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Trust for America's Health Obesity Report 2010

Trust for America's Health Obesity Report 2010

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Published by estannard
The Trust for America's Health issued "F is for Fat," which reported that two-thirds of American adults and one-third of children and teens are overweight or obese.
The Trust for America's Health issued "F is for Fat," which reported that two-thirds of American adults and one-third of children and teens are overweight or obese.

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Published by: estannard on Jul 30, 2010
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The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are a joint initiative of
the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the
Department of Agriculture (USDA).406

The Guidelines, which
have been published every five years since 1980, provide peo-
ple with advice about how good dietary habits can promote
health and reduce risk for major chronic diseases. They serve
as the basis for Federal food and nutrition education programs.
The 2010 Guidelines are due out by the end of the year.

Key Recommendations

I Consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages
within and among the basic food groups while picking foods
that limit the intake of saturated and trans fats, cholesterol,
added sugars, salt and alcohol.
I Consume more dark green vegetables, orange vegetables,
legumes, fruits, whole grains and low-fat milk and milk
products.
I Eat fewer calories, refined grains, added sugars and total
fats. Eat foods lower in sodium.

Specific Recommendations for Adults

I An adult consuming 2,000 calories per day should have two
cups of fruit and two-and-a-half cups of vegetables.
I Consume three or more ounce-equivalents of whole-grain
products per day. At least half of grain intake should come
from whole grains.
I Consume three cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk or
milk products.
I Increase dietary intake of calcium, potassium, fiber, magne-
sium and vitamins A, C, and E.

Specific Recommendations for Children and Adolescents

I At least half of grains consumed should be whole grain.
Children ages 2–8 should consume two cups per day of fat-
free or low-fat milk or milk products and children age 9 and
older should drink three cups per day.
I Increase dietary intake of calcium, potassium, fiber, magne-
sium and vitamin E.

2005 DIETARY NUTRITION GUIDELINES FOR AMERICANS

The American diet has skewed towards large portion sizes that
are high in fat and calories. The USDA reports that Americans are
not meeting the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In order
to meet them, Americans would need to substantially lower their
intake of added fats, refined grains, sodium, and added sugars and
sweeteners, and increase their consumption of fruits, vegetables,
whole grains, and low-fat milk and milk products.407

Some unhealthy eating habits that have developed over the
past few decades include:

More Calories

I Americans’ average daily caloric intake is 300 calories higher
than it was in 1985 and 600 calories higher than in 1970, ac-
cording to 2008 USDA data.408
I Children ages 2–18 consume almost three snacks a day, and
snacking accounted for up to 27 percent of children’s daily
caloric intake.409

Bigger Portion Sizes

I From 1977 to 1998, portion sizes for selected popular food
items and overall energy intake increased for foods pur-
chased in restaurants or fast-food establishments and for
foods prepared at home. The increase ranged from 49 to
133 calories for all selected popular foods, such as salty
snacks, hamburgers, soft drinks and french fries.410

Fewer Fruits, Vegetables and Whole Grains

I Consumption of fruits and vegetables in the United States
increased by 19 percent from 1970 to 2005; however,
Americans still are not meeting the Dietary Guidelines’ rec-

ommendations of two cups of fruit and two-and-a-half cups
of vegetables per day.411
I Children are eating less fruit and consuming more bever-
ages, such as fruit drinks, sport drinks and fruit juice.412

More Sugar

I “Added sugar” consumption is nearly three times the USDA
recommended intake.413
I Average consumption of added sugars increased 14 percent
from 1970 to 2008.414
I Children who reduced sugar by the equivalent of one can of
soda per day had improved glucose and insulin levels. This
means that parents can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in
their children by eliminating one can of soda per day, re-
gardless of any other diet or exercise changes.415

More Dietary Fat

I Americans consumed an average of 640 calories worth of
added fats per person per day in 2008.416

A Large Increase in Soda and Fruit Juice Consumption

I Sugar-sweetened beverages make up nearly 11 percent of
children’s total caloric consumption.417

A Major Increase in Eating Out

I Since the 1960s, the money Americans spend on foods
eaten outside the home has nearly doubled.418
I In 2004, 63 percent of children ages 1–12 ate out at a
restaurant one to three times per week.419

AMERICANS’ UNHEALTHY EATING HABITS

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