher than the bubble point pressure. as undersaturated oil.(10. With these restrictions in mind. F = N(Eo + mEg + Ec ) +We Bw . Boi 1 − Sw We have seen earlier that the slow decline of the volume factorBo . The reservoir fluid exists in only one phase. All produced gas comes from the oil. 10.

Note the notation: N = Von . we may find a simple relation between produced oil. N p · Bo = N · Boi ct ∆p.5: Reservoir parameter estimation for dissolved gas expansion data. Vo = Von Boi and ∆Vo = Von (Bo − Boi). we may write the equation above. N p and observed pressure drop. Np ∆p Figure 10. ∆p = pi − p. 1 − Sw (10.6 Dissolved gas expansion drive 163 co = 1 ∆Vo . 9. . 1 − Sw By introducing a total compressibility. Np = Vp ct ∆p. Bo The linear relationship between oil production N p and pressure drop ∆p can be used to estimate unknown reservoir parameters such as pore volume Vp or total compressibility ct . Vo ∆p where we may use the definitions.13) and by introducing the reservoir pore volume using the expression. Oil compressibility is therefore written.12.12) and the simplified material balance equation above is therefore. 10. N p Bo = NBoi co So + cw Sw + c p ∆p . ∆p given by. Fig. ct = co So + cw Sw + c p .10. in accordance with Fig. used to determineVp and ct .Vp So = N · Boi . Von Boi ∆p Boi ∆p (10.5 shows a linear representation of the data. co = 1 Von (Bo − Boi) Bo − Boi 1 = .

(10. When this happens. gas is produced in the reservoir and the expansion of this gas will become increasingly important for the process of oil production. Using Eq. 10. .12) we have the total compressibility. N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] ≈ N[(Bo − Boi ) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg ]. Material Balance Equation cw = 3 · 10−6 psi−1 c p = 8.164 Chapter 10.2 pi = 4000 psi pb = 3330 psi Boi = 1. we may neglect the compressibility term and write the simplified material balance equation as.24 · 10−6 psi−1 .14) The use of this approximate equation is justified through a comparison of the different volumes A and C in Fig. and the relative production becomes. Np Boi ct ∆p . Boi ∆p Inserting for the numbers from the table above.10) can now be expressed as.6 · 10−6 psi−1 Sw = 0.13) we may write. we find the total compressibility. the reservoir pressure will finally decrease below bubble point pressure. ct = Bob − Boi (1 − Sw ) + cw Sw + c p .2417 RB/STB Bob = 1. 3330psi which gives an oil recovery at the bubble point pressure equal to 1.(10. . For reservoir pressures p < pb . N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] = N (Bo − Boi) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg + cw Sw + c p ∆p .01516. = N Bob 1 − Sw where ct = co So + cw Sw + c p . we may assume the gas expansion to be gradually more important than the expansion due to compressibility of initial water and the formation.2511 RB/STB Example: Oil recovery factor at bubble point pressure An undersaturated oil reservoir has been produced down to its bubble point pressure.5%. (10.(10. Np N = 0. ct = 18. Consequently. we will find that A C in all practical cases. The material balance equation Eq.3. After some time with continuous production. 1 − Sw When we consider the significance of the different expansion factors. What is the oil recovery at this time when the following parameters are given? From Eq.

if possible be produced after the oil is produced.0940 RB/STB Example: Oil recovery below the bubble point pressure Using the same example as above. 10. we will not only loose some of the driving force. N p (Bo − Boi) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg . we find the oil recovery equal to. to be negligible compared to the solution gas compressibility. . From the example above we may state an improtant production strategy for oil reservoirs. The wells should therefore be drilled and . gas should remain in the reservoir if oil production is to be optimized. but the oil will also be smeared out due to the withdrawal of the gas zone. due to capillary effects. From this simple consideration we may assume all compressibility terms in the material balance equation. Using the numbers from the tables above.7 (10. production of gas should be minimised since gas acts as the driving force behind oil production. We may therefore use the approximation Eq.7 Gas cap expansion drive The presence of a gas cap at initial conditions indicates a saturated oil in equilibrium with the gas. The formula for gas compressibility can be given by cg = 1/V (∆V /∆p). If the gas is produced first. information about the GOR is necessary.4 .10. R + 200.00339 RB/SCF Bo (900psi) = 1. is most probably lost. This oil.14). Since the gas is considered as the driving force in the reservoir production. This is about 15 times larger than the total compressibility at pressures above the bubble point pressure. = N Bo + (R − Rs)Bg where R is the gas-oil ratio (GOR). As learned from the example above. indicating a gas compressibility of cg 300 · 10−6 psi−1 .10).(10. On the other hand it is quite obvious that oil recovery is maximised when R is kept as small as possible.where the volume factors are given: The solution gas produced in the reservoir will change the compressibility in the reservoir drastically. we can now calculate the oil recovery down to a pressure p = 900psi. it should. Np N = 900psi 344.7 Gas cap expansion drive 165 Rsi (4000psi) = 510 SCF/STB Rs (900psi) = 122 SCF/STB Bg (900psi) = 0.(10.e. Eq.15) In order to numerically define the oil recovery. namely that: All production should come from the oil zone. i.

i. Boi Bgi where the linearized material balance equation is. We = 0. like produced oil volume at surface condition N p . the linearized material balance equation could then be written. N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] = (Bo − Boi ) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg Bg NBoi + m( − 1) + (We −Wp )Bw . Eq. where mN is the slope and N is the constant term (N is the intersection point with the y-axis). unless the aquifer size is large compared to the oil reservoir. containing expansion of connate water or formation matrix. and gas cap expansion Eg . Example: Linearization of material balance equation The pressure decline in a saturated oil reservoir with a gas cap is driven by expansion of liberated solution gas Eo . In order to estimate initial oil in place N. Bgi where we assume no water production or water influx.16) are defined as below. 10. For an oil reservoir with a gas cap. When a gas cap is discovered in connection with an oil reservoir. The data in the table above is plotted in Fig. as presented in Eq.(10. F = N(Eo + mEg ) +We Bw .e. The assumption of negligible water influx is rather plausible for reservoirs with a gas cap since the expansion of initial water and formation matrix is small compared to the expansion of gas cap gas. F = N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ]. Bg and Rs . From the figure we find the initial oil volume . we need to know the production data. Eo = (Bo − Boi ) + (Rsi − Rs )Bg .(10.16) Eo Eo which clearly indicates the advantage with linearization.6 which shows a linearization fit taking into account all data points. we can safely neglect all terms in the material balance equation. keeping as much gas in the reservoir as possible.166 Chapter 10.(10.16). In the case of gas cap expansion drive we therefore get the somewhat simplified material balance equation. in addition to the gas-oil ratio R. The linearized terms used in Eq. Bg Eg = Boi ( − 1). Eg F = N + mN . Material Balance Equation completed with the purposed of optimising oil production. (10. and the size of the gas cap mN.10). Further information is also acquired with respect to the different volume factors Bo . we have the following data. If we could assume no water influx during oil production.

7 Eg /Eo 4.7 · 106 STB.8 Water influx Water influx is more the rule. to be N = 109.7 340.94 4. 10. Note that the units on the y.51 4. than the exception for normal oil and gas production.93 F/E o 450 [STB] 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 Measurements Linear fit E g/E o Figure 10.5 355. where f is some function which will depend on the reservoir and the extent and volume of the aquifer itself. indicating a fractional gas cap size of m = 0.99 3.6: Extrapolation of lineraized gas cap expansion data.6 340.8 368.axis (F/Eo ) is given in 106 ST B.8 Water influx 167 p [psia] 3150 3000 2850 2700 2550 2400 F/Eo · 106 [ST B] 398. we expect some influx of water to be present in all situations where reservoir production takes place over some period of time. Generally we may expect the influx of water to be both time and pressure dependent and we write.t). i. .10.25 3.54.e.29 4. We = f (p.5 · 106 STB and the slope or gas cap size mN = 58.8 371. .

00107 RB/SCF R = 3000 SCF/STB Rs = 401 SCF/STB . N p [Bo + (R − Rs)Bg ] = Wp Bw . as shown in Fig. qw = C(pe − p). The pressure difference induced.168 Chapter 10. 10. The cumulative water influx can be found by integrating over the time this process takes place. Material Balance Equation This picture could be clarified by considering a reservoir model.2002 RB/STB Bg = 0. p qw qw qw re pe qw qw Figure 10. N p = 10000 STB Bo = 1. The constant C is adjusted in such a way as to secure the match between the model and the real data. t We = 0 qw dt ∑ qi ∆ti = C ∑ ∆pi∆ti. i i In the equation above we move from a continuous case to a discrete case by summing over all pressure drops ∆p for all time periods ∆t. Injection water rate will be proportional to the oil production rate and the following simplified material balance equation is applied. will then cause water to flow into the reservoir volume. where the periphery pressure (pressure near the boundary) in the aquifer zone is equal tope . where C is a constant depending on the various reservoir parameters. Example: Pressure maintenance through water injection In an attempt to maintain the reservoir pressure we may inject water into the reservoir. This flow will obey Darcy’s law.7. The use of this equation is important when real data is supposed to be fitted in accordance with a material balance model. Key data for a typical oil reservoir is.7: Water influx from external aquifer.

8 Water influx 169 If pressure is maintained. measured in [STB].0N p . . Wp = 4. .10. we can conclude from the data above that the relation between produced oil and injected water has to be.

0 · 10−6 psi−1 .1115 1.1450 1. when the pressure decreases from pi = 4000 psia to the bubble point.0763 1.6 · 10−6 psi−1 and connate water saturation is Swc = 0.1822 1.2417 1. c p = 8.1633 1. a) Calculate the initial oil in place and the size of the gas cap when the following PVTand production data is given. Compressibility is given.00107 0.170 Chapter 10. p = pb . For an oil reservoir with gas cap. p [psia] 4000 3500 3330 3000 2700 2400 2100 1800 1500 1200 900 600 300 Bo 1.00137 0. . from pi = 4000 psia to p = 600 psia. 2.9 Exercises 1.2480 1.2. What is the injection water rate necessary to maintain the production at p=2700 psia ? Use Bw = 1.00096 0.0 RB/ST B.2511 1. (Bt − Boi) + (Bg − Bgi )mBoi /Bgi N= where Bt = Bo + (Rsi − Rs )Bg and Wi is the water volume injected given in STB.00519 0. The boiling point pressure is 1850 psia.0940 1. The following PVT-data is used in material balance calculations.00339 0.00119 0.0940 1.2022 1. cw = 3.2222 1. The material balance equation with no water production is.00087 0.0583 Rs 510 510 510 450 401 352 304 257 214 167 122 78 35 Bg – – 0. What is the gas saturation at 600psia.00196 0. Material Balance Equation 10. N p [Bt + Bg (R − Rsi)] −Wi Bw . when R = 1000 SCF/STB ? c) The oil rate is 10000 STB/d at pressure p = 2700 psia and the gas-oil ratio is R = 3000SCF /ST B.00249 0.01066 a) Find the recovery N p /N. b) Calculate the recovery N p /N for declining pressure. the water injection rate is not known.00161 0.

614 · 108 1000 494 1. by a method of comparing R.333 0.594 · 108 1300 535 1.24. Define an expression giving the gas-oil ratio.00101 0.2022 Rs [SCF/STB] 510 477 450 425 401 Bg [RB/SCF] 0. GOR [SCF/STB] in a reservoir with supercritical gas saturation.2222 1.258 0.17 and the water volume factor is approximately 1.363 0.0 RB/STB. R = Rs + kg Bo µo . Find the GOR using the following data. assume there is no gas cap present and the production mechanism is dissolved gas drive.10.594 0.00107 a) First. Calculate the height of the cone when the pressure at the bottom level of the oil zone (cone) is 1919 psia ( –the water-oil contact).018 cp ko =1000 mD kg =96 mD Bo =1.00190 1. [Volume of a right circular cone is π r2 h/3].363 0.12 · 108 Water saturation is 0.2353 1.3014 – – – 1600 621 1. 3. calculated from the material balance equation and secondly calculated from the GOR– equation (as done in Exercise 1). µo =0. Estimate the initial oil volume in the reservoir.2511 1.8 cp µg =0.748 0.437 0. b) Geological information indicates that the reservoir could be approximated to a right circular cone.00150 1. porosity is 0.3090 5.024 1.300 0.00096 0.00087 0.3049 3. p [psia] 3330 3150 3000 2850 2700 Np [106 STB] – 1.9 · 108 1800 3.9 Exercises 171 p [psia] Rs [SCF/STB] Bo [RB/STB] Bg [RB/SCF] Bt [RB/STB] ρo [psi/ft] N p [STB] R [SCF/STB] Wi [STB] 1850 690 1. The data in the table below is taken form an oil reservoir.363 RB/STB Bg =0.5 · 108 1350 2.001162 RB/SCF Rs = 500 SCF/STB 4.2122 1.00092 0.3132 5.00124 1. ko Bg µg A relation kg /ko exists experimentaly and the gas saturation dependency has been established: .928 – R [SCF/STB] – 1050 1060 1160 – Bo [RB/STB] 1.1 · 108 1100 1.00250 1. b) Estimate oil production at p = 2700 psia.947 2.

b) by iteration c) 108. 4.22 · 109 STB.30.5 · Sg − 2.54. in view of this new information. 3. Answer to questions: 1.0 cp and µg =0. c) Data from an other well indicates the existence of a small gas cap. c) 39830 STB/d 2. where Swc =0. 0.6 · 106 STB .43. a) 122. a) 1.52%. µo =1.172 Chapter 10. b) 46%.8 · 106 STB. b) 738 ft.1 cp.49. Calculate the initial oil volume. a) 2. Material Balance Equation log(kg /ko ) = 34. 0. 5505 SCF/STB.

While seismic data and well logs provide a static description of the reservoir.11. etc. Such a model is constructed using geological. geophysical and well data. The well test data is therefore a key element in the reservoir model construction.Chapter 11 Well Test Analysis 11.). Interpretation of these data leads to individual "models" (what the geophysicist. cuttings. well tests.1: Stages of reservoir modelling. well logs. PVT analysis. etc. we have to consider a reservoir model capable of realistically predicting the dynamic behaviour of the field in terms of production rate and fluid recovery.1. A brief understanding of the fundamental aspects of well testing is necessary in order to incorporate dynamic well test data into the reservoir model and it is the function of the reservoir engineer to incorporate these 173 .) and from interpreted data (surface seismic. Measurement Geophysics Electric Log Well Test PVT. The necessary parameters are obtained from direct measurements (cores. the petrophysicist and well analyst think the reservoir looks like). Core Interpretation Geophysical Model Log Model Reservoir Engineering Well Test Model Reservoir Model Figure 11. formation fluid samples. see Fig. only well testing data provide information on dynamic reservoir response.1 Introduction In order to optimise a development strategy for an oil or gas field.

. as the production of the reservoir fluid starts. the average pressure in the reservoir will decrease in a way similar to emptying a confined volume.1 Systems of Uunits Used in Well Test Analysis The following systems of units are traditionally used in well test analysis: SI-Units and Field Units. each describing characteristic well and reservoir pressure response profile: 1. in turn.1. However. Even though these items place tight restrictions on the reservoir itself. Wellbore storage period. In the initial phase of well tests. In this chapter we will develop simple models that can explain the measured well test data. 3. • horizontal radial flow paths (no cross flow) and • constant flow rate. created by the start-up of production.174 Chapter 11. Semi steady state period. The wellbore pressure data is subdivided into three different production periods.viscosity and . 2. Production from a confined reservoir (closed volume) where the interference from the boundary dominates pressure decline. This movement will be retarded by friction against the pore walls and the fluid’s own inertia and viscosity. Some conversion factors mostly used in well test analysis are listed below: . Well Test Analysis individual models into a cohesive reservoir model [50]. the fluid near the well expands and moves towards the area of lower pressure. This process continues until the drop in pressure. During this time. From this time and onwards. some important information can be extracted from the models. fluid contained in the wellbore and its direct connected volumes are produced. explaining reservoir behaviour on basis of the well test data. 11. as the fluid moves it will.reservoir height (reservoir thickness). The tail portion of the well test data for the test of sufficient duration. c∇p · ∇p is small (compressibility times pressure gradient squared) . is affected by the interference from other wells or by boundary effects such as those that occur when the pressure disturbance reaches the edge of a reservoir. characterised by: • isotropic and homogenous reservoir volume.1. Production from an infinite acting reservoir where no boundary effects are observed. is dissipated throughout the reservoir. i. Production from the wellbore and nearby cavities. as presented in Table 11. • constant porosity. Then. Semi logarithmic period. like a tank of gas. pressure measurements are dominated by wellbore storage effects. create a pressure imbalance and this will induce neighbouring fluid to move towards the well.e.absolute permeability. The models give a rather simplified and idealistic view of the reservoir. • test production with relative small pressure gradients. .

The definition of the wellbore fluid compressibility is c f = ∆Vw /(Vw ∆p) and the well flowrate is qB = ∆Vw /∆t.3048 m 0. First. standard volume. accessible to fluids close to 17 m3 . The compressibility is often redefined. at a well depth of H = 2000m has a volume Vw . where the pressure drop in the well is.987·10−3 µ m2 1 mPa·s 6.159 Sm3 /d 0. A real well. c f and the well storage volume. (B is the wellbore fluid volume factor. the fluids contained in the wellbore itself and its continuous cavities will be produced.11. . cws = c f Vw is used to characterise particular wells.1) where ∆p = pi − pw (t) is the difference between initial and wellbore pressure.1m. This production is characterised by the expansion of oil and gas in the well.1: System of units used in well test analysis Parameter Nomenclature SI-units Field units Flow rate Volume factor Thickness Permeability Viscosity Pressure Radial distance Compressibility Time q B h k µ p r c t Sm3 /d Rm3 /Sm3 m µ m2 mPa·s kPa m (kPa)−1 hrs STB/d RB/STB ft mD cp psia ft psi−1 hrs 1 STB/d 1 ft 1 mD 1 cp 1 psi = = = = = 0. measured in reservoir volume pr. where the wellbore storage.895 kPa 11. Vw .2 Wellbore Storage Period Let us consider the initiation of well production at a constant rate at timet0 = 0. defined by the fluid compressibility. Example: Wellbore storage effect A well has a certain volume capacity for fluids. ∆p. c f Vw (11.2 Wellbore Storage Period 175 Table 11. with an average well radius of rw = 0.) ∆p = qB t.

as seen in Fig. When the well is opened (shut-in) to flow. in the wellbore storage period If well production is measured in standard cubic meter pr.176 Chapter 11. Due to the wellbore storage. i. 11.e. . exhibits the linear relation between time and pressure drop.2. This effect must be incorporated into the interpretation model of the pressure test data. for estimation of the wellbore storage constant cws : qB cws = . The latter equation. day [Sm3 /d] and time in hours [hr]. The technique of using log-log plots is commonly used in well test analysis for model recognition.pwf ) Slope = 1 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 t. (11. . where the well itself contains a certain volume of compressible fluid. the well pressure is then given by. it is opened at the surface. This straight line behaviour seen in Fig. has a slope equal to unity. in a logarithmic scale. hrs Figure 11.2) 24(pi − pw (1hr)) with pw (1 hr) picked from the unit slope line. there is a delay in a flow-rate response at the sand-face (bottom of the well). 24cws and the logarithmic pressure difference can be given by. 11.2: Logarithmic analysis of the pressure drawdown data at early times of well testing.3. log(pi − pw (t)) = log(t) + log qB 24cws . pi − pw = qB t. but also as here. where pw is the wellbore pressure. Well Test Analysis log( pi .

µ ∂t (11.3.3) . k is permeability and vx is flow velocity in x-direction.4. ∂t k dp = − . The production profile in this period is characterised by a semi logarithmic pressure dependence.11.11.3: The wellbore storage effect on flow-rate during the drawdown (left) and build.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 177 q Surface flow rate q Surface flow rate Sandface flow rate ∆t ∆t t tp Sandface flow rate ∆t t Figure 11. we may write the same equations as. µ Substituting these two equations gives us. Using an independent co-ordinate system. as shown in Fig.up tests (right). µ dx where ρ is density. ∇ · (ρ v) = − ∂ (φ ρ ) . hence the title of this section.3 Semi Logarithmic Period In this section we will focus our attention on what happens in the reservoir when the fluid is drawn towards the well due to the pressure drop in the wellbore.1 Diffusivity Equation Transport of oil in porous media is generally described by the law of continuity and Darcy’s law. If we consider a volume element. We shall develop a theory for fluid flow in a cylindrical and somewhat idealistic reservoir (see introductory remarks). dt k v = − ∇p. k ∂ (φ ρ ) ∇ · ρ ∇p = . φ is porosity. we may define the flow of oil in the x-direction by the equations. d(ρ vx ) dx vx = − ∂ (φ ρ ) . 11. µ is viscosity. 11.

3) is further developed using the newly defined compressibilities. With this last simplification in mind.(11. . η ∂t (11. and we write. cl ∇p∇p + ∇2 p = 1 ∂p . ρ = ρ (p) and φ = φ (p).(11. Initial conditions are described by the pressure start-up conditions in the reservoir.cl and cm .e. Well Test Analysis px vx px+∆x vx+∆x x x+∆x x Figure 11. i. cl = 1 ∂ρ 1 ∂φ and cm = . Further simplification of Eq.7) 11. η ∂t The diffusitivity equation in cylindrical co-ordinates gives.4: Flow of oil in the x-direction through a volume element.4) rests on the assumption that cl ∇p∇p |∇2 p|. as mentioned above. 1 ∂ ∂p r r ∂r ∂r = 1 ∂p .5) (11. η ∂t (11. ∇2 p = 1 ∂ ∂p ∂2 1 ∂p r + 2= .3. while the boundary condition is deduced from Darcy’s law. which is the case in almost all real cases. the linearized diffusitivity equation is written.2 Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation The solution of the diffusivity equation can be simplified by using the linear source approximation implicating a zero wellbore radius.178 Chapter 11. From these relations we can define the liquid compressibility as well as the matrix compressibility as. we will consider both permeability and viscosity to be constant. ρ ∂p φ ∂p Eq.4) where η = k/(φ cµ ) and c = cl + cm .6) (11. In case of a constant flow rate the following Initialand Boundary condition are defined. we can write the Diffusitivity equation (independent of co-ordinate systems). while oil density and reservoir porosity may vary with pressure. where c is the total compressibility. r ∂r ∂r ∂z η ∂t With no crossflow in the reservoir. 1 ∂p . In accordance with an idealistic view of the reservoir.

Values of the function −Ei(−ξ ) is tabulated in Table 11. the variable of time is made implicit and the diffusivity equation is reduced to only one variable. using the boundary condition for the line-source solution.(11. When the Boltzmann transformation is applied to Eq.t) = qBµ r2 −Ei − 4π hk 4η t .(11. Line-source solution: limr→∞ r ∂ p ∂r qBµ . limr→∞ = pi . (11.e.8). ∀r. K3 = (qBµ )/(4π hk). i.7).8) ∂p 2 = K3 e−r /(4η t) .(11. (11. . ∂y where K3 is a constant that could be defined.8).2.(11. −∞ s ∞ e−s ds. ∀t. y (11. ∀t.t) = Ei(ξ ) ≡ −Ei(−ξ ) = es ds. Eq. e−s qBµ ∞ ds. by direct integration and we get. pi − p(r.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 179 Initial condition: i) ii) Boundary condition: r∂p ∂r r=rw p(r. ∂y ∂y η ∂y We may solve Eq.7). Second integration of Eq.(11. pi − p(r.11. gives the following expression. 2π hk qBµ = . r2 y= . > 0 2π hk = In solving the linear diffusitivity Eq. can then be presented as. 0) = pi .7) we may use the well known Boltzmann transformation.9) 4π hk r2 /(4η t) s The integral in Eq.10) where η = k/(φ µ c). ∂ ∂p y ∂p y = . s ξ ξ The general solution of the linear diffusitivity equation. ∀t > 0.9) is known as the Exponential integral and is originally defined as. 4t which gives the following partial derivatives: ∂ r = (r/2y)∂ y and ∂ t = −(t/y)∂ y.(11.

4092 1.90 1.9187 1.3738 0.0269 1.4115 0.0130 0.00 1.9591 2.55 0.50 2.180 Chapter 11.0139 0.28 0.12) that the behaviour of m(p) vs. This fact is commonly used in a gas well test analysis.00 4. ξ 0.0379 3.2953 2.10 [−Ei(−ξ )] 4.80 [−Ei(−ξ )] 0.4679 2. Ramey and Crawford (1966).01 0.16 0.11) they derived a simplified linear equation for a real gas flow: 1 ∂ ∂ m(p) 1 ∂ m(p) (r )= .07 0.3098 1.3 Gas Reservoir The general form of the basic (material balance) equation.14 0. ρ= Mp .40 0. In the case of more compressible fluids. (11.2227 1.3403 0.12 0.08 0.12) which is precisely the same as Eq. Attempting to obtain a linear type of the diffusivity equation for a highly compressible gas flow. µz (11.01 ≤ ξ ≤ 10.75 0.00 7.(11.35 0.60 0. is valid for both liquid and gas flow.03 0. time in oil well testing.7) where the term p is replaced by a pseudo pressure function m(p). Al-Hussainy.5241 1.6595 1.8229 ξ 0. some modifications are necessary in order to use the diffusivity equation.50 3.9057 ξ 0.02 0.1508 2. p m(p) = 2 pb p d p. time in gas well testing should have identical trends as pressure vs.11) where pb is an arbitrary (datum) pressure.6253 0.24 0.26 0.7). r ∂r ∂r η ∂t (11.00 [−Ei(−ξ )] 0.22 0.2: Table of the function Ei(ξ ) for 0.(11.3106 ξ 0.18 0.0001 0.0011 0.50 0.06 0.20 0.0762 1.5598 0. It follows from Eq. given by Eq.(11.00 10.5034 0.05 0.0489 0.0000 11.70 0. like gases.09 0.0038 0. Using the equation of state for a real gas.30 [−Ei(−ξ )] 1.4544 0.1000 0.0249 0.00 2.7942 0.04 0. zRT and a pseudo pressure function m(p) from Eq.3.7024 0.65 0.1454 1.00 5. Well Test Analysis Table 11. replaced the dependent variable p by the real gas pseudo pressure m(p) in the following manner.3547 2.6813 2.2194 0.2602 0.45 0. .9573 0.

(11. standard. i. 2 rw φ µ crw 1. ln 2 4tD 2 4tD . as presented in Eq.tD ) = − Ei − D 2 4tD . 2 φ µ crw 2π hk pD = [pi − p(r. SI.t)].e.11. 2 rw φ µ crw 141.4 The Solution of the Diffusitivity Equation in Dimensionless Form In connection with model recognition and practical application of the well test data it is quite often advantageous to plot the measured data in such a way as to initially compare it with a standard and well known function. 2 · 2! 3 · 3! where γ 0.14) +γ .units: rD = Field units: rD = π hk r 0. The interesting question now is related to the validity of the approximation: −Ei(−ξ ) ≈ − ln ξ − γ . −Ei(−ξ ) = ∞ e−s ξ s ds ≈ (− ln ξ − γ ) + ξ − ξ2 ξ3 + −···.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 181 11. such as.13) where the factor 1/2 in front of the exponential function is of purely historical reasons.t)]. It is therefore convenient to introduce dimensionless variables. 1 1 1 1 pwD (tD ) = − Ei − ≈− (11.5 Wellbore Pressure for Semi Logarithmic Data The wellbore pressure (rD = 1) is given by. rw kt tD = .t)].or field units.0036kt .842qBµ π hk r 0.000264kt . 1 −1 pwD (tD ) = − Ei . the above normalisation can be written.(11. related to the presentation of semi logarithmic data. we get.3. r rD = . tD = and pD = [pi − p(r. qBµ Depending on the units preferred. tD = and pD = [pi − p(r.5772157 is Euler’s constant.10).2qBµ Using dimensionless variables for the solution of the linear diffusivity equation.3. 11. 2 4tD From mathematical tables we have the following approximation. 1 r2 pD (rD .

1 pwD (tD ) ≈ − (ln 1 − ln 4 − lntD + γ ).14).14). In cases where the pressure drop observed in one well is induced by an other well a certain lateral distance apart from the observation well.14) is valid. 2 rD (11. is thought to be insignificant.14). then we would expect the Error always to be less then 0. we may write. In these cases the approximation may usually not hold. is not more than 0. 2 where the next term in the series expansion of Eq. In order to check the accuracy of this approximation we may look at the relative importance of the next term not included in the approximation Eq.e. or 4. Well Test Analysis We may write the dimensionless wellbore pressure as. In order to illustrate the implication of the restrictiontD ≥ 25. Eq.80907).16) Example: Semi logarithmic analysis of pressure drawdown data The wellbore pressure is given by the approximation (in dimensionless form).182 Chapter 11. 1 tD ln 2 + 0. Generally we may therefore use the following approximation. we can consider the constraint on time (in hours). lntD + 0. we have to consider the restriction imposed above very carefully. we find that the real time that passes before the approximation. 2 1 ≈ (lntD + 0. ln 2 2π hk 2 φ µ crw Rewriting this equation using log term instead of ln and standard units. pwD (rD .(11.80907 . We therefore conclude that the error done in applying the approximation in Eq.0012 hrs.25 %. i. is insignificant for all practical purposes. is 1/(4tD ).80907) 2 Using the definition of dimensionless variables. (11. Error = 1/(4tD ) .80907 . tD ≥ 25.0 cP Using the definition of the dimensionless time in field units from above.80907 (11. for a "typical" oil reservoir with the following parameters (in field units). pi − pw (t) = qBµ 1 kt + 0.3 seconds. given above. .15) If we assume the dimensionless time.(11.tD ) = 2 with the restriction of tD /rD ≥ 25. k = 100 mD c = 5 ·10−6 psi−1 φ = 25 % rw = 1 ft µ = 1. 1 pwD (tD ) = (lntD + 0.(11.

. hk The reservoir permeability. oil volume factor and oil rate are known. 2 φ µ crw 162.5: Pressure drawdown data. and from this comparison we get the following equality (using SI . we may use one of the two equations above in order to extract vital information about the reservoir. some early data originates from the wellbore storage period and some late data originates from the period when boundary effects starts to mask the pressure data.11. In the figure. oil viscosity. is defined by the equation. pi − pw (t) = 2. 2 φ µ crw When the well test data is presented in a semi logarithmic plot as shown in Figure 11. hrs Figure 11. This line is compared with the model above.0923 . m = 2. kPa Wellbore storage effect Slope m Outer boundary effect 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 t. .5.6qBµ hk logt + log k − 3.3 Semi Logarithmic Period 183 pi − pw (t) = and in field units. These data does not comply with the straight line and should therefore be disregarded when the semi logarithmic data is matched.5. p. k could be estimated when information about reservoir height.1208 qBµ . The straight line through the semi logarithmic data points in Figure 11.2275 . where m is the slope of the straight line. p(t) ∼ −m logt.1208qBµ hk logt + log k − 2.units).

the pressure profile in the reservoir is maintained unchanged.4 Semi Steady State Period After a period of reservoir production from an infinite reservoir. 1 ∂ ∂p r r ∂r ∂r = K1 .e. This period is called the semi steady state period and a steadily decreasing reservoir pressure is observed (decreased average pressure in a confined reservoir volume).184 Chapter 11. we expect the diffusitivity equation to be time independent. are going to play an increasingly important role. the reservoir pressure is steadily decreasing while the pressure profile is conserved. Integration of the time independent diffusivity equation gives. prudent interpretation of steady state data is highly recommendable. and as such. such as lateral extension.e. i.6: Steady state pressure profiles. but in addition we have assumed that the pressure profile does not significantly vary after the reservoir boundary limit is reached. At constant well production. ∂ p(r)/∂ t = constant. i. Simultaneously. the drawdown pressure profile is assumed to be constant. . In Figure 11. there comes a period of production where the influence from neighbouring wells or reservoir boundaries. faults or sands thinning out.6. The boundary conditions in the semi steady state are partly defined as for the case of the logarithmic period.17) where K2 is also a constant. in the reservoir. re Since the pressure profile is assumed to be constant. ∂r 2 (11. p pe rw Figure 11. r ∂p 1 = K1 r2 + K2 . At this limit. a constant K1 balances the diffusitivity equation. several pressure profiles are plotted. Well Test Analysis 11. It should be emphasised that this is an idealised model of how we think the reservoir responds to boundaries effects.

we (3/2−γ ) = 31. The average pressure is a weighted function of the pressure in the whole reservoir and could be defined as. The average pressure for a general reservoir is then written.1 Average Reservoir Pressure The average reservoir pressure is not an observable quantity. In real cases. Instead a slight modified version given by Eq. A = π (re − rw ). p = p(rw ) + qBµ 2π hk 1 4A ln γ 2 2 e CA rw . 2 2 In the case of a cylindrical reservoir. re rw /re → 0.17) from the well (r = rw ).19) Eq. r=re Using the boundary conditions to define the constantsK1 and K2 .(11.6206 (Dietz. the reservoir shape is seldom cylindrical and more so. i.11. 2π hk rw 4 (11.(11. i. we find the average reservoir pressure. 2π hk Boundary condition at infinite reservoir radius: r ∂p ∂r = 0. p= re rw pdV re rw dV .19) directly. the well position is most frequently off centred. gives. with a centred well location.18) and integrating. however.(11.18) rw and so where re is the radial distance to the boundary of the confined reservoir.20) is used.4. 11. p(r) = p(rw ) + qBµ 1 r2 r ln − 2 2π hk rw 2 re .4 Semi Steady State Period 185 Boundary condition in the well: r ∂p ∂r = r=rw qBµ .e. find the shape-factor CA 4π e . In these real cases we may not use Eq.e.(11.20) where γ is Euler’s constant. (11.19) gives the average pressure in a cylindrical reservoir with an outer radius equal to re and where the well is located in the centre.(11.1965). (11. and integrating Eq. where A is the top area of the reservoir and CA is a parameter characterising the shape and relative position of the well. p = p(rw ) + qBµ re 3 ln − . Substituting for p given by Eq.

22) (11. 2π kh rs ps − pw ≈ Note the approximation made due to the fact that re rw and re rs .23) . some of the drilling fluid penetrates the formation and particles suspended in the mud can partially penetrate the pore spaces. pe − pw = pe − ps + ps − pw = qBµ k rs re . 2π kh rw (11.186 Chapter 11.2 Well Skin Factor When a well is drilled it is always necessary to have a positive differential pressure acting from the wellbore to the formation to prevent inflow of the reservoir fluids (blow-out). S=( Hence.21) where the last term is called the mechanical skin factor S. and within the rest of the reservoir (rs < r < re ) is k. qBµ rs ln . reducing permeability. The total pressure drop from the wellbore through the reservoir is given by. 11. pwf ps pe rw rs re Figure 11. as shown in Fig.4. as stated for formation beds in series.7: Skin effect caused by formation damage. pe − pw = k rs − 1) ln . Consequently. ks rw qBµ re (ln + S). Assuming modification of the permeability in the damaged zone (rw < r < rs ) is ks . Well Test Analysis 11. ln + ( − 1) ln 2π kh rw ks rw (11.7. For the steady state inflow we can write the following equations for a cylindrical reservoir with a centred well. 2π ks h rw qBµ re pe − ps ≈ ln . and creating a so-calleddamaged zone next to the wellbore.

(11. pi to the average pressure p and we get the following simple relation between reservoir pressure and time. S < 0 when ks > k.e. (11.4. pi − p(rw ) = qBµ 2π hk qB 1 4A +S + t ln γ 2 2 e CA rw cV (11. is the important parameter.26) have introduced the skin S as an extra term in the equation. dt cV where qB is the oil flow in the reservoir and V = φ Ah is the reservoir pore volume. 11. If the permeability in the skin zone is reduced.(11. due to drilling or well treatments. then the well will experience an increased pressure drop in this region while the skin is positive.c. we pi − p(t) = get. Production is maintained through volume expansion where the combined compressibility of oil and reservoir rock . has a permeability higher than expected. Skin is associated with the condition of reservoir permeability in the closed volume next to the well. the skin may be associated with a characteristic pressure drop ∆pskin caused by the reduction in permeability in the skin zone. tDA = kt .23). which can be rewritten as. accounting for a partly damaged zone around the well.(11. The total compressibility of oil and reservoir rock is defined by. on the other hand. we may integrate from initial pressure. while when S is negative the pressure drop is less than expected. At constant reservoir flow rate.25). following the same definitions as for the case of semi steady state. If the well.3 Wellbore Pressure at Semi Steady State The reservoir pressure development in a closed reservoir could be compared to the production from a pressurised closed tank of oil. . As seen from Eq. dp qB =− . ∆pskin = • Skin factor is positive.26) Note that we in Eq. qBµ S. with the exception of the dimensionless timetDA .27) In tDA dimensionless time is referenced to the reservoir drainage areaA. Dimensionless variables are introduced. c = −dV /(V d p). an increased pressure drop towards the well is observed.25) cV Combining Eq.11.(11. qB t. i. then the skin is negative.4 Semi Steady State Period 187 where the skin is a number characterising the cylindrical volume next to the wellbore.24) 2π kh From this equation it is evident that when the skin S is positive. S > 0 when ks < k and • Skin factor is negative. (11.19) which describes the semi steady state analysis. with Eq. φ Acµ (11. which is defined.

Summing up what we already know.28) 11. 1 4A pwD = 2π tDA + ln γ +S . ln 2 2π hk 2 φ µ crw qB t.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions To this time we have developed the pressure function for the three periods of reservoir production. rw φ Acµ 1.(11. well test data. Well storage period: pW S = wD Semi logarithmic period: pSL = wD Semi steady state period: 1 4A pSS = 2π tDA + ln γ +S . as if they were independent sequences reservoir production. pD = (pi − p(r. Eq. cws Using the following set of dimensionless variables. where cD = .0036kt hk .000264kt hk . Well Test Analysis Hence. wD 2 2 e CA rw 1 4A ln 2 γ tDA + 2S . 2 rw e A cst tDA . Well storage period: pi − pw = Semi logarithmic period: pi − pw = Semi steady state period: pi − pw = qBµ 2π hk 1 2π k 4A t + ln γ +S . rw φ Acµ 141. 2 φ Acµ 2 e CA rw qBµ 1 kt + 0. referring to the wellbore storage period.t).t)).842qBµ we get the three wellbore pressure equations in dimensionless form. we may write the following three pressure equations.units: rD = Field units: rD = r 0. cD 2π hφ c . pD = (pi − p(r. the semi logarithmic period and the semi steady state period. In reality.26) can be rewritten using dimensionless variables and we get. tDA = .80907 + 2S . SI. originating from the different periods are not easily distinguishable and quite a lot of effort is spent identifying which data belongs to which period of production. 2 2 e CA rw (11.188 Chapter 11.2qBµ r 0. tDA = .

10 where we have plotted the semi logarithmic data as shown in Fig. such identification could be rather difficult to perform and therefore of less practical importance.1 Transition Time Between Semi Logarithmic Period and Semi Steady State Period The difficulties in recognising the semi logarithmic data is primarily related to identification of the time when the wellbore pressure. we can get important reservoir information. as seen in the Fig. 11. Since the wellbore pressure development in the two periods are principally different. we can identify the semi logarithmic data.9. data plotted as a straight line.5. to facilitate quantitative data analysis.e. i. This analysis is mainly performed by plotting the interesting data linearly. which can be transferred to real time by using the definition of dimenisonless time. but equally important. The purpose of plotting data is partly to be able to identify the different production periods. This technique is shown in Fig. such that wD wD d(pSS (tDA ) − pSL (tDA )) wD wD = 0. by the minimum pressure difference min{pSS − pSL }. In a linear-linear plot as shown in Fig. 11. 11.11.8: Transition between semi logarithmic period and semi steady state period. The semi logarithmic data is plotted as a straight line and from the slope of this line.11.2 Recognition of Semi Logarithmic Data Appropriate plotting of the well test data is an important tool in the process of differentiating the different reservoir production periods.5 Wellbore Pressure Solutions 189 11. .tDA = 1/(4π ).5. 11. changes from being semi logarithmic to being semi steady state dominated. pwD SS pwD SL pwD semi semi logaritmic state steady state tDA Figure 11.8. dtDA Carrying out the derivation we find the transition time. we may define the transient time when one period is followed by the other.9. For real data. in a linear-log plot. following a non linear time development.

Claculate the dimensionless time tD for the following cases.12 µ = 0.9: Linear-linear plot of well test data.. 11. a) with data: φ = 0. a) with data: φ = 0.3 cp t = 10 s c = 15 · 10−5 atm−1 k = 0.6 Exercises 1.15 r = 10cm µ = 0.7 cp c = 10 · 10−5 atm−1 h = 2400cm r = 10cm t = 1s k = 0.01D 2.05 D q = 10000cm3 /s . Find the exponential intergrals and pressure drops for the following cases.190 Chapter 11.1 D b) with data: φ . µ and c as above and r = 10 cm t = 1000s k = 0. tDA pwD WS pwD SL pwD SS pwD 1/4π log(tDA) Figure 11.10: Linear-log plot of well test data. Well Test Analysis pwD WS pwD SL pwD SS pwD 1/4π Figure 11.

In a reservoir at initial pressure. will the approximation Ei(−x) = − ln(xeγ ) be valid ? (Eulers constant γ =0. c and h as above and r = 30000cm t = 24h 3. i=1 dxi 3 5. c= 1 dρ . A pressure drop of 4439 psi is observed in well W1 after 1600 hours of production at a constant flow rate of 190 STB/D from well W2 and after 1550 hours of production of 80 STB/D from W3. a well with a flow rate of 400 STB/D is shut-in. b) What is the pressure draw-down in the well after 3 hours of production? c) For how long must the well produce.20 rw = 0.80 Sw = 0. The reservoir is characterised by the following parameters: k= 50 mD h= 30 ft rw = 0.5772.15 cp c f = 4. W2 and W3) where W1 is an observation well.15 RB/STB So = 0. ρ dp to derive the diffusivity equation for one phase liquid flow.0 ·10−6 psi−1 Use the total compressibility ct = So co + Sw cw + c f in the calculations. until a pressure drop of 1 psi is observed in a neighbouring well 2000 f t away? 4. Use the diffusivity equation.0 ·10−6 psi−1 cw = 3. For a reservoir at initial pressure with 3 wells (W1.6 Exercises 191 b) with data: φ .5 ft φ = 0.3 µ = 3. i=1 ∑ dxi 3 d ρ dp dxi = φ µ dρ .) Show that: d2 p φ µ c d p ∑ 2 = k dt .0 ·10−6 psi−1 Bo = 1. after the shut-in.5 mD µo = 1. k dt and the expression for the compressibility at constant temperature.276 ft h=30 ft co = 8.25 RB/STB a) At what time. Estimate the average reservoir porosity between the wells.11. . (Assume the liquid compressibility to be small and constant for the pressures in mind. at constant flow rate. µ .0 cp c= 10 ·10−6 psi−1 Bo = 1. Well W2 is located 2000 f t north of W1 and W3 is 1900 f t west of W1. the following data is given: Pi = 4483 psia ko = 7.

b) 0. a) 4. b) 51. 3.895.4 s. c) 227 hr.62.192 Chapter 11. b) 14815.3 bar.175 . 5. a) 15. a) 1481. 0. Well Test Analysis Answers to questions: 1. 2.

Pressure tests are classified in accordance with their operation.1. causing pressure falloff. • Pressure drawdown test (Fig. Unfortunately. Build-up tests are basically the opposite of drawdown tests.1 Pressure Tests Well testing has become a widely used tool for reservoir characterisation and parameter identification. A drawdown test simply involves flow rate measurements and pressure decline in a flowing well.Chapter 12 Methods of Well Testing 12. the well is first shut-in until wellbore pressures stabilise. fluid segregation and gas liberation. • Multiple rate (Fig. causing pressure build-up. as in drawdown testing. Drawdown and build-up tests are the two most common types of well tests and the selection of which one to use depends on the practical field requirements. • Falloff test (Fig.1. In a conventional drawdown test. each lasting until the flowing pressure stabilises.1. • Pressure build-up test (Fig. Instead of measuring pressures in a flowing well.lower right): Well tested at different flow rates.upper right): Production of constant flow rate well is shut-in. and then opened and produced at a steady rate while the pressure decrease within the well bore is monitored.upper left): The well is opened to flow at a constant rate causing pressure drawdown. Such flow rates do not reflect the true downhole conditions as they are considerably affected by wellbore storage. 12. 12. This poses a problem as well testing theory requires downhole flow rates.1.lower left): Injecting at constant rate and injection well shut-in. Analysis of pressure trends enables us to evaluate several important reservoir parameters and to appraise the drainage zone. 12. 12. This is followed by a shut-in period. which again lasts until the pressure stabilises. the well is shut-in and the increase or build-up in 193 . flow rates are still measured at the surface in most well tests. The development of well testing has accelerated from rudimentary productivity tests into a powerful technique which is strengthening the understanding of complex reservoir characteristics.

The observed pressure build-up/drawdown response. . presented in the previous chapter. 12. multiple rate tests are not as simple as it might appear. within a given time. a Drill-Stem Test (DST) is performed by carrying out a series of build-up and drawdown tests in relatively quick succession.194 Chapter 12. However. incorporates all the pressure transient effects caused by every previous step-change in production rate. Methods of Well Testing q q 0 t 0 t p p 0 q t 0 q t 0 t 0 t p p 0 t 0 t Figure 12.2 Pressure Drawdown Test Drawdown test analysis are done by direct application of the wellbore pressure solutions. pressure is monitored. while it relies on additional reservoir information as well as complex interpretation of pressure data using analysis based on theoretical models. In practice. as with drawdown tests. Therefore pressure readings taken from the beginning of the test has to be ignored and all analysis is done on the later part of the pressure response. even though it has been realised that this discarded early time data contains a considerable amount of information. is usually complex. Nevertheless. build-up tests are still affected by wellbore storage effects during the initial stages or "early time"-part of the test. it is not so easy to carry out a "pure" drawdown or build-up test as the production schedule prior to the test.1: Methods of well testing. For example.

2. see Fig.1208 qBµ S k − 2. log(t)). The early portion of the data is unfortunately. we may formulate the semi logarithmic pressure solutions in SI-units and Field-units as: SI-units: pw = pi − 2.151 (12. 2 kh φ µ crw 1.6 qBµ S k − 3. The latter portion of the pressure transient is affected by the interference from other wells or by boundary effects such as those that occur when the pressure response reaches the edge of the reservoir. This fact provides us with an easy and seemingly precise graphical procedure for interpretation of the pressure data. kPa Wellbore storage effect Slope m Outer boundary effect 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 t. 12.2275 + (logt + log ). 12.1) Field-units: pw = pi − 162.0923 + (logt + log ).2 Pressure Drawdown Test 195 A plot of pressure versus the log of time (p.2. The slope and intercept of the portion of the curve forming a straight line is used for permeability and skin factor calculations.12.2: Semi-logarithmic plot of pressure drawdown test data. An alternative straight line could be the signature of a fault located near the well. 2 kh φ µ crw 1. .151 (12. 12. hrs Figure 12. Sometimes more than one "apparent" straight line appears and analysis finds it difficult to decide which one to use. distorted by wellbore storage and skin effects as indicated in Fig. will show the radial flow solution as a straight line.1 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Logarithmic Conditions From the previous chapter in section "Wellbore pressure solutions". Well tests have therefore to be made long enough to overcome both effects and to produce a straight line in a semi logaritmic plot.2) p.2. But even this approach presents drawbacks.

to define the reservoir permeability. Methods of Well Testing In Fig.2 Pressure Drawdown Test Under Semi Steady State Conditions When the pressure transient is affected by the interference from boundary effects or other wells.) SI-units: S = 1. k. productivity and skin are estimated.1208qB µ mh The skin factor S is conventionally identified from the same plot. Sometimes such disturbances overlap with other kinds of "early time" effects like large scale reservoir inhomogeneity.1) or (12. where the well is producing from its own drained area. The semi steady state equation is written. (12. is a data point on the straight line which needs not necessarily correspond to an observed pressure.2.3) .151 Field-units: S = 1. Semi steady state tests are therefore normally not preferred when typical reservoir parameters like permeability.2).0923 . SI-units: Field-units: 2 ]. the pressure curve deviates downwards from the straight line behaviour. where m is the slope of the straight line. see Fig. If we define the slope as a positive number. The linear pressure at time t = 1 hr is used in Eqs.1) or (12.2 we recognise the semi logarithmic data. 12. These effects can completely mask the all-important pressure response such that proper pressure analysis becomes impossible. Under semi steady state test conditions we are investigating a sealed-off reservoir. log(t1 ) − log(t2 ) we may use Eqs. neighbouring sealing faults or other pressure disturbing zones.2) and the skin is directly calculated. (12.6qB µ [mD]. (Note that pw (1hr) in the equations below.2. 12.2275 . The analysis of semi steady state data is more rigorous than might possible be interpreted by the wellbore pressure equation.151 pi − pw (1hr) k + 3. − log 2 m φ µ crw pi − pw (1hr) k + 2.196 Chapter 12. + ln γ 2 φ cµ A 2 e CA rw (12. m= (pi − pw (t1 )) − (pi − pw (t2 )) > 0. k= [µ m mh 2. pw (t) = pi − qBµ 2π kh 2π kt 1 4A +S . At these late times in the development of the well test procedure we may likely observe complicated pressure data which is masked by several effects. as the data points being plotted on a straight line. The known m-value yields a permeability value. k = 162. − log 2 m φ µ crw 12.

since the influence from dynamical effects near the well is of lesser importance. the wellbore pressure is influenced by the continuos production at positive rate +q causing the pressure to decrease. The no-flow condition is obtained when the positive and negative well rate are summed. 12.151 (12. the "Wellbore pressure solutions" may not be used directly. hrs Figure 12.4. The asymptotic pressure value p0 = pw (t = 0). In Field Units. in the figure. the no-flow condition can be described by adding the pressure solutions for the positive flow rate and the pressure solution for the negative flow rate. we will observe a combined pressure development caused . For times greater than t. the bottomhole pressure drawdown is. at constant wellbore rate. i. enables us to define the Dietz shape factor CA . γ r2 e w 1. As a theoretical assumption we may consider the wellbore rate to be both positive. 12.3: Semi steady state analysis of pressure drawdown data.4) pwf .3.3) can re-written. the build-up pressure data is considered to be more reliable than the pressure drawdown data. (12. Semi steady state data is plotted as a straight line in a line-line plot.4. +q and negative. we could directly apply the "Wellbore pressure solutions" from the previous chapter. 12. psi po 0 t. 12. Eq. as seen in Fig.3 Pressure Build-Up Test 197 where the pressure is a linear function of time. The technique of superposition is depicted in Fig. can be described by a superposition technique.e. The influence by the negative rate −q is to increase the wellbore pressure. since pressure is decreasing with time. the same equations can be applied since the process. the no-flow conditions. 12. −q. Normally. p0 = pi − 162. At timet when the well is shut-in. in principle. using the "Wellbore pressure solutions" (drawdown pressure analysis). when the well is closed.6qBµ kh log S 4A − logCA + . as shown in Fig. similar too the process of pressure build-up. Fortunately. as indicated in Fig.3 Pressure Build-Up Test In analysing drawdown data. If a well is shut-in at a certain time t. Consequently. In the case of pressure build-up.5.12. (+q) + (−q) = 0.

198

Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing

q +q

q=0

0

t

∆t

time

-q

Figure 12.4: Pressure build-up test. Representation of a non-flowing well performance by a superposition technique.

by a decreasing pressure due to the positive well rate (−q) and a increasing pressure due to the negative well rate (−q).

pi
pw(∆t)

A B" ∆t B ∆t A"

pw(t+∆t)

0

t 0

t+∆t ∆t

t ∆t

Figure 12.5: Pressure formation by superposition in build-up tests. Using wellbore pressure, we define, pw (∆t): pw (t + ∆t): pi − pw (∆t): Pressure in the well after shut-in. Pressure in the well given by continuos production at positive well rate. Pressure in the well given by start-up of continuos production at negative well rate (increasing pressure contribution).

12.4 Pressure Test Analysis

199

The superposition principle gives, pw (∆t) = pw (t + ∆t) + pi − pw (∆t), where pw on the left side of the equallity is the well shut-in pressure, while pw on the right side is the well flow pressure. Using dimensionless pressures, the well shut-in pressure is given, pi − pw (∆t) = qBµ [pwD (tD + ∆tD ) − pwD (∆tD )]. 2π hk

If skin is included and the wellbore pressure at shut-in is pw (∆tD = 0) = pws , we have pi − pws = qBµ [pwD (tD ) + S]. 2π hk

From the above equations, we may derive the following expressions for the wellbore pressure. qBµ [pwD (tD + ∆tD ) − pwD (∆tD )], 2π hk qBµ pw (∆t) = pws + [pwD (tD ) − pwD (tD + ∆tD ) + pwD (∆tD ) + S], 2π hk qBµ pw (∆t) = p − [pwD (tD + ∆tD ) − pwD (∆tD ) − 2π tDA ]. 2π hk

pw (∆t) = pi −

(12.5) (12.6) (12.7)

Pressure build-up data is analysed using the three equations above, where Eq. (12.6) is applied to estimate the reservoir permeability and skin, while Eq. (12.7) is used to determine the average pressure p. Eq. (12.7) is derived on the basis of average pressure development, where pi − p = qB k qBµ t. t= 2π tDA , tDA = ct V 2π hk φ Acµ

It is important to notice that the dimensionless pressures pD in Eqs. (12.5) to (12.7) could represent the equations describing both semi logarithmic period as well as semi steady state period, i.e. depending on the analysis to be performed, we may chose which set of equations we think will fit the data best.

12.4 Pressure Test Analysis
Based on Eqs. (12.5) to (12.7), we may perform different analysis, where certain assumptions are made about the nature of pressure test data. In the following, two examples are give on how pressure build-up data might be analysed.

12.4.1 Miller - Dyes - Hutchinson (MDH) Analysis
In this analysis [43] we will assume that the semi logarithmic period is long enough to recognise a straight line behaviour in a semi logarithmic plot, i.e. we need to be able to differentiate between the three different periods, described in the previous chapter.

200

Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing

pi

p(t+∆t)~ p(t) t t+∆t

Figure 12.6: Pressure approximation in MDH-analysis. Shortly after the well is shut-in, at time t, we start to monitor the wellbore pressure pw (∆t). For some period of time we may assume t ∆t and during this period the dimensional pressure approximation pwD (tD + ∆tD ) pwD (tD ) is valid, as depicted in Fig. 12.6. Combining Eq. (12.6) and the above assumption, gives the wellbore pressure qBµ (12.8) [pwD (∆tD ) + S]. 2π hk If the pressure development is assumed to have reached the semi logarithmic state, after shut-in of the well, we may write: pwD (∆t) = pSL (∆tD ), with reference to the definitions of wD semi logarithmic solutions in the previous chapter. Using the definitions of dimensionless time and pressure for semi logarithmic data, we get the following pressure expression, pw (∆t) = pws + pw (∆t) = pws + m log ∆t + log k S − 2.0923 + , 2 φ µ crw 1.151

where m is the slope of the linearized semi logarithmic data (see Fig. 12.7) and the number 2.0923 is a conversion factor to SI-units. SI-units or Field units depends on preference and the following definitions. SI-units: m= Field units: m =
2.1208qB µ hk 162.6qB µ hk

and −2.0923 and −3.2275

From Eq. (12.8), we find the skin factor by direct substitution, see also Fig. 12.7, S = 1.151 pw (∆t = 1hr) − pws k + 2.0923 . − log 2 m φ µ crw

The average reservoir pressure p, could be evaluated on the basis of Eq. (12.7), using the same approximation as above, namely; pwD (tD + ∆tD ) pwD (tD ). pw (∆t) = p − m [pwD (tD ) − pwD (∆tD ) − 2π tDA ]. 1.151

12.4 Pressure Test Analysis

201

pw
p

pw (∆t=1hr)

∆t =

φµcA 0.0036 k CA

0.1

1

10

100

∆t

Figure 12.7: MDH analysis of semi logarithmic pressure data. We shall now assume that the reservoir had reached its semi steady state period before or shortly after the well was shut-in. The interpretation of the different dimensionless pressures are accordingly, pwD (tD ) = pSS (tD ) wD and pwD (∆tD ) = pSL (∆tD ), wD

and the wellbore pressure is the written, pw (∆t) = p − m [pSS (tD ) − pSL (∆tD ) − 2π tDA ], wD 1.151 wD m 1 1 4∆tD 4A = p− − ln γ − 2π tDA , 2π tDA + ln γ 2 1.151 2 e CA rw 2 e m 1 A = p− . ln 2 1.151 2 CA rw ∆tD

Using SI-units we get, pw (∆t) = p −

φ µ cA m 1 ln . 1.151 2 0.0036kCA ∆t

If the reservoir has reached its semi steady state period before (or shortly after) the well was shut-in, the average reservoir pressure p is found by following the semi logarithmic line to the time ∆t = φ µ cA/(0.0036kCA ), as shown in Fig. 12.7, where the average pressure is, p = pw ∆t =

φ µ cA 0.0036kCA

.

12.4.2 Matthews - Brons - Hazebroek (MBH) Analysis (Horner plot)
Following the same approach as in the above section, we have assumed the pressure difference pwD (tD + ∆tD ) − pwD (tD ) to be small but finite, i.e.,

2 t φ µ crw 1. (12.11). The pressure difference is depicted in Fig.8.151 pw (∆t) = pws + m − log Permeability and skin are estimated by plotting the build-up pressures pw (∆t) against the time function ∆t/(t + ∆t) on a semi logarithmic plot. Methods of Well Testing 1 t + ∆t ln . while for dimension less pressures pwD (tD + ∆tD ) ≥ pwD (tD ).151 2 t (12.analysis [36]. is considered to be in the semi logarithmic period.6). (12. (12. where t + 1 t is assumed.0923 . t + ∆t S k − 2. we get pw (∆t) = pws + m 1 t + ∆t − ln + pwD (∆tD ) + S .11) 2 t + ∆t φ µ crw 1.10) where pwD (∆tD ) = pSL (∆tD ). which points out that the time of shut-in tD . this means that the well could be closed somewhat earlier in the MBH . (12. (12.. since pwD ∝ (pi − pw ).151 pw (∆t = 1hr) − pws k + 2. 12. 12. as shown in Fig. in MBH . pwD (tD + ∆tD ) − pwD (tD ) = pi p(t) p(t+∆t) t t+∆t Figure 12. as indicated by Eq.0923 + + logt + log . .202 Chapter 12.9) 2 t In practical terms.9.0923 + + log∆t + log .151 ∆t S k = pws + m log − 2. S = 1. Combining the approximation given by Eq. − log 2 m φ µ crw The pressure pw (∆t = 1) is read directly from the plot. may come earlier and further up on the pressure decline curve. i. compared to MDH . 1.analysis. The skin is calculated at the time ∆t = 1.8 we have pw (t) ≥ pw (t + ∆t). wD Using SI-units this gives. The slope of the linear data is m and hence k or kh are found by substitution.analysis.9) and the wellbore pressure solution Eq. In Fig.e. 12.8: Wellbore pressure difference at the shut-in time.

151 m = p− 1. (12. 1 + pwD (tD ) − (ln ∆tD + 0.151 2 ∆t 2 e 2 e CA rw t + ∆t A 1 = p − m log .151 m = p− 1.13) is a well defined time (time of shut-in).4 Pressure Test Analysis 203 pw p pi pw (∆t=1) 1 ∆t = t+∆t CA tDA 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 1 ∆t t+∆t Figure 12.12. for defining the average reservoir pressure p.80907) − 2π tDA . wD .151 1 t + ∆t ln 2 t 1 t + ∆t ln 2 t 1 t + ∆t ln 2 ∆t 1 t + ∆t ln 2 ∆t + −pwD (∆tD ) − 2π tDA .9) may be applied in a similar way as done above.e. we then get by substitution into Eq. (12. i. we may estimate the average reservoir pressure as the pressure on the straight line (see Fig. Substituting Eq.7). i. ln − ln γ + 2π tDA + ln γ 2 1. 2 1 + pwD (tD ) − (lntD + 0.9) in Eq. pwD (tD ) = pSS (tD ).13) 2 ∆t CA rw tD Since tD in Eq. ∆t 1 A = .12). (12. wD (12. (12. = 2t t + ∆t CA rw D CAtDA If we now assume that the well is in its semi logarithmic state at the time of shut-in. The pressure approximation Eq. (12.80907) − 2π tDA .9) at the time. pwD (tD ) = pSL (tD ).12) pw (∆t) = p − If we then assume that the well is in its semi steady state at the time of shut-in.e.9: Horner plot. (12. we get m 1. the we get wD pw (∆t) = p − m 1 1 t + ∆t 1 4tD 4A − 2π tDA . 2 + pwD (tD ) − pSL (tD ) − 2π tDA .151 m = p− 1. 12. Wellbore pressure data plotted for MBH analysis.

204

Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing

pw (∆t) = p

m 1 t + ∆t ln − 2π tDA 1.151 2 ∆t

At the time ∆t/(t + ∆t) = 1, we get ∆t =1 t + ∆t m [2π tDA ], 1.151 kt qBµ = p , 2π 2π hk φ Acµ qBt = p+ , where V = φ Ah Vc

pw

= p+

(12.14)

Under semi steady state conditions we have seen that, pi − p = and consequently we may write, pw ∆t = 1 = p + (pi − p) = pi . t + ∆t qBt , Vc

The initial reservoir pressure is defined in Fig. 12.9 on the straight line at time∆t/(t +∆t) = 1.

12.5 Exercises

205

12.5 Exercises
1. A well is tested by exploiting it at a constant rate of 1500 STB/d for a period of 100 hours. It is suspected, from seismic and geological evidence, that the well is draining an isolated reservoir block which has approximately a 2:1 rectangular geometrical shape and the extended drawdown test is intended to confirm this. The reservoir data and the flowing bottom hole pressures recorded during the test are detailed below. h = 20 f t rw = 0.33 f t φ = 0.18 Time (hours) 0 1 2 3 4 5 pw (psi) 3500 (pi ) 2917 2900 2888 2879 2869 c = 15 · 10−6 psi−1 µo = 1 cp Bo = 1.20 RB/ST B Time (hours) 7.5 10 15 20 30 40 pw (psi) 2848 2830 2794 2762 2703 2650 Time (hours) 50 60 70 80 90 100 pw (psi) 2597 2545 2495 2443 2392 2341

a) Calculate the effective permeability and skin factor of the well. b) Make an estimate of the area being drained by the well and the Dietz shape factor. (after L.P.Dake) 2. A discovery well is produced for a period of approximately 100 hours proir to closure for an initial pressure buildup survey. The production data and estimated reservoir and fluid properties are listed below. q = 123ST B/d N p = 500ST B h = 20 f t rw = 0.3 f t A = 300 acers Time (hours) 0.0 0.5 0.66 1.0 pw (psi) 4506 4675 4705 4733

φ = 0.2 µ = 1 cp Boi = 1.22 RB/ST B c = 20 · 10−6 psi−1 (co So + cw Sw + c f )

Time (hours) 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

pw (psi) 4750 4757 4761 4763

Time (hours) 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0

pw (psi) 4766 4770 4773 4775

a) What is the initial reservoir pressure? b) If the well is completed across the entire formation thickness, calculated the effective permeability.

206

Chapter 12. Methods of Well Testing

c) Calculate the value of the mechanical skin factor. d) What is the additional pressure drop in the wellbore due to the skin? e) If it is initially assumed that the well is draining from the centre of a circle, is it valid to equate pi to the asymptotic value log(t + ∆t)/(∆t) = 0? (after L.P.Dake) 3. A reservoir has 3 wells; W1, W2 and W3. Well W1 has been producing at a constant flow rate of 120 STB/D for 70 hours and is then converted to an observation well. Well W2, located 2500 f t straight north of well W1, is producing at a flow rate of 190 STB/D. Well W3, located 1900 f t west of W1, is producing at a rate of 80 STB/D. At the time when well W1 was shut-down, well W2 had produced for 100 hours and well W3 for 50 hours. Pressure data from well W1 is given in the table: ∆t [hours] Pws [psia] ∆t Pws 0 4213 200 4473 5 4380 250 4474 10 4413 300 4478 20 4433 400 4480 30 4443 500 4470 40 4450 800 4461 50 4455 1200 4448 100 4466 1500 4439 150 4472 – –

Additional reservoir data:

µo = 0.8 cp So = 0.80 h = 30 ft

Bo = 1.15 RB/STB Sw = 0.20 rw = 0.276 ft

c f = 4.0 ·10−6 psi−1 co = 8.0 ·10−6 psi−1 cw = 3.0 ·10−6 psi−1

Assume that the pressure development in well W1 can be expressed by the formula below: Pws = Pi − 162.6 where Q1 µ B t1 + ∆t log kh ∆t − 70.6 Q3 Q1 µ B Q2 Ei(x1 ) + Ei(x2 ) kh Q1 Q1

2 2 φ µ ct d13 φ µ ct d12 x2 = 0.00105kt2 0.00105kt3 and where d12 and d13 is the distance between W1 and W2 and W1 and W3, respectively. t1 is the time of production for well W1.

x1 =

a) Calculate the average reservoir compressibility ct . b) Estimate the initial pressure Pi, assuming the interference between well W2 and W3 is negligible for early pressure data. c) Calculate the average reservoir oil permeability ,ko . d) Calculate the mechanical skin, S. e) Use the pressure observation form ∆t = 1500 hours to find the average reservoir porosity between the wells.

12.5 Exercises

207

4. An oil well has been producing 1484 STB at a flow rate of 124 STB/D, when it was shut down. The pressure build-up data is given in the table below: ∆t [hours] Pws [psia] ∆t Pws Additional reservoir data: 4 2857 28 3308 8 3027 32 3315 12 3144 36 3323 16 3252 40 3331 20 3283 44 3338 24 3298 48 3342

µ = 3.2 cp h = 8.4 ft φ = 0.02

Bo = 1.21 RB/STB ct = 12 ·10−6 psia−1

a) Find the reservoir pressure at the outer boundary, Pe . b) Calculate the average reservoir oil permeability, ko . Answers to questions: 1. a) 240 mD, b) 4.5, 2. a) 4800 psi, b) 50 mD, c) 6.0, d) 128 psi, 3. a) 11· 10−6 psi−1 , b) 4485 psi, c) 7.6 mD, d) -3.5, e) 0.135, 4. a) 3475 psi, b)58 mD.

Methods of Well Testing .208 Chapter 12.

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