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Richmond Review July31-10

Richmond Review July31-10

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Published by Richmond Review
the richmond
ESTABLISHED 1932

Suspect caught in racist graffiti
richmondreview.com

REVIEW
SATURDAY, JULY 31, 2010 20 PAGES

Sound advice for building downtown
Aircraft noise is audible concern for a growing city
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter If Doug Kennedy started a band, he wouldn’t have to look far for members. Many acoustical engineers on his team are musicians; Kennedy plays saxophone. A music interest is partly why he perked up when a man loved and loathed in Richmond offered him a
the richmond
ESTABLISHED 1932

Suspect caught in racist graffiti
richmondreview.com

REVIEW
SATURDAY, JULY 31, 2010 20 PAGES

Sound advice for building downtown
Aircraft noise is audible concern for a growing city
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter If Doug Kennedy started a band, he wouldn’t have to look far for members. Many acoustical engineers on his team are musicians; Kennedy plays saxophone. A music interest is partly why he perked up when a man loved and loathed in Richmond offered him a

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ESTABLISHED 1932 SATURDAY, JULY 31, 2010 20 PAGES

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richmondreview.com
REVIEW
the richmond
Suspect caught in racist graffiti
Aircraft noise
is audible
concern for a
growing city
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter
If Doug Kennedy started a
band, he wouldn’t have to
look far for members. Many
acoustical engineers on his
team are musicians; Kennedy
plays saxophone. A music in-
terest is partly why he perked
up when a man loved and
loathed in Richmond offered
him a job.
Kennedy is president of BKL
Consultants Ltd., which pro-
vides a range of acoustical
design services for a grow-
ing number of development
projects in Richmond City
Centre.
From ensuring Olympic
speed skaters had blissful
quiet at the oval start line to
limiting aircraft noise inside
Aberdeen Residence, to get-
ting River Rock Show Theatre
concert-ready to measuring
the impact of Canada Line
construction, BKL has offered
sound advice to those build-
ing Richmond’s downtown.
It was 1970, and Kennedy
was a fresh, young mechani-
cal engineering graduate
from University of B.C.—a
faculty with a tradition of
hanging vehicles off bridg-
es. In his final year, he got
to know Tom Siddon, a UBC
professor who started an
acoustical firm with one of
Kennedy’s classmates.
Shortly after graduation,
they invited Kennedy to join
them. He did.
The trio managed a suc-
cessful office in Richmond,
but Siddon’s opinions were
getting stronger and he made
a leap into politics, serving
on Richmond council before
moving on to a long career in
federal politics.
“(Siddon) was very good
technically. As he became
more and more involved in
politics, he became less and
less involved in the acousti-
cal business. Obviously, he
had his strong opinions,”
said Kennedy, 63.
The firm carried on without
Siddon and later merged with
another in 1988, when BKL
was born.
Today, Richmond offers the
firm no shortage of work.
Much of City Centre is clas-
sified as a high noise area—
requiring developers to miti-
gate aircraft noise—and it’s
here where the city is con-
centrating its growth.
BKL works with architects to
control outside noise, it aids
in the design of performance
spaces and measures the en-
vironmental impact of noise
from major transportation or
industrial projects.
In some cities, the firm is
contracted to measure the
impact of noise from roads
adjacent to proposed resi-
dential developments—but
in Richmond, aircraft noise
is No. 1.
Vancouver International Air-
port is Canada’s second busi-
est airport, welcoming 16.2
million people in 2009 and
averaging over 700 takeoffs
and landings each day. All
that adds up to a lot of noise
for those living under a flight
path.
Experts warn that noise
brings annoyance and po-
tential impacts to human
health. In high noise areas
in Richmond, new housing
must be in the form of high-
rise buildings equipped with
air conditioning, double- or
triple-glazed windows and
covenants for property own-
ers. And before construction
starts, an acoustic study
must be completed.
Once noise exposure is cal-
culated, the acoustical engi-
neer calculates the interior
noise based on an architect’s
preliminary plans for walls,
windows and room sizes.
See Page 4
Matthew Hoekstra photo
Using a sound level meter, Douglas Kennedy measures the sound of an aircraft flying overhead River Rock Casino Resort.
Sound advice for building downtown
Dry weather
prompts trail
closures
Tinder-dry conditions has
prompted the city to close
portions of Richmond Nature
Park and Shell Road Trail until
further notice.
City staff posted notices
Thursday to mark the closure
of the interior trails and east
bog forest of the nature park
and the Shell Road Trail.
The move is aimed at pre-
venting a possible fire in the
dry conditions Richmond and
the rest of the region is expe-
riencing.
“We ask people to respect
those very sensitive areas —
they are very dry. For safety
reasons we want to keep
people out of there,” said
Ted Townsend, the city’s se-
nior manager for corporate
communications.
The Richmond Nature Park’s
nature house remains open
daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
and all summer programs will
continue, including a blue-
berry sale on Sunday from
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The sale is a
fundraiser for the Richmond
Nature Park Society’s educa-
tional programs.
The city is also urging resi-
dents to avoid tossing ciga-
rettes and matches out of
car windows or off balconies,
and also operate barbecues
at a safe distance from flam-
mable materials.
No-smoking signs have
been posted in Terra Nova
Park, Garden City Park, Bath
Slough Trail, Horseshoe
Slough Trail, Paulik Gardens
Neighbourhood Parkand and
McDonald Beach, with more
postings possible.
Townsend noted there was
a small grass fire off the East-
West Connector earlier this
week when someone threw
a cigarette out of there car
window.
“It’s dry out there. A grass
fire can turn into a structure
fire.”
Experts warn that noise brings annoyance
and potential impacts to human health. In
high noise areas in Richmond, new housing
must be in the form of high-rise buildings
equipped with air conditioning, double- or
triple-glazed windows and covenants for
property owners.
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Police look for
others who
targeted Empire
Centre mall
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Police have arrested one of the
suspects accused of writing racist
graffiti at Empire Centre mall.
The arrest happened right by the
scene of the crime and came at
around the same time that police
held a press conference about the
case.
On Wednesday, at 3 p.m., Rich-
mond RCMP bike squad members
found the suspect during their pa-
trols of the Empire Centre parkade.
The 18-year-old male was arrested
as he tried to flee the parkade.
Police are still looking for another
suspect in the July 21st incident.
The vandalism was reported to the
Richmond RCMP on July 22; the se-
curity camera filmed the incident the
previous night. The graffiti consisted
of derogatory comments targeting
people of Chinese origin and police
themselves as well as swastikas and
offensive drawings.
“We want the community to realize
the significance of crime like this,”
Richmond RCMP Cpl. Sherrdean Tur-
ley said.
“It is not something these suspects
will get away with. Their actions
were hurtful and disrespectful.
“Graffiti would typically warrant
a charge of mischief, however the
racism in the writing could raise the
incident to a hate crime. If so, the
investigation will be looked at ac-
cordingly.”
Paul Kung, the centre’s security
manager, blames four men and a
women all who were captured on
surveillance cameras. Two of these
men returned the next day to smash
security cameras and leave more of-
fensive messages, he says.
“We won’t pay to remove the van-
dalism yet because they are drawing
new graffiti almost everyday,” says
Kung.
“Police are used to being the tar-
get of negative comments, but when
the comments are aimed at commu-
nity members based on their ethic
origin, that’s simply not going to be
tolerated,” Turley said.
The male was released from cus-
tody and will face his first court
appearance on Sept. 14. A charge
of mischief has been forwarded to
Crown.
Richmond RCMP say the graffiti
found recently is an isolated inci-
dent involving a single group of in-
dividuals that are known to police.
The investigation is continuing with
efforts focused on identifying the
other suspects involved.
Police wouldn’t release the se-
curity footage stills to the press,
but they helped RCMP identify the
suspect. The website www.chinese-
invancouver.ca has several stills of
the suspect and crime scene.
“What’s very unfortunate in this
case is that the photos that were re-
leased to the media without police
knowledge has hindered our ability
to locate independent witnesses
which would have been very ben-
eficial to this investigation,” Turley
says. “We strongly discourage the
public from disclosing any mate-
rial without consultation with the
police.”
“I am pleased the Richmond RCMP
has proceeded quickly to apprehend
one of the suspects in this disgrace-
ful act of vandalism,” says Richmond
Mayor Malcolm Brodie.
“The messages contained in the
vandalism are hurtful and dis-
respectful to all members of the
community. It goes against our
community values of respecting all
individuals equally.”
Anyone with information regarding
the incident is asked to contact Rich-
mond RCMP at 604-278-8477, or if
Near
drowning
sends two
women to
hospital
Two women are recov-
ering from a near-
drowning at an apart-
ment complex pool.
On Saturday, July 24,
at around 3 p.m., B.C.
Ambulance Service
rushed to an apart-
ment building on
Minoru Boulevard,
across from Richmond
Centre mall.
Bystanders found two
women unresponsive
in the building’s pool.
When Advanced Life
Support crews arrived,
paramedics found
two women in their
50s, who bystanders
had pulled out of the
water.
“Our crews worked on
them very aggressively
and treated them with
advanced life support
measures,” said Pascal
Rodier, superintendent
for B.C. Ambulance
Service.
He described the
women as “really,
really sick,” and not
requiring resuscita-
tion. They were taken
to hospital in serious
condition.
Rodier said he did not
know the circumstanc-
es behind the acci-
dent, and it’s unclear
if police are investigat-
ing. Richmond RCMP
were not available for
comment.
—by Matthew Hoekstra
Want to be
editor for
a day?
The Richmond Review
is publishing an spe-
cial Arts and Culture
edition this fall and
we’re looking for
someone to help put it
together.
If you have an inter-
est in the Arts or
Culture, let us know in
150 words or less why
you would be a good
choice to help us put
this edition together.
The winner will sit in
on story meetings and
help decide editorial
content for the special
edition on Sept. 18.
For your chance to
win, email your entry to
Editor for a Day at con-
tests@richmondreview.
com.
Entry deadline is
Friday, August 20.
The Richmond Yacht Club, a fixture on the Middle Arm for 35 years in its modern configuration,
is hoping to expand and move its clubhouse off the dyke.
City in the
midst of
redeveloping
Middle Arm
dyke into a
greenway
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter
More boats, more members
and a new clubhouse are all
part of the Richmond Yacht
Club’s vision for the future.
The club, founded in 1962,
unveiled its development
plan at city hall Tuesday.
“We need to increase our
membership; our member-
ship is very small. We have
approximately 160 mem-
bers,” said Robert Poburko,
vice-commodore of the club.
“As with every organiza-
tion, we’re all getting older,
and we’re really looking for
our new membership to
come out of Richmond-based
families.”
City council has endorsed
the first phase of the plan,
which will add a new float to
the marina, pending approval
from Port Metro Vancouver.
Future plans call for more
floats, a new floating club-
house and removing the
club’s current building and
parking lot from the dyke.
Forty-seven boats are
moored at the marina today.
The expansion would add
room for up to 15 more boats
and allow larger vessels to
maneuver.
“There is a very great
shortage of mooring space
in the Lower Mainland,” said
Poburko.
The current clubhouse, at
7471 River Rd., was built in
1965 and moved to its cur-
rent location 10 years later,
followed by construction of
the marina. A new clubhouse
would be a smaller version of
the nearby John MS Lecky UBC
Boathouse building, and offer
more space to other users.
It could take a decade
before all the changes are
complete, said Poburko.
The plan ties in with a new
1.3-kilometre greenway and
park that stretches south-
west along the Middle Arm
dyke from a new plaza at
Cambie Road, past the yacht
club to the Dinsmore Bridge.
That project is scheduled to
be complete by September.
Yacht club lays expansion course
Man arrested in racist graffiti incident
Video still of one of the suspects.
Jessica Tieszen photo
The graffiti included racist slogans
and taunts to police.
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ADVERTISING FEATURE
Starting Monday July 19th,
the speed limits on the
Trans Canada (Highway
1) have been lowered to
protect the construction
workers on the Gateway
construction project
which extends from
the Cassiar interchange
approximately 37
kilometers east to the
208th street intersection
in Langley.
From Cassiar to the Grandview interchange
the speed limit drops to 70 kmh; from
Grandview to 208th Street to 80 kmh.
Speeding fines are higher in construction
zones. Over the limit by 20 kmh attracts
a $196 fine instead of a $138 fine; over by
up to 40 kmh a $253 fine instead of a $196
fine; over by 40 kmh a $360 fine; and over
by 60 kmh a $468 fine. These changes are
expected to remain in effect until the project
is completed in 2013.
Reports of these changes have noted that,
practically speaking, commuters over the Port
Mann Bridge should not find much, if any,
change in their commute times. Westbound
traffic is jammed “16 hours a day,” says
Cpl. James Cheung of the RCMP’s highway
division. “It’s impossible to go over the speed
limit [during the day].” Enforcement efforts
will concentrate on evenings when night
shifts are working on the project, the traffic
has thinned out, and speeding becomes a
tempting possibility. Or some might say an
act of go-with-the-flow self-preservation. How
many drivers, we wonder, have found that
actually sticking to the speed limit can be a
challenging?
Such a question should not be construed
as a caution against doing so. Articulate
arguments against ‘too low speed limits’
and ‘extreme enforcement’, and for go-with-
the-flow mobility ignore some important
fundamentals. According
to Leonard Evans, an
internationally renowned
traffic safety expert,
case-control studies
comparing the speeds of
cars involved in crashes,
(or case cars), to the
speeds of control cars
not involved in crashes
have shown “that risk
(of a crash)… increases
steeply as speeds exceed the 60 km/h speed
limit, approximately doubling for each
additional 5 km/h.” For example, with a 50
Km/h speed limit, “the risk at 80 km/h is 30
times the risk (compared to) driving at the
speed limit.”
Leonard Evans also notes that another
approach to examining the relationship
between speed and risk “is to relate changes
in aggregate casualties on selected roads to
changes in the average speed of the traffic
on these roads.” Swedish studies comparing
casualty rates before and after changes in
speed limits on many (mainly higher speed
limit) roads in Sweden found that “speed
increases lead to…[higher] risk of crashing,
risk of serious injury, if a crash occurs, risk
of death, if a serious injury occurs.”
These results were echoed at the time of
the lowering of the maximum speed limit on
US rural Interstates to 55 mph in response to
the October 1973 oil embargo. Evans noted,
“Prior to the change, the speed limits on
rural Interstates were nearly all 70 mph…
Average travel speed was observed to be 63.4
mph. After imposition of the 55 mph limit,
the observed speed declined to 57.6 mph, a
seemingly modest 5.8 mph drop…However,
a sharp drop in the fatality rate occurred.”
…by Cedric Hughes, Barrister & Solicitor
with regular weekly contributions from
Leslie McGuffin, LL.B.
The Faster You Go,
the Closer You are to Death

THE
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REVIEW
the richmond
*Limited distribution
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From Page 1
“The most common change that
is required is upgrading the type
of window glazing,” said Kennedy.
“If it’s not possible to achieve the
interior level just by upgrading the
glazing, then we sometimes have
to look at upgrading the exterior
walls as well, or possibly reducing
the area of the windows.”
Kennedy’s most challenging res-
idential project in Richmond was
Aberdeen Residence. The 124-unit
high-rise is the first to be built
under a jumbo jet highway and is
equipped with a specialized four-
element window system—a more
advanced version of the technol-
ogy used at the famed Fairmont
Vancouver Airport hotel, which
BKL also worked on.
Windows are floor-to-ceiling and
when the door to a narrow bal-
cony remains closed noise can’t
get in. Air conditioning keeps the
temperature cool. Concrete con-
struction and noise-deadening
insulation further cut down the
noise, according to Fairchild De-
velopments.
“That Aberdeen project, as far
as city council was concerned,
was a bit of a trial project. They
were nervous about having a resi-
dential development in that high a
noise area. But they were aware of
the fact we were taking extra pre-
cautions,” said Kennedy. “I think
it’s worked out fairly well.”
For non-residential work, the
Richmond Olympic Oval has
proved to be BKL’s toughest lo-
cal project. Not only was the firm
tasked with assisting in interior
acoustic design, it also had to
ensure athletes wouldn’t be dis-
tracted by aircraft and helicopters
flying overhead. This, in a building
with a massive light-weight roof.
“The Olympic committee was
quite adamant, they didn’t want
any aircraft noise distracting the
skaters when they were waiting
for the starting gun,” said Ken-
nedy.
Other past projects include Rich-
mond City Hall and the BCIT Aero-
space Campus.
This year, BKL was tasked with
another new challenge: manag-
ing the acoustics for the first six-
storey wood frame building in the
province. The Remy, in the high-
Tower beneath jumbo jet highway
designed to keep out the noise
Latest
Richmond
Local Food
Guide gets
released
The 2010 Richmond
Local Food Guide is now
available online.
It’s a list of local farms,
u-picks and farmers’
markets in Richmond.
The guide may be found
on the Richmond Food
Security Society’s web
site at http://richmond-
foodsecurity.org/2010-
richmond-local-food-
guide or at the at the
Richmond Food Bank.
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Video art
approved
for oval
lobby
City council is spend-
ing $350,000 for an
artistic video display in
the Richmond Olympic
Oval lobby.
Various images of
Richmond’s past will
be projected above
two entrances as part
of the city’s latest
public art endeavour,
approved Tuesday by
council.
Designed by art-
ists Deanne Achong
and Faith Moosang,
the work is the sec-
ond phase of the Lulu
Suite project. The first
phase—budgeted at
$200, 000—i ncl udes
a multi-channel video
installation, interac-
tive iPhone tour of the
oval and a website.
Planned projections
for this new installa-
tion include images of
Brighouse racetrack,
a Japanese fisherman
mending a net and
tides on the Fraser
River. The video imag-
es will turn at dusk or
during dark days.
As part of the project,
windows in the oval’s
lobby will be covered
with a transparent film
to aid in the clarity of
video projections.
—by Matthew Hoekstra
by Kevin Diakiw
Black Press
Kwantlen’s student union is con-
sidering legal action after the school
announced it would no longer accept
credit card payment for domestic
students.
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
has given notice it will no longer
accept credit cards for tuition pay-
ment as of Aug. 3. It’s similar to
policies of other universities, such
as SFU and UBC.
For Kwantlen, it means substantial
savings in annual credit card fees
go back into student services, the
school’s website says. It also notes
that $250,000 of the savings will go
to bursaries and scholarships.
Some students say the payment
restriction leaves them in a bind
and in some cases, unable to con-
tinue attending.
Kwantlen Student Union’s director
of academic affairs, Bradley Head,
is planning a meeting with school
administration to get the problem
sorted out.
If it can’t be, it’s off to court, he
said.
Head has taken the issue to a
lawyer, who told him it is a viola-
tion of the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms and B.C. Human Rights
Code because international stu-
dents will still be allowed to use
credit cards for payment.
“By restricting domestic students,
you’re discriminating based on place
of origin,” Head said.
He’s rather negotiate than litigate,
he said, but will go as far as needed
to get the problem resolved.
“The lawsuit is a last resort,” Head
said.
Kwantlen won’t accept
credit cards for classes
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Fraser Wharves Ltd. offi-
cially broke ground on its
new 60,000-square-foot
facility.
The company, which has
been in business for 40
years, processes vehicles
imported from Asia.
The expansion will
see the facility at 13800
Steveston Hwy. bringing
its auto processing and
administrative operations
under one roof.
The company also pro-
vides automobile acces-
sorizing, repair and trans-
portation throughout
North America.
“By upgrading to a big-
ger facility, we are work-
ing to be more efficient
in our business,” says
vice-president Peter Liu.
“We hope to expand our
body shop work, espe-
cially accessories.”
The new building meets
LEED (Leadership in
Energy and Environmental
Design) program’s silver
qualification standards of
a “green” development.
“It was a big expense
and procedure to get
that certificate,” explains
Fraser Wharves manager
of compliance adminis-
tration Keith Beale. “We
had to build it to their
exact standards.”
Not only does the build-
ing meet environmen-
tal standards, but the
landscaping does too.
Placed off to the side of
the building is a giant
planted area that serves
a function beyond esthet-
ics. Known as a bioswale,
its landscape elements
are designed to remove
silt and pollution from
surface runoff water.
“The bioswale holds
runoff water, slowly
releasing it back into the
river,” says Richmond
Mayor Malcolm Brodie. “It
is designed to maximize
the time water spends
in the swale, which aids
the trapping of pollutants
and silt.”
Fraser Wharves imports
more than 200,000 vehi-
cles a year from Toyota,
Lexus, Mazda, Suzuki,
and General Motors. The
building is expected to
be completed by March
2011.
“Fraser Wharves has
been a great corporate
citizen for many years,”
Brodie said at a ground-
breaking ceremony
Wednesday. “When a
company wants to invest
millions into your city, oth-
ers do too. I look forward
to how the Richmond
community will update,
modernize and grow from
this development.”
P a g e 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
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Fraser Wharves building new facility
Jessica Tieszen photo
Fraser Wharves president Mike Uchiyama, Richmond Mayor Malcolm Brodie
and vice-president Peter Liu stand.
Home of
local non-
profit groups
hoping city will
support plans
for massive
expansion
by Matthew Hoekstra
Staff Reporter
The Richmond Caring
Place Society is trying
to raise its profile to
secure support for an
$18-million expansion.
A new three-storey
building atop a two-
level parkade is pro-
posed for the facility’s
existing parking lot on
Minoru Boulevard at
Granville Avenue. The
development would
quadruple office space
to 75,000 square feet.
But some residents
think of Caring Place as
a health care facility,
instead of a building
that houses non-profit
agencies, the society
says.
“You have people
who think we are a
hospice,” said direc-
tor Gary Hagel. “As the
project moves forward,
there’s going to be
debate... If the commu-
nity is aware of what
we do, that can only
enhance the debate.”
Board chair Belinda
Boyd said the soci-
ety is now “seeding
the ground” for what
would become the larg-
est public fundraising
campaign in the his-
tory of Richmond.
Boyd said the expan-
sion would give the
existing 14 tenants
more space and pro-
vide room for other
agencies in a grow-
ing City Centre. The
facility’s model allows
agencies—and their
clients—to reap the
benefits of being in
close proximity to each
other, and offers cli-
ents and visitors ano-
nymity.
The society hopes
the city will ante up
$4.5 million in cash
and development cost
charges to kick-start
the largest public fund-
raising campaign in the
city’s history.
Boyd suggested the
Caring Place expansion
would benefit the com-
munity as much as the
$178-million Richmond
Olympic Oval.
City planning staff
are examining the pro-
posal and considering
ideas from city coun-
cil that include adding
housing and an activity
centre for seniors.
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 7
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The Richmond Review is
publishing an Arts and
Culture Overview
this fall and we’re looking
for someone to help
put it together.
If you have an interest in the Arts
or Culture, let us know in 150
words or less why you would be
a good choice to help us put this
edition together.
The winner will sit in on story meetings
and help decide content for our special
edition on September 18.
Win a chance to be
Editor
for a
day
For your chance to win,
email your entry to
Editor for a Day at
contests@
richmondreview.com.
Entry deadline is
Friday, August 20. REVIEW
the richmond
Information importante: traduisez s’il vous plaît. ࡌ࠱௢Ѿçቁӗʆᙲᜃé
Mahalagang Pag-uulat: Pakisalin lamang. zrUrI sUcnw ikrpw krky Anuvwd kr.
Ba»noe oõ+xn¬enne: Ho»a¬vnc1a nepenenn1e.
SCHOOL DI STRI CT NO. 38 ( RI CHMOND)
1. Under the student placement policy, newly arriving students (new Richmond residents or residents
moving within Richmond and changing schools) to the Richmond School District should register as soon
as possible: Monday, July 12 – Wednesday, August 25, 2010 at the District Registration Center,
7811 Granville Avenue, 9 A.M.–12 NOON (Mon/Wed/Fri only).
After Monday, August 30, 2010, 1 P.M., students register at the neighbourhood school.
2. A parent or legal guardian must personally attend when registering their son or daughter and present
original documents for proof of residence (one of the following: mortgage document, rental or lease
agreement, property tax notice or unconditional contract of purchase and sale with possession date),
proof of Canadian citizenship or Landed Immigrant Status for child and parents, birth certificate,
immunization record, if available, and last report card, if available.
3. Late Returning Students: Parents of a child who is currently enrolled in a Richmond school and is
returning to school later than 12 NOON on Wednesday, September 8, 2010 but before Thursday,
September 30, 2010 must advise the school in writing by July 2, 2010 of the late return date to hold
the student’s place in the school.
For further information please contact the district office,
at 604-668-6000 or 604-668-6087.

R I C H MO N D S C H O O L D I S T R I C T
Student Placement Policy
New to Richmond? Moving within Richmond?
Register NOW for School!
Architect’s rendering of how a second Caring Place could look. The current Car-
ing Place is cramped and the society that runs the home for non-profit agencies
wants to add a second building.
Caring Place tenants
•Alzheimer Society of B.C.
•Canadian Cancer Society, Richmond Unity
•Canadian Hemochromatosis Society
•Centre for Ability
•Family Services of Greater Vancouver
•Richmond Caring Place Society
•Richmond Hospice Association
•Volunteer Richmond Information Services
•Richmond Society for Community Living
•Richmond Multicultural Concerns Society
•Richmond Women’s Resource Centre
•SUCCESS
•Chimo Crisis Services
•Heart and Stroke Foundation, BC & Yukon
Caring Place looks for support
P a g e 8 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
The non-art of watering
I
often stand at the
top of the steps in
my bare feet won-
dering if the vegeta-
bles I’m growing down
beside the ditch might
need some water.
From above they look OK
because as far as I can see
their leaves haven’t started
to wilt. Well not yet that is.
Lately when I’m down in
this spot to pick small zuc-
chinis and cucumbers and if
I’m in a hurry, I end up hop-
ing I don’t have to water.
But If the cucumbers look
thirsty I have a garbage can
filled with sun-warmed H2O
nearby for them. I don’t
think the zukes, onions and
broccoli really care what the
temperature of the water
is. Their mission in life right
now is to keep on growing.
If I’m not sure what needs
attention I poke a finger
down in the baked earth.
When it’s dry at least four
to five inches down, then it
means dragging the hose
down the stone steps to
give everything a soak that
I hope will be good for at
least a week. No way would
I use a sprinkler down there
because not only would it
be wasteful, it would prob-
ably flatten the tall sunflow-
ers and wreck the tomato
plants.
The abundant day lilies
growing on the bank tend to
get ignored. They must be
dry because I get the feeling
they aren’t day lilies at all.
They’re more like one hour,
stressed-out lilies.
It’s easy to tell that my
obvious priorities in my
haphazard approach to
watering are the vegeta-
bles. The roses fair better
along the brick pathway as
they get some water with
a weekly sprinkler that’s
aimed low down.
If I’m deadheading the
roses or patches of shasta
daisies then I make the
time to let the hose run on
its own, such as under the
large clump of hydrangeas
by the front steps that has
been gulping down inordi-
nate amounts of water in
the last few weeks.
On the porch is a earthen
ware water vessel for Hugo
to drink from, plus for me
to dip watering cans into.
It’s also used as a place to
wash my sandy feet when I
return from Gilbert Beach.
The porch window boxes
and hanging baskets need
a water hit almost everyday
because these plants dry
out quickly in the afternoon
sun and if it’s been windy.
I love my watering cans.
One is a tall one that isn’t
too heavy to lift up to reach
the height of the baskets.
Then I have two old galva-
nized ones which hold at
least a gallon. I got one of
them at a garage sale for
five bucks. The other one I
found in an abandoned gar-
den shed years ago in the
Terra Nova area.
For my planted evergreen
and several bonsai trees I
have placed found beach
stones around the roots to
slow down them drying out
too quickly. These lovely
rounded and thin stones—
speckled granites, blues
and grays—are ones that
I have collected from West
Coast beaches.
My life as “one-who-
waters” also includes
when it’s my turn to water
the new pear trees beside
the apple tree orchard on
Gilbert Road, winter starts
at the Sharing Farm, and
a courtyard garden at the
Minoru Residence. None
of these places, including
my own small garden, use
timers.
There is something about
preferring to do it by hand.
I’m convinced I use less
water and only water when
it’s really needed. Or per-
haps it’s my avoidance of
not wanting to rely on regu-
lated timers. Or a need for
less gadgets in my life? Who
knows.
Mary Gazetas is a direc-
tor of the Richmond Fruit
Tree Sharing Project,
instructor, artist and
writer. Her column appears
every weekend in The
Richmond Review.
Stupid act
needn’t speak
for society
A
stupid stunt by a few young punks cap-
tured an incredible amount of attention
this week. But reading into the story
anymore for what it is would give these crimi-
nals credence.
It started when Richmond RCMP issued a press
release about vandals whose crude graffiti in a
parkade at Empire Centre mall attacked the Chinese
community.
The story erupted and people started to question
why. As the media hounded a police spokesperson for
answers, RCMP held a press conference. But police
had little to share, refusing to release surveillance
video images of the suspects, which had already been
circulating in some media circles.
More questions. Who would have so much hate in
their heart? Is this just an example of the hate in the
wider community? And why the press conference?
Then we learn of police arresting the lead suspect,
that afternoon. Apparently the genius was nabbed
right by the scene of the crime.
Questions remained—what would drive someone to
do this? How many racists are among us?
The graffiti was indeed racist and hurtful. But before
immigrants of different origin—who we all are—start
eyeing each other and thinking the worst, take this
crime for what it is. Stupid.
Stupid punks do stupid things, and they need not
speak for the rest of society while doing them.
In Canada, we should have zero tolerance for such
blatant displays of racism. But reading into the story
further will only give credit where credit isn’t due.
opinion
140-5671 NO. 3 RD., RICHMOND, B.C. V6X 2C7
604-247-3700 • FAX: 604-606-8752 • WWW.RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
SPORTS EDITOR
DON FENNELL, 604-247-3731
SPORTS@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
The Richmond Reviewis a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body govern-
ing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints fromthe public about the
conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input fromboth the
newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your com-
plaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern,
with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C.
V9R2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org
REVIEW
the richmond
Published in Richmond every Thursday and Saturday by Black Press Ltd.
PUBLISHER
MARY KEMMIS, 604-247-3702
PUBLISHER@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CIRCULATION MANAGER
RACHAEL FINKELSTEIN, 604-247-3710
CIRCULATION@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER
JAANA BJORK, 604-247-3716
JAANA@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
STAFF REPORTERS
MATTHEW HOEKSTRA, 604-247-3732
MHOEKSTRA@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, 604-247-3733
MARTIN@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
EDITOR
BHREANDAIN CLUGSTON, 604-247-3730
EDITOR@RICHMONDREVIEW.COM
Folio One
Mary Gazetas
Letters to the editor
•The Richmond Review welcomes letters to The Editor on any subject. Send letters to news@richmondreview.com.
Letters must include first and last name—or two initials and a last name—mailing address and phone number. Letters
will be edited for clarity, brevity, legality and good taste. Sorry, not all letters are published. No poems, please.
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 9
<
A Different Way to Live
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letters
On snow geese and
the dangers of Bambi
Editor:
Letter writer Irene Solstad (“Snow geese don’t
deserve to be shot,” July 22) doesn’t want any geese
shot. She is typical of well-meaning, but naive city
animal lovers.
She says the geese are beautiful. Yes, they are,
and so is Bambi. In the United States, thousands
of people are killed or injured each year because of
Bambi. In Saskatchewan, deer hunting is down be-
cause of ignorant do-gooders who are against it. The
result is that a percentage of night-time car crashes
are caused by Bambi. In Cranbrook, TV news showed
Bambi stalking the city streets, attacking children and
stomping on small dogs.
Ms. Solstad writes “there may be some excrement
left” on a goose airfield (a children’s play field).
Some? I’ve seen a lawn turned into a feces mudbath
by geese.
She says the geese don’t deserve to die. Do fish
deserve to die by pressure and suffocation after be-
ing thrown into the hold of a fish boat on top of each
other just so we can have fish and chips?
And please don’t try to hand me that old, tired line
that man is encroaching on the animal’s territory. It’s
the other way around. But, if you really believe that
man is the overpopulator, then don’t have three or
four children.
There’s always a flip side to everything.
G. Simpson
Richmond
Editor:
With each passing year
Richmond’s population
density increases and
the roads become more
congested, contribut-
ing to the stress of its
citizens. If today’s new
homes have any yard
at all, it is rarely a sub-
stantial size because the
price of land is too
dear. As in other Lower
Mainland communi-
ties, many Richmond
residents have no out-
door space of their
own in which to relax,
unwind, and reconnect
with nature.
Parks such as South
Arm, which are natural
and serene, offer a
place to escape from the
hustle and bustle
of modern life. I believe
such places are vital
for everyone’s mental
health. People who con-
centrate on being physi-
cally fit are sometimes
unaware that stress can
be as detrimen-
tal to one’s health as
other factors.
Most Richmond
residents are prob-
ably not aware that
there are plans on the
table which will for-
ever change South Arm
Park as we know it.
Natural grass fields will
be replaced by artificial
turf and jogging tracks.
I very much doubt that
covered picnic areas
will benefit the neigh-
bourhood. I frequently
come upon empty liquor
bottles (often shattered
on the paths) which are
evidence that young
people are drinking
in the park after dark.
Building sheltered
areas will only make
it more convenient for
them to hang out in all
kinds of weather.
In my opinion, it is vital
that South Arm Park be
preserved exactly the
way it is for present
and future generations.
I am not in favour of
any changes which
would reduce green
space, create noise pol-
lution, or destroy the
serenity of the park.
This doesn’t mean that
I’m opposed to athletic
facilities; I just do not
believe that green fields
in a natural park should
be covered with artificial
surfaces.
If there is a demand
for more man-made facil-
ities, surely more suit-
able locations can be
found. We must not
allow the peacefulness
and natural beauty of
South Arm Park to be
sacrificed in the name of
“progress.” I urge others
who feel the same way
to take action before it’s
too late.
Write letters, sign Ms.
Eve Rollet de Darante’s
petition (www.the
petitionsite.com/2/
save-south-arm-park),
and make your opinion
known. If you do noth-
ing, then we, and gen-
erations to come, may all
live to regret it.
Pamela Gibson
Richmond
See www.richmond
review.com/opinion/let-
ters for the full version of
this letter.
Don’t sacrifice South Arm Park in
the name of progress
P a g e 1 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
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opinion
Measuring
up water
consumption
C
oming back
from a week-
long vaca-
tion, the family
minivan was caked
in dirt.
“Wash me!” was fin-
gered in on the grit of
the back window and
had been for several
days.
With no rain clouds in
sight that day and a car
full of bored kids, we
drove to the car wash.
Oh the joy of the car
wash! I remember the
cloth octopus legs that
used to march across
the car in a froth of
rainbow bubbles, the
spray of water against
your face behind the
window, the ominous
roar of the automatic
dryer. While today’s
car washes tend to be
touch free, the delight
of the experience
always guarantees a
full attendance in our
family car. All three kids
were mesmerized by
the bubble bursts and
timed sprays and we
ended up with a shiny
car, smiling faces, and
surprisingly, a green
feeling.
I used to feel guilty
about using a commer-
cial car wash until I did
some research on the
topic. Washing the car
at home in the driveway
wastes 60 per cent
more water on average
and worse, introduces
the soaps, pollutants,
and dirt from your car
directly into the storm
water system. Car
washes are mandated
by law to direct waste
water into the sewer
system where danger-
ous chemicals can be
removed before return-
ing them to nature.
“So bring on the
car washes!” my kids
would say with delight.
Within reason, I’d
caution. There is a
hierarchy of sustain-
ability in car washes.
The kind where your car
moves on a conveyer
belt uses around 19 to
45 gallons, the ones
where your car sits
and the spray moves
about it, 17 to 69 gal-
lons, and the hand held
sprayers, just 12 to 18
gallons. These are con-
siderably better than
home spraying which
uses 110 gallons, the
equivalent of running
the dishwasher seven
times. And remember,
the commercial washes
keep the chemicals
away from Nemo.
Of course the most
sustainable option
would be to live with
the “wash me” mes-
sage until the rain
comes, but somehow,
this option doesn’t
appeal. Or better, we
could leave the car in
the driveway perma-
nently and take out our
shiny bikes. Still, for
post family trip grunge,
we’ll be heading to the
car wash, baby!
Andrea Phillpotts
is a Richmond writer
and teacher. Opinions
expressed in this col-
umn do not necessar-
ily reflect those of any
school district, organi-
zation, or school.
Life Lessons
Andrea Phillpotts
Car wash vs. garden hose
HST: Hardly
Satisfying
Taxes
Editor:
If you don’t pay GST
on it now, you won’t
pay HST on it. This rule
of thumb that the B.C.
government placed on
their HST site seems
great right? Wrong.
The introduction of
the Harmonized Sales
Tax in British Columbia
has got many wonder-
ing and individuals
across the west coast
have no idea what HST
is and what the hype
was all about. Combin-
ing PST and GST, the
HST supposedly makes
pricing simpler.
Assuming that we
are simply renaming
two taxes as one, there
should be no difference
and most products
will actually remain
unchanged in price. In
fact, you save money
on residential energy,
motor fuels, books and
children-sized clothing!
Of the nine possible
savings that I found in
the list of HST changes,
five fall into the motor-
ized vehicle section. Not
very helpful.
The truth, however,
is that many items and
services that previously
had no PST will gain a
hefty 7 per cent raise.
Many everyday pur-
chases like magazines,
school supplies and
food at restaurants will
change. For this reason
I am against HST.
In my day, we didn’t
have HST, we had PST
and GST.
Jeffrey Wong
Richmond
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 1
Visit www.stevestoncommunitysociety.com for complete details and race schedule
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AUGUST 15
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ROAD CLOSURES: 7.30 AM - 2.00 PM
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cash prizes on a fast, picturesque course
throughout the Steveston business core.
Features include Novice, Men’s &
Women’s Categories as well as a
Kids Bike Parade.
RACE ROUTE
Moncton Street (Start/Finish at 2nd Avenue)
3rd Avenue to Bayview, to No. 1 Road, to
Moncton.
Steveston restaurants, cafes and stores will be
open for business during the race; pedestrian
crossings will be available at key locations
around the race route.
Sanctioned by CyclingBC
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PHONE:
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140 - 5671 No. 3 Road, Richmond
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AUGUST 13•14•15

letters
Watch out for suspicious people
at the water park
Editor:
Last Wednesday my girlfriend took my son as well
as her son and daughter to the Steveston Water Park.
She arrived around 10:30 a.m. (just after our kids fin-
ished their swimming lessons) and the park was busy.
When I arrived at the park to meet her with lunch she
had a surprising story to tell me.
She had been watching a young male (approximately
mid-to-late 20s) leaning up against the basketball
hoop on his bike. She thought it was rather strange
that he was hanging around a kids park clearly with-
out any kids of his own. She kept he eye on him as
well as an even closer eye on our kids.
She then noticed the young male making his way
(on his bike) over towards the picnic table where our
things were sitting. She had place the kids towels
on top of the table to dry from the previous lessons
and had the backpacks underneath the table. The
guy casually leaned up against the table and reached
underneath to grab my son’s backpack. She saw all
of this happening and yelled “Hey, that’s my bag!” He
started pedalling away and she went after him. There
were several people around and he didn’t seem to be
bothered. My friend continued in his direction when
he finally dropped the bag and said “fine have it.”
My son’s bag doesn’t look like a kids backpack and
maybe that what he was looking for. The park would
be a perfect place to do this since the parents are gen-
erally paying attention to their children and not neces-
sarily their belongings. I highly doubt this is this first
time this has happened and I doubt it will be the last.
I’m happy that my son’s bag wasn’t taken as we had
a change of clothes for him and his brother (which
were new) as well as my son’s wallet which had some
allowance money and gift cards in it. My friend was
very gutsy with her efforts to stop this thief and I’m
relieved nothing escalated to put her or the kids in
harms way.
I’ve received two other e-mails this week of other
incidents at Steveston Park. One of a older male taking
photos of the kids and another of a different man tak-
ing photos of kids during a stroller work out session.
The community centre sent an e-mail to the instructors
notifying them of this but I feel its important for the
community to know as well.
Laura Dodds
Richmond
Editor:
Lately, it appears that
we have a deadly plague
loose in our land! But
take heart, people, all is
not lost, as this disease
seems to infect only our
politicians!
The name of this horrid
disease? Spendicitis!
It has been abroad
in the world for many
years, but lately, it seems
to have become much
more virulent. Some
examples are the federal
government spending
billions (that we must
borrow) on everything
and anything. From more
jails and police, to more
materials for the next
war. (Who are we going
to fight this time?)
Within B.C., the
Campbellites blew the
budget on the Olympic
whoop-de-do, and still
wont come clean on
how much they spent
on their version of
Emperor Nero’s “Bread
and Circuses,” but not to
worry, the HST will cure
everything!
Now locally, it seems
Richmond’s own
politicians have also suc-
cumbed to the disease.
Witness the debate over
how urgent it was to
spend an unexpected
surplus. Horrors, here’s
$2 million we haven’t
spent. Quick, get rid of it!
I cannot see a cure in
sight for this disease,
so it would seem the
only answer is to elect
a new and uninfected
group of politicians,
and hope that it takes
a few years for them to
become infected with
Spendicitis.
But the civic politicians
have an answer for this
too—they will have their
term extended to four
years by their provincial
buddies, thus making it
harder to get rid of them.
If the people get
the government they
deserve, we must have,
collectively, been really
bad actors in the past!
T.R. (Terry) Murphy
Richmond
Politicians have been infected by a plague of overspending
Editor:
It is not just the con-
tinual demolition of
older homes and their
replacement with over-
sized, kit-plan houses
that is at the core of
the issue addressed
by the two letter writ-
ers who have decried
the “wrecking of
Richmond.” (Letters, July
24 and 29).
It is, in the most pro-
found and negative
sense, the de-construc-
tion of the very concept
and evolution of “neigh-
bourhood” itself that
is represented in these
changes.
Our neighbourhood,
like many others on
the Lower Mainland,
has experienced the
relentless demise of
the culturally rich and
dynamic environments
that included backyards
where families and
friends socialized and
children played, where
neighbours watched-out
for each other, where
colourful displays of
well-tended flowerbeds
and mature shrubbery
and trees brought joy to
the inhabitants, where
driveways were filled
with toys and bicycles
and the shouts of happy
children, and where
houses were obviously
“homes” —places that
had matured into dis-
tinct personalities and
that displayed an obvi-
ous pride of ownership.
Slowly but surely our
neighbourhoods have
devolved into more ster-
ile landscapes dominat-
ed by massive houses
that are out of scale
to their lots, devoid of
front or back lawns or
gardens of any kind,
lacking any sense of life,
personal touch, or pride
of ownership, and more
often than not have
remained unoccupied
since completion. They
do not contribute any
children to the neigh-
bourhood dynamic or
offer any addition of the
type neighbourly inter-
actions and socialization
that make neighbour-
hoods civilized, vital,
and enjoyable to live in.
Most of these shodily-
built, pseudo-Southern
mansion edifices offer
nothing more than dead
zones and dark voids in
the environment, repleat
with the requisite sec-
ond floor light on a
timer, car with expired
licence plates and/or
seldom if ever used bas-
ketball net in the drive-
way, and periodic visits
from a contracted gar-
dener to cut the lawn.
One house near us still
has a cobweb-covered
chair sitting near the
front door that was put
there when the house
was completed two
years ago, and another
has the pathetic remains
of a Christmas wreath
slowly disintegrating at
the entrance.
Near where we once
lived in Dunbar there
were eight houses in
a row that remained
unlived-in for three
years—empty testa-
ments to the primacy
of greed and profit over
social and environmen-
tal enhancement.
Devoid of life dur-
ing the day and black
and forlorn at night,
these abominations
do nothing but destroy
our sense of neigh-
bourhood and pride of
place, and contribute to
the growing senses of
alienation, disconnec-
tion, and lack of trust
that continue to influ-
ence our society. There
is no culture in places
dominated by such
houses, and we are so
much the poorer for it.
No doubt our city
council over the years
has salivated at the tax
revenues to be gained
through such develop-
ments and given the
backgrounds of most
politicians these days
it is not surprising that
they put profit ahead of
any other concerns.
But by not foreseeing
and/or caring (most
likely not caring) about
the social consequences
of the lack of any degree
of enlightened town-
planning as it applies
to life in residential
communities, and by
failing to implement
regulations that would
be educated as to the
real needs of its full-
time citizens as well as
represent a committ-
ment to the enrichment
of their lives, it has sold
us out to the wants and
demands of the devel-
opers and contractors
and the greed of foreign
investors.
R. Arnold
Richmond
P a g e 1 2 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
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Effective: SUN MON TUES WED
August 1 2 3 4
fresh • large pack
chicken
leg quarters
2.84kg • per pound
1
29
grifo
extra virgin
olive oil
CLUB PRICE
3l tin
13
00
cortina
marinated
artichoke hearts
CLUB PRICE
170ml jar
1
00
fresh • ecuador grown
bananas
1.08kg • per pound
49
fresh • medium pack
whole frying
chicken
1
69
3.73kg • per pound
fresh • medium pack
pork side
spareribs
1
79
3.95kg • per pound
canada aged AA • medium pack
beef boneless
thin cut shortribs
3
49
7.70kg • per pound
fresh • medium pack
halibut
pieces 1
69
per 100g
fresh • medium pack
imitation
crabmeat
69
per 100g
good host
iced tea
drink mix
3
99
1kg can
prego • assorted
pasta
sauce
1
99
675ml jar
betty crocker • assorted
mashed
potato mix
1
69
215g box
webber
vitamin b12
1000ug 5
99
60 tablets
suave • select varieties
shampoo or
conditioner
1
99
444ml bottle
island farms
whipping
cream
1
79
500ml carton
christie • cones or cuplets
ice cream
cones
1
69
pack
campbell’s • consomme or
chicken
broth
89
284ml tin
six fortune
udon
noodles
39
200g pack
assi • assorted
korean
barbecue sauce3
99
960ml jar
boton
calrose
white rice
10
99
8kg bag
fresh • us or mexico grown
seedless
watermelons
27
0.60kg • per pound
fresh • us grown
large black
plums 97
2.14kg • per pound
fresh • bc grown
tomatoes
on the vine
87
1.92kg • per pound
fresh • earthbound farms
organic
salads
2
77
142g pack
fresh • bc grown
zucchini
squash 47
1.04kg • per pound
fresh • bc or us grown
iceberg
head lettuce
79
each
Super Grocer & Pharmacy
WE FILL YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS WHILE YOU SHOP.
OPEN 8:00am to 9:00pm DAILY
Grocer 604-271-2722 • Pharmacy 604-274-7878 • Florist 778-881-2797
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TIME OF PURCHASE • large pack = 10Kg+, medium pack = 5Kg+
r
FORCED TO
LIQUIDATE
DUE TO THE SLOW ECONOMIC CLIMATE, HIPE IS FORCED
TO LIQUIDATE IT’S ENTIRE LADIES’ SUMMER INVENTORY.
$
5
TO

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15
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L
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A
T
5441 No. 3 Road 604-278-0048
ACROSS FROM LANSDOWNE MALL
letters
The loss of neighbourhoods
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 3
sports
SPORTS EDITOR: Don Fennell
Phone: 604 247 3732
E-mail: sports@richmondreview.com
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Despite softball being cut from the Olympic ros-
ter, young players continue to aspire to compete
at a top level.
Richmond Islanders ‘94B are a group of girls who
won’t hold anything back.
“Its a bummer that my teammates and I can no
longer work towards the Olympics,” explains sec-
ond base Kara Lee. “But that won’t stop of us from
playing the game and having fun.”
Softball was introduced as an Olympic sport at
the 1996 Games in Atlanta and last played at the
2008 Games in Beijing. The International Olympic
Committee voted to remove softball from the 2012
Games and also declined to include them in the
2016 Games. One suggestion for the decision to
omit softball is that the United States has been
too dominant.
The Islanders, who host the Western Canadian
Bantam B championships Wednesday through
Sunday (Aug. 5 to 9) at London Park, got off on
a sombre note last December with the unexpect-
ed and tragic passing of assistant coach Dennet
Kuan.
“Coach Kuan’s role on the team was immeasur-
able and his abundant knowledge and enthusiasm
for the game have been sorely missed,” said Lee’s
dad Kevin. “Each and every player and person as-
sociated with the team knew that Kuan would want
them to continue on and play the game they all
love.”
They have, but with heavy hearts. This season,
dedicated in Kuan’s memory, has been success-
ful.
Coming off a silver-medal finish at the provincial
championships, the Islanders are heating up as
they prepare to host the westerns. Richmond will
host the top teams from B.C., Alberta, Saskatch-
ewan, Manitoba, Yukon and the Northwest Territo-
ries. Teams from B.C. include Islanders, Abbotsford
Outlaws and South Surrey Thunder ‘95.
“Looking back over previous years, the B.C. teams
are usually the strongest,” said Richmond head
coach Sam Young. “After losing to Abbotsford in
the final game of the provincials, we are hoping to
face them in the final game of this tournament.”
Young explains that the Islanders have success-
fully maintained their goal of medaling in every
tournament.
“As a coach, my philosophy is not (focused on)
winning, (but) I expect the girls to work hard and
have fun,” says Young. “I think that’s a huge rea-
son why we have done so well.”
Young said as a coaching staff, they work to teach
the girls not only softball skills, but life skills too.
Kevin Lee photo
Richmond Islanaders ’94B will count on strong team play and solid pitching from the likes of Madison
Kaplan (above) in their bid for the Western Canadian Bantam B Girls’ Softball Championship.
Host team draws inspiration from memory of its former assistant coach
Ray Pang (middle) won a gold medal Sunday as assis-
tant coach of B.C.’s under-14 boys’ soccer team at the
Canadian all-star nationals, while his sons Riley and
Jonah won gold the same day playing for their zone
team at the B.C. Summer Games.
Sunday was golden on soccer pitch for Pangs
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
Separated by nearly 4,000 kilometres, three
members of Richmond’s Pang family celebrated
two championships in a matter of hours last
Sunday.
While Ray Pang was busy helping to coach
B.C.’s under-14 boys’ soccer team to the national
championship in Sherbrooke, Que., two of his
sons, Riley and Jonah, were playing for the win-
ning Zone 4 (Richmond, Burnaby, New Westmin-
ster and Delta) team at the B.C. Summer Games
in Langley. The only disappointing thing for Ray
was not being able to be there to share in their
success. He learned of the good news during a
phone conversation with his wife Tara just be-
fore boarding a plane headed home.
The boys found out about their dad’s success
when presented with their gold medals by B.C.
under-15 coach Dante Zanatta, who said to Ri-
ley: “So, gold runs in your family?”
Said Riley: “We had a lot of fun. This was like
the Olympics for us.”
Twenty-five years ago, Ray won a national soc-
cer championship playing for the B.C. under-16
team. He would later add the under-18 title to
his collection.
Soccer is in his blood. He grew up playing the
game and, modestly, said he “lucked out” play-
ing at the provincial and then national youth lev-
els, before concentrating on his studies after a
broken leg. It wasn’t long, however, before he
returned to the pitch. He helped form the IMG
Dragons and continues to play for the Richmond
Senior Soccer League powerhouse.
Coaching is a relatively new experience for
Ray, who assisted longtime friend Rob Csabai
with the B.C. under-14 team that featured two
Richmond players—Liam Doig and Justin Turn-
er-Pearce. He will guide two Richmond youth
teams (under-12 gold and under-16 metro) dur-
ing the 2010-11 season. His eldest son, Zachery,
who played on the under-14 team last season,
will play for the under-16 squad.
See Page 15
Boys tee
off Monday
at junior
nationals
by Jessica Tieszen
Contributor
Richmond Country Club
will host the 67th annual
Canadian Junior Boys’ Golf
Championship Monday
through Friday (Aug. 2-6).
Among nationally-ranked
players and top competitors
are Richmond’s own Mason
Pimentel and Curtis Chan.
Coming off a disappoint-
ing finish at the B.C. junior
championship, Pimentel is
turning things around and
eager to compete in his own
backyard.
“Its unbelievable that they
would host a tournament
like this in my own city,” ex-
plains Pimentel. “I always
have to travel to champion-
ships, but this time I can
just walk.”
Pimentel feels confident in
his game on the course he’s
known for 10 years. He also
draws inspiration from the
Shia LaBeouf movie, Great-
est Game on Earth.
Based on a true story, the
movie replays the journey
of a small town amateur
who is picked to represent
his course when it hosts the
1913 British Open Champi-
onship. After extreme rejec-
tion from media, he shock-
ingly defeats the five-time
U.S. Open winner to make
history.
“(Richmond Country Club)
has always been member-
friendly, but for this tour-
nament I suspect that the
rough will be overgrown,
increasing the difficulty,”
he said.
Pimentel will start Grade
11 in September and begin
the hunt for post-secondary
education and the opportu-
nity to pursue his golf career
at the collegiate level.
“Playing in this tourna-
ment gives the exposure
and reputation to be rec-
ognized by some of the top
universities,” he said.
Confident in his ability,
Pimentel said, “I’ve been
playing this game for so
long now, I just have to con-
tinue my daily routine. The
physical training is done in
the winter, now I just have
to put my hard work into
action.”
The junior champion will
earn a spot at the Canadian
Men’s Amateur Aug 12-15
Isles have high hopes at westerns
Richmond
Country Club
hosting
P a g e 1 4 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
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S
O
L
D
sports
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
Alison McNeill suggested Thursday that Canada’s national
women’s basketball team sports a “world-class” defence.
It’s hard to argue with the head coach’s assessment after
Canada’s 66-39 victory over Sweden Thursday at the Rich-
mond Olympic Oval. The win capped a four-game exhibition
series in which Canada held the Swedish and Chilean national
teams to an average of 41 points.
But the question remains. Where are the points for going to
come from? During the four-game set, Canada averaged 74.5
points but gave away the ball far too frequently. At times, their
confidence also seemed fragile which they can’t afford at the
World Basketball Championships which tip off Sept. 23 in the
Czech Republic.
Ranked No. 12 in the world rankings, Canada is grouped in
what many feel is the toughest pool at the tournament with
the likes of No. 2-ranked Australia, No. 4 China and No. 6 Be-
larus.
“We can’t afford to miss any easy shots (like Thursday
against Sweden),” said McNeill, who added mental tough-
ness will be vital if Canada is to have any kind of success at
the worlds.
Kim Smith of Mission, who led Canada with 21 points and
is routinely the team’s top scorer (Jordan Adams and Natlie
Achonwa were next highest with seven points each), said the
four-game exhibition series was a good gauge to see where
the team is at.
“I think from our first game against Chile to our last against
Sweden we’re much better,” she said, noting the players don’t
have a lot of time to jell.
“This has absolutely helped us prepare for the worlds,” said
OR, if you just want to “Change” and receive 12 Months Free Desk Fees,
Canada proves its D is world class
But point production still a concern heading to World Basketball Championships
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
On the heels of their winning the women’s
division title at the annual Dolphin Park Bas-
ketball Classic a couple of weeks ago, Rich-
mond’s Breanne Watson has convinced some
of her hoop friends to join forces again for an
exhibition game here next month.
The Northwest All-Stars, featuring sev-
eral pros including Watson who played last
season in Spain, will take on a young, but
athletically-gifted Texas Tech University Red
Raiders’ team Aug. 9 at the Richmond Olym-
pic Oval. Tip off is 6 p.m. Tickets are $5 at
the door.
“My biggest motivation for organizing this
is to help young girls see the best baskeball,
and know they can potenetially be playing at
that level,” said Watson.
Texas Tech, an NCAA Division 1 team, plays
in the highly-competitive Big 12 conference
and will be a handful for the expeirence All-
Stars, Watson predicts.
The All-Stars will include Lindsey Wilson,
a former Iowa State star who played pro in
Greece and is a former WNBA draft pick; Amy
Taylor, who played in the Netherlands; Dae-
sha Henderson from Seattle Pacific; and Si-
mon Fraser Univeristy grad Morgan McLaugh-
All-stars hosting
Texas Tech Aug. 9
Don Fennell photo
Richmond’s Breanne Watson has helped to set up a game Aug. 9 at the Richmond Olympic
Oval between a group of Northwest All-Stars and the Texas Tech University Red Raiders’
women’s basketball team.
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 5
sports
From Page 13
“I love playing the
game, but I now know
how hard it is to be a
coach,” Ray said.
“The time and effort
to get these boys ready
for such a competition
takes a lot of work. To
also be a champion is
just the icing on the
cake.”
Ray said Canadian
soccer has its share
of critics, particularly
those who feel there’s
a lack of what is often
called possession-style
soccer. His preference
is to encourage young
players to be creative.
“When kids try to be
creative and some-
one screams at them
it makes them want to
stop,” he said. “I have
no problem with mis-
takes because that’s
how they learn. What I
want to see is them de-
veloping a good thought
process which helps
them to be capable of
doing more.”
B.C. won the Dr. Fred
Stambrook Trophy at
the 2010 BMO national
championships Nutrilite
under-14 boys’ competi-
tion in Sherbrooke by
placing first in its group
with three wins and one
loss, then clinching the
title on the final day of
the round-robin compe-
tition. B.C. and Ontario
tied with nine points,
but B.C. earned first
based on a 2-1 win over
Ontario July 22. B.C.
also won the fair play
award.
After going undefeat-
ed in the round-robin
pool, Zone 4 (Rich-
mond, Burnaby, New
Westminster and Delta)
defeated the Vancou-
ver/Squamish zone
team 3-1 in the gold-
medal game at the B.C.
Summer Games.
•Richmond’s Emma
Kallner helped B.C.
win a silver medal last
weekend at the un-
der-14 girls’ national
soccer championship in
St. John’s, Nfld. B.C. tied
Ontario 1-1 in the final
game, but had to setle
for second place after
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Bailey earns player-of-year honours
by Don Fennell
Sports Editor
Jonathan Bailey is standing tall after being
awarded the Pepsi Player of the Year award
for zone 4 at the B.C. Midget A Lacrosse
Championships.
Along with the honour recognizing a sec-
ond-year player who displays strong skills,
good academic grades and gives back to
lacrosse, the Richmond minor player was
given a $500 scholarship and a player-of-
the-year jacket.
Zone 4 consists of players from Richmond,
Delta, Burnaby and New Westminster. Bai-
ley was selected by the Richmond Lacrosse
Association from all its second-year play-
ers. Each player was considered by coach-
ing staff and executives to determine the
best candidate.
In its nomination letter to the B.C. La-
crosse Association, Richmond minor noted
Bailey’s “very consistent” play over the
years and his dedication to the game. He
is described as a player who “puts forward
120 per cent at every practice and game and
a natural leader on and off the floor,” and
who is widely respected by peers.
In 2009, Bailey also played field lacrosse.
He was asked to play bigstick and although
this was his first year he enthusiastically
agreed and was highly successful. He end-
ed the season being one of the top defen-
sive players.
Bailey sets high standards and works
hard to achieve them. One of his goals is
to earn a scholarship.
Bailey’s coach, Mike Gilles, said he works
“as hard as anyone I have ever coached to
make himself and those around him bet-
ter.”
“Jonathan only has positive statements to
make, and in the six years of coaching him
I have never heard a derogatory remark ut-
tered from his mouth.”
Kajaks throw down the
hammer at B.C. Games
Petri Daviel of Richmond won silver and bronze in throwing
events at the B.C. Summer Games last weekend in Langley. Her
performances, both personal bests, helped Richmond Kajaks
dominate the field.
Daviel threw 43.08 metres in the hammer and 26.2 metres in
the discus. Kajaks swept the hammer with Asianna Covington
winning with a meet record throw of 55.69 metres and Joscelyn
Wallace third at 33.80 metres.
Daviel, a Grade 10 student at McRoberts, was 10th in the ham-
mer at last spring’s B.C. high school championships. Kajak Mark
Kalmykov won the boys’ hammer with a throw of 48.14 metres.
All are coached by Richard Collier.
Kajak John Kalris-Cates collected a gold medal and two silvers.
He won the 100-metre sprint in 11.85 seconds, the 200 metres in
24.27 seconds and the long jump at 5.70 metres.
Full results for Richmond athletes are at richmondreview.
com.
Kajaks, from left: Joscelyn Wallace, Asianna Covington and Petri
Daviel swept the hammer event.
P a g e 1 6 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
We need your help at the
1
ST
ANNUAL STEVESTON SOCKEYE SPIN
bike race in Richmond on
AUGUST 15
TH
, 2010
GET INVOLVED IN EXPERIENCING A
PROFESSIONAL BIKE RACE.
We’re looking for mature individuals to volunteer
for setup, sweepers, runners, and crowd control.
Training provided by Steveston Athletic Association.
To volunteer call Marisa Achtymichuk at
604-718-8087 at Steveston Community Centre
or email machtymichuk@richmond.ca
or register directly online at
https://icanhelp.richmond.ca and choose
Steveston as the prefered facility.
For more information, visit www.stevestoncommunitysociety.com
Sanctioned by: CyclingBC
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FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
5 IN MEMORIAM
JO JO
Memories of you are like
threads of gold,
They never tarnish and they
never grow old.
Happy 84th Birthday my love
(Aug. 3)
You will be forever Loved and
Remembered
Your Anna
7 OBITUARIES
GORDON: Danny aka
Captain Snag
Aug 19th 1942 – July 15th 2010
Kaylen and Lucy are very sad
to announce the passing of
our Papa. He will be greatly
missed by all of his Family and
Friends.
There will be a memorial
Service on Monday Aug 9th at
1pm at the Steveston United
Church 3720 Broadway St
Richmond.
In lieu of flowers donations
may be made To a charity of
your choice.
33 INFORMATION
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
7 OBITUARIES
WILSON, Robert (Bob). It is
with great sadness that we an-
nounce the passing of Bob at
the age of 69. He is survived
by his loving family, wife
Elaine, sons Russell, Scott
(Zalika), Brian, grandchildren
Josh and Lacey, sister Wendy
(Tom) and brother Bob. Prede-
ceased by his parents, George
and Lillian. Bob will be greatly
missed by his immediate fami-
ly, extended family and many
friends. Bob worked for Air
Canada for 35 years after
which he worked for the Air-
port Authority for another 14
years. A private memorial
mass to celebrate his life will
be held. In lieu of flowers,
please make donations to the
Canadian Cancer Society.
33 INFORMATION
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
7 OBITUARIES
WHITING, Mary Doreen (nee
Moyls)
Doreen was a true Vancouver-
ite, born Dec. 13, 1924 at St.
Paul’s Hospital. She passed
away peacefully, at Vancouver
General Hospital, July 23,
2010, with her family at her
side, including her dog Max.
She was a loving Mother,
Grandmother, Great Grand-
mother, and Great-Great
Grandmother, aunt, cousin
and dear friend to many over
the years. She is pre-
deceased by her parents, Fred
and Mable Moyls, brother
Ernie, and her beloved hus-
band, Hector, who passed in
1995. She is survived by 7
children, Joan (Charlie) Haws,
Lynne (Joe) Grayston, Daryl
(Jo-Ann), Ross (Linda), Janice
Philps, Ernie (Luz), & Freddie,
10 grandchildren, and 12
great-grandchildren. She was
thrilled wiht the birth of her first
great-great grandchild, James,
on May 20, 2010.
Mom worked at VGH’s Doc-
tor’s Residence until it closed.
She then started her more
than 25 year career with
Canada Post. After retirement
Mom and Dad spent many
happy years travelling the
world, often with family. Mom
loved cruising. Her last cruise,
to the Mediterranean, was in
2008.
Mom and Dad were long term
members of the TB Veterans
Branch 44. Mom was also an
active member of the Rich-
mond Minoru Seniors Centre.
The Family would like to thank
the wonderful staff at Vancou-
ver General Hospital, and es-
pecially the staff in ICU for the
special care Mom received.
As with Mom’s wishes she will
be cremated and her ashes in-
terned with her parents, and
only sibling Ernie. A celebra-
tion of her life for family and
close friends, was held Thurs-
day, July 29th at the Whiting
Family home in Richmond. In
lieu of flowers donations may
be made in her name to the
VGH & UBC Hospital Founda-
tion - Intensive Care Unit or
the BC Cancer Foundation.
Rest in peace dear Mom. We
already miss you terrible but
you will remain in all of our
hearts forever.
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
33 INFORMATION
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
REVIEW
PAPER
DELIVERY
PHONE NO.
604-247-3710
CHILDREN
83 CHILDCARE AVAILABLE
JOYLAND Montessori Childcare
Centre (2.5 to 5 year-old) New
classroom and experienced teach-
ers. Expanding the potential of each
individual child through the com-
bined ECE and Montessori teaching
methods. Address: 6091 Udy Rd
Richmond (604-272-5655) 8:30am--
5:30pm
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
$1000 CASH
to the next executive on my team.
Business is good, call James
604-779-2147
BE YOUR OWN BOSS with Great
Canadian Dollar Store. New
franchise opportunities in your area.
Call 1-877-388-0123 ext. 229 or
visit our website:
www.dollarstores.com today.
109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Service Manager Required
High volume Chrysler Dodge
dealership. Live & work in BC
Interior. Chrysler Dodge
knowledge an asset. Email re-
sume to:
steve@kamloopsdodge.com
114 DRIVERS/COURIER/
TRUCKING
DRIVER (CLASS 5) /
WAREHOUSE WORKER
Growing Surrey building products
company req. Driver / Warehouse
Worker. Heavy lifting involved.
Positive attitude, dedication &
willingness to learn rewarded
with:
EXCELLENT REMUNERATION
& BENEFITS.

Fax resume:
604-513-1194 or e-mail:
jobs@westcoastmoulding.com
115 EDUCATION
Become a Psychiatric Nurse -
train locally via distance education,
local and/or regional clinical place-
ments, and some regional class-
room delivery. Wages start at
$29/hour. This 23 month program is
recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t
funding may be available.
Toll-free: 1-87-STENBERG
www.stenbergcollege.com
DGS CANADA
2 DAY
FORKLIFT
WEEKEND
COURSE
No Reservations Needed
Report to 19358 - 96 Ave., #215
Surrey, Saturday 8:30am
www.dgscanada.com
604-888-3008
“Preferred by Canadian
Employers”
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
115 EDUCATION
INTERIOR Heavy Equipment Op-
erator School Train on full-size Ex-
cavators, Dozers, Graders,Loaders.
Includes safety tickets. Provincially
certified instructors. Government
accredited. Job placement assis-
tance. www.iheschool.com 1-866-
399-3853
130 HELP WANTED
A Rock $ Roll
Attitude!
Up to $800/Week!!!
10 F/T Openings Avail
NOW!
40 hrs./wk - skip the rush hour.
Great Team Environment.
Quick learners welcome.
Benefits Available
Call Jill 604 777 2195
FLAGGERS NEEDED
If not certified, training available for
a fee. Call 604-575-3944
FOREST Fire Medics And
Class 1 or 4 Drivers.
A.S.A.P.E-mail your resume to
david@alphasafety.net or fax
to 250.787.8839 You can
also check our website
alphasafety.net
115 EDUCATION
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
DELIVERY
PERSONS
Call NOW!
PHONE
BOOKS
Mature persons with car or
truck to deliver Yellow
Pages™ Telephone Direc-
tories to Richmond, Ladner,
Tsawwassen and surround-
ing areas.
Call 1-800-733-9675
Mon.- Fri. 8 am - 4 pm
MACCARTHY GM
dealership looking to hire a
Qualified Service
Advisor
Candidate needs to have
strong leadership qualities, ad-
ministrative skills and good
customer communication
skills, excellent remuneration
pkg. available to the right can-
didate. Resumes & cover letter
attention:
John Cooper
MacCarthy GM
5004 Hwy. 16 W
Terrace, B.C. V8G 5S5
Fax: 250-635-6915 Email:
jcooper@maccarthygm.com
No phone calls please
P/T chiropractic receptionist for
Richmond Clinic. Fluent in
English/Mandarin/Cantonese. Basic
computer knowledge. Email resume
to achandc@telus.net
115 EDUCATION
INDEX IN BRIEF
AGREEMENT
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FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57
TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76
CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98
EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198
BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387
PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587
REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696
RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757
AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862
MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 7
The City of Richmond is a diverse and dynamic
community in pursuit of our vision to be the most
appealing, livable and well-managed community
in Canada.
Are you ready for the career of your dreams? With initiatives such as our
corporate education program, our competitive compensation and benefit
packages, and our strong support of a healthy work/life balance, we demonstrate
our commitment to providing employees with opportunities to achieve excellence.
WE ARE CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR THE FOLLOWING:
• ICE LEADER & SKATE SHOP ATTENDANT
The City of Richmond's Arena Services Division is currently looking for
enthusiastic, self-motivated individuals who have excellent customer service,
public relations, communication and interpersonal skills. You will enjoy working
with the public in a busy and varied environment.
Successful candidates for these positions will be available to work a variety of
shifts, including days, evenings and weekends.
For further details regarding this job opportunity, please visit our careers website
at www.richmond.ca/jobs and apply online by August 3, 2010.
Come explore the opportunities and future career prospects at the City of
Richmond.
People X Excellence X Leadership X Team X Innovation
We thank all applicants in advance for their interest. However, only those
under consideration will be contacted. This position is restricted to those
legally entitled to work in Canada. The City of Richmond is an equal
opportunity employer.
www.richmond.ca/jobs
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers either!
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Call Brian 604-247-3710
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Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
15101024 9000blk Cambie, 4000-4600 Garden City, 8700blk Odlin 56
15101011 Garden City Rd, Patterson Rd 64
15101030 Beckwith Rd, Charles St, Douglas St, 47
Sexsmith Rd, Smith St
15101110 Brown, Browndale, Brownell, Browngate, Brownlea 65
15101021 Cambie Rd, Patterson Rd, Sexsmith Rd 65
14701370 9000 Blk Alberta Rd 48
14701365 7000 Blk No 4 Rd, Keefer Ave 105
14500471 Francis Rd, St. Albans Rd 86
14500481 9000 Blk Francis Rd 100
15101018 Capstan Way, Regina Ave, Stolberg St 56
15102156 Montego St,Thorpe Rd 76
15102142 Aztec St,Woodhead Rd 103
15102647 Harrison Ave, Jensen Dr, Gt, McNeely Dr 114
14701362 Bridge St, General Currie, Shields Ave 87
14500451 Lismer Ave, Gate 91
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert flyers
either! Deliver 2x week, Thursdays and Saturdays, right in your
neighbourhood. Call our circulation department for information.
Call JR 604-247-3712
or email us at circulation@richmondreview.com
Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
14903089 4000 Blk River Rd 23
(between No 1 Rd and McCallen)
14902121 Thormanby Cres,Woolridge Crt 63
14901171 Ludlow Rd, Pl, Ludgate Rd 36
14901173 Langton Rd 91
Papers are delivered to your door. No need to insert
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our circulation department for information.
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Kids and Adults Needed
Route Boundaries Number of Papers
14401714 9500-10800 Block Shell 64
14600550 Anahim Dr, Aragon Rd 90
14401544 10000 Blk No 4. Rd 60
14302277 8000 Blk of Railway Ave 24
14600511 Kingcome Ave, Pl, 185
Kingsbridge Dr, Kingsbrook Rd
14600810 6000-8000 Blk of No 5 Rd 126
14401575 Leonard Rd, Pl, Ruskin Rd, Pl 71
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
138 LABOURERS
WAREHOUSE
LEAD HAND
HELLY HANSEN Leisure Canada
Inc. is seeking an experienced
Warehouse Lead for our Delta, BC
warehouse. Must have 3+ years
exp. as lead; prefer exp. in apparel.
We provide competitive pay, product
discount & full benefits.
E-mail resume & pay range to
jobs@hrnovations.com.
130 HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
139 MEDICAL/DENTAL
F/T TECHNICAL Sales Specialists
(dental devices) Must have knowl-
edge & skill of dental laboratory
bench worker University degree or
college diploma of in a related
program & Ability to train staffs
$20/hrs Email to resume:
prem2@telus.net
156 SALES
PREMIER DEAD Sea is seeking
4 energetic Retail Sales Reps.
for skin care kiosks and carts
in Oakridge Mall, $12.50/hr
drwvancouver@gmail.com
PREMIER Dead Sea Skin Care re-
tailer is seeking 4 energetic Retail
Sales Reps. for our locations in
Richmond. $12.50/hr. Please mail
to: drwrichmond@hotmail.com
130 HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL
F/T Contract Supervisor-Build/in-
stall interior finishing. Requisition
materials/supplies. Ensure stan-
dards for safe working cond. Pre-
pare schedules/reports. $28/hr.
Email, info@bestkitchens.com or
123-13065 84 Ave Surrey V3W1B3
SITE SUPERINTENDENTS
Required for Prism Construction
for Vancouver and Surrey for
commercial projects. Full-Time
opportunity.
COMPETITIVE SALARY
& BENEFIT PACKAGES

Fax Resume: 604.526.2151
or Call: 604.290.2424 or
E-mail: generalinfo@
prismconstruction.ca
PERSONAL SERVICES
180 EDUCATION/TUTORING
ADD YOUR business on
www.BCLocalBiz.com directo-
ry for province wide exposure!
Call 1-877-645-7704
182 FINANCIAL SERVICES
AVOID BANKRUPTCY - SAVE UP
TO 70% Of Your Debt. One af-
fordable monthly payment, interest
free. For debt restructuring on
YOUR terms, not your creditors.
Call 1-866-690-3328 or see web
site: www.4pillars.ca
DEBT CONSOLIDATION
PROGRAM Helping Canadians
repay debts, reduce or eliminate
interest, regardless of your credit.
Steady Income? You may qualify
for instant help. Considering
Bankruptcy? Call 1-877-220-3328
FREE Consultation Government
Approved, BBB Member
GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad cred-
it? Bills? Unemployed? Need Mon-
ey? We Lend! If you own your own
home - you qualify. Pioneer Accep-
tance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-
987-1420.
www.pioneerwest.com
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
236 CLEANING SERVICES
Best House CLEANERS. Trusted &
reliable. Filipino owned & operated,
lic. Prof. touch. Cleaning supplies
prov’d. Move in/out Houses, Office
ref’s, free est. Daisy 604-727-2955
CAROLINE’S CLEANING
Mother/daughter team. Non toxic
products. Bonded. 778-233-7712
257 DRYWALL
DRYWALL REPAIRS, CEILING
TEXTURE SPRAYING. Small Job
Specialist. Mike at (604)341-2681
260 ELECTRICAL
#1167 LIC’D, BONDED. BBB Lge &
small jobs. Expert trouble shooter,
WCB. Low rates 24/7 604-617-1774
ALL KINDS OF ELECTRICAL ser-
vices. Reasonable rates. Certified
electrician. Call 604-805-6591.
YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service
Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td
We love small jobs! 604-568-1899
269 FENCING
Cedar & Concrete Fences and
Landscaping. Quality work, Free
Estimates. Call Mike 604-781-3870.
130 HELP WANTED
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
269 FENCING
PHIL’S FENCING: Custom blt cedar
fences/gates/lattice. Repairs, decks
& stairs, 604-591-1173, 351-1163
S & S CEDAR FENCING
Factory Direct Cedar Fence Panels
for Sale & Installation. 8291 No. 5
Road, Richmond. 604 275-3158
SAFARI CONSTRUCTION
Specializing in new residential
framing & form work.
(604)773-2482
281 GARDENING
Gardening Services 21 yrs exp.
Tree topping, pruning, trimming,
power raking, aeration, clean-up.
Free est. Michael 604-240-2881
** HON’S GARDEN SERVICE **
Lawn Maintenance, Power Raking
Trimming, Pruning Garden clean-up
New Sod, Weeding. Free Est. 604-
317-5328 honsgarden@shaw.ca
RICH BLACK double screen organ-
ic topsoil. Sand, gravel, River rock.
Delivery, 604-722-5252, 277-3073
Soil, bark, Sand, Gravel etc. $25/yd
+ $50 del. Also, Property Maint.
Services avail.Simon 604-230-0627
283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS
GUTTER CLEANING
& REPAIR
604-764-0399
287 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Additions, Reno’s & New Construc-
tion. Concrete Forming & Framing
Specialist. Call 604.218.3064
FAAM CONSTRUCTION
We can handle any renovation or
immediate work that needs to be
done. Structural or cosmetic. Exp’d.
Reas Rates. Pls call: 604-583-6844
NEW CONSTRUCTION
& RENOVATIONS
Comm - Res. S Decks S Patios S
Small & Large projects S
Garages S Add-ons
You name it we make it happen.
High Quality ~ 10 Years Exp.
Match or beat any written est.
Magnus Contracting &
Renovations
Call Today 604-868-7278
PAINTING, HOME RENOVA-
TIONS, tile setting, sundecks,
stairs. Free est. 778-686-0866.
PRP RENOVATIONS
Kitchens, baths, tiles, granite, floor-
ing, painting, plumbing, electrical.
Gutter cleaning. Free estimates.
Small jobs welcome. 604-764-0399.
288 HOME REPAIRS
GENERAL SMALL HOME Repairs
Your home / apt. (Richmond only).
Reynaldo 604-339-9402.
SEMI-RETIRED CARPENTER for
repairs or any kind of carpentry,
plumbing & electrical. 604 272-1589
300 LANDSCAPING
TOBIAS & LAIRD
EXCAVATION INC.
Yard Re-Development
Sewer, Drain Tile, Water Main,
Pool Excavation, Fill, Turf,
Ponds, Demo & Haul Away.
778-885-5009, 604-782-4322
130 HELP WANTED
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
311 MASONRY & BRICKWORK
MASONRY
& STONE
Pavers - Allan Block
Stone - Fireplaces
Stucco / Tile Repairs
604-951-4000
320 MOVING & STORAGE
2guyswithatruck.ca
Moving & Storage
Visa OK. 604-628-7136
AAA ADVANCE MOVING
Experts in all kinds of moving/pack-
ing. Excellent Service. Reas. rates!
Different from the rest. 604-861-8885
www.advancemovingbc.com
AFFORDABLE MOVING
Local & Long Distance
From $45/Hr
1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10 Ton Trucks
Insured ~ Licenced ~ 1 to 3 Men
Free estimate/Seniors discount
Residential~Commercial~Pianos
604-537-4140
SPARTAN Moving Ltd.
Fast & Reliable. Insured
Competitive rates. Wknd Specials.
Call Frank: (604) 435-8240
329 PAINTING & DECORATING

ABOVE THE REST “
Int. & Ext., Excellent Prices,
Res/Comm. Free Est.
Written Guarantee. No Hassle,
Quick Work, Insured, WCB.
Call (778)997-9582
A-TECH Services 604-230-3539
PAINT SPECIAL
3 rooms for $269, 2 coats
(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls
Cloverdale Premium quality paint.
NO PAYMENT until Job is
completed. Ask us about our
Laminate Flooring &
Maid Service!
www.paintspecial.com
332 PAVING/SEAL COATING
ALLAN CONST. & Asphalt. Brick,
concrete, drainage, foundation &
membrane repair. (604)618-2304 ~
604-820-2187.
338 PLUMBING
10% OFF if you Mention this AD!
AMAN’S PLUMBING SERVICES
Lic.gas fitter. Reas $. 778-895-2005
1ST CALL Plumbing, heating, gas,
licensed, insured, bonded. Local,
Prompt and Prof. 604-868-7062
MIN. EXPRESS PAGING
SYSTEM
Reasonable Rates
604-270-6338
T.A.K. PLUMBING & Heating Ltd.
Residential Plumbing - Licensed,
Insured & WCB. Tom @ 778-997-
8143 or takplumbing@yahoo.ca
130 HELP WANTED
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS
#1 Roofing Company in BC
All types of Roofing
Over 35 Years in Business
Call for your FREE ESTIMATE
604-588-0833
SALES@PATTARGROUP.COM
WWW.PATTARGROUP.COM
A & G ROOFING, all kinds of re-
roofing and new. Fully insured.
Free estimate. 604-537-3841
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING. Est. 20
yrs Asphalt, Shingles, Cedar. Clean
gutters $80. Gurpal 604-240-5362
AT NORTHWEST ROOFING
Re-roofing, Repair & New Roof
Specialists. Work Guar. BBB. WCB
10% Sen. Disc. Jag 778-892-1530
BEST CHOICE ROOFING
Spring Special - 20% OFF w/ ad
Reroofs, Torch-on, Asphalt & Cedar
Conversions. Tarlok 778-892-6444
EAST WEST ROOFING & SIDING
CO. Roofs & re-roofs. BBB &
WCB. 10% Discount, Insured.
Call 604-812-9721, 604-783-6437
J.J. ROOFING. New Roofs / Re-
Roofs / Repairs. Free Est. Ref’s.
WCB Insured. 10% off competitor’s
written quote. Jas @ 604-726-6345
P.K. ROOFING
All kinds of re-roofing & repairs.
Free est. Reasonable rates.
(604)961-7505, 278-0375
PRP ROOFING
REROOF, NEW ROOFS & repairs.
Insured, WCB. Free estimates.
15 yrs. exp. Call 604-764-0399.
356 RUBBISH REMOVAL
RECYCLE-IT!
#1 EARTH FRIENDLY
JUNK REMOVAL
Make us your first call!
Reasonable Rates. Fast,
Friendly & Reliable Service.
604.587.5865
www.recycle-it-now.com
#1 AAA Rubbish
Removal
21 Years Serving Rmd.
Residential & Commercial
Clean Courteous Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Joe 604-250-5481
HAUL - AWAY
Rubbish Removal
House-Garden-Garage
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimate or Appointment
Mike: 604-241-7141
PETS
477 PETS
BERNESE Mountain Dog Pups.
Champion line, training. $1500.
604-740-0832 or 604-740-2986.
CATS & KITTENS GALORE, TLC
has for adoption spayed & neutered
adult cats.604-309-5388 / 856-4866
ENGLISH BULLDOG puppies, 1
male 2 f/m, pb, mircochiped, de-
wormed, Vet check, healthy guar’d
Call 604-970-3807
PETS
477 PETS
FRENCH BULLDOG PUPPIES,
reg. micro chip, health guarant’d.
1st shot vet ✔ $1800 778-908-9172
GERMAN SHEPHERDS, beautiful
p/b, black & tan, long-haired, shots
& vet checked. Call (604)820-4644
GERMAN SHEPHERDS: One F, 2
Puppies, 1M, 1F, 1st shots, de-
wormed. $550. 778-863-6332.
Golden Doodle puppies. Ready to
go to a new home. $300-$500.
(604)796-2474
GOLDEN DOODLES, 6M/4F
avail Sept 9, $1250. (778)737-0146
www.foxycharliepuppies.com
Golden Retriever P/B, vet & shots,
ready Aug. 9. Pics avail., $600
Rosedale (604)845-7434
timbur6@telus.net
GORGEOUS RUSSIAN Blue Cat
fem., spayed c/w home, toys, car-
ry on, litter box. $350 604-538-2218
JACK RUSSEL PUPPIES tri-colour
tails docked 1st shots, vet checked
(604)820-5225
KITTENS, 3 black & white, male, 11
weeks old. $20 each. 604-557-1871
LAB PUPS CKC Reg’d, 3 yellow 4
blk. Champ. blood lines, 1st shots,
dewormed, tattooed, vet ✔. $800/
ea Ready Aug.8 604-857-9192.
NEED A GOOD HOME for a good
dog or a good dog for a good
home? We adopt dogs!
www.856-dogs.com or call: 604-
856-3647.
Newfoundlander pups, P/B, blk or
choco brown, 3 wks. old. (604)796-
2926 (604)819-1466 No Sun calls
PUG puppies for sale, fawn, 1
male, 1 female, vet checked & first
shots. 12 wks old. (604)860-5010
RABBITS pedigree REW Angora.
great fibre, good temperment. 4-H
or show. $80-$100 (604)534-8619
Teddy Bear Yorkies, adorable, 10
wk, ready. 778-878-4424 www.
ouradorableyorkies.blogspot.com
YORKSHIRE TERRIERS 3 puppies
born June 2, tails docked, vet ✔, &
shots done $750 (604)820-3320
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
533 FERTILIZERS
WEED FREE MUSHROOM
Manure 13 yds $140 or Well
Rotted $160/10yds. Free Delivery
Richmond area. 604-856-8877
548 FURNITURE
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
RICHMOND MOVING SALE. Great
Prices. Bdrm suite, 6 pce, queen;
desk 6 drawers, coffee & end ta-
bles, oak & glass; large office size
OLD oak desk & chair; black leather
recliner; 2 old rocking chairs; 4 old
trunks; 2 bookcases; stereo & TV
(good working order); 3 pce chil-
drens bdrm set; Large deep freeze
plus misc items. (604)274-5393
560 MISC. FOR SALE
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best
price. Best quality. All shapes &
colours available. 1-866-652-6837
www.thecoverguy.com
One Peavey base amp $1500obo.
604-274-6491
566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
COLLECTORS SAXOPHONES
Baritone 1926 Silver, CM Conn Ltd,
original with Case, good shape,
$3500 consider trade for Saprano
Sax. Tenor Saxophone, Buffet
Champion SA Paris, good shape
$1250 Call 604-534-2997
PIANO & BENCH Mason & Risch -
58-1/2 x 40. $1200: Call (604)542-
1035
PIANO KIMBALL UPRIGHT, very
good condition, wonderful mellow
tone $650 obo (604)826-5585
REAL ESTATE
603 ACREAGE
80+ PROPERTIES for sale
throughout BC. Acreages,
lakefront, oceanfront, building
lots, & more. Prices start at
$29,500. View virtual tours on
website. Niho Land & Cattle
Co. Ltd. Phone: 604-606-
7900. Email: sales@niho.com
Website: www.niho.com/bcc
551 GARAGE SALES
12880 RAILWAY Ave. (past Monc-
ton St), Richmond Garage/Moving
Sale. Multi-Family. Sat only Aug 7
9:00 a.m. small household items,
Christmas lights & decor, crafts,
mirrors, used clothing
8SSYVZEPYIHVIEHIVW
8lack Press and the 8C
SPCA suppcrt respcn-
slble pet euardlan-
shlp and the humane
treatment cf anlmals.
8efcre buylne a new
puppy, ensure the seller
has prcvlded a hleh
level cf welfare tc the
anlmal and the breedlne
parents. Fcr a ccmplete
eulde tc ccnslderatlcns
when acqulrlne a new
pet, vlslt spca.bc.ca.
TRY A bcclassified.com CLASSIFIED AD.
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RICHMOND STEEL
RECYCLING LTD.
(604) 324-4656 11760 Mitchell Rd., Richmond
We pay for scrap cars
Servicing the entire province of B.C. for over 35 years.
COMMODITIES WE PURCHASE
Car Bodies • Tin • Steel • Industrial Scrap • Other Metals
DRIVE-IN SERVICE FOR SCRAP VEHICLES!
REAL ESTATE
603 ACREAGE
80+ PROPERTIES for sale
throughout BC. Acreages,
lakefront, oceanfront, building
lots, & more. Prices start at
$29,500. View virtual tours on
website. Niho Land & Cattle
Co. Ltd. Phone: 604-606-
7900. Email: sales@niho.com
Website: www.niho.com/bcc
612 BUSINESSES FOR SALE
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
Restaurant for sale. Owner retiring,
established clientele, 20yrs. Serious
inq. (604)793-8735, Chilliwack area
625 FOR SALE BY OWNER
BLAINE, WASHINGTON. Victorian
heritage 2 bdrm home, 1.5 baths, 2
blks from Blaine arena, rv prkg, cor-
ner lot, possible terms, motivated
sellers. Asking $235,000. Call 1
(360)332-9548
Richmond
Price reduced $350,000
Emerald Place
304 - 8280 Westminster Hwy
1200+ s.f., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, w/i
closets, 5 min walk to Canada
Line. Immediate possession.
To view 9am-9pm.
Call Alex owner 604-276-2248
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
REAL ESTATE
627 HOMES WANTED
* SELL YOUR HOME FAST *
Buying Any Price, Cond., Location.
NO COMMISSIONS ~ NO FEES ~
No Risk Home Buying Centre
(604)435-5555
WE BUY HOUSES
Older Home? Damaged Home?
Need Repairs? Behind on
Payments? Quick CASH!
Call Us First! 604.657.9422
660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE
HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS
www.dannyevans.ca
Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley
690F NANAIMO
REAL ESTATE INVESTING
BUS TOURS TO NANAIMO
August 12 & 24, 2010
$79 per person or $99 per couple
Full-day tour includes bus, ferry
fare, lunch, tour of the city & devel-
opments. Learn real estate invest-
ing strategies from award-winning
BC & Alberta Cash Flow Investment
Realtor, Wendy Cheung.
bcret@shaw.ca or (604)-722-2009
http://bustour.mybigape.com
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
7280 LINDSAY ROAD. 1 bdrm apt.
$780/mo incls heat & h/w, 1 prkg,
604-321-9095 or 778-822-2660
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
RICHMOND
1 & 2 Bdrms
Available Immediately
Located in central
Richmond, close to all
amenities & Kwantlen
College. Rent includes heat
and hot water.Sorry no pets.
Call 604-830-4002 or
604-830-8246
Visit our website:
www.aptrentals.net
RICHMOND 2 bdrm apt, 1 bath and
livingroom, N/S, N/P. $1200/mo.
Avail now. Call 604-274-4001.
RICHMOND, 5888 Dover Cres.,
quite 1 bdrm apt., 2nd flr, 675 sf, 5
appls, river view from balcony, 1 car
prkg, NS/NP, avail. now. $1,200.
Phone 604-613-3866
RICHMOND. Busell St. 1 & 2 bdrm
apts. Close to all amens. Parking
included. Call 604-880-8738
Richmond
Ocean Residences
11671 7th Avenue
Condo-like bldg with great
views a must see. Modern
living, beaut grounds incl’d
ponds & fountains. Close to
Steveston and markets;
Many stes with ocean views.
Indoor/outdoor pkg, lockers,
party rm, fitness rm, sauna,
outdoor pool, games rm,
social rm, BBQ Area. Bach,
1 & 2 bdrm stes from $800.
For more info & viewing call
Irina 778-788-1872
Email:
rentoceanresidences
@gmail.com
Professionally managed by
Gateway Property Management
STEVESTON. Beautiful Waterfront
condo, 2 bdrm + den, 2 bath, h/w
flrs, 6 s/s appl., sec parking. Np/ns.
Available Aug 15th. 604-657-1788
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
RICHMOND
QUEENSGATE GARDENS
11020 Williams Rd.
Spacious 2 & 3 bedroom town-
houses. 6 Appl’s., balcony, 2 car
garage, 2 full bath, gas f/p. 1
Year lease required. No Pets.
Professionally Managed by
Colliers International
Call 604-841-2665
WOODRIDGE 2br,1ba. 7431Minoru
Pool, Gym & Spa. 1000sf SE corne
unit, Top floor, sundeck, 1300/m.
No pet, 1 prkg, 604-771-6596
715 DUPLEXES/4PLEXES
Richmond. #1 & Williams. 3 bdrm
upper 1.5 bath lrg liv rm/kitchen utils
incl Sept.1 $1150. 604-270-2225
RICHMOND 2 bdrm grnd flr duplex
suite. Walk to schools. 4931
McLure Ave. Sh/Lndry. S/F/DW.
$1140 inc utils. N/P. N/S. Ref. req.
604-274-2222.
736 HOMES FOR RENT
#4/FRANCIS. 3 BDRM HOUSE, all
appls, sgle garage, avail immed,
$1600/mo. N/P. Ph: (604)271-0844
RICHMOND, West. #1/Williams. 3
Bdrm, 1.5 baths. Nr shops/park.
Lndry. $1600/mo. 604-375-3986.
741 OFFICE/RETAIL
ON CANADA LINE
6700 #3 ROAD, RICHMOND
800 sq. ft. Ideal for Travel, Insu-
rance etc. Parking available. 604-
277-0966 or 604-273-1126
750 SUITES, LOWER
HUGE 1 BDRM reno’d bsmt suite
avail asap. Close to everything. No
pets/smoking. Laundry inc.
$750/month inc utils. Garden
City/Williams area. 778-840-1855/
604-279-1855
IRONWOOD. Bright 2 bd g/l. New
carpets. No Pets/Smoking. Shrd
lndry. Ref’s. $950. 604-250-9872
RICHMOND, 11111 Bird Rd. New
1bdr ste, priv garage, immed, N/P,
$750. 604-273-6129/604-603-7936
RICHMOND 1Bd g/l $795 New
home, sep ent, incl util Avail now
refs Suit 1 or 2 ns/np 604-314-1123
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
RENTALS
750 SUITES, LOWER
RICHMOND: 1 Bdrm ste. Incl all
utils. No lndry, N/S, N/P. $750/mo.
Avail now. Call: (604)808-4297
RICHMOND #2/Moncton 1 lrg bdrm
& lrg liv/rm. Reno’d. $875+1/3 hydro
Incl cbl. Ns/np. Now. (604)270-1010
RICHMOND. #5/Cambie. 1 bdrm.
np/ns. $650/mo incls utils. Avail
Aug. 1. 778-885-8245
RICHMOND beautiful 1 bdrm g/lvl
newly reno’d kitch, nice lrg b/yard,
nr amens/bus, shared w/d, suit 1
person, ns/np, $875 incl utils/cable.
Avail Aug1. Call eves 604-272-3033
RICHMOND, BRIGHT 2 bdrm,
$950 incl. utils & cable. Avail. now.
Phone (604)275-4423
RICHMOND. NEW clean & bright,
1 bdrm, new dw, sep. alarm, sep
entry, own lndry, utils incl, $850/mo.
Immed. NS/NP (778) 858-3607
RICHMOND: Steveston & Railway.
Lrg 2 bdrm grnd lvl suite, bright &
airy, incl utils $885/mo. N/S, N/P.
Avail now. Call: 604-271-0739
RICHMOND, West. #1/Williams. 2
Bdrm. Nr shops. N/S, N/P. Incl utils,
& lndry. $975/mo. 604-375-3986.
752 TOWNHOUSES
✰ RENTAL ✰
✰ INCENTIVES ✰
Richmond, East / New
Westminster: 3 storey
Townhouses with 5/appls,
2/bath, garage, f/p.
From $1440/mo.
Call 604-522-1050
STEVESTON TOWNHOUSE.
New - 2 bdrm, 2 bath fur-
nished. Rooftop patio, utilities
incl. N/S. $2200./mo. Avail Au-
gust 1st. Ph. (604) 802-1721
TRANSPORTATION
810 AUTO FINANCING
$0 DOWN & we make your 1st pay-
ment at auto credit fast. Need a ve-
hicle? Good or Bad credit call
Stephanie 1-877-792-0599.
www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309.
TRANSPORTATION
810 AUTO FINANCING
818 CARS - DOMESTIC
AT A CLICK of a mouse,
www.BCLocalBiz.com is your
local source to over 300,000
businesses!
838 RECREATIONAL/SALE
1989 Travelmate 23 ft. 5th wheel.
V/good condition. 1 owner. $5,500
obo. 604-274-6392, 604-328-9636
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE
REMOVAL
ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT
$$$ PAID FOR SOME
604.683.2200
AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
Minimum $100 cash for full size
vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673
ALL VEHICLES
WANTED
DONATE YOUR
VEHICLE & BE A HERO
◆ FREE TOW
◆ TAX RECEIPT
24 - 48hr. Service
604.408.2277
TRANSPORTATION
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
The Scrapper
MARINE
912 BOATS
WANTED TO BUY 2 small o/b mo-
tors from 2HP to 1HP. Motor
doesn’t need to run 604-319-5720
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
That in accordance with the
Warehouse Lien, there will be
sold by Public Auction at Love’s
Auctioneers & Appraisers Ltd.,
2720 #5 Road, Richmond, BC
V6X 2T3, commencing @ 6 p.m.
and at subsequent sales thereaf-
ter until sold. The following stor-
age lot:
Name:
Eiji & Sakae Toda
Description:
Household & Personal Goods
BULK DELIVERIES
Call 604-278-9580
We deliver up to 3 yards of soil and
bark and up to 1 yard of sand.
P L A N T L A N D
BUILDING & RENOVATIONS
OVER 30 YEARS
EXPERIENCE
CALL FOR ESTIMATE
www.gen-west.com 604-812-8350
“YOU DREAM IT, WE BUILD IT”
GENERAL CONTRACTING & RENOVATIONS
To advertise in the
Home Service Guide
Call Rick
604-247-3729
email: adcontrol@richmondreview.com
GARBAGE/JUNK REMOVAL
“HAUL ANYTHING…BUT DEAD BODIES!”
220.JUNK
(5865)
6
0
4
185-9040 BLUNDELL ROAD, RICHMOND
SUPPORT LOCAL
SAME DAY SERVICE!
OVER
2O YEARS
SERVICE
BradsJunkRemoval.com BradsJunkRemoval.com
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
BUILD NEW HOMES
2 - 5 - 10 Warranties
General Contractor
Total Renovations & Additions
•Licensed • Insured
604-985-8270
www.a-diamondhome.com
•Kitchens • Baths
•Drywall •Painting
•Garage •Roofs •Decks
•Driveways •Asphalt
•Concrete •Drain tiles
•Landscaping •Excavating
•Contracting
HOME SERVICE GUIDE
REVIEW
the richmond
RENOVATIONS
M.S. MAINTENANCE
& RENOVATIONS
Insured / WCB
Mike Favel • 604-341-2681
Plumbing • Electrical • Woodwork • Drywall • Bathrooms
Door Repairs: Patio • Pocket • Bifolds • Shower • Mirror
and I’m a
Nice Guy!
LANDSCAPING
Eva 604 813-1964
Design, Installation,
Waterfeatures & more!
www.sensiblelandscapes.com w
RENOVATIONS
AA CONTRACTOR
COMPLETE HOME RENOVATIONS
• Home Repair
• Bathroom, Kitchen Remodeling
• Fence, Deck Renewing
• Free Estimate and Low Cost
CALL ALLAN 778-229-7880
PLUMBING & HEATING
604-868-7062
Licensed, Insured & Bonded
Local Plumbers
• Plumbing Repairs
• Boilers & Furnaces
• Gas
Water heater Special
Installed From $735
S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0 T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w • P a g e 1 9
Visit our website
to check out and
register for
hundreds of
parks, recreation
and cultural
programs.
www.richmond.ca/
register
k
u
d
o
s
Kudos is a
weekly feature
showcasing all
the good deeds
around town.
E-mail submis-
sions to news@
richmondr
eview.com
Contemporary, Comprehensive & Compassionate
Wal k-Ins & Emergenci es Wel come
Affinity Dental Clinic
Located at Richmond Centre next to Tim Hortons
DENTAL
FINANCING
DentalCard™
604-821-1111
Complete Smile Makeovers • Implants •
Porcelain Veneers • Crowns & Bridges •
Tooth-colored Fillings • Root Canal Therapy •
Intraoral Camera • Digital X-rays •
Oral Surgery • Zoom2 Whitening •
VelScope (Cancer Screening ) •
FAMILY, COSMETIC &
GENERAL DENTISTRY
Early Morning, Evening & Weekend Appointments • New Patients Welcome • Insurance Plans Accepted
sake | sushi bar
120 - 9020 capstan way (at garden city)
dine in | take out 604.821.9834
open seven days
dinner
5.00 - midnight
BRING IN THIS AD FOR
10% OFF* YOUR BILL
*SOME EXCEPTIONS APPLY.

The Heart and Stroke
Foundation’s High
School Summer
Research program
provided 10 students
from across B.C. with
the opportunity to
work alongside es-
tablished cardiovas-
cular researchers in
labs during the past
few weeks. Michael
Cheng, a student
from A.R. MacNeill
worked in the lab of
Dr. Leslie Burtnick
at the UBC Centre
for Blood Research.
Michael aided in the
extraction of actin
preparative from
rabbit muscle tissue
using centrifugation
and gel filtration
chromatography.
“Biology has always
been my favourite
subject out of the
three sciences I am
currently taking, and
I am certain that my
secondary studies
will be mainly focus-
ing on biochemistry
or medical biology,”
Michael explains.
Richmond Hospital Foundation was presented with a $5,000 cheque from BMO
Bank of Montreal. This donation will go toward Richmond Hospital’s Emergen-
cy Pediatric Resuscitation Room. It will help to fund the purchase of urgently
needed advanced medical equipment including defibrillator with child-sized
paddles, an extra-sensitive monitor that can track the oxygen in a child’s blood-
stream, and other vital life-saving equipment that are designed especially for
kids.
Cadet Shanie Yin of Richmond received the award as the top cadet in 14 Platoon
of the first intake of general military training at Vernon Army Cadet Summer
Training Centre. Presenting the award is Vernon Fire Chief Jeff Carlisle. Cadet
Yim is a member of 2381 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps in Richmond. Yim
and 142 other army cadets attended the Army Cadet General Military Training
Course which sees the cadets introduced to communal living, participate in an
overnight basic trades field exercise and other training.
P a g e 2 0 • T h e R i c h m o n d R e v i e w S a t u r d a y , J u l y 3 1 , 2 0 1 0
For more about dental implants and a FREE Consultation, please call.
Want them to
Stop Floating?
Dentures wear and the mouth and jaw
change over time. Your old dentures can’t
adapt to these inevitable changes.

R Sore and irritated tissues
RThinning lips and sagging mouth
RLooking older than you actually are
RToothless looking smile
R Your face looks shorter “chin too close to
your nose” when your teeth are together
RDentures fall out when speaking or laughing
RDeepening Wrinkles around the nose and mouth
RHeadaches, neck pain or ringing in your ears
RYou are saying “no” to social events to avoid embarrassment
Here are a few signs to indicate you
should have your dentures checked:
West Coast
DENTURE CLI NI C
#370 - 6091 Gi l ber t Road • 604- 278- 5447 • TANYA HUNT RD

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