P. 1
SOCAN Application Record in Tariff 22 Case (PUBLIC)

SOCAN Application Record in Tariff 22 Case (PUBLIC)

1.0

|Views: 1,762|Likes:
Published by barry sookman
SOCAN application for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada on whether offering an online preview is a fair dealing
SOCAN application for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada on whether offering an online preview is a fair dealing

More info:

Published by: barry sookman on Aug 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/25/2012

pdf

text

original

Sections

Court File No.

: IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CANADA (ON APPEAL FROM THE FEDERAL COURT OF APPEAL) BETWEEN: SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant (Applicant on Judicial Review) - and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents (Respondents on Judicial Review)

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL (Pursuant to s. 40, Supreme Court Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. S-26, as amended) REDACTED VERSION

Martin W. Mason Matthew S. Estabrooks Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Barristers and Solicitors 160 Elgin Street, Suite 2600 Ottawa, ON K1P 1C3 Tel: (613) 786-0159 Fax: (613) 788-3451 Counsel for the Applicant

Gerald (Jay) L. Kerr-Wilson/ Anne Ko Fasken Martineau LLP 55 Metcalfe Street Suite 1300 Ottawa, ON K1P 6L5 Tel: (613) 236-3882 Counsel for the Respondents Bell Canada, Rogers Communications Inc., Rogers Wireless Partnership, Shaw Cablesystems G.P., and Telus Communications Inc. J. Thomas Curry Marguerite Ethier Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP 130 Adelaide Street, West Suite 2600 Toronto, ON M5A 3P5 Tel: (416) 865-3096 Counsel for the Respondent CRIA Michael Koch Dina Graser Goodmans LLP Suite 2400 250 Yonge Street Toronto, ON M5B 2M6 Tel: (416) 597-5156 Counsel for the Respondent Apple Canada Inc. Casey M. Chisick Tim Pinos Cassels Brock &Blackwell LLP 1200 Scotia Plaza 40 King Street, West Toronto, ON M5H 3C2 Tel: (416) 869-5784 Counsel for the Respondent CMRRASODRAC Inc.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Tab 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Notice of Application for Leave to Appeal Certificate of the Applicant regarding confidentiality Confidentiality Order of Létourneau J.A. dated July 7, 2009 Reasons for Decision of the Copyright Board dated October 18, 2007 Tariff 22.A certified November 24, 2007 Reasons for Decision of the Federal Court of Appeal dated May 14, 2010 Order of the Federal Court of Appeal dated May 14, 2010 Memorandum of Argument Part I – Facts Part II – Issues Part III – Argument Part IV – Submissions on Costs Part V – Order Sought Part VI – Table of Authorities Part VII – Statutes Relied Upon Page 1 4 6 13 78 84 99 101 102 109 109 120 120 121 122

-1-

Court File No.: IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CANADA (ON APPEAL FROM THE FEDERAL COURT OF APPEAL) BETWEEN: SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant (Applicant on Judicial Review) - and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents (Respondents on Judicial Review)

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL (Pursuant to s. 40, Supreme Court Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. S-26, as amended)

TAKE NOTICE that the Society Of Composers, Authors And Music Publishers Of Canada hereby applies for leave to appeal to the Court pursuant to s. 40(1) of the Supreme Court Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. S-26, as amended, from the judgment of the Federal Court of Appeal made May 14, 2010; AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that this application for leave is made on the following grounds which are of national and public importance: 1. The purpose of the Copyright Act is to strike a balance between encouraging the disclosure of new works for the advancement of learning and rewarding authors and

-2-

copyright owners for their creative works; the defence of fair dealing is an important tool in achieving this purpose. 2. The decisions below threaten to disrupt the balance that the Copyright Act is intended to strike by adopting an overly expansive approach to the defence of fair dealing. Because the copyright-protected works, copyright owners and copyright users in this case are typical of those involved in the normal trade in copyright-protected content, preserving the balance between creators and users in this situation is an issue of public and national importance such that guidance from this Court on the scope and application of the fair dealing defence is warranted.

3.

Dated at Ottawa, Ontario, this 13th day of August, 2010.

________________________ Martin W. Mason Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Barristers and Solicitors 160 Elgin Street, Suite 2600 Ottawa, ON K1P 1C3 Tel: (613) 786-0159 Fax: (613) 788-3451 Counsel for the Applicant ORIGINAL TO: AND TO: THE REGISTRAR Gerald (Jay) L. Kerr-Wilson Anne Ko Fasken Martineau LLP 55 Metcalfe Street Suite 1300 Ottawa, ON K1P 6L5 Counsel for the Respondents Bell Canada, Rogers Communications Inc., Rogers Wireless Partnership, Shaw Cablesystems G.P., and Telus Communications Inc.

-3-

AND TO:

J. Thomas Curry Marguerite Ethier Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP 130 Adelaide Street, West Suite 2600 Toronto, ON M5A 3P5 Counsel for the Respondent CRIA

AND TO:

Michael Koch Dina Graser Goodmans LLP Suite 2400 250 Yonge Street Toronto, ON M5B 2M6 Counsel for the Respondent Apple Canada Inc.

AND TO:

Casey M. Chisick Tim Pinos Cassels Brock &Blackwell LLP 1200 Scotia Plaza 40 King Street, West Toronto, ON M5H 3C2 Counsel for the Respondent CMRRA-SODRAC Inc.

NOTICE TO THE RESPONDENT: A respondent may serve and file a memorandum in response to this application for leave to appeal within 30 days after service of the application. If no response is filed within that time, the Registrar will submit this application for leave to appeal to the Court for consideration pursuant to section 43 of the Supreme Court Act.

-4-

Court File No.: IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CANADA (ON APPEAL FROM THE FEDERAL COURT OF APPEAL) BETWEEN: SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant (Applicant on Judicial Review) - and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents (Respondents on Judicial Review) CERTIFICATE OF COUNSEL FOR THE APPLICANT (Pursuant to Rule 25 of the Rules of the Supreme Court of Canada)

I, Martin W. Mason, counsel for the Applicant hereby certify that: (a) there is a Confidentiality Order on designated documents produced by the parties issued by Létourneau J.A. on July 7, 2009 pursuant to Rule 151 of the Federal Courts Rules. A copy of this order is included in this Application; and

-5-

(b) there is not any confidential information on the file that should not be accessible to the public by virtue of specific legislation.

Dated at Ottawa, Ontario, this 13th day of August, 2010. ________________________ Martin W. Mason Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Barristers and Solicitors 160 Elgin Street, Suite 2600 Ottawa, ON K1P 1C3 Tel: (613) 786-0159 Fax: (613) 788-3451 Counsel for the Applicant

-6-

-7-

-8-

-9-

- 10 -

- 11 -

- 12 -

- 13 Copyright Board Canada Commission du droit d’auteur Canada

Collective Administration of Performing Rights and of Communication Rights

Gestion collective du droit d’exécution et de communication

Copyright Act, subsection 68(3)

Loi sur le droit d’auteur, paragraphe 68.3

File: Public Performance of Musical Works

Dossier : Exécution publique d’œuvres musicales

STATEMENT OF ROYALTIES TO BE COLLECTED BY SOCAN FOR THE COMMUNICATION TO THE PUBLIC BY TELECOMMUNICATION, IN CANADA, OF MUSICAL OR DRAMATICO-MUSICAL WORKS

TARIF DES REDEVANCES À PERCEVOIR PAR LA SOCAN POUR LA COMMUNICATION AU PUBLIC PAR TÉLÉCOMMUNICATION, AU CANADA, D’ŒUVRES MUSICALES OU DRAMATICO-MUSICALES

[Tariff No. 22.A (Internet – Online Music Services) 1996-2006]

[Tarif no 22.A (Internet – Services de musique en ligne) 1996-2006]

DECISION OF THE BOARD

DÉCISION DE LA COMMISSION

Reasons delivered by: Mr. Justice William J. Vancise Mr. Stephen J. Callary Mrs. Sylvie Charron

Motifs exprimés par : M. le juge William J. Vancise M. Stephen J. Callary Me Sylvie Charron

Date of Decision October 18, 2007

Date de la décision Le 18 octobre 2007

- 14 -1Ottawa, October 18, 2007 File: Public Performance of Musical Works Ottawa, le 18 octobre 2007 Dossier : Exécution publique d’œuvres musicales Motifs de la décision homologuant le tarif 22.A de la SOCAN (Internet – Services de musique en ligne) pour les années 1996 à 2006 I. INTRODUCTION [1] Il s’agit de la seconde partie d’un processus en deux phases visant à établir un tarif pour la communication d’œuvres musicales sur Internet. La Société canadienne des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique (SOCAN) a déposé des projets de tarifs pour les années1996 à 2006.1 En 1996, la Commission a décidé de traiter les questions juridiques et de compétence séparément de la question tarifaire. Les audiences de ce qu’il est convenu d’appeler la phase I ont eu lieu en 1998. En 1999, la Commission a rendu une décision,2 qui a fait l’objet d’un contrôle judiciaire de la Cour d’appel fédérale, 3 puis d’un pourvoi auprès de la Cour suprême du Canada.4 [2] Dans son examen de la décision de la Commission, la Cour d’appel fédérale s’est prononcée sur trois questions importantes. En premier lieu, les fournisseurs de services Internet (FSI) peuvent invoquer l’alinéa 2.4(1)b)5 de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur6 pour la plupart des services et installations matérielles qu’ils offrent, car ils ne font que fournir à un tiers, le fournisseur de contenu, les moyens de télécommunication nécessaires pour communiquer une œuvre. Cependant, la mise en cache n’est pas « nécessaire » au fonctionnement d’Internet, et la Commission avait donc commis une erreur en concluant que ceux qui mettent un contenu dans une cache peuvent invoquer l’alinéa 2.4(1)b). Deuxièmement, la personne qui facilite une communication ne l’autorise généralement pas, à moins qu’elle exerce un degré important de contrôle sur les activités de ceux qui offrent un contenu. Troisièmement, une communication provenant de l’extérieur du Canada peut être une communication au Canada dans la mesure où elle a un lien réel et important avec le Canada.

Reasons for the decision certifying SOCAN Tariff 22.A (Internet – Online Music Services) for the years 1996 to 2006 I. INTRODUCTION [1] This is the second part of a two-stage process to establish a tariff for the communication of musical works over the Internet. The Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) filed proposed tariffs for the years 1996 to 2006.1 In 1996, the Board decided to deal with legal and jurisdictional issues separately from the determination of the tariff. Hearings into the so-called Phase I were held in 1998. In 1999, the Board rendered its decision,2 which was the subject of judicial review by the Federal Court of Appeal 3 and subsequently appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada.4

[2] The Federal Court of Appeal made three important rulings when it reviewed the Board’s decision. First, Internet service providers (ISP) can avail themselves of paragraph 2.4(1)(b)5 of the Copyright Act6 for most of the services and facilities they offer as they only provide the means of telecommunication necessary for another person, the content provider, to communicate a work. However, caching is not “necessary” to the operation of the Internet; as a result, the Board erred in finding that those who cache material can avail themselves of paragraph 2.4(1)(b). Second, the person who facilitates a communication generally does not authorize it unless he exerts a significant level of control over the activities of those who post content. Third, a communication that originates outside Canada can be a communication in Canada as long as it has a real and substantial connection with Canada.

- 15 -2[3] The Supreme Court of Canada affirmed all but one of these findings, ruling that caching enhances the Internet economy and efficiency and as such, is “necessary” within the meaning of paragraph 2.4(1)(b) of the Act. The decision contains a number of statements that are worthy of note. First, a communication occurs when music is transmitted from the host server to the end user. Second, the content provider, who makes the work available for communication, effects the telecommunication, not the host server provider. Third, in terms of the Internet, the relevant connecting factors in determining whether there is a real and substantial connection between Canada and a communication include the situs of the content provider, the host server, the intermediaries and the end user; the weight to be given to any factor varies with the circumstances and nature of the dispute. The decision also states that an Internet communication that crosses one or more national boundaries “occurs” at a minimum in the country of transmission and in the country of reception. Fourth, those who confine themselves to providing “a conduit” for information communicated by others fall within paragraph 2.4(1)(b); intermediaries whose participation is not content neutral might not. Each transmission must be looked at individually to determine whether the intermediary is fulfilling a function that triggers liability. Fifth, when massive amounts of non-copyrighted material are made accessible, it is not possible to impute to the ISP an intention to authorize the download of copyrighted material, though liability may attach if the service provider has notice that a content provider has posted infringing material on its system and fails to take remedial action. [3] La Cour suprême du Canada a confirmé ces conclusions, sauf une, statuant que la mise en cache améliore l’économie et l’efficacité d’Internet et qu’à ce titre, elle est « nécessaire » au sens de l’alinéa 2.4(1)b) de la Loi. L’arrêt contient un certain nombre d’affirmations dignes de mention. Premièrement, il y a communication lors de la transmission de musique du serveur hôte à l’utilisateur final. Deuxièmement, l’auteur de la télécommunication est le fournisseur de contenu qui rend l’œuvre disponible pour la communication, et non le fournisseur du serveur hôte. Troisièmement, en ce qui concerne Internet, les facteurs de rattachement pertinent pour établir s’il existe un lien réel et important entre le Canada et la communication visée comprennent le situs du fournisseur de contenu, du serveur hôte, des intermédiaires et de l’utilisateur final; l’importance à accorder à chacun varie selon les circonstances de l’espèce et la nature du litige. L’arrêt statue également qu’une communication Internet qui franchit une ou plusieurs frontières nationales « se produit » au moins dans le pays de transmission et dans le pays de réception. Quatrièmement, celui qui se contente d’être « un agent » permettant à autrui de communiquer bénéficie de l’application de l’alinéa 2.4(1)b); les intermédiaires dont la participation a une incidence sur le contenu ne le pourraient pas. Chaque transmission doit être examinée individuellement pour établir si l’intermédiaire remplit une fonction qui engage sa responsabilité. Cinquièmement, lorsqu’une quantité phénoménale de données non protégées par le droit d’auteur sont rendues accessibles, il n’est pas possible d’imputer au FSI l’intention d’autoriser le téléchargement de fichiers protégés par le droit d’auteur, encore que la responsabilité du fournisseur de services peut être engagée si celui-ci sait qu’un fournisseur de contenu rend du matériel illicite disponible grâce à son système et ne prend pas de mesures pour y remédier. [4] La transmission de musique sur Internet touche d’autres droits que ceux de la SOCAN. Le 16 mars 2007, la Commission homologuait un tarif pour la reproduction d’œuvres musicales

[4] The transmission of music over the Internet involves rights other than SOCAN’s. On March 16, 2007, the Board certified a tariff for the reproduction of musical works in permanent

- 16 -3downloads, limited downloads and on-demand streams of music transmitted over the Internet.7 As will become clear, that decision will be important in determining the tariff in this instance. livrées sur Internet en téléchargements permanents, en téléchargements limités et en transmissions sur demande.7 Comme on le verra clairement plus loin, cette décision sera importante pour l’établissement du tarif en l’espèce. [5] Pour les motifs suivants, nous avons décidé pour l’instant de nous attarder uniquement aux utilisations visées dans la décision CSI – musique en ligne. D’abord, cette partie du tarif produira fort probablement le gros des redevances payables en vertu du tarif 22. Ensuite, traiter des autres utilisations que vise le tarif 22 soulève des questions administratives et sémantiques nécessitant de longues consultations avec les parties. Nous homologuerons le tarif visant ces autres utilisations plus tard. Cela dit, pour des raisons de commodité et de cohérence, nous avons rédigé les parties descriptive et analytique des présents motifs comme si nous traitions du tarif dans son ensemble. II. LES PARTIES [6] Conformément au paragraphe 67.1(2) de la Loi, la SOCAN a déposé un projet de tarif 22 pour chacune des années allant de 1996 à 2006 inclusivement. Le tarif vise la communication au public par télécommunication d’œuvres musicales au moyen de transmissions Internet ou autres moyens semblables. Chaque tarif a été publié dans la Gazette du Canada comme le prévoit la Loi. [7] Les utilisateurs éventuels et leurs représentants ont été avisés à chaque fois de leur droit de s’opposer au projet de tarif. Un certain nombre d’entre eux ont contesté un ou plusieurs des projets. Au moment de l’audience, les opposantes étaient Bell Canada (Bell), l’Association canadienne des radiodiffuseurs (ACR), la Société Radio-Canada (SRC), l’Association de l’industrie canadienne de l’enregistrement (CRIA), Apple Canada Inc. (Apple), l’Association nationale des radios étudiantes et communautaires (ANREC),

[5] For the following reasons, we have decided to deal at this time only with those uses that are targeted in CSI – Online Music. First, this part of the tariff will, in all likelihood, generate the bulk of Tariff 22 royalties. Second, dealing with the other uses targeted in Tariff 22 raises administrative and wording issues that will require extensive consultations with the parties. The tariff for these uses will be certified at a later date. That being said, for the sake of convenience and coherence, the descriptive and analytical parts of these reasons are written as if we were dealing with all of proposed Tariff 22.

II. THE PARTIES [6] Pursuant to subsection 67.1(2) of the Act, SOCAN filed a Tariff 22 proposal for each year from 1996 to 2006 inclusive. The tariff targets the communication to the public by telecommunication of musical works by means of Internet transmissions or similar transmission facilities. Each tariff was published in the Canada Gazette as required by the Act.

[7] Potential users and their representatives were advised on each occasion of their right to object to the proposed statement of royalties. A number of them challenged one or more of the proposed tariffs. At the time of the hearing, the objectors were Bell Canada (Bell), the Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA), Apple Canada Inc. (Apple), the National Campus and Community Radio Association (NCRA), the Entertainment Software

- 17 -4Association and the Entertainment Software Association of Canada (ESA), Iceberg Media.com (Iceberg), Rogers Communications Inc. and Rogers Wireless Partnership (Rogers), Shaw Cablesystems G.P. (Shaw) and TELUS Communications Inc. (TELUS). Mr. Bill Deys, CKUW Radio, Bucket Records Music Inc. and the DiMA Coalition were also objectors but failed to comply with the directive on procedure and were therefore deemed to have abandoned their objections. [8] Written submissions were also filed by CMRRA/SODRAC Inc. (CSI), Michael Dunn of Esprit Communications, CKUA Radio Network – a community broadcaster – and the Retail Council of Canada (RCC). l’Entertainment Software Association et l’Entertainment Software Association of Canada (ESA), Iceberg Media.com (Iceberg), Rogers Communications Inc. et Rogers Wireless Partnership (Rogers), Shaw Cablesystems G.P. (Shaw) et TELUS Communications Inc. (TELUS). M. Bill Deys, CKUW Radio, Bucket Records Music Inc. et la DiMA Coalition étaient également des opposantes, mais ils n’ont pas respecté la directive sur la procédure et ont donc été réputés avoir abandonné leur opposition. [8] Ont également présenté des observations écrites CMRRA/SODRAC inc. (CSI), Michael Dunn d’Esprit Communications, le CKUA Radio Network – radiodiffuseur communautaire – et le Conseil canadien du commerce de détail (CCCD). [9] Au fil du temps, la Commission a reçu des lettres d’observations de stations de radio et de particuliers ainsi qu’une pétition électronique de personnes qui soutenaient la position des FSI, qui s’opposaient à ce que le tarif leur impose des redevances pour l’utilisation de téléchargements en plus de la redevance pour la copie privée. La question est devenue sans objet suite à l’arrêt SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC). [10] L’audience relative à l’établissement du tarif a commencé le 17 avril 2007, a duré 13 jours et a pris fin le 8 mai 2007. III. LA TERMINOLOGIE [11] D’entrée de jeu, il serait utile de définir un certain nombre de termes qui seront employés dans les présents motifs. [12] Une transmission Internet peut être un téléchargement ou une transmission continue. [13] Un téléchargement est un fichier contenant des données (en l’espèce, un ou plusieurs enregistrements sonores de tout ou partie d’une œuvre musicale) que l’usager peut conserver. Dans le cas du téléchargement permanent,

[9] Over time, the Board received a number of letters of comments from radio stations and individuals, as well as an electronic petition from people who supported the position of ISPs who were against SOCAN’s proposed tariff charging them for the use of downloads in addition to the private copying levy. As a result of the decision in SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC), that issue has since become moot. [10] The hearing dealing with the determination of the tariff started on April 17, 2007, occupied 13 days and ended on May 8, 2007. III. TERMINOLOGY [11] At the outset, it would be helpful to define a number of terms that will be used throughout this decision. [12] An Internet transmission can be a download or a stream. [13] A download is a file containing data (in our case, one or more sound recordings of part or all of a musical work) the user is meant to keep as his own. The person who receives a permanent download is authorized to use it forever, though

- 18 -5the digital rights management (DRM) software attached to the file may limit the number and kind of copies that can be made. A limited download can be used as long as the user’s subscription is paid up; the DRM will prevent further use of the content if the subscription expires. l’acheteur est autorisé à utiliser le fichier pour une durée indéterminée, bien que le logiciel de gestion des droits numériques (GDN) joint au fichier puisse limiter le nombre et le genre de copies qui peuvent être faites. Le téléchargement limité peut être utilisé tant et aussi longtemps qu’on reste abonné au service; le GDN rend le fichier inutilisable quand l’abonnement prend fin. [14] Un balado est un téléchargement. Le terme baladodiffusion sert à décrire un ensemble de technologies permettant de distribuer automatiquement une programmation audio et vidéo sur Internet en utilisant un modèle édition/abonnement. La baladodiffusion est souvent utilisée pour distribuer une programmation s’apparentant à la radio classique; elle peut aussi bien servir à distribuer toute autre forme de contenu audio-visuel. [15] Une transmission en continu est une transmission de données permettant à l’usager d’entendre ou de voir le contenu au moment de la transmission et qui n’est pas destinée à la reproduction et ce, malgré le fait qu’une copie « temporaire » soit parfois stockée sur le disque dur de l’utilisateur. Il y a transmission sur demande si c’est l’usager qui choisit le contenu; ce contenu peut aussi être choisi par la personne qui le fournit. La transmission en continu comporte d’autres sous-catégories. [16] Règle générale, la diffusion simultanée [ou transmission jumelée] implique la diffusion du même contenu sur plus d’une plate-forme. Aux fins des présents motifs, la diffusion simultanée consiste à transmettre sur Internet, en continu et en simultané, un signal radio ou télévision conventionnel, câblé ou par satellite. [17] La webdiffusion est une autre forme de transmission en continu de contenu. Ce contenu peut préexister, ce qui est le cas du diffuseur qui permet aux usagers d’écouter ou de voir une partie de sa programmation après l’avoir diffusée. Il peut aussi être original, ce qui est le cas de la personne qui exploite un signal dit de

[14] A podcast is a form of download. Podcasting is a term used to describe a collection of technologies for automatically distributing audio and video programs over the Internet using a publisher/subscriber model. Podcasting is often used to distribute radio-style shows, but can serve to distribute any form of audio-visual content.

[15] A stream is a transmission of data that allows the user to listen or view the content at the time of transmission and that is not meant to be reproduced, even though a “temporary” copy sometimes is stored on the user’s hard drive. An on-demand stream is one the content of which is selected by the user; streamed content also can be selected by the person who offers the content. Streams can be further subdivided in other categories.

[16] Simulcast is a portmanteau of “simultaneous broadcast”; it generally involves broadcasting a program or event at the same time on more than one medium. For the purpose of this decision, simulcast refers to streaming a radio or television signal simultaneously to its transmission over the air, on cable or by satellite. [17] A webcast also involves the streaming of content. That content may be pre-existing, as when a broadcaster allows users to hear or view part of its programming after it has been broadcast. It may also be original, as when a person operates a so-called “Web radio” signal, posts a video on a Web site such as YouTube or

- 19 -6allows visitors to his MySpace Web page to listen to an original recording. « webradio », qui publie un vidéo sur le site YouTube ou qui permet aux visiteurs de sa page Web MySpace d’écouter un enregistrement original. [18] L’écoute préalable est un moyen de mise en marché utilisé entre autres par les fournisseurs de musique en ligne. Il implique la transmission sur demande d’un extrait (habituellement d’au plus 30 secondes) d’un enregistrement sonore afin de permettre à l’utilisateur de l’« essayer », de façon à décider d’acheter ou non un téléchargement (la plupart du temps permanent). [19] La MLA (Mechanical Licensing Agreement) est l’entente de reproduction mécanique conclue entre l’Agence canadienne des droits de reproduction musicaux (CMRRA) et la CRIA. Elle autorise les maisons de disques à reproduire des œuvres musicales sur des CD préenregistrés. IV. LA POSITION DES PARTIES ET LA PREUVE A. La SOCAN [20] La SOCAN est une société de gestion au sens défini à l’article 2 de la Loi. Elle gère les droits d’exécution du répertoire mondial de musique protégée par le droit d’auteur au Canada. De manière spécifique, la SOCAN gère le droit de communiquer des œuvres musicales au public par télécommunication et d’autoriser ces communications; selon la SOCAN, ces droits sont visés par les usages décrits au tarif 22. [21] Le projet de tarif 22 de la SOCAN vise la communication d’œuvres musicales « au moyen de transmissions Internet ou autres moyens semblables ». La façon dont la SOCAN propose d’y arriver a changé dans le temps. [22] De 1996 à 2005, la SOCAN a déposé des projets essentiellement sous la même forme. Ils ciblaient les « services de télécommunication » en général, notamment les sites Web et autres FSI. Les services ne percevant pas de recettes

[18] Previews are a marketing tool offered by online music services, among others. A preview is an excerpt (usually 30 seconds or less) of a sound recording that can be streamed so that consumers are allowed to “preview” the recording to help them decide whether to purchase a (usually permanent) download.

[19] The Mechanical Licensing Agreement (MLA) is the agreement entered into between the Canadian Musical Reproduction Rights Agency (CMRRA) and CRIA. It licences record labels to reproduce musical works onto prerecorded CDs.

IV. POSITION OF THE PARTIES AND EVIDENCE A. SOCAN [20] SOCAN is a collective society as defined in section 2 of the Act. It administers the performing rights of the world repertoire of music protected by copyright in Canada. Specifically, SOCAN administers the right to communicate musical works to the public by telecommunication and the right to authorize such communications which, according to SOCAN, are involved in the uses described in Tariff 22. [21] SOCAN’s Tariff 22 proposal targets the communication of musical works “by means of Internet transmissions or similar transmission facilities”. The manner in which SOCAN proposed to do this has varied over time. [22] For 1996 to 2005, SOCAN filed tariffs in substantially the same form. The tariffs targeted “telecommunication services” broadly, including websites and other Internet service providers. If a service did not earn advertising revenues, the

- 20 -7tariff would be 25¢ per subscriber, per month; otherwise, the service would pay a percentage (3.2 per cent from 1996 to 2000 and 10 per cent from 2001 to 2005) of all its revenues with a minimum fee of 25¢ per subscriber, per month. The proposed tariff claimed a royalty from any entity in the Internet chain, though SOCAN’s preference was that the fees be paid by the entities that provide end users with access to the telecommunication networks. publicitaires verseraient 25 ¢ par mois, par abonné; les autres paieraient un pourcentage (3,2 pour cent de 1996 à 2000 et 10 pour cent de 2001 à 2005) de l’ensemble de leurs revenus, compte tenu d’une redevance minimale de 25 ¢ par mois, par abonné. Le projet de tarif réclamait une redevance de toute entité de la chaîne Internet, mais la SOCAN privilégiait le paiement de redevances par ceux qui fournissent à l’utilisateur final l’accès aux réseaux de télécommunication. [23] Le projet pour 2006 distingue diverses catégories d’usages de musique et déplace la cible des FSI vers les sites Web. Dans tous les cas, la SOCAN a demandé un pourcentage des revenus bruts ou des dépenses brutes d’exploitation, selon le plus élevé des deux, assorti d’une redevance mensuelle minimale de 200 $. Les taux proposés dans le projet de tarif étaient les suivants : 25 pour cent pour les sites de musique offrant des téléchargements ou des transmissions sur demande; 20 pour cent pour les webdiffusions audio semblables à un service sonore payant, 15 pour cent pour les webdiffusions semblables à la radio commerciale ou de la SRC et 7,5 pour cent pour les webdiffusions semblables à la radio non commerciale; 15 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal de radio commerciale ou de la SRC et 7,5 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal non commercial; 15 pour cent pour les webdiffusions audiovisuelles semblables à une station de télévision conventionnelle ou câblée; 15 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal télé; 10 pour cent pour des sites de jeux, y compris le pari; et 10 pour cent pour les autres sites communiquant de la musique. [24] Dans son énoncé de cause, la SOCAN a révisé son projet initial et demandé les taux suivants : 10 pour cent pour les téléchargements avec écoute préalable, 7 pour cent pour les téléchargements sans écoute préalable et 16,7 pour cent pour les transmissions sur demande; 9 pour cent pour les webdiffusions audio

[23] SOCAN’s proposal for 2006 itemizes several categories of music uses and shifts the focus away from Internet service providers towards websites. In all cases, SOCAN asked for a percentage of the greater of gross revenues or gross operating expenses, with a minimum monthly fee of $200. The rates proposed in the published statements were: 25 per cent for music sites that offer downloads or on-demand streams; 20 per cent for audio webcasts similar to a pay audio service, 15 per cent for webcasts similar to a commercial or CBC radio station and 7.5 per cent for webcasts similar to a non-commercial radio station; 15 per cent for webcasts of commercial and CBC radio signals and 7.5 per cent for non-commercial signals; 15 per cent for audiovisual webcasts similar in content to over-the-air or cable television; 15 per cent for webcasts of television station signals; 10 per cent for game sites, including gambling; and 10 per cent for other sites that communicate music.

[24] In its statement of case, SOCAN revised its initial proposal and asked for the following rates: 10 per cent for downloads with previews, 7 per cent for downloads without previews and 16.7 per cent for on-demand streams; 9 per cent for audio webcasts similar to a pay audio service, 6 per cent for webcasts similar to a commercial or

- 21 -8CBC radio station and 3 per cent for webcasts similar to a non-commercial radio station; 8 per cent for webcasts of commercial and CBC radio signals and 3.6 per cent for non-commercial signals; 4 per cent for audiovisual webcasts similar in content to over-the-air or cable television; 4 per cent for webcasts of television station signals; 6 per cent for game sites, including gambling; and 7 per cent for other sites that communicate music. SOCAN also asked that these rates and this structure be applied for 1996 to 2005. semblables à un service sonore payant, 6 pour cent pour les webdiffusions semblables à la radio commerciale ou de la SRC et 3 pour cent pour les webdiffusions semblables à la radio non commerciale; 8 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal de radio commerciale ou de la SRC et 3,6 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal non commercial; 4 pour cent pour les webdiffusions audiovisuelles semblables à une station de télévision conventionnelle ou câblée; 4 pour cent pour la diffusion simultanée d’un signal télé; 6 pour cent pour des sites de jeux, y compris le pari; et 7 pour cent pour les autres sites communiquant de la musique. La SOCAN a aussi demandé que ces taux et cette structure soient appliqués pour les années 1996 à 2005. [25] La SOCAN a fait un certain nombre de concessions avant et pendant l’audience. Les redevances minimales applicables aux téléchargements et aux transmissions sur demande seraient fixées conformément à la formule utilisée dans CSI – musique en ligne. La SOCAN pourrait calculer les redevances sur les dépenses brutes d’exploitation (plutôt que sur les revenus bruts) jusqu’au moment où elle opterait pour les revenus bruts : elle ne pourrait revenir aux dépenses d’exploitation par la suite. Les recettes provenant de publicité intégrée au signal du diffuseur seraient exclues de l’assiette tarifaire. Les diffuseurs bénéficiant d’un taux inférieur pour leur activité principale profiteraient également d’un taux inférieur pour la transmission Internet de leur signal. Ceux qui transmettent leur signal en simultané ne paieraient pas pour la webdiffusion de segments archivés. La redevance mensuelle minimale pour la radio non commerciale serait de 90 $ plutôt que de 200 $. Le taux pour les sites de jeux baisserait de 6 à 4 pour cent. Les baladodiffuseurs amateurs utilisant le répertoire de la SOCAN moins de 20 pour cent du temps et n’engendrant aucun revenu paieraient 60 $ par année.

[25] SOCAN made a number of concessions before and during the hearing. Minimum fees for downloads and on-demand streams would be set in accordance with the formula used in CSI – Online Music. SOCAN would have the option of calculating royalties based on gross operating expenses (rather than gross revenues) only until it opted for gross revenues: it would not be allowed to revert to operating expenses thereafter. Revenues generated by advertising embedded in a broadcaster’s signal would be excluded from the rate base. Broadcasters who benefit from a lower rate for their main activity would also benefit from a lower rate for the Internet transmission of their signal. Those who simulcast their signal would not pay for webcasting archived clips or segments. The minimum monthly fee for non-commercial radio stations would be $90, not $200. The rate for game sites would be lowered from 6 to 4 per cent. Amateur podcasters who use the SOCAN repertoire less than 20 per cent of the time and generate no revenues would pay an annual fee of $60.

- 22 -9[26] In support of its tariff proposal, SOCAN first submitted that, as a result of SOCAN v. CAIP (FCA) and SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC), it is now settled law that (a) a musical work is communicated to the public by telecommunication when a server containing the work responds to a request for the musical work and transmits packets of information over the Internet and that (b) the person who makes the work available on the Internet authorizes its communication. SOCAN also relies on a number of the Board’s earlier legal determinations.8 [26] À l’appui de son projet tarifaire, la SOCAN a d’abord fait valoir qu’en raison des arrêts SOCAN c. ACFI (CAF) et SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC), il est maintenant de droit constant a) qu’une œuvre musicale est communiquée au public par télécommunication quand un serveur contenant l’œuvre répond à une demande pour cette œuvre et transmet des paquets d’information sur Internet et b) que la personne qui rend l’œuvre disponible sur Internet autorise sa communication. La SOCAN s’appuie également sur un certain nombre de conclusions de droit antérieures de la Commission.8 [27] La SOCAN a demandé à M. Tom Jurenka de Disus Inc. de mettre à jour le rapport sur le modèle d’affaires d’Internet qu’il avait élaboré pour l’audience de 1998. M. Jurenka, un ingénieur, compte de nombreuses années d’expérience dans le domaine des ordinateurs, du multimédia et des contenus en ligne. Il a témoigné que la Commission avait correctement décrit Internet dans la décision SOCAN 22 (1999), position qu’il avait adoptée dans son témoignage au nom de SOCAN dans l’affaire SOCAN 24.9 Dans son rapport,10 il a exposé sa thèse selon laquelle les entreprises Internet doivent prendre en compte divers facteurs, notamment la nécessité du rendement sur le capital investi, la banalisation de l’accès à Internet, la demande des consommateurs visant des contenus conviviaux et la nécessité de fournir ces contenus. À son avis, ces facteurs sont des clés permettant de comprendre l’orientation que prendra le secteur d’activité dans les prochaines années. [28] M. Jurenka a exposé ses vues sur un certain nombre d’avancées technologiques réalisées depuis l’élaboration de son premier rapport. Le réseautage entre pairs utilise Internet pour déplacer de grandes quantités de données entre des ordinateurs sans contrôle centralisé; il poursuivra sa croissance. Le logiciel en libre accès est désormais un modèle d’affaires viable. Le sans-fil a connu une croissance exponentielle et indique à Internet la voie à suivre. Introduit en 2001, le couple iPod – iTunes a rapidement

[27] SOCAN commissioned Mr. Tom Jurenka of Disus Inc. to update the report he prepared on the Internet business model for the 1998 hearing. Mr. Jurenka is an engineer with many years of experience with computers, multimedia and online content. He testified that the Board had correctly described the Internet in SOCAN 22 (1999), a position he had adopted when he testified for SOCAN in SOCAN 24.9 His report10 set out his thesis that Internet firms are subject to a number of factors, including the need to make a return on investment, the commoditization of Internet access, consumer demand for easy-to-use content and the need to supply that content. In his opinion, these factors are the key to understanding where the industry will be heading over the next few years.

[28] Mr. Jurenka offered his views on a number of technological developments that have occurred since he prepared his first report. Peer-to-peer networking uses the Internet to move large amounts of data between computers without centralized control; it will continue to grow. Open-sourced software has emerged as a viable business model. Wireless has grown exponentially and points the way forward for the Internet. The iPod – iTunes combo, which arrived in 2001, quickly dominated the pay per

- 23 - 10 download model. Internet has evolved to become a necessity. Finally, the pace of change on the Internet will accelerate rather than slow down. dominé le modèle du téléchargement payant à l’unité. Internet s’est progressivement transformé en une nécessité. Enfin, le rythme du changement sur Internet devrait s’accélérer plutôt que ralentir. [29] La SOCAN a demandé à Erin Research Inc. de mener quatre études connexes en vue de rassembler des renseignements de base sur les quantités de musique que reçoivent les Canadiens sur Internet. La première étude a sondé 4000 usagers d’Internet choisis au hasard pour identifier chacun des sites visités dans les 24 dernières heures. En moyenne, une personne visitait 7,8 sites. Quinze pour cent écoutaient la radio sur Internet et 17 pour cent avaient visité un site de téléchargement de musique. Le tiers avait visité un site de cartes de souhaits et un autre tiers, un site de jeux. Fait intéressant, personne n’a mentionné avoir visité des sites pornographiques. [30] La deuxième étude s’est penchée sur 268 sites Internet identifiés comme canadiens. Quarante pour cent des sites et 26 pour cent des pages Internet examinées utilisaient de la musique. [31] La troisième étude a examiné le lien entre la musique et les revenus. Presque tous les sites étudiés comptaient une ou plusieurs sources de revenus. [32] La quatrième étude était un sondage visant à établir la valeur de l’écoute préalable. On demandait aux répondants d’identifier, en dollars, l’économie qui les persuaderait de passer d’un site offrant des extraits à un site qui n’en offre pas. L’étude a conclu qu’il faudrait une économie d’au moins 40 pour cent pour que la plupart des répondants effectuent la conversion. [33] Les études d’Erin ont été d’une utilité limitée. La première et la deuxième n’étaient pas directement pertinentes aux questions dont nous sommes saisis étant donné qu’elles identifiaient des types d’usage plutôt que des habitudes de

[29] SOCAN commissioned Erin Research Inc. to conduct four related studies in order to provide baseline information about the amount of music Canadians receive over the Internet. The first study surveyed 4,000 randomly selected Internet users to identify each site visited in the last 24 hours. On average, a person visited 7.8 sites. Fifteen per cent listened to radio over the Internet and 17 per cent visited a music downloading site. One-third visited greeting card sites and another third visited game sites. Interestingly, no one reported visiting pornographic sites.

[30] The second study examined 268 Internet sites identified as Canadian. Forty per cent of the sites and 26 per cent of the Internet pages examined used music.

[31] The third study examined the link between music and revenue. Almost all sites examined had one or more sources of revenue.

[32] The fourth study was a survey that sought to establish the value of previews. Respondents were asked to identify the amount of savings in dollars that would persuade them to switch from a site which offers previews to one which does not. The study concluded that it would require savings of at least 40 per cent before most respondents would switch. [33] The Erin studies proved to be of limited use. The first and second studies were not directly relevant to the issues before us given that they identified types of uses and not consumption patterns. More importantly, since no one reported

- 24 - 11 visiting pornographic sites and given their omnipresence on the Internet, the users’ responses and the selection of sites were inherently skewed. The study that examined the link between music and revenue suffered from similar limitations: it listed the types of revenues that music can generate but provided little information about whether music “drives” either revenues in general, or revenues of a particular kind. As for the survey dealing with the value of previews, its results cannot be relied upon for two reasons. First, the questions were worded in such a way as to emphasize the value of previews. Second, consumers’ estimates of value tend to be higher when they are asked to give up something they have than when they are asked how much they would be willing to pay for it: willingness to accept tends to be higher than willingness to pay.11 consommation. Point plus important, puisque personne n’a dit avoir visité des sites pornographiques et compte tenu de leur omniprésence sur Internet, les réponses fournies par les usagers de même que le choix des sites étaient fondamentalement biaisés. L’étude sur le lien entre la musique et les revenus était entachée de limites semblables : elle dressait la liste des types de revenus qui peuvent être produits par la musique, mais fournissait peu de renseignements sur la question de savoir si la musique attire fortement les revenus en général ou un type particulier de revenus. Quant au sondage sur la valeur de l’écoute préalable, ses résultats ne sont pas fiables pour deux raisons. Premièrement, les questions étaient formulées de façon à mettre l’emphase sur la valeur de l’écoute préalable. Deuxièmement, les estimations de valeur des consommateurs tendent à être plus élevées quand on leur demande d’abandonner une chose qu’ils ont que lorsqu’on leur demande quel prix ils seraient disposés à payer pour l’obtenir : la propension à accepter est généralement plus forte que la propension à payer.11 [34] M. Paul Hoffert, musicien, professeur et expert des nouveaux médias, a retracé l’histoire d’Internet depuis ses origines. Il a noté que des millions de fichiers musicaux sont échangés parce que la musique numérique peut être facilement convertie du CD classique vers l’ordinateur ou le serveur, ce qui n’est pas le cas des images, films et autres contenus stockés en formats analogiques. Actuellement, la musique continue de dominer et représente une partie très importante du trafic sur Internet (au deuxième rang, dépassée uniquement par la pornographie). [35] M. Robert Linney, consultant en radiotélévision, a présenté un aperçu de l’évolution de la distribution de contenus dans les médias traditionnels et nouveaux au Canada. Il a témoigné que les radiodiffuseurs développent des modèles d’affaires plus complexes, qui intègrent les nouvelles technologies à la programmation et aux objectifs de commercialisation. À son avis, la webradio ouvre la possibilité d’un usage nouveau

[34] Mr. Paul Hoffert, musician, professor and new media expert, reviewed the history of the Internet from its early days. He noted that millions of music files are exchanged because digital music can be easily transferred from conventional CDs to a computer or server, unlike images, movies or other content stored in analog formats. Music today continues to dominate and accounts for a very significant portion of Internet traffic (second only to pornography).

[35] Mr. Robert Linney, a broadcasting consultant, provided an overview of the evolution of content delivery in traditional and non-traditional media in Canada. He testified that broadcasters are developing more complex business models which incorporate new technology into their programming and marketing objectives. Web radio, in his opinion, provides the opportunity for a new and additional use of

- 25 - 12 music to build and expand the target audience. He stated that websites of music radio stations provide services other than music, for example playlist identification, VIP club contests, Internet radio surveys and podcasts. All of these are used to promote the on-air listening of conventional radio stations. Television broadcasters also use websites to provide detailed program review or listing information. The Internet is used to cross-promote the on-air programming of the broadcaster. complémentaire d’expansion de l’auditoire cible. Les sites Web de stations de radio musicales fournissent d’autres services que la musique, par exemple l’identification de listes d’écoute, les concours de clubs VIP, les sondages radio sur Internet et les balados. Tous ces éléments servent à la promotion de l’écoute conventionnelle de la station. Les télédiffuseurs utilisent aussi les sites Web pour présenter la revue détaillée de leurs émissions ou des renseignements sur leur programmation. Internet sert à la promotion croisée de la programmation à l’antenne du diffuseur. [36] Un panel composé de Me Paul Spurgeon, vice-président des services juridiques et chef du contentieux, et de Me Anne Godbout, directrice du contentieux, tous les deux de la SOCAN, a témoigné sur l’évolution des projets de tarifs depuis 1996 jusqu’aux conditions tarifaires que propose finalement la SOCAN. [37] M. Stanley J. Liebowitz, professeur à l’Université du Texas, a présenté une analyse économique destinée à appuyer et à valider les redevances que propose la SOCAN. Cette analyse fera l’objet d’un examen détaillé lorsque nous étudierons l’ensemble de la preuve économique. [38] Se fondant sur ces éléments de preuve, la SOCAN soutient que chacune des catégories décrites dans son projet de tarif modifié reflète des usages distincts de musique sur Internet. Elle fait valoir que la musique occupe une place importante dans l’ensemble des contenus accessibles sur le Web, étant donné qu’au moins 44 pour cent des sites utilisent une forme ou l’autre de musique. Par conséquent, elle maintient que les taux qu’elle demande sont amplement justifiés. B. Les opposantes [39] Chaque opposante s’est concentrée sur certains éléments du tarif. Leurs positions seront examinées à tour de rôle.

[36] A panel consisting of Mr. Paul Spurgeon, Vice-President and General Counsel, and Ms. Anne Godbout, Director of Legal Services, both of SOCAN, testified on the evolution of the proposed tariffs from 1996 to the terms SOCAN finally proposed.

[37] Dr. Stanley J. Liebowitz, Professor at the University of Texas, provided an economic analysis to support and validate the royalties proposed by SOCAN. This analysis will be examined in detail when we consider the economic evidence as a whole.

[38] Based on this evidence, SOCAN contends that each category described in its modified proposed tariff reflects distinct music uses on the Internet. It argues that music is an important part of the overall content accessed on the Web, given that at least 44 per cent of sites use some form of music. As a result, it maintains that the rates it is requesting are amply justified.

B. The Objectors [39] Each objector focussed on one or more elements of the tariff. Their positions are examined in turn.

- 26 - 13 1. CAB [40] CAB represents conventional radio stations as well as conventional, pay and specialty television stations. Its primary focus was the use of music on Internet websites operated by radio and television stations. To the extent these websites communicate music, they do so mostly by streaming rather than by downloading. 1. L’ACR [40] L’ACR représente les stations de radio conventionnelles et les stations de télévision conventionnelles, payantes et spécialisées. Elle s’est essentiellement concentrée sur l’usage de musique sur les sites exploités par ces stations. Dans la mesure où ces sites communiquent de la musique, ils le font essentiellement par transmission en continu plutôt que par téléchargement. [41] L’ACR s’est attaquée au projet de tarif de deux façons. Elle a d’abord proposé des taux et modalités précis pour les éléments qui touchent le plus ses membres : contenu audio semblable à la radio, diffusion simultanée de signaux de radio traditionnels, contenu audiovisuel semblable à la télévision et diffusion simultanée de signaux de télévision. Ensuite, elle a critiqué l’approche d’ensemble de la SOCAN et son argumentation économique à l’appui des tarifs proposés et présenté sa propre approche pour l’établissement des tarifs qui la concernent. [42] Deux panels, l’un pour la radio, l’autre pour la télévision, ont décrit l’exploitation des stations et le rôle que joue l’Internet dans ces activités.12 Selon les panels, la plupart des diffuseurs utilisent les sites Web en prolongement de leurs activités traditionnelles; l’objectif est la fidélisation de l’auditoire plutôt que la production de revenus indépendants. Quand ils mesurent leur auditoire, les diffuseurs ne distinguent pas ceux qui les reçoivent via Internet de ceux qui syntonisent le signal conventionnel. Les témoins ont déclaré que la publicité incluse dans le signal conventionnel transmis en simultané fait déjà partie de l’assiette tarifaire utilisée pour établir les redevances payables au titre des tarifs 1.A (Radio commerciale), 2.A (Télévision commerciale) et 17 (Services payants et spécialisés) de la SOCAN pour l’usage de musique transmise dans le signal conventionnel. [43] L’ACR a demandé à Solutions Research Group (SRG) de fournir un aperçu de l’usage et

[41] CAB used a twofold approach to object to the tariff. First, it proposed specific rates and terms for those items that most concern its members: audio content similar to radio, simulcasts of conventional radio signals, audiovisual content similar to television and simulcasts of television signals. Second, CAB criticized the overall approach taken by SOCAN and its economic rationale for the proposed tariffs, and offered its own approach to the determination of the tariffs relevant to it.

[42] Two panels, one for radio and another for television, described the operation of radio and television stations and the role Internet plays in these operations.12 According to the panels, most broadcasters use websites as an extension of their conventional operations; the object is to retain listeners or viewers rather than to derive independent revenues. Broadcasters do not segregate their Internet listeners or viewers from those who receive the conventional signal when measuring their audience. The witnesses stated that advertising that is streamed with the simulcast of a station’s signal is already included in the rate base used to calculate the royalties payable pursuant to SOCAN Tariffs 1.A (Commercial Radio), 2.A (Commercial Television) and 17 (Pay and Specialty Services) for the use of music on conventional signals.

[43] CAB commissioned Solutions Research Group (SRG) to provide an overview of the use

- 27 - 14 and content of broadcaster websites. SRG conducted a survey using the sample of 104 radio stations and 48 television stations identified in the Erin studies. [44] The survey confirmed that the majority of radio sites operate as an extension of the on-air brand of the conventional station, by supporting the station’s efforts to build a secure audience. Few of the sites currently generate significant revenue and those that do account for a very small proportion of the overall listening audience. Seventy-seven per cent of radio websites offer continuous streaming of the broadcast signal and all offer non-audio content. du contenu des sites Web des diffuseurs. SRG a mené un sondage sur l’échantillon de 104 stations de radio et de 48 stations de télévision identifiées dans les études d’Erin. [44] Le sondage a confirmé que la majorité des sites de stations de radio fonctionnent en prolongement de la station conventionnelle, appuyant les efforts de cette dernière pour fidéliser son auditoire. Peu de sites produisent actuellement des revenus importants et ceux qui le font représentent une infime partie de l’ensemble des auditoires. Soixante-dix-sept pour cent des sites Web des stations de radio offrent la diffusion simultanée du signal radio et tous offrent des contenus non audio. [45] Toutes les stations de télévision sondées exploitent un site Web dont la taille et la portée varient énormément. Seize pour cent des sites fournissent un contenu audio ou vidéo où la musique prédomine. Treize pour cent offrent la transmission de sélections tout audio où la musique prédomine. Dix pour cent permettent l’écoute préalable d’extraits musicaux et 33 pour cent transmettent des sélections audio où la musique joue un rôle secondaire; c’est le cas surtout de sites Web de réseaux et de stations spécialisées plutôt que de sites de télédiffuseurs indépendants traditionnels. Quarante-quatre pour cent utilisent la musique de manière purement accessoire et 40 pour cent n’en utilisent pas du tout. Les revenus des sites de télévision n’étaient pas importants : en novembre 2006, 39 pour cent ont signalé des revenus mensuels de 1 000 $ ou moins. Comme un très petit nombre de sites ont fait état de revenus mensuels supérieurs à 100 000 $ (trois réseaux et trois services spécialisés), les revenus moyens s’en trouvent significativement biaisés. [46] L’ACR a commandé une étude de la publicité sur Internet à Jeff Osborne d’OzWorks Marketing Communications. L’étude conclut que le contenu non musical influe considérablement plus sur les décisions d’achat de publicité sur Internet que le contenu musical. Les sites et les

[45] All television stations surveyed operate a website but those vary greatly in size and scope. Sixteen per cent provide audio or video content where music predominates. Thirteen per cent include some streamed, full audio selections where music predominates. Ten per cent offer music previews and 33 per cent stream audio selections where music plays a secondary role; this occurs mostly on network and specialty websites rather than on the sites of independent conventional broadcasters. Forty-four per cent use music on a purely incidental basis and 40 per cent do not use music at all. Television website revenues were not substantial: in November 2006, 39 per cent reported monthly revenues of $1,000 or less. A handful of television sites reporting monthly revenues of more than $100,000 (three networks and three specialty services) skewed the mean revenue significantly.

[46] CAB commissioned a study of advertising on the Internet by Jeff Osborne of OzWorks Marketing Communications. The study concluded that non-music content influences considerably more Internet advertising purchasing decisions than music content. Sites

- 28 - 15 and pages dedicated to cars, health, travel, home decorating or gardening play a much more important role than music pages. Music attracts a very small proportion of all advertising revenues and music specific pages attract a very small proportion of all page views. As for streamed and downloaded music, it represents only a small proportion of all music content, if one accounts for the large amount of informational material available. pages consacrés aux voitures, à la santé, aux voyages, à l’aménagement intérieur ou au jardinage jouent un rôle beaucoup plus important que les pages à contenu musical. La musique engendre une très petite partie de toutes les recettes publicitaires et les pages consacrées spécifiquement à la musique comptent pour une très faible partie de toutes les pages demandées. La musique transmise ou téléchargée, quant à elle, ne représente qu’une faible proportion de tous les contenus musicaux, considérant les grandes quantités de documents d’information disponibles. [47] M. Osborne a utilisé les résultats d’un rapport de recherche ComQUEST de 2006 pour établir la faible part de l’activité Internet que constituent les portions audio et vidéo des sites Web de stations de radio et de télévision. On a demandé à 1507 répondants canadiens ce qu’ils avaient fait sur Internet à un moment ou à l’autre, ou la plupart du temps, au cours du mois précédent. Seulement 3,3 pour cent avaient écouté une station de radio et 0,8 pour cent avaient téléchargé une émission de télévision. [48] M. Osborne a également fait l’examen de données de ComScore Media Metrix pour estimer l’importance relative des visites à des pages Web de musique en ligne. Entre octobre et décembre 2006, plus de deux millions de consommateurs ont autorisé ComScore à saisir leur comportement de navigation et de transaction en ligne. Au cours de cette période, les visites de la catégorie musique-divertissement n’ont représenté que 0,9 pour cent de toutes les visites de pages Web. Les demandes de pages de diffuseurs canadiens comptaient pour moins encore : par exemple, les statistiques étaient de 0,07 pour cent pour Corus Radio et de 0,03 pour cent pour MuchMusic. [49] L’ACR a demandé à M. Frank Mathewson, professeur d’économie à l’Université de Toronto, de recommander une approche économique raisonnée pour l’établissement des redevances de la SOCAN à l’égard de la diffusion simultanée

[47] Mr. Osborne used the results of a 2006 ComQUEST Research Report to demonstrate the low share of Internet activity represented by the audio and video portions of television and radio websites. Some 1,507 Canadian respondents were asked what they did on the Internet some or most of the time in the past month. Only 3.3 per cent listened to radio stations and 0.8 per cent downloaded television programs.

[48] Mr. Osborne also examined data from ComScore Media Metrix to estimate the relative importance of visits to online music Web pages. Between October and December 2006, more than 2 million customers allowed ComScore to capture their browsing and transaction behaviour. During that period, visits for the entertainment-music category accounted for only 0.9 per cent of all Web page visits. Page views of Canadian broadcaster websites were even less: for example, figures were 0.07 per cent for Corus Radio and 0.03 per cent for MuchMusic.

[49] CAB commissioned Dr. Frank Mathewson, Professor of Economics at the University of Toronto to recommend a principled economic approach to setting the SOCAN royalties for conventional television and radio simulcasts and

- 29 - 16 other audio webcasts. This analysis will be examined in detail when we consider the economic evidence as a whole. de signaux conventionnels de radio et de télévision et pour les autres webdiffusions audio. Cette analyse fera l’objet d’un examen détaillé lorsque nous étudierons l’ensemble de la preuve économique. [50] S’appuyant sur la preuve, l’ACR dégage un certain nombre de conclusions. Premièrement, le contenu musical joue un faible rôle dans l’ensemble de l’environnement Internet. Internet est simplement un système de distribution supplémentaire auprès d’un groupe indifférencié d’auditeurs. Par conséquent, les taux qui s’appliquent actuellement à l’égard d’usages identiques ou similaires devraient s’appliquer aux usages sur Internet. [51] Deuxièmement, le projet de tarif traite les balados comme des téléchargements de fichiers musicaux. Les balados devraient plutôt faire l’objet des mêmes redevances que les webdiffusions. La SOCAN est d’accord.13 [52] Troisièmement, les redevances devraient être fonction des pages demandées : seuls les revenus provenant du trafic sur la portion musicale d’un site Web seraient compris dans la base de tarification. Les dépenses brutes d’exploitation ne devraient pas servir d’assiette tarifaire. Les revenus provenant de la diffusion simultanée devraient être traités en vertu des tarifs 1.A, 2.A ou 17 de la SOCAN. Si les redevances applicables à d’autres contenus musicaux audio ou audiovisuel ne sont payées que sur les revenus associés à ces contenus, l’application de tarifs multiples au même site Web ne créera pas de chevauchement de redevances. [53] Quatrièmement, une formule analogue à la licence générale modifiée devrait être offerte pour que la programmation qui ne fait pas appel au répertoire de la SOCAN ne soit pas frappée par des redevances selon le tarif. [54] Cinquièmement, l’ACR s’oppose aux redevances minimales que propose la SOCAN.

[50] Based on the evidence, CAB draws a number of conclusions. First, music content plays a small role in the full Internet experience. Internet is just an additional delivery system to an undifferentiated group of listeners. As a result, royalty rates that are currently applicable to existing tariffs for the same or similar uses should apply to Internet uses.

[51] Second, the tariff as proposed treats podcasts as downloads of musical files. Instead, they should attract the same royalties as webcasts. SOCAN agrees.13

[52] Third, royalties should be based on a “page view” approach: only revenues derived from traffic on the music portion of a website would be included in the rate base. Gross operating expenses should not serve as the rate base. Revenues from radio or television simulcasts should be dealt with under SOCAN Tariff 1.A, 2.A or 17. If royalties for other musical audio and audiovisual content are only paid on the revenues associated with that content, then the application of multiple tariff items to the same website will not result in overlapping royalty rates.

[53] Fourth, something akin to a modified blanket licence should be available to ensure that programming that does not use SOCAN’s repertoire does not attract royalties pursuant to the tariff. [54] Fifth, CAB opposes the minimum fees proposed by SOCAN.

- 30 - 17 2. CRIA and Apple [55] CRIA and Apple jointly challenged the proposed royalties for permanent downloads, limited downloads, on-demand streaming and other sites. [56] An industry panel consisting of Graham Henderson, President of CRIA, Christine Prudham, formerly Vice-President SONY BMG Canada, and Mark Jones of Universal Music Canada, testified about the state of the music industry in Canada, the high cost to enter the on-line music business and the cost to maintain the infrastructure. They also offered their views on the effect of unauthorized downloading of music on the industry in general and in Canada in particular. 2. La CRIA et Apple [55] La CRIA et Apple ont ensemble attaqué les redevances proposées pour les téléchargements permanents, les téléchargements limités, la transmission sur demande et les autres sites. [56] Un panel du secteur d’activité, composé de Graham Henderson, président de la CRIA, Christine Prudham, ancienne vice-présidente de SONY BMG Canada, et Mark Jones d’Universal Music Canada, a témoigné sur l’état de l’industrie musicale au Canada, les coûts élevés pour entrer sur le marché de la musique en ligne et les coûts de maintien de l’infrastructure. Ils ont également présenté leurs vues sur les effets du téléchargement non autorisé de musique sur l’industrie musicale en général et au Canada en particulier. [57] La CRIA et Apple ont commandé à M. James Brander, professeur à l’Université de la Colombie-Britannique, une justification économique du calcul de la base appropriée sur laquelle établir les tarifs pour les téléchargements et les transmissions sur demande. Le témoignage de M. Brander sera analysé plus en détail dans la partie réservée à la preuve économique. [58] La CRIA et Apple ont déposé une étude menée par Pollara.14 Selon cette étude, 92 pour cent des répondants sondés ne paieraient pas pour écouter des extraits au préalable alors que 6 pour cent ont indiqué qu’ils paieraient. Ces résultats sont radicalement différents de ceux des études Erin sur lesquelles s’est appuyé M. Liebowitz. [59] Se fondant sur la preuve, la CRIA et Apple ont fait valoir que les taux proposés sont excessifs. Ils soutiennent en particulier que l’assiette tarifaire proposée ne prend pas dûment en compte les déductions appropriées et inclut des revenus qui ne proviennent pas directement de l’utilisation du répertoire de la SOCAN. [60] La CRIA et Apple proposent la MLA comme prix de référence servant à établir les

[57] CRIA and Apple commissioned Dr. James Brander, Professor at the University of British Columbia, to provide an economic rationale to calculate the appropriate basis for determining rates for downloads and on-demand streams. Professor Brander’s evidence will be analyzed in greater detail when we deal with the economic evidence. [58] CRIA and Apple filed a study conducted by Pollara.14 According to it, 92 per cent of respondents surveyed would not pay for previews while only 6 per cent indicated that they would. These findings are dramatically different from the findings in the Erin studies on which Dr. Liebowitz relied.

[59] Based on the evidence, CRIA and Apple argue that the proposed rates are excessive. In particular, they submit that the proposed rate base fails to properly account for appropriate deductions and includes revenue not directly attributable to the use of SOCAN’s repertoire.

[60] CRIA and Apple submit that the appropriate proxy to use in setting the royalty for downloads

- 31 - 18 and on-demand streams is the MLA. The rate for permanent downloads should be set by determining first how much should be paid for both the reproduction and communication rights, by deciding the relative importance of the two rights and then apportioning the rate between them. The appropriate rate base should be restricted to revenue which is directly attributable to the use of the SOCAN repertoire and should not include advertising revenue. redevances pour les téléchargements et les transmissions sur demande. On devrait fixer le taux pour les téléchargements permanents en établissant d’abord le prix à payer à la fois pour les droits de reproduction et de communication, en décidant de l’importance relative des deux et en répartissant proportionnellement le taux. L’assiette tarifaire appropriée devrait être restreinte aux revenus directement attribuables à l’utilisation du répertoire de la SOCAN et ne devrait pas inclure les recettes publicitaires. [61] La CRIA et Apple invoquent le témoignage de M. Stephen Stohn dans l’affaire CSI – musique en ligne, qui avait conclu que le taux ajusté de la MLA pour les téléchargements permanents devrait être 5,3 pour cent du prix de détail des pistes individuelles et 6,7 pour cent de celui des albums. Elles proposent d’utiliser la moyenne de 6 pour cent. La CRIA soutient que la distribution de musique en ligne n’a pas augmenté les revenus des détaillants ou des maisons de disques et que la contribution globale des compositeurs et des éditeurs sur Internet a la même valeur que dans le monde matériel. Elle fait aussi valoir que l’écoute préalable visant à promouvoir les téléchargements permanents ne devrait pas être frappée de redevances supplémentaires. Pour ces motifs, le montant total des droits de reproduction et de communication (l’« ensemble de droits ») afférents aux téléchargements permanents devrait être le même que pour le seul droit de reproduction dans le marché des CD, soit 6 pour cent. [62] La CRIA et Apple soutiennent que le taux pour les téléchargements limités et les transmissions sur demande devrait être inférieur à celui pour les téléchargements permanents, et établi de la même manière que dans la décision CSI – musique en ligne. Le taux pour les téléchargements limités devrait donc représenter les deux tiers de celui pour les téléchargements permanents alors que le taux pour les transmissions sur demande devrait représenter la moitié de celui pour les téléchargements permanents.

[61] CRIA and Apple adopt and rely on the evidence of Mr. Stephen Stohn in CSI – Online Music, who concluded that the adjusted MLA rate for permanent downloads should be 5.3 per cent of retail for singles and 6.7 per cent for albums. They propose using an average of 6 per cent. CRIA contends that online distribution of music has not increased revenues of retailers or labels and that the overall contribution of composers and publishers over the Internet is worth the same as in the physical world. It also argues that previews offered to promote permanent downloads should not attract additional royalties. For those reasons, the total amount payable for the reproduction and communication rights (the “bundle of rights”) for permanent downloads should be the same as the amount payable for the reproduction right alone in the CD market, or 6 per cent.

[62] CRIA and Apple submit that the rate for limited downloads and on-demand streams should be lower than for permanent downloads, and should be set in the same way as in CSI – Online Music. Thus, the rate for limited downloads should be two-thirds of that for permanent downloads, while the rate for on-demand streams should be half of that for permanent downloads.

- 32 - 19 [63] CRIA and Apple contend that the Board should set a nominal rate for downloads and streams prior to the launch of Puretracks in October of 2003, given the difficulties in establishing a legitimate online business and the administrative problems in determining the appropriate liability for past use. They also contend that the retroactive application of the tariff as currently proposed by SOCAN raises jurisdictional issues regarding the Board’s authority to impose a tariff on users without notice. They oppose the imposition of minimum royalties. [63] La CRIA et Apple font valoir que la Commission devrait établir un taux nominal pour les téléchargements et transmissions effectués avant le lancement de Puretracks en octobre 2003, étant donné les difficultés que pose la constitution d’une entreprise en ligne légitime et les problèmes administratifs liés à la détermination du fardeau approprié à l’égard d’un usage passé. Elles soutiennent également que l’application rétroactive du tarif que la SOCAN propose désormais soulève des questions de compétence touchant le pouvoir de la Commission d’imposer sans préavis un tarif aux usagers. Elles s’opposent à l’imposition de redevances minimales. 3. Les telcos/câblos : Bell, Rogers, Shaw Cablesystems et TELUS [64] Les telcos/câblos s’opposent au projet de tarif applicable au téléchargement et à la transmission. Par la voix de deux panels,15 elles ont présenté des éléments de preuve sur les secteurs d’activités de la diffusion des portails Web et des télécommunications sans fil. [65] Les telcos/câblos soutiennent une fois de plus que le téléchargement sur Internet n’est pas une communication au public par télécommunication. Selon elles, le téléchargement est une transmission point à point de fichiers individuels au consommateur, ce qui n’est pas assujetti à la Loi et n’entraîne donc pas le paiement de redevances à la SOCAN. Si leur position sur ce point n’est pas retenue, elles conviennent avec la CRIA et Apple que le montant payable pour l’ensemble de droits à l’égard des téléchargements permanents devrait être identique à celui qui touche le seul droit de reproduction dans le marché des CD et que le taux pour les téléchargements limités et les transmissions devrait être escompté de la manière prévue dans CSI – musique en ligne. [66] Les telcos/câblos font aussi valoir qu’aucune preuve n’établit que la distribution de musique sur Internet doive être traitée

3. The Cable/Telcos: Bell, Rogers, Shaw Cablesystems and TELUS [64] The Cable/Telcos oppose the proposed tariff as it concerns downloading and streaming. They presented evidence of the portal webcasting business and the wireless business through two industry panels.15

[65] The Cable/Telcos submit once again that downloading over the Internet is not a communication to the public by telecommunication. In their submission, downloading is a point to point transmission of individual files to the consumer with the result that the Act is not engaged and no royalties are payable to SOCAN for such activity. If that argument fails, they agree with CRIA and Apple that the amount payable for the bundle of rights for permanent downloads should be the same as the amount payable for the reproduction right alone in the CD market and that the rate for limited downloads and streams should be discounted in the same manner as in CSI – Online Music.

[66] The Cable/Telcos also contend there is no evidence to support the position that the delivery of music over the Internet should be treated

- 33 - 20 differently from other forms of delivery such as cable or satellite; as a result, the applicable rates should not exceed those found in SOCAN’s Tariff 1.A , 2.A or 17. In their submission music plays a minor role in the broad range of products offered on their websites. Only revenues attributable to music streaming or downloading should be included in the rate base. différemment d’autres modes de distribution, comme le câble ou le satellite; par conséquent, les taux applicables ne devraient pas excéder ceux des tarifs 1.A, 2.A ou 17 de la SOCAN. Elles soutiennent que la musique joue un rôle mineur dans la vaste gamme des produits offerts sur leurs sites Web. Seuls les revenus attribuables à la transmission ou au téléchargement de musique devraient être inclus dans l’assiette tarifaire. 4. La SRC [67] La SRC offre plusieurs services susceptibles d’être assujettis au tarif 22. CBC Radio One et CBC Radio 2 sont des services radio conventionnels de langue anglaise. Radio One présente essentiellement un contenu parlé. La programmation de Radio 2, axée avant sur la musique et la culture, est à la fois musicale et parlée. La Première Chaîne et Espace Musique sont leurs équivalents français (bien qu’Espace Musique donne beaucoup plus d’importance à la musique que Radio 2). Tous ces services sont transmis simultanément sur CBC.ca et Radio-Canada.ca, sites Web anglais et français exploités par la SRC. [68] Bande à part et CBC Radio 3 sont des services français et anglais de webradio, qui présentent des musiciens canadiens nouveaux et prometteurs dans les domaines de la musique pop, rock et d’autres genres musicaux émergents. Les usagers peuvent aussi obtenir la transmission de certaines émissions audio et audiovisuelles déjà diffusées sur les réseaux, conventionnels ou câblés, radio et télé, de la SRC. [69] La SRC a longuement fait valoir que le projet de la SOCAN ne tient pas compte du caractère et du mandat uniques de la société. Elle soutient qu’elle ne devrait pas payer davantage pour la diffusion simultanée de musique sur Internet. La SRC verse déjà des redevances pour le droit d’utiliser le répertoire de la SOCAN sur ses quatre stations de radio traditionnelles. Cela devrait suffire, pour les raisons suivantes.

4. CBC [67] CBC offers a number of services that could be subject to Tariff 22. CBC Radio One and CBC Radio 2 are English language over-the-air radio services. Radio One consists mostly of spoken word. Radio 2 consists of spoken word programming and music relating primarily to culture and music. La Première Chaîne and Espace Musique are their French equivalent (though Espace Musique emphasizes music much more than Radio 2). All of these services are simulcast on CBC.ca and Radio-Canada.ca, the English and French language websites that CBC maintains.

[68] Bande à part and CBC Radio 3 are French and English Web radio services that consist of new and rising Canadian musical artists in the pop, rock and emerging music categories. Users may also stream some audio and audiovisual programs previously broadcast on CBC’s over-the-air and satellite-to-cable television and radio networks.

[69] CBC argued at length that SOCAN’s proposal ignores its unique character and mandate. It maintains that it should have no additional liability for its simulcast use of music on the Internet. It already pays SOCAN royalties for the right to use its repertoire on its four conventional radio services. This should be sufficient, for the following reasons.

- 34 - 21 [70] Internet simulcasts are a complement to its national over-the-air distribution system. According to its mandate, CBC must make its programming available throughout Canada by the most appropriate and efficient means. The only issue then, is whether the listener turns on the radio or the computer. [70] La diffusion simultanée sur Internet est un complément au réseau national de transmission hertzienne. Selon son mandat, la SRC doit rendre sa programmation accessible dans tout le Canada par les moyens les plus appropriés et les plus efficients. La seule question, par conséquent, est de savoir si l’auditeur ouvre son poste de radio ou son ordinateur. [71] Bande à part et CBC Radio 3 sont des vitrines au service des musiciens nouveaux et prometteurs. Selon la SRC, les artistes sont titulaires de tous les droits sur les œuvres présentées aux deux services. [72] La SRC offre une sélection d’émissions de radio et de télévision pour transmission après leur diffusion. Le contenu musical de cette programmation est substantiellement inférieur à celui des services conventionnels. La SRC propose de calculer la redevance à partir de ce qu’elle paie pour ses signaux conventionnels, et d’appliquer des escomptes pour refléter l’usage inférieur de musique et la valeur moindre des droits sur Internet. Selon ce calcul, les redevances annuelles se chiffreraient à 6 690 $ pour la radio et à 31 155 $ pour la télévision. [73] La SRC offre certaines de ses émissions sous forme de balados. Dans la plupart des cas, on enlève le contenu musical. La SRC est disposée à payer des redevances à l’égard des balados audio et audiovisuels, selon une formule semblable à celle qu’elle propose d’utiliser pour établir ses redevances pour la transmission en continu du contenu de ses signaux radio conventionnels. 5. L’ESA [74] L’ESA soutient comme les telcos/câblos qu’il n’y a pas de responsabilité à l’égard de la transmission numérique point à point, un à un, de jeux vidéo à l’utilisateur final. Elle soulève aussi d’autres questions juridiques qui sont abordées plus loin. Ses éléments de preuve peuvent se résumer comme suit.

[71] Bande à part and CBC Radio 3 are outlets for new and rising musical artists. According to CBC, artists own all of the rights in the works offered on the two services.

[72] CBC streams a select number of radio and television programs after they have been broadcast. The musical content of this programming is much lower than that of conventional services. CBC proposes to calculate the royalty by taking what it pays for its conventional signals, and applying discounts to reflect lower music use, as well as the lower value of rights on the Internet. This calculation would yield annual royalties of $6,690 for radio and $31,155 for television.

[73] CBC makes some of its program available for podcasts. In most cases, the musical content has been removed. CBC is willing to pay royalties for audio and audiovisual podcasts according to a formula similar to the one it proposes be used to set its royalties for the webcast of its conventional radio signals’ content.

5. ESA [74] ESA contends with the Cable/Telcos that no liability exists for point to point, one to one digital delivery of video games to end users. It also raises other legal issues which are addressed later. Its evidence can be summarized as follows.

- 35 - 22 [75] The use of music in online video games and on game publishers’ sites is marginal. Video games consist of millions of lines of software code which, when played by the end user, process the data entered by the user and generate an audiovisual output. That output is generally comprised of many components, including images of the playing environment, characters and objects as well as full motion video segments, narrative text and voice over, and sound effects. The music component of a video game typically consists of a minute portion of the overall audiovisual output and, in ESA’s submission, an equally negligible piece of the overall software program that is a video game. Between 0 and 5 per cent of the development budget of games can be attributed to music. Generally, a video game publisher will enter into an agreement with a third-party rights holder to provide the music for incorporation in the video game. ESA argues therefore that the rights holders are fully compensated in advance of the game’s publication. [75] L’usage de la musique dans les jeux vidéo en ligne et sur les sites des éditeurs de jeux est marginal. Les jeux vidéo sont formés de millions de lignes de code logiciel qui, au moment où l’utilisateur final joue, traitent les données inscrites par l’utilisateur et produisent une sortie audiovisuelle. Cette sortie comporte généralement un grand nombre de composantes, notamment des images de l’environnement de jeu, des personnages et des objets, des segments cinévidéo, des textes narratifs et des voix hors champ ainsi que des effets sonores. La composante musicale d’un jeu vidéo est généralement une infime portion de la sortie audiovisuelle globale et, selon le point de vue de l’ESA, une partie tout aussi négligeable de l’ensemble du logiciel que forme un jeu vidéo. Entre 0 et 5 pour cent du budget de conception des jeux peut être attribué à la musique. En général, l’éditeur de jeux vidéo passe une entente avec un tiers titulaire de droits d’auteur, qui lui fournit la musique destinée à être intégrée au jeu vidéo. L’ESA soutient donc que les titulaires sont pleinement rémunérés avant la publication des jeux. [76] L’ESA soutient que si la Commission doit homologuer un tarif, la seule référence acceptable est le tarif 17 de la SOCAN applicable à la faible utilisation de musique, soit 0,8 pour cent des recettes publicitaires. Elle fait également valoir que la distinction entre le téléchargement et la transmission devrait être maintenue et le taux, fixé à 0,8 pour cent pour la transmission et 0,3 pour cent pour le téléchargement. Un escompte d’au moins 90 pour cent devrait ensuite être consenti, étant donné que la musique n’est jamais l’élément principal de toute communication qui puisse avoir lieu sur le site d’un éditeur de jeux vidéo. L’assiette tarifaire devrait être exclusivement limitée à la partie du site associée à l’usage de musique. L’ESA partage également l’opposition de la CRIA aux redevances minimales.

[76] ESA submits that if the Board must certify a tariff, the only acceptable proxy is the low music use tariff set in SOCAN Tariff 17, which is 0.8 per cent of advertising revenues. They also submit that the distinction between downloading and streaming should be maintained and that the rate should be 0.8 per cent for streaming and 0.3 per cent for downloading. A discount of at least 90 per cent should then be applied to take into account that music is never the main feature of any communication that might occur on a video game publisher’s site. The revenue base should only be that part of the site associated with the music use. ESA also agrees with CRIA’s objection to the minimum fees.

- 36 - 23 6. Iceberg [77] Iceberg is Canada’s largest music streaming Internet service. It provides over 100 channels operated by Standard Interactive, a division of Standard Broadcasting. In general, it supports the position of CAB insofar as it relates to streaming. In its submission, the rate should be no higher than for conventional radio stations. The royalty should only apply to revenue generated from the use of music. This should be determined using page views as they form the basis for generating advertising revenues. Operating expenses should be used as a rate base only if a site or service is not designed to generate commercial revenues. 6. Iceberg [77] Iceberg est le plus important service Internet de transmission de musique au Canada. Il fournit plus de 100 canaux exploités par Standard Interactive, division de Standard Broadcasting. En général, Iceberg appuie la position de l’ACR à l’égard de la transmission. Selon elle, le taux ne devrait pas excéder celui des stations de radio conventionnelles. La redevance devrait s’appliquer exclusivement aux revenus engendrés par l’usage de musique, établis selon la formule des pages vues, qui forment la base de production des recettes publicitaires. Les dépenses d’exploitation ne devraient servir de base de tarification que si le site ou le service ne vise pas à produire des revenus commerciaux. 7. L’ANREC [78] L’ANREC est une association nationale qui représente 46 stations de radio communautaires et étudiantes sans but lucratif. La radio communautaire offre un produit musical éclectique et philosophiquement alternatif. Elle donne la possibilité de se faire entendre à des artistes qui n’auraient pas autrement leur place dans le système de diffusion canadien. Comme la SRC et l’ACR, l’ANREC fait valoir qu’Internet n’est qu’un autre mode de transmission et qu’il ne devrait donc pas commander un autre tarif. De toute façon, les stations qui pratiquent la diffusion simultanée paient déjà des redevances sur leurs dépenses en vertu du tarif 1.B (Radio non commerciale autre que la Société RadioCanada). [79] L’ANREC soutient que le projet de tarif est inapproprié et que son homologation mettrait fin à la diffusion sur Internet de la radio communautaire. Elle demande la suppression des dispositions pertinentes du tarif 22 et l’application du tarif 1.B tant à la diffusion simultanée qu’à la diffusion sur Internet seulement. Même la redevance minimale révisée de 90 $ que propose la SOCAN ne reflète pas la réalité économique de la radiodiffusion

7. NCRA [78] NCRA is a national organization representing 46 non-profit community and campus radio stations. Community radio offers an eclectic and philosophically alternative music product. They provide an opportunity for artists who would not otherwise find a voice to be heard in the Canadian broadcasting system. Like CBC and CAB, NCRA contends that Internet is just another method of transmission and as a result should not attract another tariff. In any event, the stations that simulcast on the Internet already pay royalties on these expenses pursuant to Tariff 1.B (Non-Commercial Radio other than the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation).

[79] NCRA contends the proposed tariff is inappropriate and if certified would result in the elimination of Internet broadcasting of community radio. It requests that the relevant sections of Tariff 22 be eliminated and that Tariff 1.B apply to both simulcast and Internet only stations. Even the revised minimum tariff of $90 per month proposed by SOCAN does not reflect the economic reality of community and campus broadcasting and is beyond the means of

- 37 - 24 the community based non-profit organizations to pay. NCRA requests that the minimum payable as applied to them should be more in keeping with their ability to pay. communautaire et dépasse la capacité de payer de ces organismes sans but lucratif. L’ANREC demande que le tarif minimal applicable à elle soit plus adapté à la capacité de payer de ses membres. 8. Observations écrites [80] CSI ne souscrit pas à la position de la SOCAN et de son expert, M. Liebowitz, selon laquelle le droit de reproduction pour les téléchargements limités ne vaut que les deux tiers de celui pour les téléchargements permanents. Elle soutient que le taux devrait être le même. [81] Le CCCD a soutenu que le tarif demandé pour les « autres sites » n’est pas réaliste et que le tarif et la redevance minimale proposés imposeraient une charge indue aux détaillants qui utilisent de la musique de manière accessoire sur leur site Web. Il a également attiré notre attention sur une décision récente rendue aux États-Unis qui vise le droit de téléchargement et de transmission de la musique.16 [82] Michael Dunn a soutenu qu’un tarif tel que le demande la SOCAN empêcherait le développement au Canada d’un réseau radiophonique indépendant dynamique. Il a fait valoir qu’il devrait y avoir des redevances sur la seule base des revenus bruts et un plancher sous lequel aucune redevance ne serait payable. [83] Le CKUA Radio Network est un radiodiffuseur communautaire qui a été la première station de radio au Canada à transmettre son signal par Internet. Il est le plus important réseau de radio communautaire au Canada. Il compte 16 émetteurs FM en Alberta et son signal est transmis par Star Choice. CKUA s’oppose au projet de tarif pour la diffusion simultanée sur Internet au motif qu’il s’agit d’une double cotisation, exorbitante, dont l’autorisation mettrait en péril la croissance de la radio communautaire sur Internet au Canada.

8. Written Submissions [80] CSI submitted that it does not agree with the position of SOCAN and its expert, Dr. Liebowitz, that the reproduction right for limited downloads is worth only two thirds of the value of permanent downloads. It argues the rate should be equal. [81] RCC contended that the tariff requested for “other sites” is unrealistic and that the tariff and minimum fees proposed would impose undue hardship on retailers that use music incidentally on their website. It also brought to our attention a recent American decision regarding the right to download and stream music.16

[82] Michael Dunn contended that a tariff in the form requested by SOCAN would impede the development of a vibrant Canadian based independent radio network. He argued there should be a royalty based only on gross revenues with a threshold below which no royalties would be payable. [83] CKUA Radio Network is a community radio broadcaster that was the first radio station in Canada to stream its signal via the Internet. It is the largest community radio network in Canada with 16 FM transmitters in Alberta and is carried by Star Choice satellite. CKUA opposes the tariff proposed by SOCAN on Internet simulcasts by reason that it is a double assessment, exorbitant and, if granted, would jeopardize the growth of community Internet radio in Canada.

- 38 - 25 V. Legal Issues [84] A number of legal issues must be resolved before determining whether or not the tariff can be certified. They can be summarized as follows: V. Les questions juridiques [84] Certaines questions juridiques doivent être tranchées avant d’établir si le tarif peut être homologué. Ces questions peuvent être résumées comme suit. 1. La transmission d’un téléchargement est-elle une communication au public par télécommunication au sens de l’alinéa 3(1)f) de la Loi? 2. L’offre d’extraits pour écoute préalable constitue-t-elle une utilisation équitable à des fins de recherche au sens de l’article 29 de la Loi? 3. Existe-t-il un empêchement juridique à l’homologation d’un tarif prenant effet en 1996 selon le dépôt original ou selon le projet actuel? Il s’agit de la question dite de la rétroactivité. 4. Les services fournis à partir de serveurs situés à l’extérieur du Canada sont-ils assujettis au tarif? [85] L’ESA a également soulevé un certain nombre de questions qu’il est préférable de traiter ensemble. 1. La transmission d’un téléchargement estelle une communication au public par télécommunication au sens de l’alinéa 3(1)f) de la Loi? [86] La Commission et les tribunaux ont déjà examiné la question à plusieurs reprises. Dans la décision SOCAN 22 (1999), la Commission a avancé trois propositions que la Cour suprême du Canada a reformulées comme suit dans l’arrêt SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC) :
[30] [...] une communication Internet a lieu au moment où l’œuvre est transmise du serveur hôte à l’ordinateur de l’utilisateur final, que l’écoute ou le visionnement soit immédiat ou ultérieur, ou

1. Is the transmission of a download a communication to the public by telecommunication within the meaning of paragraph 3(1)(f) of the Act? 2. Is offering previews fair dealing for the purpose of research within the meaning of section 29 of the Act?

3. Is there any legal impediment to certifying the tariff starting in 1996 as originally filed or as now proposed? This is the so-called retroactivity issue.

4. Are services whose servers are located outside Canada subject to the tariff?

[85] ESA also raised a number of issues that are best addressed together.

1. Is the transmission of a download a communication to the public by telecommunication within the meaning of paragraph 3(1)(f) of the Act? [86] The Board and the courts have examined this issue several times in the past. In SOCAN 22 (1999), the Board advanced three propositions, which the Supreme Court of Canada restated as follows in SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC):
[30] [...] an Internet communication occurs at the time the work is transmitted from the host server to the computer of the end user, regardless of whether it is played or viewed at that time, or later, or never. It is made “to the public” because

- 39 - 26 the music files are “made available on the Internet openly and without concealment, with the knowledge and intent that they be conveyed to all who might access the Internet”. Accordingly, “a communication may be to the public when it is made to individual members of the public at different times, whether chosen by them (as is the case on the Internet) or by the person responsible for sending the work (as is the case with facsimile transmission)”. n’ait jamais lieu. Il y a communication « au public » parce que les fichiers musicaux sont « rendu[s] disponibles sur Internet de manière ouverte, sans dissimulation, l’intéressé, en connaissance de cause, ayant l’intention qu’[ils] soient transmi[s] à tous ceux qui peuvent avoir accès à l’Internet ». En conséquence, « il peut y avoir communication au public quand celle-ci est faite à des personnes du public à des moments différents, que le moment soit choisi par ces dernières (ce qui est le cas sur Internet) ou par la personne responsable de l’envoi de l’œuvre (ce qui est le cas pour les transmissions par télécopieur) ».

[87] On judicial review, these propositions were not directly challenged. Still, the Federal Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada, both in the course of reviewing SOCAN 22 (1999) and in other decisions, have made a number of statements that would tend to support them.

[87] Dans le cadre du contrôle judiciaire, ces propositions n’ont pas été directement contestées. Néanmoins, la Cour d’appel fédérale et la Cour suprême du Canada, tant dans le cadre de leur réexamen de la décision SOCAN 22 (1999) que dans d’autres arrêts, ont fait un certain nombre de déclarations qui tendraient à les appuyer. [88] Dans l’arrêt SOCAN c. ACFI (CAF), la Cour d’appel fédérale a déclaré :
[174] [...] même lorsque les utilisateurs finaux reçoivent des données sous une forme qui les oblige à ouvrir le fichier pour écouter une œuvre musicale après l’avoir téléchargée sur leur disque dur, l’œuvre musicale en question est communiquée lorsque l’utilisateur final qui en a demandé la transmission la reçoit dans son ordinateur, qu’il l’écoute ou non par la suite.

[88] In SOCAN v. CAIP (FCA), the Federal Court of Appeal stated that:
[174] [...] even when end users receive data in a form that requires them to open the file to listen to the music after downloading it to their hard drive, the music is communicated when it is received on the computer of the end user who requested its transmission, whether or not it is in fact ever heard.

[89] In SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC), the Supreme Court of Canada made two important statements:
[42] [...] The Board ruled that a telecommunication occurs when the music is transmitted from the host server to the end user. I agree with this. [...] [45] At the end of the transmission, the end user has a musical work in his or her possession that was not there before. The work has necessarily been communicated [...] If the communication is by virtue of the Internet, there has been a “telecommunication”. [...]17

[89] Dans l’arrêt SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC), la Cour suprême du Canada a fait deux affirmations importantes :
[42] [...] La Commission a statué qu’il y avait télécommunication lors de la transmission de l’œuvre musicale du serveur hôte à l’utilisateur final. Je suis d’accord. [...] [45] À l’issue de la transmission, l’utilisateur final a en sa possession une œuvre musicale qu’il n’avait pas auparavant. L’œuvre a nécessairement été communiquée [...] Si la communication est effectuée sur l’Internet, il y a « télécommunication ». [...]17

- 40 - 27 [90] Finally, in CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada,18 the Supreme Court of Canada stated that:
[78] [...] The fax transmission of a single copy to a single individual is not a communication to the public. This said, a series of repeated fax transmissions of the same work to numerous different recipients might constitute communication to the public in infringement of copyright. However, there was no evidence of this type of transmission having occurred in this case.

[90] Enfin, dans l’arrêt CCH Canadienne Ltée c. Barreau du Haut-Canada,18 la Cour suprême du Canada a affirmé :
[78] [...] Transmettre une seule copie à une seule personne par télécopieur n’équivaut pas à communiquer l’œuvre au public. Cela dit, la transmission répétée d’une copie d’une même œuvre à de nombreux destinataires pourrait constituer une communication au public et violer le droit d’auteur. Toutefois, aucune preuve n’a établi que ce genre de transmission aurait eu lieu en l’espèce.

[91] In SOCAN 24, the Board, after examining the question at length, concluded that the transmission of a ringtone is a communication “to the public”.19 This decision is currently the subject of an application for judicial review. The application challenges both the Board’s conclusion and the proposition, which was conceded before the Board, that such a transmission is a “communication”.20

[91] Dans la décision SOCAN 24, la Commission, après avoir longuement examiné la question, a conclu que la transmission d’une sonnerie est une communication « au public ».19 Cette décision fait actuellement l’objet d’une demande de contrôle judiciaire. La demande conteste à la fois la conclusion de la Commission et la proposition, qui avait été concédée devant la Commission, que cette transmission est une « communication ».20 [92] Dans la présente affaire, les deux propositions sont contestées. En pratique, les opposantes reprennent à leur compte les arguments qui se trouvent dans la demande de contrôle judiciaire de la décision SOCAN 24. [93] À notre avis, les quatre citations des paragraphes 88 à 90 sont convaincantes. À l’instar de la Commission en 2006, nous sommes d’accord pour reconnaître le caractère public des transmissions sur Internet en général, et des sonneries en particulier; nous concluons que cette qualification s’applique également aux téléchargements. Étant donné que ces questions sont maintenant soulevées directement devant la Cour d’appel fédérale et indirectement devant nous et étant donné que les opposantes, dans la décision SOCAN 24, ont décidé de ne pas débattre devant la Commission la conclusion qu’elles contestent maintenant en Cour d’appel fédérale, nous nous sentons obligés de traiter des arguments visés.

[92] In the matter before us, both propositions are challenged. In effect, the objectors rely on the arguments that are contained in the application for judicial review of SOCAN 24.

[93] We find the four quotations in paragraphs 88 to 90 compelling. We agree with what the Board said in 2006 about the public nature of Internet transmissions in general, and of ringtones in particular; we find it equally applicable to downloads. Given that the issues are now raised directly before the Federal Court of Appeal and indirectly before us, and given that the objectors in SOCAN 24 chose not to debate before the Board a conclusion which they now dispute before the Federal Court of Appeal, we feel compelled to deal with the arguments.

- 41 - 28 [94] First, the transmission of a download over the Internet communicates the content of the download. Arguments advanced to challenge the proposition that the transmission of a download does not involve a communication are neither convincing nor relevant. The statement of the Supreme Court of Canada according to which a work has necessarily been communicated once the end user possesses a musical work that was not there before, clearly targets downloads, not streams. The statement of the Federal Court of Appeal according to which “music is communicated when it is received on the computer of the end user who requested its transmission, whether or not it is in fact ever heard”, makes it clear that music that cannot be heard at the time of transmission (i.e., a download, not a stream) is communicated nevertheless. Both statements support the proposition that a work is communicated even if it is not used or heard at the time of the transmission or indeed ever. [94] Premièrement, la transmission d’un téléchargement sur Internet communique le contenu du téléchargement. Les arguments avancés pour contester la proposition portant que la transmission d’un téléchargement ne comporte pas une communication ne sont ni convaincants ni pertinents. La déclaration de la Cour suprême du Canada selon laquelle une œuvre a nécessairement été communiquée lorsque l’utilisateur final a en sa possession une œuvre musicale qu’il n’avait pas auparavant, vise clairement les téléchargements et non les transmissions. La déclaration de la Cour d’appel fédérale selon laquelle « l’œuvre musicale en question est communiquée lorsque l’utilisateur final qui en a demandé la transmission la reçoit dans son ordinateur, qu’il l’écoute ou non par la suite », établit sans ambiguïté que la musique qui ne peut être écoutée au moment de la transmission (donc, la musique téléchargée) est néanmoins communiquée. Les deux déclarations appuient la position que l’œuvre est communiquée même si elle n’est pas utilisée ou écoutée au moment de la transmission, voire même jamais. [95] Les efforts faits pour distinguer les transmissions des téléchargements se fondent sur des hypothèses techniques et juridiques incorrectes. Les deux sont fragmentés en paquets et transmis, sur demande, individuellement à chaque utilisateur final, au moyen de transmissions distinctes et à des moments différents.21 Aucun des deux n’est audible pendant la communication. Les deux doivent être stockés, ne serait-ce que temporairement, avant d’être joués. Seule différence, une transmission est programmée de façon à sembler être effacée 22 au fur et à mesure où elle est jouée, contrairement à un téléchargement permanent.23 Si la transmission d’un téléchargement n’implique pas une communication, la transmission en continu n’en implique pas non plus. Cela signifierait que la SRC ne communique pas les nouvelles qu’elle publie en vue de webdiffusion ultérieure ou les contenus de son signal de radiodiffusion offert en diffusion simultanée. Cela signifierait aussi que tout le tarif 22 n’a absolument aucun fondement juridique.

[95] Attempts to distinguish streams from downloads are based on technical and legal assumptions that are incorrect. Both are broken down into packets and transmitted, on request, to each end user individually, in separate transmissions and at different times.21 Neither is audible during the communication. Both must be stored, even if only temporarily, before they can be played. The only difference is that a stream is programmed to appear to be erased as it is played,22 while a permanent download is not.23 If the transmission of a download does not involve a communication, then neither does the transmission of a stream. This would mean that CBC does not communicate the news items it posts for later webcasts or the contents of its broadcast signal when it is simulcast. This would also mean that none of the items in proposed Tariff 22 has any legal foundation whatsoever.

- 42 - 29 [96] Therefore, from a copyright perspective, common sense dictates that the content of a download is communicated when it is received, whether or not it is ever used, just as the content of a fax is communicated when it is received, whether or not it is ever read. CCH Canadian makes it clear that any fax transmission is a communication, whether private or public. Since a fax transmission normally results in the delivery of a physical copy, a fortiori the delivery of a digital copy (the download) must also involve a communication.24 [96] Par conséquent, du point de vue du droit d’auteur, le bon sens exige que le contenu d’un téléchargement soit communiqué au moment où il est reçu, qu’il soit utilisé ou ne le soit jamais, tout comme le contenu d’une télécopie est communiqué lorsqu’il est reçu, qu’il soit lu ou ne le soit jamais. CCH Canadienne établit clairement qu’une transmission par télécopieur est une communication, publique ou privée. Puisqu’une telle transmission entraîne normalement la livraison d’une copie matérielle, a fortiori, la livraison d’une copie numérique (le téléchargement) doit aussi impliquer une communication.24 [97] Deuxièmement, la transmission d’un téléchargement à un membre d’un public est une communication au public. Les téléchargements sont « destiné[s] à un groupe de personnes ».25 Ils sont offerts à quiconque possède l’appareil approprié et est disposé à remplir les conditions dictées par la personne qui fournit les téléchargements. Une ou plusieurs transmissions de la même œuvre, sur Internet, par télécopieur ou autrement, à un ou plusieurs membres d’un public constituent chacune une communication au public. Tout fichier iTunes offert aux clients est communiqué au public dès qu’un client « tire » le fichier. [98] La position portant qu’une communication ne s’adresse pas au public à moins que les destinataires partagent une expérience simultanée (ou presque simultanée) commune est incompatible avec l’idée qu’un fichier est communiqué même s’il n’est jamais ouvert. Elle contredit la position de la Cour d’appel fédérale qui convient qu’« une série de transmissions séquentielles puisse violer le droit de communiquer au public ».26 Elle va aussi à l’encontre du bon sens : si la position était fondée, le contenu d’un article savant publié sur Internet ne serait pas communiqué au public s’il était lu (à l’écran ou après avoir été téléchargé) par plusieurs personnes à des moments très éloignés les uns des autres. En pratique, exiger la simultanéité ou la communauté de l’expérience

[97] Second, the transmission of a download to a member of a public is a communication to the public. Downloads are “targeted at an aggregation of individuals”.25 They are offered to anyone with the appropriate device who is willing to comply with the terms dictated by the person who supplies the downloads. One or more transmissions of the same work, over the Internet, by fax or otherwise, to one or more members of a public each constitute a communication to the public. Any file iTunes offers to its clients is communicated to the public as soon as one client “pulls” the file.

[98] The proposition that a communication is not to the public unless recipients share a simultaneous (or near-simultaneous), common experience is incompatible with the notion that a file is communicated even if it is never opened. It runs contrary to the statement of the Federal Court of Appeal according to which “a series of sequential transmissions may infringe the right to communicate to the public.”26 It also challenges common sense: if the proposition were true, the content of a learned paper posted on the Internet would not be communicated to the public if it was read (on screen or after being downloaded) by several persons but at vastly different times. In effect, to require simultaneity or commonality of experience would lead to the absurd result that most of what is viewed or heard by hundreds or

- 43 - 30 even thousands of Internet users would involve private communications within the meaning of the Act. entraînerait comme résultat absurde que la plupart des choses vues ou entendues par des centaines, voire des milliers d’internautes concerneraient des communications privées au sens de la Loi. [99] Troisièmement, la transmission sur Internet n’est pas simplement une autre forme de distribution, pour la simple raison que l’alinéa 3(1)f) de la Loi vise expressément la communication par télécommunication.27 Si la notion de télécommunication même appelle une interprétation qui prend en compte les développements technologiques,28 toute tentative de comparaison entre la distribution de musique en ligne et sur des supports matériels est viciée en soi du point de vue du droit d’auteur. La transmission d’un fichier de musique sur Internet est protégée par la Loi; la transmission d’un CD de musique par la poste ne l’est pas. [100] Quatrièmement, les membres de la SOCAN ne font pas de cumul. Les droits de communication et de reproduction sont des droits distincts, souvent la propriété de personnes distinctes, administrés par des circuits distincts et assujettis à des régimes distincts. La personne qui copie une œuvre pour la diffuser « commet deux délits »29 et doit payer pour les deux actes. Cela devrait être tout aussi vrai quand les rôles sont inversés et qu’une personne communique une œuvre à un membre du public avec l’intention de lui fournir une copie de l’œuvre. 2. L’offre d’extraits pour écoute préalable constitue-t-elle une utilisation équitable à des fins de recherche au sens de l’article 29 de la Loi? [101] Tous les sites de musique offrant des téléchargements permettent aux usagers d’écouter au préalable un extrait d’une œuvre. L’écoute préalable sert à établir si la piste convient aux goûts de l’usager ou à vérifier si c’est bien celle qu’il souhaite acheter. En moyenne, on écoute 10 extraits avant d’acheter une piste. Un grand nombre de sites qui vendent des CD matériels permettent aussi l’écoute préalable.

[99] Third, Internet transmissions are not just another form of delivery, for the simple reason that paragraph 3(1)(f) of the Act specifically targets communications by telecommunication.27 While the notion of telecommunication itself must be interpreted in a way that takes account of technological developments,28 any attempt to compare delivery of music online with delivery of music on physical media is inherently flawed from a copyright perspective. Sending a music file over the Internet is protected by the Act; sending a music CD in the mail is not.

[100] Fourth, SOCAN members are not double dipping. The communication and reproduction rights are separate rights, often owned by separate persons, administered through separate channels and subject to separate regimes. The person who copies a work to effect a broadcast of that work “commits two torts”29 and should pay for both acts. The same should hold true when the sequence is inversed and someone communicates a work to a member of the public with a view to providing that person with a copy of the work. 2. Is offering previews fair dealing for the purpose of research within the meaning of section 29 of the Act?

[101] All music sites that offer downloads allow users to listen by way of a preview to an excerpt of a work. This preview is used either to determine whether the track suits the user’s tastes or to verify that the track is the one the user wants to buy. On average, a buyer examines 10 previews before purchasing a track. Many sites that sell physical CDs also offer previews.

- 44 - 31 [102] The availability of previews raises two questions. The first is essentially economic and concerns whether their availability and use should attract compensation over and above what is paid for a download or a CD. The second is legal and concerns whether the way in which services deal with previews involves a protected act under the Act. Although none of the parties addressed the legal issue directly, we must deal with it. [102] L’offre d’extraits en écoute préalable soulève deux questions. La première, essentiellement d’ordre économique, est de savoir si leur disponibilité et leur utilisation devraient justifier une contrepartie supérieure à ce qui est payé pour un téléchargement ou un CD. La seconde, d’ordre juridique, est de savoir si la façon dont les services utilisent l’écoute préalable est un acte protégé par la Loi. Personne n’a abordé directement la question juridique. Il nous faut pourtant en traiter. [103] L’article 29 de la Loi prévoit que l’utilisation équitable aux fins d’étude privée ou de recherche ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur. La juge en chef McLachlin s’est longuement penchée sur la notion d’utilisation équitable dans l’arrêt CCH Canadienne (CSC). Elle débute son examen en reformulant la nature de l’« exception » relative à l’usage équitable de la manière suivante :
[48] [...] Sur le plan procédural, le défendeur doit prouver que son utilisation de l’œuvre était équitable; cependant, il est peut-être plus juste de considérer cette exception comme une partie intégrante de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur plutôt que comme un simple moyen de défense. Un acte visé par l’exception relative à l’utilisation équitable ne viole pas le droit d’auteur. À l’instar des autres exceptions que prévoit la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, cette exception correspond à un droit des utilisateurs. Pour maintenir un juste équilibre entre les droits des titulaires du droit d’auteur et les intérêts des utilisateurs, il ne faut pas l’interpréter restrictivement. Comme le professeur Vaver, op. cit., l’a expliqué, à la p. 171, [TRADUCTION] « [l]es droits des utilisateurs ne sont pas de simples échappatoires. Les droits du titulaire et ceux de l’utilisateur doivent donc recevoir l’interprétation juste et équilibrée que commande une mesure législative visant à remédier à un état de fait. »

[103] Section 29 of the Act provides that fair dealing for the purpose of research or private study does not infringe copyright. The notion of fair dealing was examined extensively by McLachlin C.J.C. in CCH Canadian (SCC). She started by recasting the nature of the fair dealing “exception” in these terms:
[48] [...] Procedurally, a defendant is required to prove that his or her dealing with a work has been fair; however, the fair dealing exception is perhaps more properly understood as an integral part of the Copyright Act than simply a defence. Any act falling within the fair dealing exception will not be an infringement of copyright. The fair dealing exception, like other exceptions in the Copyright Act, is a user’s right. In order to maintain the proper balance between the rights of a copyright owner and users’ interests, it must not be interpreted restrictively. As Professor Vaver, supra, has explained, at p. 171: “User rights are not just loopholes. Both owner rights and user rights should therefore be given the fair and balanced reading that befits remedial legislation.”

[104] The Chief Justice then outlined what is involved in claiming fair dealing generally, and fair dealing for the purpose of research in particular:

[104] La juge en chef souligne ensuite ce que représente le recours à l’utilisation équitable en général, et aux fins de recherche en particulier :
[50] Pour établir qu’une utilisation était équitable

- 45 - 32 [50] In order to show that a dealing was fair [...], a defendant must prove: (1) that the dealing was for the purpose of either research or private study and (2) that it was fair. [51] The fair dealing exception [...] is open to those who can show that their dealings with a copyrighted work were for the purpose of research or private study. “Research” must be given a large and liberal interpretation in order to ensure that users’ rights are not unduly constrained. I agree with the Court of Appeal that research is not limited to non-commercial or private contexts. The Court of Appeal correctly noted, at para. 128, that “[r]esearch for the purpose of advising clients, giving opinions, arguing cases, preparing briefs and factums is nonetheless research.” Lawyers carrying on the business of law for profit are conducting research within the meaning of s. 29 of the Copyright Act. au sens de l’art. 29 de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, le défendeur doit prouver (1) qu’il s’agit d’une utilisation aux fins d’étude privée ou de recherche et (2) qu’elle était équitable. [51] Toute personne qui est en mesure de prouver qu’elle a utilisé l’œuvre protégée par le droit d’auteur aux fins de recherche ou d’étude privée peut se prévaloir de l’exception créée par l’art. 29. Il faut interpréter le mot « recherche » de manière large afin que les droits des utilisateurs ne soient pas indûment restreints. J’estime, comme la Cour d’appel, que la recherche ne se limite pas à celle effectuée dans un contexte non commercial ou privé. La Cour d’appel a signalé à juste titre, au par. 128, que « [l]a recherche visant à conseiller des clients, donner des avis, plaider des causes et préparer des mémoires et des factums reste de la recherche. » L’avocat qui exerce le droit dans un but lucratif effectue de la recherche au sens de l’art. 29 de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur.

[105] Chief Justice McLachlin also referred to a list of factors which Linden J.A. had proposed to help determine whether a dealing is fair:
[53] At the Court of Appeal, Linden J.A. acknowledged that there was no set test for fairness, but outlined a series of factors that could be considered to help assess whether a dealing is fair. Drawing on the decision in Hubbard, supra, as well as the doctrine of fair use in the United States, he proposed that the following factors be considered in assessing whether a dealing was fair: (1) the purpose of the dealing; (2) the character of the dealing; (3) the amount of the dealing; (4) alternatives to the dealing; (5) the nature of the work; and (6) the effect of the dealing on the work. Although these considerations will not all arise in every case of fair dealing, this list of factors provides a useful analytical framework to govern determinations of fairness in future cases.

[105] La juge en chef McLachlin fait également référence à une liste de facteurs proposés par le juge Linden pour aider à décider si une utilisation est équitable :
[53] Le juge Linden, de la Cour d’appel, a reconnu l’absence d’un critère établi permettant de dire qu’une utilisation est équitable ou non, mais il a énuméré des facteurs pouvant être pris en compte pour en décider. S’inspirant de Hubbard, précité, ainsi que de la doctrine américaine de l’utilisation équitable, il a énuméré les facteurs suivants : (1) le but de l’utilisation; (2) la nature de l’utilisation; (3) l’ampleur de l’utilisation; (4) les solutions de rechange à l’utilisation; (5) la nature de l’œuvre; (6) l’effet de l’utilisation sur l’œuvre. Bien que ces facteurs ne soient pas pertinents dans tous les cas, ils offrent un cadre d’analyse utile pour statuer sur le caractère équitable d’une utilisation dans des affaires ultérieures.

[106] She concluded her analysis this way:
[60] To conclude, the purpose of the dealing, the character of the dealing, the amount of the dealing, the nature of the work, available

[106] La juge en chef conclut son analyse en ces termes :
[60] En conclusion, le but de l’utilisation, la nature de l’utilisation, l’ampleur de l’utilisation,

- 46 - 33 alternatives to the dealing and the effect of the dealing on the work are all factors that could help determine whether or not a dealing is fair. These factors may be more or less relevant to assessing the fairness of a dealing depending on the factual context of the allegedly infringing dealing. In some contexts, there may be factors other than those listed here that may help a court decide whether the dealing was fair. la nature de l’œuvre, les solutions de rechange à l’utilisation et l’effet de l’utilisation sur l’œuvre sont tous des facteurs qui peuvent contribuer à la détermination du caractère équitable ou inéquitable de l’utilisation. Ces facteurs peuvent être plus ou moins pertinents selon le contexte factuel de la violation alléguée du droit d’auteur. Dans certains cas, d’autres facteurs que ceux énumérés peuvent aider le tribunal à statuer sur le caractère équitable de l’utilisation.

[107] The Chief Justice then found that a person who facilitates the fair dealing of another may avail herself of section 29 in one of two ways:
[63] [...] Section 29 of the Copyright Act states that “[f]air dealing for the purpose of research or private study does not infringe copyright.” The language is general. “Dealing” connotes not individual acts, but a practice or system. This comports with the purpose of the fair dealing exception, which is to ensure that users are not unduly restricted in their ability to use and disseminate copyrighted works. Persons or institutions relying on the s. 29 fair dealing exception need only prove that their own dealings with copyrighted works were for the purpose of research or private study and were fair. They may do this either by showing that their own practices and policies were research-based and fair, or by showing that all individual dealings with the materials were in fact research-based and fair. [64] [...] although the retrieval and photocopying of legal works are not research in and of themselves, they are necessary conditions of research and thus part of the research process. The reproduction of legal works is for the purpose of research in that it is an essential element of the legal research process.

[107] La juge en chef conclut ensuite que la personne qui facilite l’utilisation équitable faite par une autre peut invoquer l’article 29 de l’une ou l’autre de deux façons :
[63] [...] L’article 29 de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur dispose que « [l]’utilisation équitable d’une œuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur aux fins d’étude privée ou de recherche ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur. » Les termes employés sont généraux. « Utilisation » ne renvoie pas à un acte individuel, mais bien à une pratique ou à un système. Cela est compatible avec l’objet de l’exception au titre de l’utilisation équitable, qui est de faire en sorte que la faculté des utilisateurs d’utiliser et de diffuser des œuvres protégées ne soit pas indûment limitée. La personne ou l’établissement qui invoque l’exception prévue à l’art. 29 doit seulement prouver qu’il a utilisé l’œuvre protégée aux fins de recherche ou d’étude privée et que cette utilisation était équitable. Il peut le faire en établissant soit que ses propres pratiques et politiques étaient axées sur la recherche et équitables, soit que toutes les utilisations individuelles des ouvrages étaient de fait axées sur la recherche et équitables. [64] [...] Même si la recherche documentaire et la photocopie d’ouvrages juridiques ne constituent pas de la recherche comme telle, elles sont nécessaires au processus de recherche et en font donc partie. La reproduction d’ouvrages juridiques est effectuée aux fins de recherche en ce qu’il s’agit d’un élément essentiel du processus de recherche juridique.

[108] In this instance, our only concern is whether the way in which services deal with previews constitutes fair dealing for the purpose

[108] En l’espèce, notre seule préoccupation est de savoir si la manière dont les services exploitent l’écoute préalable d’extraits constitue

- 47 - 34 of research. Services that supply previews do not conduct research. It must therefore be demonstrated that they supply previews with the view to facilitate the research of others. Only then can it be argued that previews are offered “for the purpose of research”. une utilisation équitable aux fins de recherche. Le service qui fournit des extraits en écoute préalable n’effectue pas de recherche. Il faut donc établir qu’il offre des extraits afin de faciliter la recherche effectuée par d’autres. Sinon, le service ne peut prétendre que les extraits sont offerts « aux fins de recherche ». [109] L’article 29 de la Loi s’applique exclusivement à la recherche et à l’étude privée. La Cour suprême du Canada a établi de manière claire que « la recherche ne se limite pas à celle effectuée dans un contexte non commercial ou privé ».30 Planifier l’achat d’un téléchargement ou d’un CD requiert un effort pour trouver : identifier les sites offrant ces biens, en choisir un, établir si la piste est disponible, vérifier qu’il s’agit de la bonne version et ainsi de suite. L’écoute préalable contribue à cet effort pour trouver. Si copier un arrêt en vue de pouvoir conseiller un client ou un senior est une utilisation « à des fins de recherche » comme l’entend l’article 29, écouter au préalable un extrait en vue de décider d’acheter ou non un téléchargement ou un CD l’est aussi. L’objet de la démarche est différent, tout comme l’expertise qu’elle requiert ou les conséquences d’une recherche bâclée. Il s’agit là de différences de degré et non de nature. [110] Toutefois, il ne suffit pas que l’utilisation de l’écoute préalable ait une finalité de recherche pour que l’application de l’article 29 soit justifiée. Le caractère équitable de l’utilisation doit être apprécié en fonction des facteurs exposés par le juge Linden dans l’arrêt CCH Canadienne (CAF). [111] Le premier facteur est le but de l’utilisation. Si l’utilisation faite par l’usager vise la recherche, l’offre d’extraits en écoute préalable pour faciliter ce but répond au facteur dans la mesure où il existe des dispositifs de protection raisonnables pour s’assurer que l’utilisation des consommateurs est équitable (par exemple, qu’elle ne se substitue pas à l’achat de la piste). Le dossier de la présente affaire établit

[109] Section 29 of the Act only applies to research and private study. The Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that “research is not limited to non-commercial or private contexts.”30 Planning the purchase of a download or CD involves searching, investigation: identifying sites that offer those products, selecting one, finding out whether the track is available, ensuring that it is the right version or cover and so on. Listening to previews assists in this investigation. If copying a court decision with a view to advising a client or principal is a dealing “for the purpose of research” within the meaning of section 29, so is streaming a preview with a view to deciding whether or not to purchase a download or CD. The object of the investigation is different, as are the level of expertise required and the consequences of performing an inadequate search. Those are differences in degree, not differences in nature.

[110] It is not sufficient, however, that the dealing be for the purpose of research for section 29 to apply. The fairness of the dealing must be assessed according to the factors outlined by Linden J.A. in CCH Canadian (FCA).

[111] The first factor is the purpose of the dealing. If the user’s dealing is for the purpose of research, supplying previews with a view of facilitating that purpose satisfies this factor as long as reasonable safeguards are in place to ensure that the user’s dealing in previews is fair (for example, that it is not a substitute to the purchase of the track). The record of these proceedings shows that such safeguards are in

- 48 - 35 place. Previews are streamed. They are not exchanged on P2P networks unless they are hacked. They offer an excerpt of the work that is long enough for the user to do his research, but short enough and of a sufficiently degraded quality that it cannot replace the complete work. l’existence de ces dispositifs de protection. Les extraits en écoute préalable sont transmis en continu. Ils ne font pas l’objet d’échanges sur les réseaux de pairs à moins d’être sabotés. L’extrait de l’œuvre est assez long pour que l’usager puisse effectuer sa recherche, tout en étant assez court et d’une qualité assez piètre pour qu’il ne puisse remplacer l’œuvre au complet. [112] Le deuxième facteur est le caractère de l’utilisation. L’écoute d’un extrait d’une piste en vue de prendre une décision d’achat est généralement une utilisation équitable. Faciliter cette activité en est donc une également. [113] Le troisième facteur est l’ampleur de l’utilisation. Transmettre un extrait pour en permettre une seule écoute préalable est une utilisation quantitativement modeste par rapport à l’achat de l’œuvre au complet pour écoute répétée. Aider l’usager à prendre une décision d’achat à l’égard du fichier au complet est une utilisation dont on peut présumer qu’elle est équitable. [114] Le quatrième facteur prend en compte les solutions de rechange à l’utilisation. Ces solutions ne sont pas évidentes. Inciter l’usager à recourir aux réseaux de pairs soulève des difficultés qu’il n’y a pas lieu d’examiner ici. L’écoute préalable d’un extrait est vraisemblablement la façon la plus pratique, la plus économique et la plus sûre pour les usagers de s’assurer d’obtenir ce qu’ils veulent. Comme la Cour suprême du Canada l’a d’ailleurs noté, la possibilité d’obtenir une licence n’est pas pertinente pour décider du caractère équitable d’une utilisation.31 [115] Les deux derniers facteurs sont la nature de l’œuvre et l’effet de l’utilisation sur l’œuvre. Les téléchargements de musique qu’offrent les services sont des objets de commerce. Toute mesure prise pour augmenter la probabilité de ventes est conforme à la nature de l’œuvre. L’offre d’extraits en écoute préalable encourage les ventes de téléchargements, ce qui profite aux titulaires de droits.

[112] The second is the character of the dealing. Listening to an excerpt of a track to decide whether to purchase it or not is generally a fair dealing. So is facilitating that activity.

[113] The third is the amount of the dealing. Streaming a preview to listen to it once is a dealing of a modest amount, when compared to purchasing the whole work for repeated listening. Helping the user to decide his course of action with respect to a purchase of the whole file is presumptively fair.

[114] The fourth is the possible alternatives to the dealing. These alternatives are not apparent. Inciting users to resort to P2P networks would create difficulties that need not be discussed here. Listening to a preview probably is the most practical, most economical and safest way for users to ensure that they purchase what they wish. And as the Supreme Court of Canada noted, the availability of a licence is not relevant to deciding whether a dealing is fair.31

[115] The last two factors are the nature of the work and the effect of the dealing on the work. Musical downloads offered by services are objects of commerce. Anything that is done to increase the probability of sales accords with the nature of the work. Offering previews encourages sales of downloads, which in turns benefits copyright owners.

- 49 - 36 [116] We conclude that generally speaking, users who listen to previews are entitled to avail themselves of section 29 of the Act, as are those who allow them to verify that they have or will purchase the track or album that they want or to permit them to view and sample what is available online. Some users may use previews in a manner that does not constitute fair dealing; this does not compromise the position of the services, so long as they are able to show “that their own practices and policies were research-based and fair”.32 [116] Nous concluons que, de manière générale, les usagers qui effectuent l’écoute préalable d’extraits peuvent se prévaloir de l’article 29 de la Loi, comme ceux qui permettent aux usagers de vérifier qu’ils ont ou vont acheter la piste ou l’album souhaités ou encore qui leur permettent d’examiner et d’essayer ce qui est disponible en ligne. Certains usagers peuvent utiliser l’écoute préalable d’une manière non conforme à l’utilisation équitable; cela n’affecte pas la position des services, dans la mesure où ils peuvent établir que « [leurs] propres pratiques et politiques étaient axées sur la recherche et équitables ».32 3. Existe-t-il un empêchement juridique à l’homologation d’un tarif prenant effet en 1996 selon le dépôt original ou selon le projet actuel? (Rétroactivité) [117] L’ACR reconnaît que la Commission a le pouvoir d’homologuer un tarif qui prend effet en 1996, mais soutient que la Commission ne peut homologuer de tarifs qui pourraient être plus préjudiciables que ce que demandait la société de gestion au départ. Il n’y a pas lieu d’examiner cette question. Le tarif plafonnera les redevances au niveau de ce qui était demandé dans les projets de tarifs. [118] Les projets de tarifs pour les années 1996 à 2005 visaient les communications des « services de télécommunication » aux « abonnés ». Le tarif désormais proposé vise les communications des « fournisseurs de musique en ligne » aux « usagers ». L’ACR, la CRIA et Apple soutiennent que le concept d’usager est plus large que celui d’abonné, celui-ci présupposant [TRADUCTION] « des arrangements de participation particuliers en contrepartie d’un droit ».33 Elles concluent de ce fait que le tarif des années 1996 à 2005 ne peut s’appliquer qu’à des services relevant d’un abonnement. Nous ne sommes pas d’accord. Les projets de tarifs des années 1996 à 2005 définissent l’« abonné » comme « toute personne qui a accès ou qui a droit d’accéder, en vertu d’un contrat, au service ou au contenu fourni par le service de

3. Is there any legal impediment to certifying the tariff starting in 1996 as originally filed or as now proposed? (Retroactivity)

[117] CAB concedes that the Board has the power to certify a tariff that takes effect in 1996, but argues the Board cannot certify tariffs which are potentially more prejudicial than the tariff originally sought by the collective. There is no need to address this issue. The tariff will provide that royalties will be capped to what was requested in the proposed tariffs.

[118] The proposed tariffs for 1996 to 2005 target communications by “telecommunication services” to “subscribers”. The tariff as proposed now targets communications by “online music suppliers” to “users”. CAB, CRIA and Apple argue that the notion of user is wider than that of subscribers, which presuppose “specific arrangements for participation in return for a fee”.33 From that, they conclude that the tariff for 1996 to 2005 can apply only to subscriber-based services. We disagree. The proposed tariffs for 1996 to 2005 define “subscriber” as “a person who accesses or is contractually entitled to access the services or content provided by the telecommunication service in a given month”. That definition does not presuppose a formal contractual arrangement (accesses or is contractually entitled to access) or the payment

- 50 - 37 of a fee. Neither are the notions of subscription and payment inextricably linked; users commonly “subscribe” to a variety of services for free in the virtual and material worlds. For these reasons, we find that the proposed tariffs for 1996 to 2005 target all the uses that SOCAN now seeks to include in the certified tariff. télécommunications dans un mois donné ». Cette définition ne présuppose pas d’arrangement contractuel formel (a accès ou a droit d’accéder, en vertu d’un contrat) ni le paiement d’un droit. Les notions d’abonnement et de paiement ne sont pas non plus inextricablement liées; les usagers « s’abonnent » souvent à une gamme de services gratuits dans le monde virtuel ou réel. Pour ces motifs, nous concluons que les projets de tarifs pour les années 1996 à 2005 visent tous les usages que la SOCAN souhaite maintenant inclure dans le tarif homologué. [119] La SOCAN s’est engagée à ne pas percevoir rétroactivement auprès des petits usagers. Elle demandera toutefois des redevances aux gros usagers, à partir de 1996. Chaque situation sera examinée au cas par cas par la SOCAN. Le bon sens et les considérations économiques prévaudront.34 4. Les services fournis à partir de serveurs situés à l’extérieur du Canada sont-ils assujettis au tarif? [120] La décision SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC) a tranché la question. L’utilisation d’un serveur situé à l’extérieur du Canada ne dégage pas à elle seule un fournisseur de contenu de sa responsabilité en vertu du tarif. L’applicabilité de la Loi aux communications faisant intervenir des participants internationaux dépendra de l’existence d’un lien réel et important entre le Canada et la communication. Selon le juge Binnie, « une télécommunication effectuée à partir d’un pays étranger vers le Canada ou à partir du Canada vers un pays étranger “se situe à la fois ici et à l’autre endroit”. »35 [121] La difficulté que soulève cette position est qu’il faut considérer chaque communication individuellement pour établir si son lien avec le Canada est suffisamment fort pour que la communication se situe « ici ». Dans la pratique, c’est impossible à faire. Par conséquent, nous devrons recourir à des approximations grossières pour déterminer ce qui est inclus et ce qui ne l’est pas dans le tarif. La proposition ouvre également

[119] SOCAN undertook not to pursue small users retroactively. SOCAN will however claim royalties from large users starting in 1996. Each situation will be looked at on a case by case basis by SOCAN. Common sense and economics will prevail.34

4. Are services whose servers are located outside Canada subject to the tariff?

[120] SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC) settles this issue. Using a server located outside of Canada does not of itself isolate a content provider from liability under the tariff. The applicability of the Act to communications that have international participants will depend on whether there is a real and substantial connection between Canada and the communication. According to Binnie J., “a telecommunication from a foreign state to Canada, or a telecommunication from Canada to a foreign state, ‘is both here and there’.”35

[121] The problem with this proposition is that it requires looking at each communication individually to determine if the connection to Canada is sufficiently strong for the communication to happen “here”. In practice, this is impossible to do. As a result, we will have to resort to rough approximations to determine what is included in the tariff and what is not. The proposition also creates the possibility of a

- 51 - 38 “layering of royalty obligations”36 which might need to be addressed in future proceedings. la possibilité d’une « superposition des redevances exigibles »,36 point qu’il faudra peutêtre examiner dans les procédures à venir. 5. Les questions soulevées par l’ESA [122] L’ESA a soulevé un certain nombre de questions juridiques qui peuvent être tranchées succinctement. [123] Un logiciel de jeu n’est peut-être pas de la musique, mais l’affirmation passe à côté de la question. La communication d’un logiciel qui intègre de la musique entraîne la communication simultanée de cette musique, tout comme la communication d’une émission de télévision comportant de la musique entraîne la communication simultanée de cette musique. [124] L’ESA fait valoir que les droits relatifs à la musique utilisée dans les jeux vidéo ont déjà été acquittés. Compte tenu de la différence entre la législation canadienne et la législation américaine sur le droit d’auteur, il se pourrait fort bien que la musique que les membres de l’ESA pensent avoir libérée de droits ne le soit pas, du moins au Canada. [125] L’ESA a tort de déclarer que si la SOCAN ne produit pas suffisamment d’éléments de preuve, la Commission ne peut pas décider ce qui constitue un tarif équitable. S’il existe un usage potentiellement protégé du répertoire de la SOCAN, celle-ci a droit à un tarif. L’insuffisance d’éléments de preuve peut influer sur le montant, mais pas sur l’existence du tarif. Il est tout aussi incorrect d’avancer que les usages de minimis ne justifient pas l’homologation d’un tarif. L’absence de tarif prive la SOCAN d’un recours. [126] Enfin, l’ESA soutient que la solution relative à l’usage de la musique dans les jeux devrait être de nature contractuelle plutôt que réglementaire. Pareille solution est impossible, du moins dans le contexte du régime de la SOCAN. Comme la Commission l’a déclaré dans le passé, on peut faire valoir avec raison que les ententes entre la SOCAN et les usagers sont nulles parce que contraires à l’ordre public.37

5. Issues raised by ESA [122] ESA raised a number of legal issues that can be disposed of succinctly.

[123] Game software may not be music, but that statement misses the point. The communication of software in which music is embedded involves the simultaneous communication of the music, just as the communication of a television program containing music involves the simultaneous communication of the music it contains. [124] ESA argues that all music used in video games is pre-cleared. Given the difference that exists between Canadian and American copyright legislation, it may well be that music ESA’s members think is pre-cleared is not, at least for Canada.

[125] ESA is incorrect in stating that if SOCAN fails to adduce sufficient evidence, the Board is unable to determine what is a fair tariff. If there is a potentially protected use of SOCAN’s repertoire, SOCAN is entitled to a tariff. The lack of evidence may affect the amount of the tariff, but not its existence. It is just as incorrect to advance that de minimis uses do not justify the certification of a tariff. The absence of a tariff deprives SOCAN of a recourse.

[126] Finally, ESA argues that the solution to the use of music in games should be contractual, not regulatory. This cannot be so, at least within the context of the SOCAN regime. As the Board stated in the past, an argument can be made that agreements between SOCAN and users are void as a matter of public policy.37

- 52 - 39 VI. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS [127] We turn now to the economic analysis to establish the tariffs proposed by SOCAN. VI. ANALYSE ÉCONOMIQUE [127] Nous procéderons maintenant à l’analyse économique nécessaire pour établir les tarifs que propose la SOCAN. [128] M. Liebowitz, l’expert de la SOCAN, a proposé une analyse économique et une méthode permettant d’établir les taux applicables aux catégories 1 (sites de musique), 2 (webdiffusions audio), 3 (diffusions simultanées de signal radio), 4 (webdiffusions audiovisuelles) et 5 (diffusions simultanées de signal de télévision). Cette méthode consiste essentiellement à choisir le meilleur prix de référence possible, puis à y apporter des corrections sur la base d’une analyse des caractéristiques propres à chaque marché. [129] L’analyse de M. Liebowitz pour la catégorie 1 est fondée sur la rentabilité comparée du marché numérique et du marché du CD traditionnel. En ce qui concerne les catégories 2, 3, 4 et 5, il a examiné les webdiffusions et les diffusions simultanées et il a conclu de cet examen que les coûts irrécupérables38 contribuent à faire d’Internet un marché beaucoup plus rentable que celui des supports traditionnels. [130] M. Mathewson, l’expert de l’ACR, a présenté une analyse économique concernant les taux proposés pour les catégories 2, 3, 4 et 5. Il a aussi examiné l’importance relative de la musique sur les sites Web pour établir l’assiette du tarif. [131] M. Brander, l’expert de la CRIA et d’Apple, a proposé une analyse économique concernant les taux de la catégorie 1. Il a aussi examiné les caractéristiques et la rentabilité du marché numérique afin d’établir le taux applicable aux sites de musique. [132] MM. Liebowitz, Mathewson et Brander s’entendent dans la plupart des cas sur le choix des prix de référence, mais ils ne sont pas du même avis sur les corrections à leur apporter,

[128] Professor Liebowitz, SOCAN’s expert, provided an economic analysis and proposed methodologies to help determine the rates for items 1 (Music Sites), 2 (Audio Webcasts), 3 (Radio Simulcasts), 4 (Audiovisual Webcasts) and 5 (Television Simulcasts). Professor Liebowitz essentially used a methodology that consisted of selecting the best available proxy and then made adjustments to it based on an analysis of the specific characteristics of each market.

[129] Professor Liebowitz’s analysis of item 1 is based on the comparative profitability of the digital market and the traditional CD market. For items 2, 3, 4 and 5, he examined webcasts and simulcasts and concluded that sunk costs38 contribute to a significantly more profitable market on the Internet than in the traditional media.

[130] Professor Mathewson, CAB’s expert, provided an economic analysis for the proposed rates for items 2, 3, 4 and 5. He also examined the relative importance of music on websites to determine the rate base of the tariff.

[131] Professor Brander, the expert for CRIA and Apple, provided an economic analysis with respect to the rates for item 1. He also examined the characteristics and the profitability of the digital market to determine the tariff rate applicable to music sites. [132] Although Professors Liebowitz, Mathewson and Brander agree in most cases on the choice of proxies, they disagree on the adjustments that must be made for a number of

- 53 - 40 different reasons that are specific to each item which we will examine in detail. Online Music Services [133] We start our analysis by looking at the price to be paid for the communication of permanent downloads, limited downloads and ondemand streams. 1. Permanent Downloads [134] Professor Liebowitz starts from the premise that since digital downloads and physical CDs are close substitutes, the best proxy available for evaluating the rights involved in the former is the rate payable for the mechanical reproduction of the master recording of the latter. This rate, which is 7.7¢ per track, is agreed to in the MLA. [135] Professor Liebowitz then makes a series of adjustments to the proxy to reflect the very different characteristics of the download industry. He recognizes that the MLA rate is a payment for the reproduction right only and that, unlike downloads, no communication right is involved in the sale of a physical CD. The adjustments he makes to the MLA rate proxy therefore result in a total value for the bundle of rights. This necessitates establishing sharing options to distribute value between the communication and reproduction rights. pour plusieurs raisons qui varient d’une catégorie à l’autre et que nous allons examiner en détail. Services de musique en ligne [133] Nous débutons notre analyse par l’examen du prix à payer pour la communication de téléchargements permanents, de téléchargements limités et de transmissions sur demande. 1. Les téléchargements permanents [134] M. Liebowitz part du principe que, puisque les téléchargements numériques et les CD sont de proches substituts, la meilleure mesure de référence dont on dispose pour évaluer les droits applicables aux premiers est le taux du droit de reproduction mécanique pour les seconds. Ce taux est de 7,7 ¢ par piste, tel que convenu dans la MLA. [135] M. Liebowitz apporte ensuite une série de corrections à cette mesure de référence pour tenir compte des caractéristiques très différentes de l’industrie du téléchargement. Il admet que le taux de la MLA s’applique au seul droit de reproduction et que, contrairement à ce qui est le cas pour les téléchargements, il n’y a pas de droit de communication dans la vente de CD matériels. Par conséquent, les corrections qu’il apporte au taux de la MLA en tant que prix de référence donnent une valeur globale pour l’ensemble de droits. Il faut donc définir des critères de répartition de cette valeur globale entre le droit de communication et le droit de reproduction. [136] La première correction se fonde sur la rentabilité comparée des maisons de disques opérant sur Internet et dans leur marché traditionnel. M. Liebowitz soutient que ces maisons font beaucoup plus de bénéfices en vendant des téléchargements numériques que des CD matériels. Selon lui, elles multiplient plusieurs fois leur rentabilité parce qu’elles y font l’économie des coûts de fabrication (inexistants dans l’environnement numérique), d’une partie des coûts de distribution, de vente et indirects

[136] The first adjustment is based on comparing the profitability of record companies on the Internet and in their traditional market. Professor Liebowitz contends that record companies make significantly greater profits when selling digital downloads than when selling physical CDs. According to him, because record companies save on manufacturing costs (not needed in the digital environment), on distribution, sales and overhead (DSO) costs (at least partly) and on reproduction royalties (retailers, not the labels,

- 54 - 41 pay the royalties), their profitability increases many times over. Part of these additional benefits should be returned to the rights owners. His assumption is that the increase in profitability reflects an increased value of sound recordings and therefore the increase in the price paid for the bundle of rights should be the same. (DVI) et des redevances de reproduction (qui sont à la charge des détaillants). Les titulaires de droits devraient recevoir une part de cet accroissement de rentabilité. Selon son hypothèse, l’accroissement de rentabilité témoigne d’une augmentation de la valeur des enregistrements sonores et le prix à payer pour l’ensemble de droits devrait augmenter dans la même proportion. [137] La deuxième correction apportée par M. Liebowitz concerne l’écoute préalable. À son avis, cette caractéristique représente un supplément de valeur, dont les titulaires de droits devraient recevoir leur part. Il invoque à l’appui de cette thèse les études effectuées par Erin Research, selon lesquelles la valeur de l’écoute préalable pour les consommateurs pourrait atteindre 40 pour cent ou même plus; il retient lui-même une estimation prudente de 30 pour cent. Il divise ce pourcentage en parts égales entre les consommateurs, les vendeurs de téléchargements et les titulaires du droit de communication, ce qui établit à 10 pour cent la valeur de l’écoute préalable pour les titulaires. M. Liebowitz étudie aussi des scénarios où cette part serait de 5 pour cent. Il additionne simplement ces taux à la valeur de l’ensemble de droits. [138] M. Liebowitz opère une troisième correction pour obtenir ce qu’il appelle des « taux de parité ». Cette correction prend en compte le fait que le paiement supplémentaire au titre de l’ensemble de droits aura une incidence défavorable sur le taux de profit de l’industrie du disque. Les taux de parité se définissent donc comme des paiements, au titre de l’ensemble de droits, qui sont égaux en pourcentage aux gains nets du titulaire du droit sur l’enregistrement sonore (autrement dit, au taux de profit de l’industrie du disque). [139] La dernière étape de l’analyse consiste à formuler diverses hypothèses de répartition entre la communication et la reproduction. M. Liebowitz tire de son examen la conclusion

[137] The second adjustment of Professor Liebowitz concerns previews. In his opinion, this feature adds value, a share of which should go back to rights owners. In support of this position, Professor Liebowitz relies on the Erin Research studies, which estimate that the value of previews to consumers could be as high as 40 per cent, and even more, and he used a conservative value of 30 per cent. This number is further divided in equal parts between consumers, sellers of downloads and owners of the communication right, resulting in a value for previews of 10 per cent for rights owners. Professor Liebowitz also explores scenarios with a value for previews of 5 per cent. These value rates are simply added to the value of the bundle.

[138] Professor Liebowitz makes a third adjustment to arrive at what he calls “parity rates”. This adjustment recognizes that the additional payment made for the bundle of rights will have a negative impact on the profit rate of the record industry. Parity rates are thus defined as payments for the bundle of rights that are equal, in percentage terms, to the net gains for the sound recording right owner (or the profit rate of the record industry).

[139] The final step in the analysis consists in assuming various sharing hypotheses between the communication and the reproduction rights. In the end, Professor Liebowitz concludes that the

- 55 - 42 royalty rate for the communication right in permanent downloads should be between 8.9 and 14.6 per cent. [140] Professor Brander disagrees with Professor Liebowitz on a number of points. He starts from the premise that downloads are not a “new market” but rather a substitute for an existing physical market, and because the productivity of SOCAN members has not changed in the substitute Internet environment, no additional payments should be awarded to SOCAN rights owners. The addition of a new communication right in the Internet environment does not create an additional economic value. [141] Professor Brander also argues that Professor Liebowitz erred by focusing only on the benefits of delivering tracks through the Internet rather than on CDs, ignoring increased costs such as bandwidth, computer hardware and software, formatting, storing, delivering and tracking systems, etc. These additional costs have a severe impact on the profitability of the digital business. que le taux de redevance pour la communication de téléchargements permanents devrait s’inscrire entre 8,9 et 14,6 pour cent. [140] M. Brander est en désaccord avec M. Liebowitz sur plusieurs points. Il postule que les téléchargements ne forment pas un « nouveau marché », mais plutôt un marché de remplacement de celui du CD matériel, et que, leur productivité n’ayant pas changé dans l’environnement Internet, les membres de la SOCAN ne devraient pas toucher davantage pour les droits qu’ils détiennent. L’utilisation du droit de communication dans l’environnement Internet ne crée pas de valeur économique additionnelle. [141] M. Brander soutient aussi que M. Liebowitz s’est trompé en retenant seulement les avantages économiques associés à la livraison de pistes par Internet plutôt que sur des CD et en ne tenant pas compte de l’augmentation des charges pour la bande passante, le matériel informatique, les logiciels, le formatage, le stockage, les systèmes de livraison et de suivi, etc. Ces nouvelles charges entament largement la rentabilité du marché numérique. [142] M. Brander soutient aussi que l’écoute préalable n’a pas d’autre valeur que l’avantage indirect représenté par l’accroissement des ventes, que leur valeur est déjà intégralement prise en compte dans le prix du téléchargement et que, selon l’étude Pollara, cette valeur est de toute façon presque nulle. L’écoute préalable existe aussi dans l’environnement physique, où les titulaires de droits ne reçoivent rien à ce titre. Qui plus est, sur tout autre marché, le fait de permettre au consommateur de se familiariser avec le produit n’entraîne normalement aucune rémunération spéciale pour les producteurs : cette caractéristique ne rapporte qu’indirectement, par l’intermédiaire d’un supplément de ventes. [143] M. Brander propose une méthode différente pour établir le taux pour la communication d’œuvres musicales. Il convient avec M. Liebowitz que la meilleure mesure de

[142] Professor Brander also argues that previews have no value other than the indirect benefits they create by increasing sales, that their value is already fully reflected in the price of the download and that the Pollara study shows that their value is close to nothing in any event. The ability to preview exists in the physical environment; rights owners do not get compensated for this. Also, in any other market, allowing customers to learn about the product normally provides no specific return to underlying producers in and of itself. Any return arises indirectly from additional sales.

[143] Professor Brander proposes a different methodology to establish the rate for the communication of musical works. He agrees with Professor Liebowitz that the best available proxy

- 56 - 43 is the MLA rate but then relies on a study prepared by Mr. Stohn for CSI – Online Music39 and concludes that the current MLA rate of 7,7¢ per track translates into a percentage of retail sales (of individual tracks and albums) of about 6 per cent of Internet download revenues. référence est le taux de la MLA. Cependant, se fondant sur une étude effectuée par M. Stohn pour CSI – musique en ligne, 39 il conclut que le taux actuel de la MLA de 7,7 ¢ par piste équivaut à un pourcentage des ventes au détail (de pistes individuelles et d’albums) d’environ 6 pour cent des revenus des téléchargements Internet. [144] Selon M. Brander, la seule différence entre le marché du CD matériel et celui du téléchargement numérique réside dans le mode de distribution – qui est essentiellement une question technologique. Le produit final consommé est le même; dans les deux cas, les chansons pourront se retrouver sur un iPod, un lecteur MP3, un CD ou un autre support. Par conséquent, le taux global pour la communication et la reproduction dans l’environnement numérique devrait être le même que dans l’environnement physique. Se fondant sur cette analyse, M. Brander propose que l’ensemble des redevances à verser à CSI et à la SOCAN s’inscrive entre 6 et 8 pour cent. [145] Nous souscrivons à l’approche générale de M. Liebowitz, mais nous estimons nécessaire de modifier son modèle à certains égards et nous rejetons certaines des corrections qu’il propose. [146] Premièrement, nous pensons aussi que la mesure de référence appropriée du prix à payer pour utiliser une œuvre musicale dans un téléchargement est le prix à payer pour la reproduction de l’œuvre sur un CD. [147] Deuxièmement, nous rejetons la thèse des opposantes selon laquelle le prix à payer pour l’ensemble de droits dans un téléchargement devrait être le même que le taux applicable à la reproduction mécanique sur CD matériel. La Commission a déclaré à de nombreuses reprises que l’usage d’un nouveau droit, ou un nouvel usage d’un droit qui existe déjà, doit donner lieu à rémunération selon sa juste valeur.40 Si le téléchargement de musique d’Internet entraîne une communication au public par télécommunication, il faut rémunérer cette communication, même si le produit final est le même pour le consommateur.

[144] According to Professor Brander, the only difference between the physical CD market and digital downloads is in the mode of distribution – essentially a technological issue. The final product enjoyed by the consumers is the same; in both cases, the songs might end up on iPods, MP3 players, CDs or other media. Therefore, the total rate for both the communication and the reproduction rights in the digital environment should replicate the amount paid in the physical environment. Based on his analysis, Professor Brander proposes that the combined CSI and SOCAN royalty rates be in the order of 6 per cent to 8 per cent. [145] We agree with the general approach proposed by Professor Liebowitz, though we find the need to correct the model in certain respects and reject some of the adjustments he proposes. [146] First, we agree that the appropriate proxy for the price to pay to use a musical work in a download is the price paid to reproduce a musical work onto a CD.

[147] Second, we reject the objectors’ contention that the rate payable for the bundle of rights in downloads should be the same as the rate for the mechanical reproduction of physical CDs. The Board has stated on many occasions that the use of a new right, or a new use of an existing right, must be compensated for at its fair value.40 If downloading music from the Internet involves a communication to the public by telecommunication, it must be compensated for even though the end product to the consumer is the same.

- 57 - 44 [148] Third, we agree with Professor Liebowitz that the best way to account for the value of the communication right is to look at the profitability of the record industry. We also agree with him that the record companies’ profitability is greater in the digital environment than in the physical CD market. The evidence demonstrates that the increase in profitability is due in part to the efficiencies that are achieved by delivering music as digital files rather than as physical discs. The bundle of rights in musical works should get a share of that increase. [148] Troisièmement, nous croyons comme M. Liebowitz que la meilleure façon de rendre compte de la valeur du droit de communication est d’examiner la rentabilité de l’industrie du disque. Nous concluons aussi comme lui que la rentabilité des maisons de disques est plus élevée dans l’environnement numérique que sur le marché du CD matériel. La preuve montre que ce supplément de rentabilité est attribuable en partie aux gains d’efficience que permet la fourniture de musique sous forme de fichiers numériques plutôt que de disques. L’ensemble de droits dans les œuvres musicales devrait recevoir une part de ce supplément. [149] Dans CSI – musique en ligne, CSI avançait un argument semblable à l’appui de sa proposition de taux pour les téléchargements. Elle faisait valoir que, comme les maisons de disques étaient en mesure d’obtenir un taux de redevance élevé des services de musique en ligne, elle devrait aussi en profiter. CSI calculait le taux qu’elle proposait en appliquant aux services de musique en ligne le ratio des redevances payées pour la reproduction d’œuvres musicales aux redevances applicables à la reproduction d’enregistrements sonores sur le marché des sonneries. La Commission a rejeté cette méthode pour plusieurs raisons. Premièrement, il n’est pas possible d’utiliser les sonneries comme mesure de référence pour le téléchargement, au motif que les deux marchés ne sont même pas des substituts éloignés. Deuxièmement, la Commission a constaté que le marché des sonneries n’était pas suffisamment établi et son avenir, trop incertain. [150] M. Liebowitz a appliqué une approche quelque peu différente. Il a proposé d’accroître la part de l’œuvre musicale sur la base de l’accroissement de la rentabilité des maisons de disques dans le même marché, celui des téléchargements. En outre, le marché des téléchargements a des possibilités de croissance et de durée supérieures au marché des sonneries et il a plus de chances de devenir un modèle opérationnel dominant. Le marché des sonneries vendues en tant que produits distincts pourrait

[149] In CSI – Online Music, CSI presented a similar argument to justify its proposed rate for downloads. It argued that because record labels were able to negotiate a high royalty rate from online music services, CSI should also benefit. The proposed rate was derived by applying to online music services the ratio between the royalties paid for the reproduction of musical works and sound recordings in the ringtone market. The Board rejected this approach for a number of reasons. First, ringtones could not be used as a proxy for downloads because the two markets are not even distant substitutes. Second, the ringtone market was found to be not mature and stable enough.

[150] Professor Liebowitz used a somewhat different approach. He proposed to increase the transfer for musical works based on the increased profitability of record companies in the same market, downloads. Furthermore, the download market has more potential for future growth and longevity than the ringtone market and is more likely to become a dominant business model. By contrast, the market for self-standing ringtones may well be short lived. It is possible to rip part of a download containing a complete musical

- 58 - 45 work to create a ringtone; it is not possible to use the excerpt contained in a ringtone to create a file containing the complete work. bien disparaître sous peu. S’il est possible d’extraire une sonnerie du téléchargement d’une œuvre musicale complète, le contraire ne l’est pas. [151] D’après les calculs de M. Liebowitz, les bénéfices des maisons de disques représentent 7 pour cent des revenus sur le marché du CD et plusieurs fois ce chiffre sur celui des téléchargements, selon qu’on suppose l’économie de la moitié ou de la totalité des coûts DVI. Ces résultats sont basés sur les coûts d’iTunes pour le deuxième trimestre de 2006. Les opposantes ont fait valoir avec raison qu’il serait plus sûr de se fonder sur les coûts de l’ensemble de l’exercice 2005 et qu’il faudrait tenir compte des coûts supplémentaires liés à la fourniture de téléchargements. [152] M. Jones et Mme Prudham ont communiqué des renseignements sur les dépenses liées à la fourniture de musique en ligne. Ces charges comprennent la mise en place du système de livraison numérique, la numérisation du catalogue existant, le changement de format, ainsi que la promotion et le soutien des ventes en ligne. [153] Cependant, comme l’a noté M. Liebowitz dans sa réplique, ces renseignements soulèvent plusieurs problèmes. Premièrement, un bon nombre de ces dépenses doivent être amorties sur plusieurs années. Deuxièmement, certaines doivent aussi être engagées dans la vente de CD, par exemple les frais de numérisation ou de lutte contre le piratage. Il s’ensuit que le total des dépenses annuelles spécialement affectées aux téléchargements numériques est probablement sensiblement inférieur aux chiffres proposés par les témoins. Ni l’un ni l’autre, pas plus que M. Brander, ne nous ont communiqué de renseignements suffisants pour être utiles. Nous sommes donc incapables d’établir une estimation sûre des coûts que représente la fourniture de téléchargements pour les maisons de disques.

[151] Professor Liebowitz calculated that the profits of record companies represent 7 per cent of revenues in the CD market and several times more for downloads, depending on whether one assumes that all or half of the DSO costs are saved. He arrived at these results by using iTunes’ costs for the second quarter of 2006. The objectors rightly argued that costs for the full year of 2005 would be more reliable and that the additional costs associated with Internet downloads should be taken into account.

[152] Mr. Jones and Ms. Prudham provided information on the various expenses that are associated with delivering music online. These expenses include costs associated with putting the digital delivery system in place, with digitization of the back catalogues, the changing of formats and the development and support of online sales. [153] However, as noted by Professor Liebowitz in his reply evidence, there are a number of problems with this information. First, many of these expenses must be amortized over a number of years. Second, some of the expenses also relate to and must be attributed to the sales of CDs, for example, the expense for digitization or fighting piracy. The result is that total yearly expenses specifically dedicated to digital downloads probably are significantly lower than the numbers initially reported by the witnesses. Neither of those witnesses, nor Professor Brander provided us with enough information to be useful. We are therefore unable to estimate in any reliable way the costs incurred by the record companies for Internet downloads.

- 59 - 46 [154] Based on this evidence, we find that the record companies’ profitability is 7 per cent in the CD market and [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent in the digital environment. This latter finding is based on two conclusions. First, we assume that only half of DSO costs are saved, which we find more realistic than Professor Liebowitz’s estimate. Second, for the reasons given by Professor Liebowitz, the additional costs incurred for downloads are relatively modest. Had CRIA and Apple provided detailed, reliable and precise information on which we could have based our calculations, our conclusions might have been different. [154] Nous concluons de ces éléments de preuve que le taux de rentabilité des maisons de disques est de 7 pour cent sur le marché du CD et de [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent sur le marché numérique. Nous en arrivons à la seconde conclusion en posant que seulement la moitié des coûts DVI sont économisés, ce qui nous paraît plus réaliste que l’estimation de M. Liebowitz. Aussi, pour les motifs que M. Liebowitz expose, nous croyons que les charges supplémentaires liées à la fourniture de téléchargements sont plutôt modestes. Nous aurions peut-être conclu différemment si la CRIA ou Apple nous avaient communiqué des renseignements détaillés, sûrs et précis sur lesquels nous aurions pu fonder nos calculs. [155] Nous ne souscrivons pas à la thèse de la SOCAN selon laquelle l’accroissement de la rentabilité n’a d’effet que sur la valeur de l’ensemble de droits. Sur un marché concurrentiel, tous les intrants utilisés devraient avoir part aux avantages de l’augmentation de la rentabilité. Par conséquent, la valeur de l’ensemble de droits ne devrait augmenter que d’une quantité égale au produit de l’accroissement de la rentabilité et de la part actuelle de cet ensemble dans les dépenses totales. [156] L’accroissement du taux de rentabilité est de [CONFIDENTIEL] points de pourcentage, soit la différence entre 7 et [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent des revenus de vente au détail. Il nous faut maintenant définir tous les intrants entre lesquels répartir cet accroissement. Selon le tableau 4 du rapport de M. Liebowitz, les revenus des maisons de disques comptent pour [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent du total des ventes au détail. Par conséquent, le total des coûts des maisons, pour ce qui concerne les téléchargements numériques, fait [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent des revenus de vente au détail, soit la différence entre [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent (les revenus) et [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent (les bénéfices). Ces charges comprennent la promotion et la commercialisation, l’enregistrement sonore et la vidéo, les coûts

[155] We do not agree with SOCAN that the increase in profitability impacts only the value of the bundle of rights. In a competitive market, all the inputs used in the process should share the benefits of the increased profitability. Thus, the value of the bundle of rights should only increase by an amount equal to the increase in profitability multiplied by the current share of total expenses represented by the bundle.

[156] The increase in profitability is [CONFIDENTIAL] percentage points, from 7 to [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent of retail revenues. We now need to identify all of the inputs to which this increase will be distributed. According to Professor Liebowitz’s Table 4, record companies’ revenues make up [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent of total retail revenues. Therefore, record companies’ total costs for digital downloads is [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent of retail revenues, the difference between revenues ([CONFIDENTIAL] per cent) and profits ([CONFIDENTIAL] per cent). These costs include promotion and marketing, recording and video, DSO, a minimal allowance for the additional costs incurred for downloads, and the artist and songwriting payments. This percentage does not

- 60 - 47 include the amount paid for the mechanical right because, in Canada, the retailers of downloaded music are responsible for paying it. DVI, une imputation modeste au titre des coûts supplémentaires liés aux téléchargements, ainsi que la rémunération des interprètes, des auteurs et des compositeurs. Ce pourcentage ne comprend pas les droits de reproduction mécanique, puisque, au Canada, ceux-ci sont à la charge des détaillants de musique téléchargée. [157] Il faut ajouter à ce total un montant correspondant au fait que les « bénéfices normaux » doivent aussi se voir attribuer une rémunération supplémentaire au titre des téléchargements numériques, puisque le bénéfice est aussi considéré comme le paiement pour l’utilisation d’un intrant. Nous retiendrons comme mesure de référence des bénéfices normaux le taux de profit de 7 pour cent établi pour le marché du CD. Le total des coûts s’élève maintenant à [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent ([CONFIDENTIEL] + 7 pour cent) des revenus de vente au détail. [158] Dans CSI – musique en ligne, la Commission a conclu que le taux du droit de reproduction mécanique de 7,7 ¢ applicable aux CD matériels équivaut à 8,8 pour cent sur le marché des téléchargements numériques. Par conséquent, si l’on pose que les maisons de disques payaient ce taux pour le droit de reproduction mécanique, la part du coût total du droit de reproduction est de [CONFIDENTIEL] pour cent (8,8 / ([CONFIDENTIEL] + 8,8)). Il faut donc attribuer 3,4 ([CONFIDENTIEL]) points de pourcentage supplémentaires à la valeur de l’ensemble de droits pour les œuvres musicales, ce qui donne une valeur totale de 12,2 pour cent pour cet ensemble. [159] Quatrièmement, nous ne voyons pas la nécessité de corriger le taux pour tenir compte du recours à l’écoute préalable dans la vente de téléchargements. Nous avons déjà conclu que l’offre d’écoute préalable constitue habituellement une utilisation équitable. Nous avons aussi constaté que les études Erin sur lesquelles se fonde M. Liebowitz sont d’une exactitude douteuse. Même s’il en était

[157] Then we must add an additional amount to the total costs to account for the fact that “normal profits” should also receive an additional remuneration from the digital downloads, since profit is also considered to be compensation for the use of an input. We will use the 7 per cent rate of profit in the CD market as a proxy for normal profits. The costs now total [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent ([CONFIDENTIAL] per cent + 7 per cent) of retail revenues.

[158] In CSI – Online Music, the Board determined that the mechanical rate of 7.7¢ payable on physical CDs is the equivalent of 8.8 per cent for digital downloads. Thus assuming record companies were paying this rate for the reproduction right, the share of the total cost of reproduction right is [CONFIDENTIAL] per cent (8.8 / ([CONFIDENTIAL] + 8.8)). The result is that 3.4 ([CONFIDENTIAL]) additional percentage points should be attributed to the value of the bundle of rights for musical works resulting in a total value of 12.2 per cent for the bundle.

[159] Fourth, we see no need to adjust the rate to account for the use of previews in selling downloads. We have already concluded that services that provide previews usually can avail themselves of the fair dealing exception. We have also found the Erin studies on which Professor Liebowitz relies are of doubtful accuracy. Even if this were not so, we would not make an adjustment. The added value of previews is in

- 61 - 48 triggering sales that would not occur if previews were not offered. Everyone gets a share of those extra sales. Also, previews cost money. These costs, like any other costs, can only be recouped when a download actually gets sold. autrement, nous n’ajusterions pas le taux. La valeur ajoutée de l’écoute préalable se reflète dans les ventes qui ne se feraient pas en son absence. Chacun reçoit sa part de ces ventes supplémentaires. En outre, les services d’écoute préalable représentent des coûts, lesquels, comme tous autres coûts, ne peuvent être récupérés que si on vend un téléchargement. [160] La dernière correction proposée par M. Liebowitz est le taux de parité. Elle veut rendre compte de l’effet ultérieur (et circulaire) de l’introduction du tarif pour le droit de communication sur la rentabilité des maisons de disques (qui constitue la mesure de référence du taux lui-même). Nous pensons qu’une telle correction ne se justifie pas. Premièrement, comme M. Liebowitz le rappelle lui-même, les droits de communication ne sont pas à la charge des maisons de disques au Canada. Deuxièmement, le montant que l’industrie du disque reçoit des détaillants s’établit en pourcentages. Par conséquent, il est peu probable que l’augmentation des sommes versées par les détaillants au titre du droit de communication influe sur la rentabilité de l’industrie. [161] Nous établissons donc à 12,2 pour cent le taux final pour l’ensemble de droits. La Commission ayant homologué un taux de 8,8 pour cent avant rabais pour la reproduction, nous fixons à 3,4 pour cent le taux pour la communication de téléchargements permanents. [162] Nous croyons utile de faire ici un lien entre la présente analyse et celle qui se retrouve dans SOCAN 24. Dans cette décision, la Commission a établi au moyen d’une analyse par ratio la valeur du droit de communication par rapport à celle du droit de reproduction. Elle a conclu qu’une sonnerie est d’abord et avant tout une reproduction, laquelle constitue l’objet de la transaction. La communication ne sert qu’à livrer la reproduction. Il est possible de livrer des sonneries sans mettre en jeu le droit de communication.

[160] The final adjustment suggested by Professor Liebowitz is the parity adjustment. It takes into account the subsequent (and circular) impact that the introduction of this new communication right tariff has on the profitability of the record companies (which is the proxy for the tariff itself). We do not agree that such an adjustment is warranted. First, as noted by Professor Liebowitz, the record companies are not responsible for paying the communication fee in Canada. Second, the amount the record industry receives from the retailers is calculated in percentages. Therefore, its profitability is unlikely to be affected by an increased payment made by the retailers on account of the communication right.

[161] The final rate we find for the bundle of rights therefore is 12.2 per cent. Having certified the reproduction right rate at 8.8 per cent before discount, the rate we establish for the communication right of permanent downloads is 3.4 per cent. [162] It is useful at this point to draw parallels with the Board’s analysis in the recent decision in SOCAN 24. In that decision, the Board used a ratio analysis to establish the value for the communication right in relation to the value of the reproduction right. The Board found that a ringtone was first and foremost a reproduction, which is the object of the transaction. The communication right was only used to deliver the reproduction. Other modes of delivery that did not use the communication right were potentially available.

- 62 - 49 [163] In SOCAN 24, the Board compared ringtones with commercial radio. There, the ratio of the value of the communication right to the reproduction right was set at 3:1, because of the ancillary nature of the reproduction right. For the ringtone market, the Board found that even though the communication right was ancillary to the reproduction right, it should be valued at more than one-third by reason that the communication right is crucial to the ringtone business model. In addition, the chances of users changing their business model and ceasing to use the communication right to avoid the tariff was found to be unlikely. On this basis, the Board decided that the value of the communication right should be equal to one-half the value of the reproduction right. [163] Dans SOCAN 24, la Commission comparait les sonneries à la radio commerciale. Pour la radio, le ratio de la valeur du droit de communication à celle du droit de reproduction était 3 : 1, étant donné la nature accessoire de ce dernier. Pour le marché des sonneries, la Commission a conclu que, même s’il était accessoire par rapport au droit de reproduction, le droit de communication devait être évalué à plus d’un tiers au motif de son importance cruciale pour le modèle opérationnel de la vente de sonneries. En outre, elle a conclu à l’improbabilité que les utilisateurs changent de modèle opérationnel et cessent d’utiliser le droit de communication pour éviter de payer le tarif. Se fondant sur ces conclusions, elle a décidé que la valeur du droit de communication devait être la moitié de celle du droit de reproduction. [164] Si nous avions eu recours ici à l’analyse par ratio et l’avions appliquée au prix de référence que nous avons retenu, nous aurions utilisé un ratio de 2 : 1 et serions arrivés à un taux de 13,2 pour cent (au lieu de 12,2 pour cent) pour l’ensemble des droits. Nous concluons que la proximité de ces deux taux est suffisante pour valider notre analyse. [165] Le taux que nous fixons pour le droit de communication donne un ratio d’environ 28 : 72 pour chacun des droits de l’ensemble. Pour la répartition des revenus au titre des téléchargements permanents, la Confédération internationale des sociétés d’auteurs et de compositeurs (CISAC) propose un ratio de 25 : 75. Même si nous ne croyons pas que ce ratio puisse servir de mesure de référence, nous croyons néanmoins qu’il est utile de noter qu’il est semblable à celui que nous obtenons ici. 2. Les téléchargements limités [166] M. Liebowitz soutient qu’il n’y a aucune raison de penser que la part de la musique dans la valeur totale pour les consommateurs devrait être différente pour les téléchargements limités que pour les téléchargements permanents; par

[164] Had we used a ratio analysis and applied it to the proxy we use in this instance, we would have used a 2:1 ratio and arrived at a rate of 13.2 per cent (instead of 12.2 per cent) for the bundle of rights. We conclude that these rates are sufficiently close to validate our analysis.

[165] The rate we set for the communication right creates a ratio of about 28:72 for each right in the bundle. For revenue distribution purposes in the case of permanent downloads, the International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers (CISAC) is proposing a ratio of 25:75. Even though we do not believe that this ratio should be used as a proxy, we nevertheless find it useful to note that it is similar to the ratio obtained here.

2. Limited Downloads [166] Professor Liebowitz argues there is no reason to believe that the share of music in the total value to the consumers should be different for limited downloads than for permanent downloads and, as a result, the total value of the

- 63 - 50 combined communication and reproduction rights should be the same for both. [167] Professor Liebowitz concedes that previews for limited downloads have less value than for permanent downloads, by reason of the nature of the business model. He also reduces the value of the reproduction right by one-third to be consistent with the position adopted by the parties and the finding of the Board in CSI – Online Music. However, Professor Liebowitz finds no reason for a lower bundle price for limited downloads than for permanent downloads and, as a result, the reduction in the value of the reproduction right translates to a higher value for the communication right, ranging from 12.1 to 15.5 per cent. SOCAN nevertheless proposes that the rate of 10 per cent apply to both permanent and limited downloads. conséquent, la valeur totale de l’ensemble de droits devrait être la même. [167] M. Liebowitz reconnaît que l’écoute préalable a moins de valeur dans le cas des téléchargements limités que dans celui des téléchargements permanents, du fait de la nature du modèle opérationnel. En outre, il réduit la valeur du droit de reproduction d’un tiers, conformément à la position adoptée par les parties et aux conclusions formulées par la Commission dans CSI – musique en ligne. Cependant, M. Liebowitz ne voit pas de raison de payer moins cher l’ensemble de droits pour les téléchargements limités que pour les téléchargements permanents, de sorte que la réduction de la valeur du droit de reproduction entraîne une augmentation de la valeur du droit de communication, qui s’inscrit entre 12,1 et 15,5 pour cent. La SOCAN propose néanmoins l’application du taux de 10 pour cent aux téléchargements limités aussi bien qu’aux permanents. [168] M. Brander soutient que les téléchargements limités sont moins rentables que les téléchargements permanents du fait de leur valeur moindre pour le consommateur, de sorte que le taux de redevance applicable aux téléchargements limités devrait être inférieur à celui des téléchargements permanents. Il soutient que le taux de redevance applicable ici aux téléchargements limités devrait être fixé aux deux tiers du taux relatif aux téléchargements permanents pour être conforme à l’approche adoptée par la Commission dans CSI – musique en ligne. [169] Nous pensons comme MM. Liebowitz et Brander que les téléchargements limités sont semblables aux téléchargements permanents. Tout comme M. Liebowitz, nous pensons que l’ensemble de droits vaut la même chose, exprimé en pourcentage du prix de vente, pour les deux formes de téléchargements. Nous établissons donc la valeur de l’ensemble de droits pour les téléchargements limités à 12,2 pour cent, soit le

[168] Professor Brander argues that limited downloads are less profitable than permanent downloads by reason that the value to the consumer is more limited and therefore the royalty rate for limited downloads should be lower than for permanent downloads. Professor Brander contends the royalty rate for limited downloads in this instance be set at two-thirds of the rate for permanent downloads to be consistent with the approach adopted by the Board in CSI – Online Music.

[169] We agree with Professors Liebowitz and Brander that limited downloads are similar to permanent downloads. We also agree with Professor Liebowitz that the bundle of rights is of equal value, as a percentage of retail, for both. Consequently, we establish the value of the bundle for limited downloads at 12.2 per cent, which is the same rate as the bundle for permanent downloads. In CSI – Online Music,

- 64 - 51 the Board agreed, with some reluctance, with the position submitted by all parties and set the value of the reproduction right for limited downloads at two-thirds of the value for permanent downloads. In our opinion, because the value of the bundle is the same for permanent and limited downloads, the lower rate for the reproduction right results in a higher rate for the communication right which is equal to the difference between the 12.2 per cent bundle value and the 5.9 per cent reproduction right for limited downloads. We therefore establish the rate for the communication of limited downloads at 6.3 per cent. même taux que pour les téléchargements permanents. Dans CSI – musique en ligne, la Commission a souscrit, non sans hésitation, à la thèse de toutes les parties et a fixé la valeur du droit de reproduction pour les téléchargements limités aux deux tiers de la valeur retenue pour les téléchargements permanents. À notre avis, étant donné que la valeur de l’ensemble de droits est la même pour les deux formes de téléchargements, le fait que le taux du droit de reproduction soit plus bas doit entraîner la fixation d’un taux plus élevé pour le droit de communication, égal à la différence entre la valeur de l’ensemble (12,2 pour cent) et le taux de 5,9 pour cent retenu pour le droit de reproduction des téléchargements limités. En conséquence, nous établissons à 6,3 pour cent le taux pour la communication de téléchargements limités. [170] La valeur globale des droits de communication et de reproduction relatifs aux téléchargements limités est égale à 12,2 pour cent, total dont une fraction de 51 pour cent représente la valeur du droit de communication. Ce pourcentage est à peu près égal aux 50 pour cent que propose la CISAC aux fins de la répartition des revenus. 3. Les transmissions sur demande [171] M. Liebowitz propose d’appliquer aux transmissions sur demande la méthode qu’il a élaborée pour les téléchargements permanents, sous réserve de deux corrections. Premièrement, aucune valeur ne devrait être ajoutée au titre de l’écoute préalable, parce que la transmission sur demande est une forme d’écoute préalable. Deuxièmement, il suppose que le droit de reproduction des transmissions sur demande a une valeur relativement faible, de sorte qu’il applique un ratio de 3 : 1 en faveur du droit de communication. Il obtient ainsi une valeur qui s’inscrit entre 15,6 et 17,9 pour cent. La SOCAN propose un taux de 16,7 pour cent.

[170] The combined value of the communication and reproduction rights for limited downloads is equal to 12.2 per cent, 51 per cent of which represents the value of the communication right. This is about equal to the 50 per cent CISAC is proposing for revenue distribution purposes.

3. On-Demand Streaming [171] Professor Liebowitz proposes that the methodology he developed for permanent downloads be used, subject to two adjustments, for on-demand streaming. First, no value should be added for previews because on-demand streaming is a form of preview. Second, he assumes the reproduction right is of relatively low value and, as a result, applies a 3:1 ratio in favour of the communication right. He obtains a range of 15.6 to 17.9 per cent. SOCAN proposes a rate of 16.7 per cent.

- 65 - 52 [172] Alternatively, SOCAN proposes a 3:1 ratio to the rate established by the Board for the reproduction of on-demand streaming. This ratio, it contends, would reflect the relatively minor role of the reproduction right for on-demand streaming. The Board set the rate for the reproduction of on-demand streaming at 4.6 per cent, which would result in a communication rate of 13.8 per cent. [172] Subsidiairement, la SOCAN propose un ratio de 3 : 1 par rapport au taux établi par la Commission pour la reproduction des transmissions sur demande. Ce ratio, soutientelle, correspondrait au rôle relativement mineur du droit de reproduction dans les transmissions sur demande. La Commission a fixé à 4,6 pour cent le taux de reproduction des transmissions sur demande, ce qui donnerait un taux de 13,8 pour cent pour le droit de communication. [173] M. Brander soutient de son côté que, pour être conforme au tarif établi dans CSI – musique en ligne, le taux du droit de communication des transmissions sur demande devrait faire la moitié du taux retenu pour les téléchargements permanents. On obtiendrait ainsi un taux d’environ 2,0 pour cent. [174] Ici encore, nous ne voyons aucune raison de penser que l’ensemble de droits vaut moins dans le cas des transmissions sur demande que dans celui des téléchargements. La différence pour chaque type de produits réside dans la valeur relative des deux droits. Le consommateur qui achète un téléchargement permanent achète une reproduction, qui lui est livrée par une communication. Pour les téléchargements limités, les droits de communication et de reproduction ont à peu près la même importance par suite de ce qui a été admis touchant la valeur du droit de reproduction. Dans le cas des transmissions sur demande, le consommateur achète la communication; la reproduction ne fait qu’y faciliter la communication. Sur la base de la formule appliquée plus haut, nous arrivons à la conclusion que le taux pour la communication de transmissions sur demande doit s’établir à 7,6 (12,2 ! 4,6) pour cent. Nous attribuons ainsi au droit de communication 62 pour cent du prix à payer pour l’ensemble des droits. La CISAC recommande un ratio de 50 : 50. 4. La base tarifaire [175] La SOCAN a demandé que la base tarifaire soit formée du plus élevé des : a)

[173] Professor Brander contends that to be consistent with CSI – Online Music, the communication rate for on-demand streaming should be one-half the rate established for permanent downloads. This would result in a rate of approximately 2.0 per cent.

[174] Again, we see no reason to believe that the bundle of rights is less valuable in on-demand streams than in permanent or limited downloads. The difference in each type of product is in the relative value of both rights. The consumer who purchases a permanent download buys a reproduction that is delivered through a communication. For limited downloads, the communication and reproduction rights are about equally important as a result of admissions made about the value of the reproduction right. In ondemand streaming, the consumer purchases the communication; the reproduction only facilitates the communication. Applying the formula we used earlier, we conclude that the rate for the communication right in on-demand streams is (12.2 ! 4.6) 7.6 per cent. The communication right receives 62 per cent of the price paid for the bundle; CISAC recommends a ratio of 50:50.

4. Rate Base [175] SOCAN requested that the rate base consists of the greater of (a) gross revenues of

- 66 - 53 the service, including revenues from the sale of downloads (whether permanent, limited or ondemand streams) and advertising on the service’s website, and (b) gross operating expenses of the service. [176] The objectors contend that SOCAN’s approach to alternate between the greater of revenues and expenses has no basis in economics and is inequitable. We agree. In all other tariffs certified by the Board, a user unable to generate a sufficient amount of revenues will pay the minimum fee, when such a fee exists. That is done here. All rates apply to a revenue base, and a sufficiently low revenue will trigger the payment of the minimum fee. It is entirely justified for a start-up company who is unable to generate enough revenues to pay the minimum fee until it is profitable enough to begin paying the full rate. revenus bruts du service, incluant les revenus provenant de la vente des téléchargements (permanent, limité ou transmission sur demande) et de la publicité sur le site Internet du service, et b) dépenses d’opérations brutes du service. [176] Les opposantes soutiennent que l’approche d’alternance de la SOCAN entre le plus élevé des revenus ou des dépenses n’a pas de fondement économique et est inéquitable. Nous sommes d’accord. Dans tous les autres tarifs que la Commission homologue, un utilisateur qui ne génère pas suffisamment de revenus paiera une redevance minimale, quand elle existe. C’est ce qui est fait ici. Les taux s’appliquent aux revenus, et un niveau suffisamment bas de revenus enclenchera le paiement de la redevance minimale. Il est pleinement justifié qu’une société à ses débuts qui génère peu de revenus paie la redevance minimale jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit suffisamment profitable pour commencer à payer le plein taux. [177] Les opposantes proposent également que, de manière similaire au Tarif CSI pour les services de musique en ligne, la base tarifaire corresponde au montant payé par le consommateur ou les sommes payées par les abonnés. Pour les raisons mentionnées dans CSI – musique en ligne (paragraphe 109), nous sommes d’accord avec les opposantes sur cette question. En particulier, puisque nous ne connaissons pas la mesure dans laquelle ces revenus publicitaires découlent de l’utilisation de la musique de la SOCAN, nous croyons qu’il est approprié d’utiliser comme base tarifaire les montants payés par les consommateurs ou les abonnés. 5. Les redevances minimales [178] Au départ, la SOCAN proposait une redevance minimale mensuelle de 200 $ pour les téléchargements permanents, les téléchargements limités et les transmissions sur demande. Dans ses conclusions orales, cependant, la SOCAN a modifié sensiblement sa proposition, déclarant

[177] The objectors also argue that the rate should be based on the amount paid by the consumer for a download, or the amounts paid by subscribers for the service, similarly to the CSI Online Music Services Tariff. For the reasons mentioned in CSI – Online Music (paragraph 109), we agree with the objectors on this point. In particular, because we do not know the extent to which advertising revenues are attributable to the use of SOCAN’s music, we believe it is appropriate to use as the rate base the amount paid by the consumers or the subscribers.

5. Minimum Fees [178] In its initial tariff, SOCAN proposed a minimum monthly fee of $200 for permanent downloads, limited downloads and on-demand streaming. In oral argument however, SOCAN significantly revised its proposal, stating its agreement with the approach used by the Board

- 67 - 54 in CSI – Online Music to establish minimum rates. souscrire à l’approche suivie par la Commission dans CSI – musique en ligne pour établir les taux minimaux. [179] La CRIA et Apple s’opposent vigoureusement à l’établissement de redevances minimales pour les sites de musique, au motif que la fixation de telles redevances désavantagerait l’industrie, qui doit soutenir la très vive concurrence des téléchargements gratuits. [180] Nous sommes très attentifs aux objections des opposantes. En fait, nous mettrons en place des mesures transitoires pour assurer l’introduction progressive du tarif. Cependant, nous pensons qu’il convient d’établir ici des redevances minimales comme dans CSI – musique en ligne, afin de faire en sorte que les titulaires de droits ne subventionnent pas les modèles opérationnels. [181] Nous souscrivons à la thèse de la SOCAN touchant la fixation de redevances minimales et nous appliquerons donc ici la même méthode que dans CSI – musique en ligne. Dans cette décision, la redevance minimale applicable aux téléchargements permanents a été fixée aux deux tiers de la somme que le taux représente pour une piste de 99 ¢. Le taux retenu dans la présente décision pour les téléchargements permanents est de 3,4 pour cent, ce qui représente 3,4 ¢. Nous établissons donc la redevance minimale à 2,3 ¢ pour les pistes individuelles. [182] Dans CSI – musique en ligne, une redevance minimale inférieure tient compte du fait que les albums contiennent parfois un grand nombre de pistes. La redevance minimale y est fixée aux deux tiers des redevances provenant de l’application du taux au prix moyen d’un album contenant le nombre moyen de pistes, soit 13. Si nous suivons ici la même méthode, nous obtenons un taux de 1,7 ¢ par piste faisant partie d’un ensemble. C’est là le taux que nous homologuons.

[179] CRIA and Apple strongly object to the establishment of any minimum fees for music sites, arguing that they would handicap the industry which faces very aggressive competition from free downloads.

[180] We are keenly aware of the objectors’ submissions. Indeed, temporary measures to ensure that the tariff is phased in gradually will be applied. However, in our opinion, minimum fees should be established here as in CSI – Online Music, to ensure that rights holders do not subsidize business models.

[181] We agree with SOCAN’s submission regarding the establishment of minimum fees and will therefore use the same methodology as used in CSI – Online Music. There, the minimum fee for permanent downloads was established at twothirds of what the rate generates for a 99 ¢ track. Here, the rate for permanent downloads is 3.4 per cent, generating 3.4 ¢. The minimum fee is therefore set at 2.3¢ for individual tracks.

[182] In CSI – Online Music, a lower minimum fee was established to take into account the fact that albums sometimes contained a large number of individual tracks. The minimum fee was established at two-thirds of the royalties generated when the rate is applied to the average price of an album containing the average number of tracks, i.e. 13. Using the same methodology, we obtain a rate of 1.7¢ per track that is part of a bundle. That is the rate we certify.

- 68 - 55 [183] For limited downloads, a distinction was made in CSI – Online Music between subscriptions that authorized the copy of a file on a portable device and those that do not. Minimum fees were calculated as two-thirds of the rate applied to the average monthly subscription fees. These fees were $9.50 when reproduction on a portable device is not authorized and $14.50 when it is. If one applies the same methodology using the 6.3 per cent rate, minimum fees of 39.9¢ and 60.9¢, respectively are arrived at. Those are the minimum monthly fees per subscriber we certify for limited downloads when reproduction on a portable device is not authorized (39.9¢) and authorized (60.9¢). [183] Pour ce qui concerne les téléchargements limités, CSI – musique en ligne établit une distinction entre les abonnements qui autorisent la copie des fichiers sur un appareil portatif et ceux qui ne l’autorisent pas. Les redevances minimales sont établies aux deux tiers du taux appliqué à la moyenne mensuelle des droits d’abonnement. Ces droits s’établissaient à 9,50 $ dans le cas où la reproduction sur un appareil portatif n’était pas autorisée, et à 14,50 $ dans le cas contraire. En appliquant la même méthode sur la base du taux de 6,3 pour cent, nous obtenons des redevances minimales de 39,9 et de 60,9 ¢. Ce sont là les redevances minimales mensuelles par abonné que nous homologuons pour les téléchargements limités, selon que la reproduction sur un appareil portatif est autorisée (60,9 ¢) ou non (39,9 ¢). [184] Pour ce qui concerne les transmissions sur demande, la Commission a appliqué dans CSI – musique en ligne la méthode proposée par CSI, qui consistait à fixer la redevance minimale en fonction du ratio entre le taux correspondant aux transmissions sur demande et le taux relatif aux téléchargements limités. Si nous appliquons cette méthode au cas présent, nous obtenons une redevance minimale mensuelle de 48,1 ¢ 41 par abonné. C’est là la redevance minimale que nous homologuons. 6. Capacité de payer [185] Nous pensons que l’entrée en vigueur progressive du nouveau tarif se justifie tout autant dans la présente affaire que dans CSI – musique en ligne. Comme la Commission l’avait alors souligné, l’industrie en est à ses débuts et sa marge bénéficiaire est relativement faible. Les services de musique en ligne sont en mesure de payer le tarif, mais tireront avantage d’une entrée en vigueur progressive. Tel que nous l’avons fait dans CSI – musique en ligne, nous appliquerons un escompte de 10 pour cent uniquement pour la durée de validité du présent tarif. Les taux qui en résultent et que nous homologuons sont indiqués dans le tableau annexé.

[184] For on-demand streaming in CSI – Online Music, the Board applied the methodology suggested by CSI, which consisted of setting the minimum fee as a function of the ratio between the percentage rate for on-demand streaming and limited downloads. If we apply this methodology here, it results in a minimum fee of 48.1¢ 41 per month, per subscriber. That is the minimum fee we certify.

6. Ability to Pay [185] We believe that a phase-in discount is equally justified here as it was in CSI – Online Music. As was said then, the industry is in its infancy, with relatively low profit margins. Online music services are able to pay the tariff, but could benefit from a phase-in discount. As we did in CSI – Online Music, we will apply a 10 per cent discount only for the life of this tariff. The resulting rates which we certify are shown in the annexed table.

- 69 - 56 VII. TARIFF WORDING [186] On September 27, 2007 we asked the parties’ views about the wording of this part of the tariff. More specifically, we asked what adjustments would be required if we were to use the CSI – Online Music Services Tariff as the starting point. VII. LIBELLÉ DU TARIF [186] Le 27 septembre 2007, nous avons demandé aux parties leur point de vue sur le libellé de cette partie du tarif. Plus précisément, nous leur avons demandé de nous faire part des changements auxquels il faudrait procéder si on utilisait le tarif CSI – Services de musique en ligne comme point de départ. [187] Les parties ont souligné que certaines dispositions du tarif de CSI seraient redondantes ou inutiles, avant tout parce que la SOCAN détient l’essentiel du répertoire mondial, ce à quoi CSI ne peut prétendre. La SOCAN a aussi demandé quelques changements qu’il n’y a pas lieu d’énumérer. [188] Quant à eux, les telcos/câblos soutiennent que les différences entre CSI et la SOCAN en ce qui concerne la nature de la licence et du répertoire sont telles que le tarif devrait plutôt s’inspirer du libellé du tarif 24 de la SOCAN (Sonneries). Par exemple, le tarif de CSI permet au service d’autoriser les copies que font les usagers. Nous n’avons pas à le faire en l’espèce. Il se peut aussi que la SOCAN n’ait pas besoin d’autant de renseignements pour surveiller l’utilisation de musique protégée par les services, précisément parce qu’elle détient le répertoire mondial. [189] Dans l’ensemble, nous partageons le point de vue des telcos/câblos. La formule tarifaire est la même que pour CSI; il faudra donc que certains éléments du tarif de la SOCAN soient les mêmes. Ainsi, comme le tarif de CSI ne vise pas toutes les transmissions sur demande, la partie du tarif que nous homologuons ne visera que les transmissions assujetties au tarif de CSI; on traitera ailleurs de celles qui restent. Cela dit, en ce qui concerne les obligations de rapport, il semble préférable de s’en tenir le plus possible au tarif pour les sonneries. [190] Cette façon de faire a d’autres avantages. Premièrement, les projets de tarifs de la SOCAN

[187] The parties noted that certain provisions of the CSI tariff would be redundant or irrelevant, mostly because SOCAN represents essentially the world’s repertoire, while CSI does not. SOCAN also asked for a few changes that need not be mentioned here.

[188] For their part, the Cable/Telcos argued that the differences between CSI and SOCAN in the nature of the licences and of the repertoires are such that the tariff should instead reflect the wording of SOCAN Tariff 24 (Ringtones). For example, the CSI tariff conveys to the service the right to authorize the copies made by users. This is not needed here. Also, SOCAN may not need as much information to monitor the services’ use of protected music, again because SOCAN represents the world’s repertoire.

[189] On the whole, we agree with the Cable/Telcos. The tariff formula is the same as for CSI; therefore, some of the elements of the SOCAN tariff must be the same as in the CSI tariff. Thus, since the CSI tariff does not target all on-demand streams, only streams targeted in the CSI tariff are subject to this part of the tariff; others will be dealt with later on. As regards reporting requirements, however, it seems preferable to keep as close as possible to the ringtones tariff.

[190] There are other advantages to this approach. First, SOCAN’s proposed tariffs said

- 70 - 57 nothing about reporting requirements until the tariff for 2006; even then, the text remains laconic. Keeping close to the wording of the ringtones tariff avoids imposing terms that are not usual in SOCAN’s tariffs and that were not included in SOCAN’s proposals. Second, the majority of online music services are also suppliers of ringtones and as such, are familiar with the reporting requirements included in the ringtones tariff. Third, this approach seems suitable for a first tariff dealing with an already past period of time. In the long term, however, we intend to dovetail the terms of tariffs targeting the same activity, unless there are practical reasons for not doing so. [191] Apple asked that a service have the option to send to SOCAN the same information as it provides to CSI. We agree that this should be so, at least for the period under examination. [192] ESA commented on the wording of this part of the tariff even though it is not directly concerned by it. More specifically, it asked that no user be required to report information that it does not have or that was not requested by SOCAN in its proposed tariffs. We agree with the first request, but not the second. The period under examination has already ended. Users cannot be expected to provide information that they did not keep, at least this time. Later on, it will become possible to specify in advance the sort of information that a service must provide to SOCAN. On the other hand, we see no reason to dispense a user from providing information that it has and that will help SOCAN to effectively monitor the use of its repertoire and distribute the royalties it collects. étaient muets sur les obligations de rapport jusqu’en 2006; même ce texte est laconique. En se rapprochant du tarif pour les sonneries, on évite d’imposer des modalités qui ne sont pas courantes dans les tarifs de la SOCAN et qui n’étaient pas incluses dans les projets de la SOCAN. Deuxièmement, la plupart des services de musique en ligne offrent aussi des sonneries; ils connaissent donc les exigences de rapport que prévoit ce tarif. Troisièmement, cette approche semble convenir à un premier tarif visant une période déjà expirée. Cela dit, à plus long terme, nous prévoyons harmoniser les modalités des tarifs visant la même activité à moins de raisons pratiques à l’effet contraire. [191] Apple a demandé qu’un service puisse fournir à la SOCAN les renseignements qu’il fait parvenir à CSI. Nous faisons droit à cette demande, du moins pour la période sous examen. [192] L’ESA a commenté le libellé de cette partie du tarif bien qu’elle ne la concerne pas directement. Plus précisément, elle a demandé qu’on n’exige pas de l’utilisateur qu’il fournisse des renseignements qu’il n’a pas ou que la SOCAN n’a pas demandé dans ses projets de tarifs. Nous faisons droit à la première demande, mais pas à la seconde. La période sous examen est déjà passée. On ne peut s’attendre de l’utilisateur qu’il fournisse des renseignements qu’il n’a pas conservés, en tout cas pour cette fois-ci. Il deviendra possible plus tard de préciser à l’avance les renseignements qu’un service doit fournir à la SOCAN. Par contre, nous ne voyons pas pourquoi on permettrait à l’utilisateur de ne pas fournir des renseignements qu’il détient et qui aideront la SOCAN à faire preuve d’efficacité dans la surveillance de l’utilisation de son répertoire et la répartition des redevances qu’elle perçoit. [193] Le tarif contient certaines dispositions transitoires qui sont nécessaires parce que le tarif prend effet le 1er janvier 1996 bien qu’il soit homologué beaucoup plus tard. Un tableau fournit les facteurs d’intérêts qui seront appliqués

[193] The tariff contains certain transitional provisions made necessary because the tariff takes effect on January 1, 1996, while it is being certified much later. A table sets out interest factors or multipliers to be used on sums owed in

- 71 - 58 a given month. The factors were derived using previous month-end Bank Rates. We consider that a penalty over and above the interest factor should not be imposed on retroactive payments in this matter, as there was no way for users to estimate the amounts payable until the tariff was approved. Interest is not compounded. The amount owed for a reporting period is the amount of the approved tariff multiplied by the factor set out for that period. aux sommes dues pour les usages effectués durant un mois donné. Les facteurs de multiplication ont été établis en utilisant le taux officiel d’escompte de la Banque du Canada en vigueur le dernier jour du mois précédent. Nous estimons que cette affaire ne nécessite pas l’imposition d’une pénalité en sus du facteur d’intérêt pour les paiements rétroactifs puisque les usagers n’étaient pas en mesure d’estimer le montant éventuel du tarif homologué par la Commission. L’intérêt n’est pas composé. Le montant dû pour une période donnée est le montant des redevances établi conformément au tarif, multiplié par le facteur fourni pour le mois en question.

Le secrétaire général,

Claude Majeau Secretary General

- 72 - 59 ENDNOTES 1. SOCAN also filed proposed tariffs for 2007 and 2008, but at the request of the parties, they are not the subject of these proceedings. NOTES 1. La SOCAN a également déposé des projets de tarifs pour 2007 et 2008; à la demande des parties, ils ne font pas l’objet de la présente procédure. 2. Décision de la Commission du 27 octobre 1999, SOCAN – Tarif 22 (Transmission d’œuvres musicales à des abonnés d’un service de télécommunications non visé par le tarif 16 ou le tarif 17) [Phase I : Questions juridiques] (ci-après, SOCAN 22 (1999)). 3. Société canadienne des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique c. Association canadienne des fournisseurs Internet (C.A.), 2002 CAF 166 (ciaprès, SOCAN c. ACFI (CAF)). 4. Société canadienne des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique c. Association canadienne des fournisseurs Internet, 2004 CSC 45 (ci-après, SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC)). 5. « 2.4.(1)b) n’effectue pas une communication [...] la personne qui ne fait que fournir à un tiers les moyens de télécommunication nécessaires pour que celui-ci l’effectue ».

2. Decision of the Board dated October 27, 1999, SOCAN – Tariff 22 (Transmission of Musical Works to Subscribers Via a Telecommunications Service Not Covered Under Tariff Nos. 16 or 17) [Phase I: Legal Issues] (hereafter, SOCAN 22 (1999)).

3. Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada v. Canadian Assn. of Internet Providers (C.A.), 2002 FCA 166 (hereafter, SOCAN v. CAIP (FCA)).

4. Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada v. Canadian Assn. of Internet Providers, 2004 SCC 45 (hereafter, SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC)).

5. “2.4(1)(b) a person whose only act in respect of the communication [...] consists of providing the means of telecommunication necessary for another person to so communicate the work [...] does not communicate that work [...]”. 6. R.S.C. 1985, c. C-42 (the “Act”). 7. Decision of the Board dated March 16, 2007 certifying the CSI Online Music Services Tariff, 2005-2007 (hereafter, CSI – Online Music). 8. Specifically SOCAN 22 (1999); Decision of the Board dated August 18, 2006 certifying SOCAN Tariff 24 (Ringtones) 2003-2005 (hereafter, SOCAN 24); and CSI – Online Music.

6. L.R.C. 1985, ch. C-42 (la « Loi »). 7. Décision de la Commission du 16 mars 2007 homologuant le Tarif CSI pour les services de musique en ligne, 2005-2007 (ci-après, CSI – musique en ligne). 8. Soit SOCAN 22 (1999); décision de la Commission du 18 août 2006 homologuant le Tarif 24 de la SOCAN (Sonneries) 20032005 (ci-après, SOCAN 24); et CSI – musique en ligne.

- 73 - 60 9. SOCAN 24 at paragraph 24. 10. Internet Industry Overview, Exhibit SOCAN-4. 11. See A Review of WTA/WTP Studies, Exhibit Coalition-16. 12. The radio panel consisted of Sylvain Langlois (Astral Media), Earl Veale (Corus) and Paul Larche (Larche Communications). The television panel consisted of Maria Hale (CHUM), Lucie Lalumière (Corus), Jed Schneiderman (CTV) and David Stevens (CanWest Global). 13. Transcript at page 964. 14. Song Previews: Analysis of Online Canadian Preferences, Exhibit Coalition-9. 15. The wireless carrier panel consisted of Nauby Jacob (TELUS), Andrew Wright (Bell Mobility) and Upinder Saini (Rogers Wireless). The portals panel consisted of Isabelle Rioux (TELUS), Kerry Munro (Yahoo! Canada) and Veronica Holmes (Sympatico). 9. SOCAN 24 au paragraphe 24. 10. Internet Industry Overview, pièce SOCAN-4. 11. Voir A Review of WTA/WTP Studies, pièce Coalition-16. 12. Le panel radio était composé de Sylvain Langlois (Astral Média), Earl Veale (Corus) et Paul Larche (Larche Communications). Le panel télé se composait de Maria Hale (CHUM), Lucie Lalumière (Corus), Jed Schneiderman (CTV) et David Stevens (CanWest Global). 13. Transcription à la page 964. 14. Song Previews: Analysis of Online Canadian Preferences, pièce Coalition-9. 15. Le panel des entreprises de télécommunication sans fil était composé de Nauby Jacob (TELUS), Andrew Wright (Bell Mobilité) et Upinder Saini (Rogers Wireless). Le panel des portails se composait d’Isabelle Rioux (TELUS), Kerry Munro (Yahoo! Canada) et Veronica Holmes (Sympatico). 16. United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, et al., No. 41-1395, (S.D.N.Y. April 25, 2007). 17. Dans l’arrêt, le juge Binnie a employé le mot « télécommunication » comme un abrégé de « communication par télécommunication » : voir les paragraphes 42, 45 et 85. 18. 2004 CSC 13 (ci-après, CCH Canadienne (CSC)). 19. SOCAN 24 aux paragraphes 47 à 71. 20. Contester par voie de contrôle judiciaire une question qui a été concédée devant la Commission pourrait déclencher

16. United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, et al., No. 41-1395, (S.D.N.Y. April 25, 2007). 17. Throughout the decision, Binnie J. used the word “telecommunication” as a shorthand for “communication by telecommunication”: see paragraphs 42, 45 and 85. 18. 2004 SCC 13 (hereafter, CCH Canadian (SCC)). 19. SOCAN 24 at paragraphs 47 to 71. 20. Challenging by judicial review an issue that was conceded before the Board might trigger the application of certain principles

- 74 - 61 governing collateral attacks of administrative decisions that the Court will no doubt examine. Others may wish to keep in mind the practical consequences of such a course of action. If a legal proposition that is conceded before the Board can be examined on judicial review, the Board will have no choice but to test every legal principle underpinning every decision it makes, including principles that no one challenged. The Board would then insist on the parties providing, no doubt at substantial expense, the evidentiary base required to address every single issue: see for example, SOCAN 24, at paragraph 38, where the Board decided the issue of whether a ringtone constitutes a substantial part of a work as contemplated by subsection 3(1) of the Act to avoid just such a challenge. l’application de certains principes visant les contestations indirectes de décisions administratives, point que la Cour examinera certainement. D’autres pourraient vouloir garder à l’esprit les conséquences pratiques de cette façon de faire. Si une proposition juridique concédée devant la Commission peut faire l’objet d’un contrôle judiciaire, la Commission n’aura d’autre choix que de vérifier chaque principe juridique fondant chacune de ses décisions, y compris les principes que personne n’a attaqués. La Commission insisterait alors pour que les parties fournissent, sans nul doute à des frais élevés, les éléments de preuve nécessaires pour traiter chacune des questions : voir, par exemple, le paragraphe 38 de la décision SOCAN 24, où la Commission se penche sur la question de savoir si une sonnerie constitue une partie importante d’une œuvre selon le paragraphe 3(1) de la Loi, justement pour éviter pareille contestation. 21. Le fait que chaque utilisateur reçoit un ensemble distinct de paquets explique les limites que les stations doivent imposer au nombre de personnes pouvant avoir accès en même temps à leur diffusion simultanée sans acheter davantage de bande passante : voir, entre autres, le témoignage de M. Linney, transcription à la page 516. 22. « Sembler être » puisque le fichier transmis est parfois stocké pour un certain temps dans le répertoire contenant les fichiers Internet temporaires. 23. Fait intéressant, comme nous l’avons noté au paragraphe 13, un téléchargement limité contient lui aussi des instructions qui empêchent l’usage du fichier si l’abonnement n’est pas renouvelé. 24. Un tribunal américain a récemment statué qu’il n’y a pas de « prestation » lors de la transmission d’un fichier musical : United States c. American Society of Composers,

21. The fact that each user receives a separate set of packets explains the limitations that stations must put on the number of persons who can access their simulcast at the same time, unless they incur increased bandwidth costs: see, for example, the testimony of Mr. Linney, transcript at page 516.

22. We say “appear to be” because streamed files may be stored for some time in a temporary Internet files folder.

23. Interestingly, as we noted at paragraph 13, a limited download does contain instructions that prevent the use of the file if the subscription is not renewed.

24. An American court recently ruled that the transmission of a musical file does not involve a “performance”: United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors

- 75 - 62 and Publishers, et al., No. 41-1395, (S.D.N.Y. April 25, 2007). That decision is not persuasive in Canada. The American Copyright Act centres on the notion of “performance” which is significantly different from the Canadian notion of communication. The American definition of performance expressly provides that a remote performance can occur only if there is an audible rendition at the time of delivery. The Canadian definition of communication contains no such express requirement. Authors and Publishers, et al., No. 41-1395, (S.D.N.Y. Apr. 25, 2007). Cette décision n’est pas convaincante au Canada. Le Copyright Act américain est axé sur la « prestation », notion fort différente de la notion canadienne de communication. La définition américaine de la prestation prévoit expressément qu’une prestation à distance ne peut avoir lieu que s’il y a une exécution audible au moment de la réception. La définition canadienne de la communication ne comporte aucune condition expresse de ce genre. 25. CCH Canadienne Ltée c. Barreau du HautCanada (C.A.), 2002 CAF 187 (ci-après, CCH Canadienne (CAF)) au paragraphe 100. 26. CCH Canadienne Ltée (CAF) au paragraphe 101; CCH Canadienne Ltée (CSC) au paragraphe 78. 27. SOCAN 24 au paragraphe 70. 28. SOCAN c. ACFI (CAF) au paragraphe 122. 29. Ash v. Hutchinson & Co. (Publishers), Ltd., [1936] 2 All E.R. 1496 (CA), at p. 1507, per Greene L.J., cité dans Bishop c. Stevens, [1990] 2 R.C.S. 467 à 477f. 30. CCH Canadienne (CSC) au paragraphe 51. 31. CCH Canadienne (CSC) au paragraphe 70. 32. CCH Canadienne (CSC) au paragraphe 63. 33. Brief on Legal Issues, pièce CAB-8 au paragraphe 30. 34. Transcription, pages 938 à 940. 35. SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC), paragraphe 59. 36. SOCAN c. ACFI (CSC) au paragraphe 152 (le juge LeBel est dissident).

25. CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada (C.A.), 2002 FCA 187 (hereafter, CCH Canadian (FCA)) at paragraph 100. 26. CCH Canadian (FCA) at paragraph 101; CCH Canadian (SCC) at paragraph 78.

27. SOCAN 24 at paragraph 70. 28. SOCAN v. CAIP (FCA) at paragraph 122. 29. Ash v. Hutchinson & Co. (Publishers), Ltd., [1936] 2 All E.R. 1496 (CA), at p. 1507, per Greene L.J. as cited in Bishop v. Stevens, [1990] 2 S.C.R. 467 at 477f. 30. CCH Canadian (SCC) at paragraph 51. 31. CCH Canadian (SCC) at paragraph 70. 32. CCH Canadian (SCC) at paragraph 63. 33. Brief on Legal Issues, Exhibit CAB-8 at paragraph 30. 34. Transcript, pages 938 to 940. 35. SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC) at paragraph 59. 36. SOCAN v. CAIP (SCC) at paragraph 152 (LeBel J. dissenting).

- 76 - 63 37. See decision of the Board dated April 21, 2006 certifying SOCAN Tariff 19 (Fitness Activities and Dance Instruction) 19962006, at pages 5 to 7. 38. Economic Analysis of SOCAN Tariff 22, Exhibit SOCAN-9 at page 6. 39. Stohn Report, Exhibit Coalition-11.A. 40. Decision of the Board dated October 20, 2006 certifying the NRCC Background Music Tariff, 2003-2009; decision of the Board dated March 28, 2003 certifying the CMRRA/SODRAC Inc. Commercial Radio Tariff, 2001-2004; and SOCAN 24. 37. Voir la décision de la Commission du 21 avril 2006 homologuant le Tarif 19 de la SOCAN (Exercices physiques et cours de danse) 1996-2006, pages 5 à 7. 38. Economic Analysis of SOCAN Tariff 22, pièce SOCAN-9 à la page 6. 39. Stohn Report, pièce Coalition-11.A. 40. Décision de la Commission du 20 octobre 2006 homologuant le Tarif SCGDV pour la musique de fond, 2003-2009; décision de la Commission du 28 mars 2003 homologuant le Tarif CMRRA/SODRAC inc. pour la radio commerciale, 2001-2004; et SOCAN 24. 41. (7,6 pour cent / 6,3 pour cent) × 39,9 ¢.

41. (7.6 per cent / 6.3 per cent) × 39.9 ¢.

- 77 - 64 TABLE / TABLEAU

CERTIFIED RATES FOR ONLINE MUSIC SERVICES

Rates before discount Permanent Downloads 3.4% of the amount paid by the consumer Minimum fee: 1.7¢ per file in a bundle 2.3¢ per file in all other cases 6.3% of the amounts paid by subscribers Minimum fee: 60.9¢ per month, per subscriber, if portable limited downloads are allowed; 39.9¢ if not 7.6% of the amounts paid by subscribers Minimum fee: 48.1¢ per month, per subscriber

Rates certified, after discount 3.1% of the amount paid by the consumer Minimum fee: 1.5¢ per file in a bundle 2.1¢ per file in all other cases 5.7% of the amounts paid by subscribers Minimum fee: 54.8¢ per month, per subscriber, if portable limited downloads are allowed; 35.9¢ if not 6.8% of the amounts paid by subscribers Minimum fee: 43.3¢ per month, per subscriber

Limited Downloads

On-demand Stream

TAUX HOMOLOGUÉS POUR LES SERVICES DE MUSIQUE EN LIGNE

Taux avant escompte Téléchargements permanents 3,4 % du montant payé par le consommateur Redevance minimale : 1,7 ¢ par fichier dans un ensemble 2,3 ¢ pour tout autre fichier 6,3 % des sommes payées par les abonnés Redevance minimale : 60,9 ¢ par mois, par abonné si les téléchargements limités portables sont permis; 39,9 ¢ si ce n’est pas le cas 7,6 % des sommes payées par les abonnés Redevance minimale : 48,1 ¢ par mois, par abonné

Taux homologués, après escompte 3,1 % du montant payé par le consommateur Redevance minimale : 1,5 ¢ par fichier dans un ensemble 2,1 ¢ pour tout autre fichier 5,7 % des sommes payées par les abonnés Redevance minimale : 54,8 ¢ par mois, par abonné si les téléchargements limités portables sont permis; 35,9 ¢ si ce n’est pas le cas 6,8 % des sommes payées par les abonnés Redevance minimale : 43,3 ¢ par mois, par abonné

Téléchargements limités

Transmission sur demande

- 78 -

Supplement Canada Gazette, Part I November 24, 2007

Supplément Gazette du Canada, Partie I Le 24 novembre 2007

COPYRIGHT BOARD

COMMISSION DU DROIT D’AUTEUR

Statement of Royalties to Be Collected by SOCAN for the Communication to the Public by Telecommunication, in Canada, of Musical or Dramatico-Musical Works Tariff No. 22.A Internet – Online Music Services (1996-2006)

Tarif des redevances à percevoir par la SOCAN pour la communication au public par télécommunication, au Canada, d’œuvres musicales ou dramatico-musicales Tarif no 22.A Internet – Services de musique en ligne (1996-2006)

Le 24 novembre 2007
COPYRIGHT BOARD FILE: Public Performance of Musical Works Statement of Royalties to Be Collected by SOCAN for the Communication to the Public by Telecommunication, in Canada, of Musical or Dramatico-Musical Works

- 79 -

Gazette du Canada Partie I

3

COMMISSION DU DROIT D’AUTEUR DOSSIER : Exécution publique d’œuvres musicales Tarif des redevances à percevoir par la SOCAN pour la communication au public par télécommunication, au Canada, d’œuvres musicales ou dramatico-musicales Conformément au paragraphe 68(4) de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, la Commission du droit d’auteur a homologué et publie le tarif des redevances que la Société canadienne des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique (SOCAN) peut percevoir pour la communication au public par télécommunication, au Canada, d’œuvres musicales ou dramatico-musicales, à l’égard du tarif 22.A (Internet – Services de musique en ligne) pour les années 1996 à 2006. Ottawa, le 24 novembre 2007 Le secrétaire général CLAUDE MAJEAU 56, rue Sparks, Bureau 800 Ottawa (Ontario) K1A 0C9 613-952-8621 (téléphone) 613-952-8630 (télécopieur) majeau.claude@cb-cda.gc.ca (courriel)

In accordance with subsection 68(4) of the Copyright Act, the Copyright Board has certified and hereby publishes the statement of royalties to be collected by the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) for the communication to the public by telecommunication, in Canada, of musical or dramatico-musical works in respect of Tariff 22.A (Internet – Online Music Services) for the years 1996 to 2006. Ottawa, November 24, 2007 CLAUDE MAJEAU Secretary General 56 Sparks Street, Suite 800 Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0C9 613-952-8621 (telephone) 613-952-8630 (fax) majeau.claude@cb-cda.gc.ca (email)

4

Canada Gazette Part I

- 80 -

November 24, 2007
TARIF DES REDEVANCES À PERCEVOIR PAR LA SOCIÉTÉ CANADIENNE DES AUTEURS, COMPOSITEURS ET ÉDITEURS DE MUSIQUE (SOCAN) POUR LA COMMUNICATION AU PUBLIC PAR TÉLÉCOMMUNICATION, AU CANADA, D’ŒUVRES MUSICALES OU DRAMATICO-MUSICALES POUR LES ANNÉES 1996 À 2006

STATEMENT OF ROYALTIES TO BE COLLECTED BY THE SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA (SOCAN) FOR THE COMMUNICATION TO THE PUBLIC BY TELECOMMUNICATION, IN CANADA, OF MUSICAL OR DRAMATICO-MUSICAL WORKS FOR THE YEARS 1996 TO 2006 Note: The reader will notice that the tariff contains a reference to the year 2007 even though the tariff itself expires at the end of 2006. That can be explained by the fact that the tariff was certified after the date it was due to expire. Transitional provisions were required to ensure that users have a reasonable amount of time after the tariff is certified to fulfil their obligations pursuant to the tariff. Furthermore, through the application of subsection 68.2(3) of the Copyright Act, the tariff, though it expires on December 31, 2006, continues to apply on an interim basis until the Board certifies a further tariff for the period starting January 1, 2007. GENERAL PROVISIONS All royalties payable under this tariff are exclusive of any federal, provincial or other governmental taxes or levies of any kind. As used in this tariff, the terms “licence” and “licence to communicate to the public by telecommunication” mean a licence to communicate to the public by telecommunication or to authorize the communication to the public by telecommunication, as the context may require. Every SOCAN licence shall subsist according to the terms set out therein. SOCAN shall have the right at any time to terminate a licence for breach of terms or conditions upon 30 days’ notice in writing. Tariff No. 22 INTERNET A. Online Music Services 1. (1) This part of Tariff 22 sets the royalties to be paid for the communication to the public by telecommunication of works in SOCAN’s repertoire in connection with the operation of an online music service in the years 1996 to 2006. (2) This part of the tariff does not apply to uses covered by other applicable tariffs, including SOCAN Tariffs 16 and 24, or to the use of a musical work in a videoclip. 2. In this part of the tariff, “bundle” means two or more digital files offered as a single product, if at least one file is a permanent download; (« ensemble ») “download” means a file intended to be copied onto a consumer’s local storage device; (« téléchargement ») “file” except in the definition of bundle, means a digital file of a sound recording of a musical work; (« fichier ») “limited download” means a download that uses technology that causes the file to become unusable when a subscription ends; (« téléchargement limité ») “on-demand stream” means a stream selected by its recipient; (« transmission sur demande ») “online music service” means a service that delivers streams or limited downloads to subscribers or permanent downloads to

Nota : La lecture du tarif révèle qu’il contient une référence à l’année 2007 malgré le fait qu’il cesse d’avoir effet à la fin de 2006. Cela s’explique du fait que le tarif a été homologué après la date à laquelle il prend fin. Des dispositions transitoires étaient nécessaires pour garantir que les utilisateurs disposent de suffisamment de temps après l’homologation du tarif pour remplir les obligations qu’il leur impose. Par ailleurs, par l’effet du paragraphe 68.2(3) de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, le tarif, bien qu’il prenne fin le 31 décembre 2006, continue de s’appliquer à titre provisoire jusqu’à ce que la Commission homologue un nouveau tarif s’appliquant à partir du 1er janvier 2007. DISPOSITIONS GÉNÉRALES Les redevances exigibles en vertu du présent tarif ne comprennent ni les taxes fédérales, provinciales ou autres, ni les autres prélèvements qui pourraient s’appliquer. Dans le présent tarif, « licence » et « licence permettant la communication au public par télécommunication » signifient, selon le contexte, une licence de communication au public par télécommunication ou une licence permettant d’autoriser une tierce partie à communiquer au public par télécommunication. Chaque licence de la SOCAN reste valable en fonction des conditions qui y sont énoncées. La SOCAN peut, en tout temps, mettre fin à toute licence sur préavis écrit de 30 jours pour violation des modalités de la licence. Tarif no 22 INTERNET A. Services de musique en ligne 1. (1) La présente partie du tarif 22 établit les redevances à verser pour la communication au public par télécommunication d’œuvres faisant partie du répertoire de la SOCAN dans le cadre de l’exploitation d’un service de musique en ligne durant les années 1996 à 2006 inclusivement. (2) La présente partie du tarif ne vise pas les utilisations assujetties à un autre tarif, y compris les tarifs 16 et 24 de la SOCAN, ni l’utilisation d’une œuvre musicale dans un vidéoclip. 2. Les définitions qui suivent s’appliquent à la présente partie du tarif. « écoute » Exécution d’une transmission sur demande; (“play”) « ensemble » Deux fichiers numériques ou plus offerts comme produit unique, pour autant qu’au moins un des fichiers soit un téléchargement permanent; (“bundle”) « fichier » Sauf dans la définition d’« ensemble », fichier numérique de l’enregistrement sonore d’une œuvre musicale; (“file”) « service de musique en ligne » Service qui livre des transmissions ou des téléchargements limités à ses abonnés ou des téléchargements permanents aux consommateurs, à l’exception des services offrant uniquement des transmissions pour lesquelles le fichier est choisi par le service, ne peut être écouté qu’au moment déterminé par le service et pour lequel aucune liste de diffusion n’est publiée à l’avance; (“online music service”)

Le 24 novembre 2007

- 81 -

Gazette du Canada Partie I

5

consumers, other than a service that offers only streams in which the file is selected by the service, which can only be listened to at a time chosen by the service and for which no advance play list is published; (« service de musique en ligne ») “permanent download” means a download other than a limited download; (« téléchargement permanent ») “play” means the single performance of an on-demand stream; (« écoute ») “portable limited download” means a limited download that uses technology that allows the subscriber to reproduce the file on a device other than a device to which an online music service delivered the file; (« téléchargement limité portable ») “stream” means a file that is intended to be copied onto a local storage device only to the extent required to allow listening to the file at substantially the same time as when the file is transmitted. (« transmission ») 3. (1) The royalties payable in a month for an online music service that offers only on-demand streams shall be A×B C where (A) is 6.8 per cent of the amounts paid by subscribers for the service during the month, (B) is the number of plays of files requiring a SOCAN licence during the month, and (C) is the number of plays of all files during the month, subject to a minimum fee of 43.3¢ per subscriber.

(2) The royalties payable in a month for an online music service that offers limited downloads with or without on-demand streams shall be A×B C where (A) is 5.7 per cent of the amounts paid by subscribers for the service during the month, (B) is the number of limited downloads requiring a SOCAN licence during the month, and (C) is the total number of limited downloads during the month, subject to a minimum fee of 54.8¢ per subscriber if portable limited downloads are allowed, and 35.9¢ per subscriber if they are not. (3) The royalty payable for a permanent download requiring a SOCAN licence shall be 3.1 per cent of the amount paid by a consumer for the download, subject to a minimum fee of 1.5¢ per file in a bundle that contains 13 or more files, and 2.1¢ per file in all other cases. 4. (1) Royalties shall be due no later than 60 days after the end of each quarter. (2) Subject to subsection (5), the payment of an online music service that offers only on-demand streams shall be accompanied by a report showing, with respect to the relevant quarter, (a) the number of plays of each file requiring a SOCAN licence; (b) the total number of plays of files requiring a SOCAN licence;

« téléchargement » Fichier destiné à être copié sur la mémoire locale d’un consommateur; (“download”) « téléchargement limité » Téléchargement utilisant une technologie qui rend le fichier inutilisable lorsque l’abonnement prend fin; (“limited download”) « téléchargement limité portable » Téléchargement limité utilisant une technologie qui permet à l’abonné de reproduire le fichier sur un appareil autre qu’un appareil sur lequel le service de musique en ligne a livré le fichier; (“portable limited download”) « téléchargement permanent » Téléchargement autre qu’un téléchargement limité; (“permanent download”) « transmission » Fichier destiné à être copié sur la mémoire locale uniquement dans la mesure nécessaire pour en permettre l’écoute essentiellement au moment où il est livré; (“stream”) « transmission sur demande » Transmission choisie par son destinataire. (“on-demand stream”) 3. (1) Les redevances payables chaque mois pour un service de musique en ligne n’offrant que des transmissions sur demande sont : A×B C étant entendu que (A) représente 6,8 pour cent des sommes payées par les abonnés pour le service durant le mois, (B) représente le nombre d’écoutes de fichiers nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN durant le mois, (C) représente le nombre d’écoutes de tous les fichiers durant le mois, sous réserve d’une redevance minimale de 43,3 ¢ par abonné. (2) Les redevances payables chaque mois pour un service de musique en ligne offrant des téléchargements limités, avec ou sans transmissions sur demande sont : A×B C étant entendu que (A) représente 5,7 pour cent des sommes payées par les abonnés pour le service durant le mois, (B) représente le nombre de téléchargements limités nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN durant le mois, (C) représente le nombre total de téléchargements limités durant le mois, sous réserve d’une redevance minimale de 54,8 ¢ par abonné si les téléchargements limités portables sont permis et de 35,9 ¢ par abonné dans le cas contraire. (3) La redevance payable pour un téléchargement permanent nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN est 3,1 pour cent du montant payé par le consommateur pour le téléchargement, sous réserve d’une redevance minimale de 1,5 ¢ par téléchargement permanent faisant partie d’un ensemble contenant 13 fichiers ou plus, et de 2,1 ¢ pour tout autre téléchargement permanent. 4. (1) La redevance est payable au plus tard 60 jours après la fin de chaque trimestre. (2) Sous réserve du paragraphe (5), le paiement d’un service de musique en ligne n’offrant que des transmissions sur demande est accompagné d’un rapport indiquant, à l’égard du trimestre pertinent : a) le nombre d’écoutes de chaque fichier nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN; b) le nombre total d’écoutes de fichiers nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN;

6

Canada Gazette Part I

- 82 -

November 24, 2007

(c) the total number of plays of all files; and (d) the number of subscribers to the service and the total amounts paid by them. (3) Subject to subsection (5), the payment of an online music service that offers limited downloads shall be accompanied by a report showing, with respect to the relevant quarter, (a) the number of portable limited downloads and number of other limited downloads of each file requiring a SOCAN licence; (b) the total number of portable limited downloads and other limited downloads requiring a SOCAN licence; (c) the total number of portable limited downloads and other limited downloads; and (d) the number of subscribers entitled to receive portable limited downloads, the number of other subscribers and the total amounts paid by all subscribers. (4) Subject to subsection (5), the payment of an online music service that offers permanent downloads shall be accompanied by a report showing, with respect to the relevant quarter, (a) the total number of permanent downloads supplied; (b) the total number of permanent downloads requiring a SOCAN licence supplied and the total amount payable by subscribers for those downloads; and (c) with respect to each permanent download requiring a SOCAN licence, (i) the number of times each file was downloaded as part of a bundle, the amount paid by consumers for each bundle and a description of the manner in which the service assigned a share of that amount to the file, (ii) the total number of times the download was supplied at a particular price, and (iii) any other available information—such as the title of the work, the name of the author, the name of the performer, the Universal Product Code (UPC) and the International Standard Recording Code (ISRC)—that may help SOCAN determine the owner of copyright in the work used in the download. (5) A service may provide the information set out in paragraphs 6(1)(f) and (g) and subsections 8(1) to (3) of the CSI Online Music Services Tariff, 2005-2007 instead of the information set out in subsections (2) to (4). (6) The payment shall be accompanied by a report showing, with respect to each download or stream not requiring a SOCAN licence, information that establishes why the licence was not required. 5. Notwithstanding section 4, (a) any amount that would otherwise be payable pursuant to this part of the tariff before December 31, 2007, shall be due no later than April 30, 2008, and shall be increased by using the multiplying factor (based on the Bank Rate) set out in the following table with respect to each period; and
1996 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1.4702 1.4585 1.4494 1.4413 1997 1.4331 1.4246 1.4152 1.4035 1998 1.3910 1.3785 1.3648 1.3517 1999 1.3394 1.3275 1.3154 1.3027 2000 1.2885 1.2735 1.2585 1.2440 2001 1.2315 1.2202 1.2125 1.2067

c) le nombre total d’écoutes de tous les fichiers; d) le nombre d’abonnés au service et le montant total qu’ils ont versé. (3) Sous réserve du paragraphe (5), le paiement d’un service de musique en ligne offrant des téléchargements limités est accompagné d’un rapport indiquant, à l’égard du trimestre pertinent : a) le nombre de téléchargements limités portables et le nombre d’autres téléchargements limités de chaque fichier nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN; b) le nombre total de téléchargements limités portables et d’autres téléchargements limités nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN; c) le nombre total de téléchargements limités portables et d’autres téléchargements limités; d) le nombre d’abonnés autorisés à recevoir des téléchargements limités portables, le nombre total d’abonnés et le montant total versé par tous les abonnés. (4) Sous réserve du paragraphe (5), le paiement d’un service de musique en ligne offrant des téléchargements permanents est accompagné d’un rapport indiquant, à l’égard du trimestre pertinent : a) le nombre total de téléchargements permanents fournis; b) le nombre total de téléchargements permanents fournis nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN et le montant total payable par les abonnés pour ces téléchargements; c) à l’égard de chaque téléchargement permanent nécessitant une licence de la SOCAN : (i) le nombre de téléchargements de chaque fichier faisant partie d’un ensemble, le montant payé par les consommateurs pour l’ensemble et une description de la façon dont le service a établi la part de ce montant revenant au fichier, (ii) le nombre total de fois que le téléchargement à été fourni à un prix donné, (iii) tout autre renseignement disponible, incluant le titre de l’œuvre, le nom de l’auteur, celui de l’artiste-interprète, le code-barres (UPC) ou le code international normalisé des enregistrements (CINE), pouvant aider la SOCAN à déterminer la titularité du droit sur l’œuvre utilisée dans le téléchargement. (5) Un service peut, au lieu des renseignements énumérés aux paragraphes (2) à (4), fournir les renseignements énumérés aux alinéas 6(1)f) et g) et aux paragraphes 8(1) à (3) du Tarif CSI pour les services de musique en ligne, 2005-2007. (6) Le paiement est accompagné d’un rapport indiquant, à l’égard de chaque téléchargement ou transmission ne nécessitant pas de licence de la SOCAN, les renseignements permettant d’établir que tel est le cas. 5. Malgré l’article 4, a) les redevances par ailleurs exigibles avant le 31 décembre 2007 en vertu du présent tarif sont payables au plus tard le 30 avril 2008 et sont majorées en utilisant le facteur de multiplication (basé sur le taux d’escompte) établi à l’égard de la période indiquée dans le tableau qui suit :
1996 T1 T2 T3 T4 1,4702 1,4585 1,4494 1,4413 1997 1,4331 1,4246 1,4152 1,4035 1998 1,3910 1,3785 1,3648 1,3517 1999 1,3394 1,3275 1,3154 1,3027 2000 1,2885 1,2735 1,2585 1,2440 2001 1,2315 1,2202 1,2125 1,2067

Le 24 novembre 2007
2002 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1.2006 1.1933 1.1858 1.1783 2003 1.1698 1.1615 1.1540 1.1469 2004 1.1410 1.1354 1.1288 1.1219 2005 1.1150 1.1081 1.1002 1.0910 2006 1.0804 1.0692 1.0579 1.0467 2007 1.0354 1.0238 1.0119 1.0000

- 83 2002 T1 T2 T3 T4 1,2006 1,1933 1,1858 1,1783

Gazette du Canada Partie I
2003 1,1698 1,1615 1,1540 1,1469 2004 1,1410 1,1354 1,1288 1,1219 2005 1,1150 1,1081 1,1002 1,0910 2006 1,0804 1,0692 1,0579 1,0467 2007 1,0354 1,0238 1,0119 1,0000

7

(b) information pertaining to that same period shall be filed with the payment and shall be supplied only if it is available. 6. SOCAN shall have the right to audit the licensee’s books and records, on reasonable notice and during normal business hours, to verify the statements rendered and the fee payable by the licensee.

b) les renseignements à l’égard de cette même période sont fournis avec le paiement et uniquement s’ils sont disponibles. 6. La SOCAN peut vérifier les livres et registres du titulaire de la licence durant les heures de bureau régulières, moyennant un préavis raisonnable, afin de confirmer les rapports soumis par le titulaire de la licence et la redevance exigible de ce dernier.

Federal Court of Appeal

- 84 -

Cour d'appel fédérale
Date: 20100514 Docket: A-514-07 Citation: 2010 FCA 123
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

CANADA

CORAM:

LÉTOURNEAU J.A. NADON J.A. PELLETIER J.A.

BETWEEN:
SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents

Hearing held in Montréal, Quebec, on May 3 and 4, 2010. Judgment delivered in Ottawa, Ontario, on May 14, 2010.

REASONS FOR JUDGMENT BY: CONCURRED IN BY:

LÉTOURNEAU J.A. NADON J.A. PELLETIER J.A.

- 85 -

Federal Court of Appeal
CANADA

Cour d'appel fédérale
Date: 20100514
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

Docket: A-514-07 Citation: 2010 FCA 123

CORAM:

LÉTOURNEAU J.A. NADON J.A. PELLETIER J.A.

BETWEEN:
SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents

REASONS FOR JUDGMENT LÉTOURNEAU J.A.

Issue

[1]

This application for judicial review challenges an aspect of the decision rendered by the

Copyright Board (the Board) on October 18, 2007. In this decision, the Board applied the exception in section 29 of the Copyright Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-42 (the Act) to the application to

- 86 -

Page: 2

certify a tariff submitted by the Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) in respect of the offer made to consumers to listen by way of a preview to excerpts of musical works.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

[2]

The applicant challenges the Board’s interpretation of this provision and the soundness of

its application to the facts of this case.

[3]

Section 29 provides that “[f]air dealing for the purpose of research or private study does

not infringe copyright”, and therefore does not require the payment of royalties.

[4]

More specifically, the debate concerns the meaning of the word “research” and the issue

of whether the offer made to the consumer to “preview” an excerpt of thirty (30) seconds or less of a musical work constitutes fair dealing for the purpose of research within the meaning of section 29 of the Act.

The relevant legislation

[5]

I reproduce section 29 and part of section 3, which are central to the dispute:

Copyright in works 3. (1) For the purposes of this Act, “copyright”, in relation to a work, means the sole right to produce or reproduce the work or any substantial part thereof in any material form whatever, to perform the work or any substantial part thereof in

Droit d’auteur sur l’oeuvre 3. (1) Le droit d’auteur sur l’oeuvre comporte le droit exclusif de produire ou reproduire la totalité ou une partie importante de l’oeuvre, sous une forme matérielle quelconque, d’en exécuter ou d’en représenter la totalité ou une partie

- 87 -

Page: 3

public or, if the work is unpublished, to publish the work or any substantial part thereof, and includes the sole right

importante en public et, si l’oeuvre n’est pas publiée, d’en publier la totalité ou une partie importante; ce droit comporte, en outre, le droit exclusif : a) de produire, reproduire, représenter ou publier une traduction de l’oeuvre; b) s’il s’agit d’une oeuvre dramatique, de la transformer en un roman ou en une autre oeuvre non dramatique; c) s’il s’agit d’un roman ou d’une autre oeuvre non dramatique, ou d’une oeuvre artistique, de transformer cette oeuvre en une oeuvre dramatique, par voie de représentation publique ou autrement; d) s’il s’agit d’une oeuvre littéraire, dramatique ou musicale, d’en faire un enregistrement sonore, film cinématographique ou autre support, à l’aide desquels l’oeuvre peut être reproduite, représentée ou exécutée mécaniquement; e) s’il s’agit d’une oeuvre littéraire, dramatique, musicale ou artistique, de reproduire, d’adapter et de présenter publiquement l’oeuvre en tant qu’oeuvre cinématographique; f) de communiquer au public, par télécommunication, une oeuvre littéraire, dramatique, musicale ou artistique;
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

(a) to produce, reproduce, perform or publish any translation of the work, (b) in the case of a dramatic work, to convert it into a novel or other nondramatic work, (c) in the case of a novel or other nondramatic work, or of an artistic work, to convert it into a dramatic work, by way of performance in public or otherwise,

(d) in the case of a literary, dramatic or musical work, to make any sound recording, cinematograph film or other contrivance by means of which the work may be mechanically reproduced or performed,

(e) in the case of any literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work, to reproduce, adapt and publicly present the work as a cinematographic work,

(f) in the case of any literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work, to communicate the work to the public by telecommunication, (g) to present at a public exhibition, for a purpose other than sale or hire, an artistic work created after June 7, 1988, other than a map, chart or plan,

g) de présenter au public lors d’une exposition, à des fins autres que la vente ou la location, une oeuvre artistique — autre qu’une carte géographique ou marine, un plan ou un graphique — créée après le 7 juin 1988;

(h) in the case of a computer program that can be reproduced in the ordinary course of its use, other than by a reproduction

h) de louer un programme d’ordinateur qui peut être reproduit dans le cadre normal de son utilisation, sauf la

- 88 -

Page: 4

during its execution in conjunction with a machine, device or computer, to rent out the computer program, and (i) in the case of a musical work, to rent out a sound recording in which the work is embodied, and to authorize any such acts. Research or private study 29. Fair dealing for the purpose of research or private study does not infringe copyright.

reproduction effectuée pendant son exécution avec un ordinateur ou autre machine ou appareil; i) s’il s’agit d’une oeuvre musicale, d’en louer tout enregistrement sonore. Est inclus dans la présente définition le droit exclusif d’autoriser ces actes.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

Étude privée ou recherche 29. L’utilisation équitable d’une oeuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur aux fins d’étude privée ou de recherche ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur.

The facts specific to this case

[6]

This challenge brought by SOCAN is one of five applications for judicial review filed

against the decision dated October 18, 2007, relating to Tariff No. 22.A.

[7]

The initial tariff proposal submitted by SOCAN to the Board targeted the years 1996 to

2006 and the communication during that period of musical works “by means of Internet transmissions or similar transmission facilities”. The tariff ultimately targeted the reproduction of musical works delivered over the Internet in permanent downloads, limited downloads and on-demand streams.

[8]

An opportunity to preview the downloads may or may not be provided. As the Board

wrote in paragraph 18 of its decision, “[a] preview is an excerpt (usually 30 seconds or less) of a

- 89 -

Page: 5

sound recording that can be streamed so that consumers are allowed to “preview” the recording to help them decide whether to purchase a (usually permanent) download”.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

[9]

Even if the applicant were not seeking a specific tariff for copyright in previews, it would

seek compensation through the royalties charged for the downloads. In fact, the tariff proposal calls for a different and higher rate for downloads with previews than for downloads without previews.

[10]

At no time did the parties raise before the Board the issue of whether the exception might

apply to previews. The Board raised this of its own initiative, and the parties learned about it when they received the decision. They were unanimous in their protests that they were denied the opportunity to make submissions regarding the scope of the exception and its applicability to this case. They expressed disappointment that they were unable to submit evidence that allegedly would have rebutted some of the presumptions on which the Board based its findings. According to the applicant, the volume of previews is such that the Board could not have held that the use is “presumptively fair”: see paragraph 113 of the decision. While emphasizing the failure to respect the rules of natural justice, they are asking that we decide the issue rather than remit the file to the Board where they would repeat the submissions made here.

[11]

It is surprising that, on such an important issue, the Board would come to a decision

about the interpretation of the exception and its field of application without the benefit of

- 90 -

Page: 6

discussion with the affected parties. The parties submit that they should have been heard, and I agree in light of the socio-economic interests at stake.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

Analysis of the Board’s decision and the parties’ allegations

[12]

Relying on CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339, the Board

adopted and applied the principle that the word “research” must be given a large and liberal interpretation in order to ensure that users’ rights are not unduly constrained: see paragraph 104 of the Board’s decision.

[13]

Having determined that a preview constituted a dealing with a musical work for the

purposes of research, the Board then asked itself whether it was fair. To do so, it methodically analyzed the following factors, proposed by Mr. Justice Linden of this Court and adopted by Chief Justice McLachlin of the Supreme Court in the CCH case, supra, to determine whether a dealing is fair: the purpose, the character and the amount of the dealing, alternatives to the dealing, the nature of the work and the effect of the dealing on the work.

[14]

At paragraph 116 of its decision, it held as follows:

[116] We conclude that generally speaking, users who listen to previews are entitled to avail themselves of section 29 of the Act, as are those who allow them to verify that they have or will purchase the track or album that they want or to permit them to view and sample what is available online. Some users may use

[116] Nous concluons que, de manière générale, les usagers qui effectuent l’écoute préalable d’extraits peuvent se prévaloir de l’article 29 de la Loi, comme ceux qui permettent aux usagers de vérifier qu’ils ont ou vont acheter la piste ou l’album souhaités ou encore qui leur permettent d’examiner et d’essayer ce qui

- 91 -

Page: 7

(a)

The meaning of “research” in section 29

[15]

Naturally, the applicant objects to the Board’s interpretation of the concept of “research”.

The applicant considers the term to apply to activities involving investigation, systematic research, critical analysis, scientific inquiry and factual discoveries arising and being carried out in a formal setting. It submits that previews over the Internet have none of the characteristics required to fall within the concept of research.

[16]

As is generally the case, one word can have many meanings. The word “research” is no

exception. According to Le Petit Robert (2006), the primary and ordinary meaning is physical: [TRANSLATION] “Action of looking or searching, effort to find something”. It also carries a secondary, intellectual meaning: [TRANSLATION] “Mental effort to discover new knowledge, truth”.

[17]

SOCAN recognizes that there are two meanings, citing the Oxford Shorter English

Dictionary, the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, the Canadian Oxford Dictionary and the Random House Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary: see paragraph 33 of its Memorandum of Fact

2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

previews in a manner that does not constitute fair dealing; this does not compromise the position of the services, so long as they are able to show “that their own practices and policies were research-based and fair”.

est disponible en ligne. Certains usagers peuvent utiliser l’écoute préalable d’une manière non conforme à l’utilisation équitable; cela n’affecte pas la position des services, dans la mesure où ils peuvent établir que « [leurs] propres pratiques et politiques étaient axées sur la recherche et équitables ».

- 92 -

Page: 8

and Law, which refers to the following definitions: 1. The action or an instance of searching carefully for a specified thing or person. 2. A search or investigation undertaken to discover facts and research new conclusions by the critical study of a subject or by a course of scientific inquiry. However, it prefers the second meaning and submits that this is the one that should be applied for the purposes of section 29.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

[18]

The legislator chose not to add restrictive qualifiers to the word “research” in section 29.

It could have specified that the research be “scientific”, “economic”, “cultural”, etc. Instead it opted not to qualify it so that the term could be applied to the context in which it was used, and to maintain a proper balance between the rights of a copyright owner and users’ interests.

[19]

If, in essence, the legal research such as that referred to in CCH has a more formal and

rigorous aspect, the same is not necessarily true for that conducted by consumers of a work subject to copyright, such as a musical work.

[20]

In that context, it would not be unreasonable to give the word “research” its primary and

ordinary meaning. The consumer is searching for an object of copyright that he or she desires and is attempting to locate and wishes to ensure its authenticity and quality before obtaining it. I agree with the Board that “[l]istening to previews assists in this investigation”.

[21]

Here is how the Board deals with this subject at paragraph 109 of its decision:

- 93 -

Page: 9

[109] Section 29 of the Act only applies to research and private study. The Supreme Court of Canada has made it clear that “research is not limited to noncommercial or private contexts.” 30 Planning the purchase of a download or CD involves searching, investigation: identifying sites that offer those products, selecting one, finding out whether the track is available, ensuring that it is the right version or cover and so on. Listening to previews assists in this investigation. If copying a court decision with a view to advising a client or principal is a dealing “for the purpose of research” within the meaning of section 29, so is streaming a preview with a view to deciding whether or not to purchase a download or CD. The object of the investigation is different, as are the level of expertise required and the consequences of performing an inadequate search. Those are differences in degree, not differences in nature.

[109] L’article 29 de la Loi s’applique exclusivement à la recherche et à l’étude privée. La Cour suprême du Canada a établi de manière claire que « la recherche ne se limite pas à celle effectuée dans un contexte non commercial ou privé ». 30 Planifier l’achat d’un téléchargement ou d’un CD requiert un effort pour trouver : identifier les sites offrant ces biens, en choisir un, établir si la piste est disponible, vérifier qu’il s’agit de la bonne version et ainsi de suite. L’écoute préalable contribue à cet effort pour trouver. Si copier un arrêt en vue de pouvoir conseiller un client ou un senior est une utilisation « à des fins de recherche » comme l’entend l’article 29, écouter au préalable un extrait en vue de décider d’acheter ou non un téléchargement ou un CD l’est aussi. L’objet de la démarche est différent, tout comme l’expertise qu’elle requiert ou les conséquences d’une recherche bâclée. Il s’agit là de différences de degré et non de nature.

[22]

SOCAN argues that the primary purpose of previews is not research, but rather increased

sales and, accordingly, increased profits. There is no doubt that, for the seller, this is an important objective, one which also benefits copyright holders through reproduction and performance rights. I agree. But this does not exclude other equally important purposes. We must consider previews from the point of view of the person for whom they are intended: the consumer of the subject-matter of the copyright. Their purpose is to assist the consumer in seeking and finding the desired musical work.

2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

- 94 -

Page: 10

[23]

In conclusion, I do not consider the contextual interpretation of the concept of research in

section 29 applied by the Board to be unreasonable or in error. This brings me to the second step of the exception: is the dealing fair?
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

(b)

Fair dealing and previews of musical works

[24]

I do not intend to revisit the Board’s analysis of the six factors that help determine

whether a dealing is fair, except for the third, the amount of the dealing. I accept the Board’s analysis of the remaining factors and its consequent findings.

[25]

I referred to the third factor at the beginning of these reasons in relation with the

frequency and volume of previews. At the hearing, SOCAN submitted confidential figures that were not before the Board, as the parties were not called upon to discuss or submit evidence on fair dealing.

[26]

Here is the analysis of the third factor found at paragraph 113 of the decision:

[113] The third is the amount of the dealing. Streaming a preview to listen to it once is a dealing of a modest amount, when compared to purchasing the whole work for repeated listening. Helping the user to decide his course of action with respect to a purchase of the whole file is presumptively fair.

[113] Le troisième facteur est l’ampleur de l’utilisation. Transmettre un extrait pour en permettre une seule écoute préalable est une utilisation quantitativement modeste par rapport à l’achat de l’œuvre au complet pour écoute répétée. Aider l’usager à prendre une décision d’achat à l’égard du fichier au complet est une utilisation dont on peut présumer qu’elle est équitable.

- 95 -

Page: 11

[27]

This passage shows that the Board found the amount of the dealing to be the length of

each preview in proportion to the length of the complete work. In making this determination, it also considered the user’s objective of researching a purchase.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

[28]

I consider this approach to be precisely what is called for in the circumstances; the Board

has not erred in adopting it. However, SOCAN proposes a different yardstick. Rather than considering each preview individually, it suggests measuring the amount and determining the fairness of the dealing by considering the aggregate number of users and previews and the resulting hours of uncompensated music.

[29]

The confidential data provided for the year 2006 for a single online music service are

surprising. Unfortunately, and through no fault of SOCAN’s, these could not be verified or subjected to the adversarial process. Furthermore, this new yardstick raises its own set of questions. For example, is it meant to replace the measure adopted by the Board, or simply add to it to provide a broader perspective for the analysis of the third factor? What weight should it be given? If it replaces the other measure, does this make the third factor the most important factor, possibly even the determinative factor, depending on the aggregate amounts in question?

[30]

Without an enlightened debate on these questions, and given the fragmentary nature of

the available information, it would be wiser to leave this issue for another day.

- 96 -

Page: 12

[31]

In the circumstances, I cannot find that the Board’s decision regarding fair dealing with

respect to previews is unreasonable or in error.
2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

Conclusion

[32]

For these reasons, I would dismiss the application for judicial review, with costs to the

respondents.

[33]

This application for judicial review was set by order to be heard jointly with five other

applications. For these six cases, the parties filed thirty-one (31) memoranda of fact and law.

[34]

I would like to commend the parties’ counsel for the quality of their written and oral

submissions. They also filed solid, well-structured compendiums, which made the hearings considerably more efficient. Finally, they submitted a schedule for their oral representations, to which they strictly adhered. The hearings were long and covered a vast amount of content, but the experience and professionalism of counsel greatly facilitated their management.

“Gilles Létourneau” J.A. “I agree M. Nadon J.A.” “I agree J.D. Denis Pelletier J.A.”
Certified true translation Francie Gow, BCL, LLB

- 97 FEDERAL COURT OF APPEAL SOLICITORS OF RECORD

STYLE OF CAUSE:

SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA v. BELL CANADA et al.

PLACE OF HEARING: DATE OF HEARING: REASONS FOR JUDGMENT BY: CONCURRED IN BY:

Montréal, Quebec May 3 and 4, 2010 LÉTOURNEAU J.A. NADON J.A. PELLETIER J.A. May 14, 2010

DATED:

APPEARANCES: Gilles M. Daigle D. Lynne Watt Gerald L. Kerr-Wilson FOR THE APPLICANT

FOR THE RESPONDENTS Bell Canada, Rogers Comm. Inc., Rogers Wireless, Shaw Cablesystems, Puretracks Inc. and Telus Comm. Inc. FOR THE RESPONDENT CRIA FOR THE RESPONDENT Apple Canada FOR THE RESPONDENT CMRRA-SODRAC Inc.

J. Thomas Curry Marguerite Ethier Michael Koch Dina Graser Casey M. Chisick Timothy Pinos

2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

DOCKET:

A-514-07

- 98 SOLICITORS OF RECORD: Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Ottawa, Ontario Fasken Martineau LLP Ottawa, Ontario FOR THE APPLICANT

Page: 2

Lenczner Slaght Royce Smith Griffin LLP Toronto, Ontario Goodmans Toronto, Ontario Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP Toronto, Ontario

FOR THE RESPONDENT CRIA FOR THE RESPONDENT Apple Canada FOR THE RESPONDENT CMRRA-SODRAC Inc.

2010 FCA 123 (CanLII)

FOR THE RESPONDENTS Bell Canada, Rogers Comm. Inc., Rogers Wireless, Shaw Cablesystems, Puretracks Inc. et Telus Comm. Inc.

- 99 -

Date: 20100514 Docket: A-514-07 Ottawa, Ontario, May 14, 2010 CORAM: LÉTOURNEAU J.A. NADON J.A. PELLETIER J.A. BETWEEN:
SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents et

Date : 20100514 Dossier : A-514-07 Ottawa (Ontario), le 14 mai 2010 CORAM: LE JUGE LÉTOURNEAU LE JUGE NADON LE JUGE PELLETIER ENTRE :
SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA demanderesse

BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK et THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA défendeurs

- 100 -

Page: 2

JUDGMENT The application for judicial review is dismissed with costs to the respondents.

JUGEMENT La demande de contrôle judiciaire est rejetée avec dépens en faveur des défendeurs.

“Gilles Létourneau” J.A. j.c.a.

- 101 -

Court File No.: IN THE SUPREME COURT OF CANADA (ON APPEAL FROM THE FEDERAL COURT OF APPEAL) BETWEEN: SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AUTHORS AND MUSIC PUBLISHERS OF CANADA Applicant (Applicant on Judicial Review) - and BELL CANADA, THE CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS, THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION, THE CANADIAN RECORDING INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, APPLE CANADA INC., THE NATIONAL CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RADIO ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION, THE ENTERTAINMENT SOFTWARE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, ICEBERG MEDIA.COM, ROGERS COMMUNICATIONS INC., ROGERS WIRELESS PARTNERSHIP, SHAW CABLESYSTEMS G.P., TELUS COMMUNICATIONS INC., CMRRA/SODRAC INC., ESPRIT COMMUNICATIONS, CKUA RADIO NETWORK and THE RETAIL COUNCIL OF CANADA Respondents (Respondents on Judicial Review)

MEMORANDUM OF ARGUMENT

- 102 -

PART I - FACTS A. 1. Overview It has been six years since this Court released its decision on the fair dealing defence to copyright infringement in CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada. The CCH case did much to clarify and develop the doctrine of fair dealing in Canada. 2. However, in the six years following the CCH decision, the face of copyright has changed considerably. Digital media has become commonplace and transmission over the Internet is quickly becoming the primary method for delivery of copyrightprotected content. 3. This case raises important questions about the scope and application of the Copyright Act (the Act), particularly the fair dealing defence, in the context of a factual matrix that sits squarely within this new world of copyright. It involves the transmission of digital music over the Internet by the largest distributors of copyright content in Canada. The use of copyright-protected works at issue here involves musical works and occurs millions of times a year. The matter also has similar implications for other types of works such as films, television programs, software and electronic books. 4. The central tension in this case is whether the defence of fair dealing applies in a situation that stands in sharp contrast to that examined by this Court in CCH. In CCH, the copyright works were judicial decisions and the copyright users were legal professionals conducting research in a library for the purpose of preparing legal advice. Here, the copyright works are musical works sold as commercial products by commercial entities to consumers. Where the CCH case involved physical photocopies and fax transmissions, this case involves digital copies and Internet transmission. 5. The factual situation in this case is typical of modern commercial copyright uses on the Internet. In CCH, the dealing at issue was the physical copying and transmission

- 103 -

of a relatively small number of paper-based documents for use as a research tool in the preparation of legal opinions and court documents. Here, the dealing involves millions of online music previews transmitted by major commercial undertakings. These previews are offered free of charge to customers of online retailers for the purpose of facilitating the selection of tracks for potential purchase. These previews are available for virtually every song in the online music retailers’ music catalogue and are transmitted to customers in Canada millions of times per year. 6. The decisions below relied on the judgment of this Court in CCH in determining that the fair dealing defence applied to the Respondents’ use of music previews, but did so without any meaningful consideration of the significant differences between the factual context in CCH and that underlying the present case. This application for leave to appeal asks for this Court to build on its decision in CCH and offer guidance on how the defence of fair dealing ought to apply in the modern commercial mainstream, in which the Internet now plays a crucial role. 7. The Applicant submits that in finding that the actions of the Respondents constitute fair dealing, the Court below has created a very significant and unwarranted expansion in the scope of the defence. This expansion disrupts the balance between creators and users that the Act was intended to strike and results in the complete removal of the Applicant’s rights over a significant use of its music repertoire on the Internet in a manner that is incompatible with the object, spirit and purpose of the Act. 8. The defence of fair dealing is intended to further the central purpose of copyright law, that is, to strike a balance between the public interest in the creation and dissemination of creative works and the interest of creators in obtaining a just reward for their efforts. The Act imposes two conditions on the availability of the fair dealing defence: the dealing must be for an allowable purpose as enumerated by the Act and the dealing must be, in fact, fair. The allowable purposes listed in section 29 of the Act are “research and private study.” In light of the purpose of the Act, the use of

- 104 -

music previews by the Respondents cannot be considered either research or private study and the volume of previews transmitted by the Respondents is too large to be considered fair.
Copyright Act, R.S.C. 1985. c.C-42., s. 29.

9.

The decisions below imperil the balance between protecting the interest of creators and promoting the development of creative works by expanding the definition of the term “research” to include activities that do not encourage the creation and dissemination of new works and by failing to consider the amount of the dealing in the aggregate. Preserving this balance is a matter of national and public importance.

B. 10.

Tariff 22.A The Applicant, Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) is a collective society within the meaning of the Act that administers in Canada the performing rights in the world repertoire of copyright music. The fees collected by SOCAN for the use of its musical works are approved by the Board and certified in the Canada Gazette in the form of statements of royalties called “tariffs”.

11.

The issues involved in this application for leave to appeal arise out of proceedings before the Copyright Board of Canada (the Board) certifying a tariff for the communication of musical works to the public by telecommunication. This tariff is known as SOCAN Tariff 22.A. It applies to the use of music by online music services that sell and transmit recordings of full-length musical works to members of the public through the Internet.

12.

In certifying a tariff, the Board hears submissions from both the collective society proposing the tariff and any affected copyright users who choose to object to its approval. In the case of Tariff 22.A, the objectors consist of music users who operate businesses that distribute music to the public through the Internet or other means of telecommunication (the Online Music Services).

- 105 -

13.

Chief among the objectors is Apple Canada Inc. (Apple), which operates the iTunes Store, the largest online music store in Canada. The iTunes service boasts millions of customers and is the dominant online music service in Canada and the world.

14.

The iTunes Store offers customers the ability to purchase individual songs or albums in a digital format for use in Apple’s Mac, iPod, iPhone and iPad devices as well as PC computers running Apple’s iTunes software. Apple recently reported the iTunes Store’s 10 billionth song purchase.

15.

The Online Music Services also include the major Canadian cable, satellite and wireless service providers: Rogers Communications Inc., Shaw Cablesystems G.P., Rogers Wireless Partnership, Telus Communications Inc. and Bell Canada.

16.

Tariff 22.A, as filed by SOCAN over the years 1996-2006, targeted various uses of music on the Internet, including the Online Music Services’ sale and transmission of musical works to consumers online. SOCAN’s proposed tariff sought different levels of compensation based on whether an online music retailer offered previews as a part of its service.

C. 17.

Previews One of the features available to customers of the Online Music Services is the ability to preview music before making a purchase. This means that a customer visiting the service may, by clicking the appropriate icon, listen to a portion of any song free of charge. All previews are available to all potential customers whether or not a purchase is made.

18.

Previews usually consist of a thirty-second segment of a song that is streamed to the end user. They are available for nearly every one of the 13 million songs in the Online Music Services’ catalogues.
Decision of the Copyright Board dated October 18, 2007 [Board’s Decision] at para. 18.

- 106 -

19.

The Board concluded that the Online Music Services use previews as a “marketing tool” that allows consumers to preview musical works to help them decide whether to make a purchase. The evidence presented to the Board by Apple witness Eddie Cue was that 10 music previews are transmitted for each download sold.

D. 20.

Decision of the Board In its 2007 decision, the Board approved Tariff 22.A for the Online Music Services’ sale and transmission of full-length musical works. However, the Board refused to approve a tariff component for the Online Music Services’ transmission of music previews because, in the Board’s view, that activity was covered by the fair dealing exception to copyright infringement in section 29 of the Act and consequently, no tariff was certifiable for that use.

21.

Although SOCAN’s proposed tariff sought to assign a value to online music previews, at no time did the parties raise before the Board the issue of whether the fair dealing exception might apply to previews. The Board raised the issue on its own initiative without notice to or input from the parties when it rendered its decision.
Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada v. Bell Canada, 2010 FCA 123 [Judicial Review Decision] at para. 10.

22.

In coming to its conclusion that the Online Music Services’ use of previews constituted fair dealing, the Board relied on the decision of this Court in CCH. The Board purported to adopt and apply the guidance of this Court stipulating that the word “research” be given a large and liberal interpretation in order to ensure that users’ rights are not unduly constrained.
CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339. Board’s Decision at para. 104. Judicial Review Decision at para. 12.

23.

The Board determined that the use of previews constituted a dealing with a musical work for the purposes of research. According to the Board, consumers who receive

- 107 -

transmissions of music previews conduct research within the meaning of section 29 for the following reasons: Planning the purchase of a download or CD involves searching, investigation: identifying sites that offer those products, selecting one, finding out whether the track is available, ensuring that it is the right version or cover and so on. Listening to previews assists in this investigation. If copying a court decision with a view to advising a client or principal is a dealing “for the purpose of research” within the meaning of section 29, so is streaming a preview with a view to deciding whether or not to purchase a download or CD. The object of the investigation is different, as are the level of expertise required and the consequences of performing an inadequate search. Those are differences in degree, not differences in nature.
Board’s Decision at para. 109.

24.

The above paragraph represents the totality of the Board’s analysis of whether the transmission of music previews constitutes “research” within the meaning of section 29 of the Act.

25.

The Board then analyzed the following factors to determine whether the dealing was, in fact, fair: the purpose, character and amount of the dealing; alternatives to the dealing; the nature of the work and the effect of the dealing on the work.
Board’s Decision at paras. 110-116.

26.

The Board considered the third factor, the amount of the dealing, on an individual preview basis, rather than an aggregate scale and concluded that thirty seconds was a fair amount of the work to use: The third is the amount of the dealing. Streaming a preview to listen to it once is a dealing of a modest amount, when compared to purchasing the whole work for repeated listening. Helping the user to decide his course of action with respect to a purchase of the whole file is presumptively fair.
Board’s Decision at para. 113.

- 108 -

E. 27.

Decision of the Federal Court of Appeal SOCAN applied for judicial review of the Board’s decision. The only part of the decision challenged by SOCAN in the application for judicial review was the Board’s ruling that Online Music Services’ use of previews constituted fair dealing under the Act. The application for judicial review dealt with the following question: Does the Internet transmission of music previews by the Services constitute “fair dealing for the purpose of research” within the meaning of section 29 of the Act?

28.

The Federal Court of Appeal considered it surprising that, on such an important issue, the Board would come to a decision about the interpretation of the fair use exception and its field of application without the benefit of discussion with the affected parties.
Judicial Review Decision at para. 11.

29.

However, the Court of Appeal agreed with the Board that the term “research” in section 29 of the Act was broad enough to include the situation where a “consumer is searching for an object of copyright that he or she desires and is attempting to locate and wishes to ensure its authenticity and quality before obtaining it.” The Court of Appeal held that the purpose of previews was to assist the consumer in seeking and finding a desired musical work.
Judicial Review Decision at paras. 20, 22.

30.

The Court of Appeal went on to consider the Board’s conclusion on whether the amount of the dealing involved in the Online Music Services’ use of previews was fair.
Judicial Review Decision at para. 29.

31.

The Court of Appeal concluded that it was unable to evaluate the appropriateness of SOCAN’s proposed approach to measuring the extent of preview use. The Board had considered the amount of dealing by comparing the length of one preview to the length of an average song, while SOCAN urged the Court of Appeal to measure the

- 109 -

fairness of the dealing by assessing the aggregate number of previews transmitted and the resulting number of hours of uncompensated music.
Judicial Review Decision at paras. 28-30.

32.

At the hearing before the Court of Appeal, SOCAN submitted confidential figures showing that during the year 2006, iTunes alone sold over [CONFIEDNTIAL] downloads. Based on Apple’s evidence before the Board that, on average, 10 previews are transmitted for each download sold, these iTunes downloads represent over [CONFIDENTIAL] previews or as many as [CONFIDENTIAL] hours of SOCAN music use during the year 2006 for a single online music retailer. The Court of Appeal found these usage data “surprising” and held that the yardstick proposed by SOCAN raised its own set of questions, including whether it makes the third factor (the amount of the dealing) the determinative factor in an assessment of fairness. Given the decisions below, this extensive use of SOCAN’s copyright music remains uncompensated.
Judicial Review Decision at para. 29.

PART II - ISSUES 33. Whether clarity in the scope and application of the fair dealing provisions in the Copyright Act is an issue of public and national importance and one which involves issues of law which ought to be decided by this Court. PART III - ARGUMENT A. 34. Overview The fair dealing defence performs an integral function within the copyright system. This Court has considered it a “user’s right.” In its most recent decision on this subject, this Court held that right extends to copying judicial decisions for the purposes of preparing legal advice.
CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339.

- 110 -

35.

This application for leave to appeal seeks further guidance from this Court on the scope and application of the fair dealing defence in a completely different context. Specifically, the applicant submits that the following questions are issues of public and national importance such that guidance from this Court is warranted: (a) What is the proper extent of the large and liberal interpretation of the term “research” described by this Court in CCH? Specifically, does this interpretation extend to the shopping activities of online music customers? (b) In situations where the medium and distribution method for a work make widespread user access possible, should the amount of the dealing in the aggregate be a factor in the court’s assessment of fairness?

36.

An answer to these questions from this Court would provide beneficial guidance to both users and owners of copyright and would assist in striking the proper balance between these two groups, thus furthering the primary purpose of copyright law.

B. 37.

Fair Dealing is a Central Concept in Canadian Copyright Law This Court has recognized the purpose of the Act as “a balance between, on the one hand, promoting the public interest in the encouragement and dissemination of works of the intellect and the arts and, on the other hand, obtaining a just reward for the creator”. The Act is intended to encourage the disclosure of works for the advancement of learning and to reward authors and copyright owners.
Theberge v. Galerie d’Art du Petit Champlain, [2002] 2 S.C.R. 336, paras. 5, 30-31. CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339 at para. 10.

38.

The Act’s goal is progress, creation, production, advancement of knowledge, the development of human capital and the propagation of new works.
D. Gervais, “The Purpose of Copyright Law in Canada”, (2005) 2:2 U.O.L.T.J. 315 at 318.

39.

The fair dealing defence performs an integral function within the copyright system: it acknowledges the collaborative and interactive nature of cultural creativity and

- 111 -

creates “breathing space” in the copyright system by allowing for uses of copyrightprotected works that are fair and for purposes that lead to the creation of new works. Because of fair dealing’s important role in furthering the objectives of copyright law, it is important that the provisions in the Act defining the scope and application of the defence be interpreted in a manner that is consistent, predictable and in accordance with the purpose of the Act as a whole.
Carys Craig, “The Changing Face of Fair Dealing in Canadian Copyright Law: A Proposal for Legislative Reform”, in In the Public Interest: The Future of Canadian Copyright Law, Michael Geist, ed. (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2005) at 437.

40.

Fair dealing is becoming increasingly important as technology lowers barriers to creation, democratises dissemination and dramatically increases access to creative works. Technology makes obtaining a copy of a protected work simpler, faster and cheaper than ever before.

41.

This ease of access and duplication enables new opportunities for creative expression and collaboration that allow creators to build on the efforts of others for the common cultural good. It is precisely this incremental creativity that the fair dealing defence was intended to foster. Fair dealing has the potential to advance the general diffusion of creative works and promote the public interest.
Giuseppina D’Agostino, “Healing Fair Dealing? A Comparative Copyright Analysis of Canada’s Fair Dealing to U.K. Fair Dealing and U.S. Fair Use”, (2008) 53 McGill L.J. 309363 at para. 1.

42.

However, this same ease of access by means of new technologies can lead to unauthorized use and infringement of copyright. An overly broad definition of the user right of fair dealing would disrupt the balance between users and creators that the Act is intended to strike. Because of this, clarity and predictability in the application of the fair dealing provisions in the Act are more important than ever before. This Court is now in a position to offer guidance in this area.

- 112 -

C. 43.

This Case Involves Fair Dealing Issues in the Online Environment Although the decision of this Court in CCH did much to clarify and advance the law of fair dealing in Canada, the factual matrix of that case was not typical and involved parties and works unique to the context of legal research in a library. This unique circumstance limits the applicability of this Court’s analysis in CCH such that further guidance from this Court on the defence of fair dealing is necessary for the purpose of assessing the more typical facts at hand in the present application.

44.

The specific factors involved in the CCH case — the fact that the Great Library was seeking to advance the practice of law generally and the fact that increasing the costs of legal research would have restricted access to justice — are not easily applicable to other creative domains. It would be valuable for this Court to consider fair dealing in a context that is more universally applicable.
Giuseppina D’Agostino, “Healing Fair Dealing? A Comparative Copyright Analysis of Canada’s Fair Dealing to U.K. Fair Dealing and U.S. Fair Use”, (2008) 53 McGill L.J. 309363 at para. 41.

45.

This case offers an opportunity for this Court to provide guidance on the doctrine of fair dealing in a situation that is very different from that in CCH. This case involves the sort of works, owners and users not considered by this Court in CCH. The works, owners and users involved here are typical of those involved in the most prevalent kind of transactions involving copyright-protected works. Because of the commonplace nature of this type of copyright use, guidance from this Court on the scope and application of the fair dealing defence here would be beneficial to a broad spectrum of copyright owners and users across the country.

i. 46.

This Case Involves Typical Users and Owners of Copyright All of the Online Music Services offer musical works for sale over the Internet. Apple and some of the other retailers also offer films, television programs and books for sale online in a similar way. As more types of copyright-protected works move to digital formats, the sale and delivery system employed by iTunes and similar

- 113 -

services are becoming the dominant form of content distribution. These Internet vendors use previews as a marketing tool in order to maximize revenue. 47. Similarly, SOCAN represents a common form of copyright-holder. For popular works, it is rarely the artist herself that owns the publishing rights. It would be prohibitively expensive for every creator to negotiate a unique deal with the Online Music Services and the imbalance in bargaining power would lead to a sub-optimal outcome for the creator. Instead, creators assign or otherwise transfer their rights to collective licensing societies like SOCAN to administer their rights. 48. In addition, there is a significant difference in the relationship between the dealing, the party engaging in the dealing and the party authorizing the dealing between the two cases. In CCH, the user of the copyright-protected works was the Great Library, a not-for-profit organization with a focus on assisting lawyers in their legal research. While the Great Library effected the dealing at issue in CCH, it was the lawyers accessing the Great Library’s copying services who were performing the research, and it was these lawyers who derived the benefit from their research activities in the form of remuneration for their work. 49. In this case, the dealing involved (i.e. the communication of music previews to the public) is effected by the Online Music Services, significant commercial undertakings whose goals are revenue-generation and profit-maximization. While it is the customers of the Online Music Services who select previews and request their transmission, the Online Music Services transmit the previews and by doing so become the users of the copyright. 50. The Court of Appeal considered the customers’ selection of previews “research”, but the relationship between the customer and the previews is much different from that between the lawyer and the copied cases in CCH. The Online Music Services use previews as a marketing tool to generate revenue, while the customer generates nothing from previews. This relationship is opposite to that in CCH where the Great

- 114 -

Library derived no benefit from copying cases, but the lawyers performing the research used the copied works to generate legal advice for financial gain. 51. Because the relationship of the parties to the dealing is so different between this case and CCH, and because the issues surrounding fair dealing in this case arise out of such a typical owner-user situation, guidance from this Court on the scope of the fair dealing defence will clarify the law on this issue and assist a broad spectrum of copyright owners and users in understanding how the fair dealing defence applies to them. ii. 52. This Case Involves Uses of Typical Copyright Works The nature of the works at issue in CCH formed an important part of this Court’s determination of whether the unauthorized copying could be considered fair dealing. In CCH, this Court found a public interest in the dissemination of judicial opinions. 53. In Alberta v. Access Copyright, the Federal Court of Appeal held that making photocopies of textbooks for use in a classroom for educational purposes could not be considered fair dealing. In its decision, the Court of Appeal endorsed the distinction made by the Copyright Board between CCH and the case before it on the basis that, unlike CCH, the copies of textbooks for classroom use were made of private material rather than material generated in the public interest such as judicial decisions.
Alberta v. Access Copyright, 2010 FCA 198 at para. 25.

54.

For digital media services such as the Online Music Services, the works involved are also private material and are sold as a commercial product. The practice of offering previews to customers to assist in purchasing decisions is commonplace. Whether the media product is music, video or software, the use of demos and previews is a simple and effective way to increase sales. However, the Online Music Services do not own the product they are giving away as a sample. In order to continue the

- 115 -

practice of offering previews, the Online Music Services ought to compensate the rights-holders for the right to do so. iii. 55. There was No Compulsory Regime in CCH The mandatory licensing scheme created by the Act contemplates that collective rate-setting through the Board will achieve the purposes of the Act by enabling widespread dissemination of creative works. This legislative scheme of collective rate-setting and compulsory licensing reduces the need for the “breathing space” created by the fair dealing defence. The Act makes it impossible for SOCAN to block access to a creative work by stipulating that as long as the user pays the royalty approved by the Board, he or she does not infringe copyright.
Copyright Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. C-42, ss. 67-68.2.

56.

In CCH, the fair dealing defence was necessary to ensure that the dissemination of important works was not unduly restricted. Here, the compulsory licensing scheme created by the Act achieves that same purpose.

D. i.

The Decisions Below Misconstrue the Scope and Application of the Defence of Fair Dealing The Term “research” Ought to be Interpreted in Accordance with the Purposes of the Act The Board and the Court of Appeal appeared to follow CCH in deciding that the term "research" must be given a large and liberal interpretation in order to ensure that users' rights are not unduly constrained.
CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339 at para. 51.

57.

58.

Drawing on the guidance in CCH, both the Board and the Court of Appeal held that the term “research” in section 29 of the Act could be interpreted to include the shopping activity that takes place when a customer of the Online Music Services listens to previews in his or her search for a potential song to purchase.

- 116 -

59.

In reaching this conclusion, the Court of Appeal observed that the term “research” in the Act was not modified by qualifiers such as “scientific”, “economic” or “cultural” and interpreted the term according to its “primary and ordinary meaning.”

60.

However, this interpretation fails to consider the purpose of the Act as a whole. The type of dealing involved here does not create the “breathing space” within copyright protection necessary for users to build on previous works.

61.

The previous decision of this Court in CCH refined the balance between users’ and creators’ rights by fostering the sort of dealing with copyright-protected works that leads to the development of new ideas: Interpretation of the scope of the “fair dealing for private study and research” defence to include commercially-motivated research activities is not unusual in light of the underlying policy imperatives that justify the defence: research is the cornerstone of discovery and the development of new ideas which, necessarily, requires the researcher to have access to pre-existing knowledge embodied in copyrighted works. Activity of this nature leads to the generation of further works and potentially useful output which may benefit society as a whole.
Burton Ong, “Fissures in the Façade of Fair Dealing”, [2004] Sing J. Legal Stud. 150172 at 162.

62.

However, listening to previews of songs available for purchase does nothing to acknowledge the collaborative and interactive nature of cultural creativity. Customers of the Online Music Services do not use the previews to generate further creative works and the use of the previews does not benefit society as a whole. The entire benefit of the availability of free previews accrues primarily to the Online Music Services as an increase in sales.

63.

In CCH, the use made by lawyers of cases and articles was research in accordance with the purposes of the Act. The copyright-protected works involved there were used to create new works, such as legal advice to clients and written submissions to courts. Despite the fact that the lawyers engaging in the research created these new

- 117 -

works for financial gain, the works benefitted the public by advancing the law, promoting justice and contributing to society’s body of knowledge. 64. In the present case, there is no transformative or creative use and the benefit of the dealing accrues primarily to the users. The previews, in their entirety, consist of excerpts of SOCAN’s musical works which are transmitted to the consumer in their original form; no value is added to the works through this transmission. They are transmitted by the Online Music Services for publicity and mercantile purposes. 65. Unlike the active, creative research involved in CCH, the purpose of listening to previews is passive and permits only consumption. In CCH, the financial benefit accruing to the user was accompanied by the creation of new works which benefitted the public at large. Here, the benefit of the dealing is purely financial and no new works are generated by the use of previews by either the customers or the Online Music Services. The definition of “research” applied by the Court of Appeal is inconsistent with the definition mandated by the purpose of the Act. 66. The public policy balance behind copyright protection has also been considered in the United States, where the question of whether music previews constitute fair dealing has been answered in the negative on two occasions even though the test for fair use in the U.S. is an open-ended one and does not require the party claiming the defence to show that the purpose of the use was one in a closed list of allowable purposes. 67. In United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, (In re AT&T Wireless), the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York held that it was not fair use to offer previews of musical ringtones to potential purchasers. In Video Pipeline v. Buena Vista Home Entertainment Inc., the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit held that Video Pipeline was not likely to succeed in raising a fair use defence where it provided two minute excerpts from feature films for use as previews on Internet retail websites.

- 118 -

United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, (In re AT&T Wireless), 599 F.Supp. 2d 415 (S.D.N.Y. 2009). Video Pipeline v. Buena Vista Home Entertainment Inc. 342 F.3d 191.

68.

In CCH, this Court endorsed the position of Linden J.A. of the Federal Court of Appeal who examined the experience in the United States for assistance in determining whether the dealing in that case was fair. Both Linden J.A. and this Court drew from American jurisprudence in developing the factors now used in Canada to assess the fairness of a dealing with a copyright-protected work.
CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada, 2002 FCA 187 at paras. 147-150. CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339 at para. 53.

69.

The Court of Appeal here has taken an approach to American jurisprudence that diverges from that taken by this Court in CCH. Instead of drawing on the American law of fair use to inform the Canadian law of fair dealing, the Court of Appeal has arrived at a result that is directly opposite to the result arrived at by the United States District Court in a case with virtually identical facts.

70.

This divergence by the Court of Appeal in its approach to American jurisprudence from that adopted in CCH underlines the unsettled nature of this issue and the need for clarity and guidance from this Court.

ii. 71.

The Amount of Music Used by Previews is Not Quantitatively Fair The third factor involved in the CCH test for fairness of a dealing with a copyrightprotected work is the amount of the dealing. Whether considered individually or in the aggregate, the amount of the dealing involved in the previews offered by the Online Music Services cannot be considered fair.

72.

The average length of a song on the iTunes Music Store is four minutes. A thirtysecond preview, then, represents one eighth of the total song length. If the same ratio were applied to a feature film of two hours, the preview would be fifteen minutes long. Similarly, a preview of a six-hundred-page novel would be seventy-five pages long.

- 119 -

73.

Considered on an aggregate scale, the amount of music transmitted to customers for free in the form of previews is staggering. The previews transmitted in 2006 alone by the iTunes store amount to [CONFIDENTIAL] hours of music from SOCAN’s repertoire transmitted without compensation. The Federal Court of Appeal considered these data “surprising”. The Applicant notes that, given the burgeoning online music market, the amount of previews transmitted since 2006 would have increased dramatically.

74.

As the delivery method of more copyright-protected content moves toward the model used by iTunes, the amount of content transmitted as previews will increase drastically. Both the Board and the Court of Appeal failed to consider the amount of dealing represented by previews in the aggregate.

75.

In view of the application of the analysis in CCH to the very different, and increasingly common, factual situation in this case without regard to the underlying purposes of the Act, and in a manner that reaches a contrary conclusion to that reached in another jurisdiction, the consideration of the scope of the fair dealing defence outside the parameters of CCH is a matter of public importance that warrants the attention of this Court.

- 120 -

PART IV - SUBMISSIONS ON COSTS 76. The Applicant submits that the Court, if it grants leave, should follow its usual practice and grant leave with costs in any event of the cause. PART V - ORDER SOUGHT 77. The Applicant respectfully requests an order granting leave to appeal from the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal dated May 14, 2010, with costs in any event of the cause.

All of which is respectfully submitted this 13th day of August, 2010. _____________________ Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Barristers and Solicitors Martin W. Mason Matthew S. Estabrooks Counsel for the Applicant

- 121 -

PART VI - TABLE OF AUTHORITIES Authority Alberta v. Access Copyright, 2010 FCA 198. Burton Ong, “Fissures in the Façade of Fair Dealing”, [2004] Sing J. Legal Stud. 150-172. 3. Carys Craig, “The Changing Face of Fair Dealing in Canadian Copyright Law: A Proposal for Legislative Reform”, in In the Public Interest: The Future of Canadian Copyright Law, Michael Geist, ed. (Toronto: Irwin Law, 2005). 4. CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada, 2002 FCA 187. 5. CCH v. Law Society of Upper Canada, [2004] 1 S.C.R. 339. 6. D. Gervais, “The Purpose of Copyright Law in Canada”, (2005) 2:2 U.O.L.T.J. 315. 7. Giuseppina D’Agostino, “Healing Fair Dealing? A Comparative Copyright Analysis of Canada’s Fair Dealing to U.K. Fair Dealing and U.S. Fair Use”, (2008) 53 McGill L.J. 309-363. 8. Theberge v. Galerie d’Art du Petit Champlain, [2002] 2 S.C.R. 336. 9. United States v. American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, (In re AT&T Wireless), 599 F.Supp. 2d 415 (S.D.N.Y. 2009). 10. Video Pipeline v. Buena Vista Home Entertainment Inc. 342 F.3d 191. 1. 2. Citing Paragraphs 53 61 39

68 22, 34, 37, 57, 68 38 41, 44 37 67 67

- 122 -

PART VII - STATUTES RELIED UPON 1. Copyright Act, R.S.C. 1985. c.C-42., ss. 29, 67-68.2.

- 123 -

CANADA

CONSOLIDATION

CODIFICATION

Copyright Act
CHAPTER C-42

Loi sur le droit d’auteur
CHAPITRE C-42

Current to July 11, 2010

À jour au 11 juillet 2010

Published by the Minister of Justice at the following address: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca

Publié par le ministre de la Justice à l’adresse suivante : http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca

Droit d’auteur — 11 juillet 2010
Where prejudice deemed

- 124 -

(2) In the case of a painting, sculpture or engraving, the prejudice referred to in subsection (1) shall be deemed to have occurred as a result of any distortion, mutilation or other modification of the work. (3) For the purposes of this section, (a) a change in the location of a work, the physical means by which a work is exposed or the physical structure containing a work, or (b) steps taken in good faith to restore or preserve the work shall not, by that act alone, constitute a distortion, mutilation or other modification of the work.
R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 6.

(2) Toute déformation, mutilation ou autre modification d’une peinture, d’une sculpture ou d’une gravure est réputée préjudiciable au sens du paragraphe (1). (3) Pour l’application du présent article, ne constitue pas nécessairement une déformation, mutilation ou autre modification de l’œuvre un changement de lieu, du cadre de son exposition ou de la structure qui la contient ou toute mesure de restauration ou de conservation prise de bonne foi.
L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 6.

Présomption de préjudice

When work not distorted, etc.

Nonmodification

EXCEPTIONS Fair Dealing
Research or private study

EXCEPTIONS Utilisation équitable 29. L’utilisation équitable d’une œuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur aux fins d’étude privée ou de recherche ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur.
L.R. (1985), ch. C-42, art. 29; L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 7; 1994, ch. 47, art. 61; 1997, ch. 24, art. 18.
Étude privée ou recherche

29. Fair dealing for the purpose of research or private study does not infringe copyright.
R.S., 1985, c. C-42, s. 29; R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 7; 1994, c. 47, s. 61; 1997, c. 24, s. 18.

Criticism or review

29.1 Fair dealing for the purpose of criticism or review does not infringe copyright if the following are mentioned: (a) the source; and (b) if given in the source, the name of the (i) author, in the case of a work, (ii) performer, in the case of a performer’s performance, (iii) maker, in the case of a sound recording, or (iv) broadcaster, in the case of a communication signal.
1997, c. 24, s. 18.

29.1 L’utilisation équitable d’une œuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur aux fins de critique ou de compte rendu ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur à la condition que soient mentionnés : a) d’une part, la source; b) d’autre part, si ces renseignements figurent dans la source : (i) dans le cas d’une œuvre, le nom de l’auteur, (ii) dans le cas d’une prestation, le nom de l’artiste-interprète, (iii) dans le cas d’un enregistrement sonore, le nom du producteur, (iv) dans le cas d’un signal de communication, le nom du radiodiffuseur.
1997, ch. 24, art. 18.

Critique et compte rendu

News reporting

29.2 Fair dealing for the purpose of news reporting does not infringe copyright if the following are mentioned: (a) the source; and

29.2 L’utilisation équitable d’une œuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur pour la communication des nouvelles ne constitue pas une violation du droit d’auteur à la condition que soient mentionnés :

Communication des nouvelles

35

Droit d’auteur — 11 juillet 2010
Studies

- 125 -

66.8 The Board shall conduct such studies with respect to the exercise of its powers as are requested by the Minister.
R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 12.

66.8 À la demande du ministre, la Commission effectue toute étude touchant ses attributions.
L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 12.

Études

Report

66.9 (1) The Board shall, not later than August 31 in each year, submit to the Governor in Council through the Minister an annual report on the Board’s activities for the preceding year describing briefly the applications made to the Board, the Board’s decisions and any other matter that the Board considers relevant. (2) The Minister shall cause a copy of each annual report to be laid before each House of Parliament on any of the first fifteen days on which that House is sitting after the Minister receives the report.
R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 12.

66.9 (1) Au plus tard le 31 août, la Commission présente au gouverneur en conseil, par l’intermédiaire du ministre, un rapport annuel de ses activités résumant les demandes qui lui ont été présentées et les conclusions auxquelles elle est arrivée et toute autre question qu’elle estime pertinente. (2) Le ministre fait déposer le rapport devant chaque chambre du Parlement dans les quinze premiers jours de séance de celle-ci suivant sa réception.
L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 12.

Rapport

Tabling

Dépôt

Regulations

66.91 The Governor in Council may make regulations issuing policy directions to the Board and establishing general criteria to be applied by the Board or to which the Board must have regard (a) in establishing fair and equitable royalties to be paid pursuant to this Act; and (b) in rendering its decisions in any matter within its jurisdiction.
1997, c. 24, s. 44.

66.91 Le gouverneur en conseil peut, par règlement, donner des instructions sur des questions d’orientation à la Commission et établir les critères de nature générale à suivre par celle-ci, ou à prendre en compte par celle-ci, dans les domaines suivants : a) la fixation des redevances justes et équitables à verser aux termes de la présente loi; b) le prononcé des décisions de la Commission dans les cas qui relèvent de la compétence de celle-ci.
1997, ch. 24, art. 44.

Règlements

COLLECTIVE ADMINISTRATION OF PERFORMING RIGHTS AND OF COMMUNICATION RIGHTS
Public access to repertoires

GESTION COLLECTIVE DU DROIT D’EXÉCUTION ET DE
COMMUNICATION

67. Each collective society that carries on (a) the business of granting licences or collecting royalties for the performance in public of musical works, dramatico-musical works, performer’s performances of such works, or sound recordings embodying such works, or (b) the business of granting licences or collecting royalties for the communication to the public by telecommunication of musical works, dramatico-musical works, performer’s performances of such works, or sound recordings embodying such works, other than the communication of musical works or dramatico-musical works in a manner described in subsection 31(2),

67. Les sociétés de gestion chargées d’octroyer des licences ou de percevoir des redevances pour l’exécution en public ou la communication au public par télécommunication — à l’exclusion de la communication visée au paragraphe 31(2) — d’œuvres musicales ou dramatico-musicales, de leurs prestations ou d’enregistrements sonores constitués de ces œuvres ou prestations, selon le cas, sont tenues de répondre aux demandes de renseignements raisonnables du public concernant le répertoire de telles œuvres ou prestations ou de tels enregistrements d’exécution courante dans un délai raisonnable.
L.R. (1985), ch. C-42, art. 67; L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (1er suppl.), art. 1, ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 12; 1993, ch. 23, art. 3; 1997, ch. 24, art. 45.

Demandes de renseignements

85

Copyright — July 11, 2010 must answer within a reasonable time all reasonable requests from the public for information about its repertoire of works, performer’s performances or sound recordings, that are in current use.
R.S., 1985, c. C-42, s. 67; R.S., 1985, c. 10 (1st Supp.), s. 1, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 12; 1993, c. 23, s. 3; 1997, c. 24, s. 45.
Filing of proposed tariffs

- 126 -

67.1 (1) Each collective society referred to in section 67 shall, on or before the March 31 immediately before the date when its last tariff approved pursuant to subsection 68(3) expires, file with the Board a proposed tariff, in both official languages, of all royalties to be collected by the collective society. (2) A collective society referred to in subsection (1) in respect of which no tariff has been approved pursuant to subsection 68(3) shall file with the Board its proposed tariff, in both official languages, of all royalties to be collected by it, on or before the March 31 immediately before its proposed effective date. (3) A proposed tariff must provide that the royalties are to be effective for periods of one or more calendar years. (4) Where a proposed tariff is not filed with respect to the work, performer’s performance or sound recording in question, no action may be commenced, without the written consent of the Minister, for (a) the infringement of the rights, referred to in section 3, to perform a work in public or to communicate it to the public by telecommunication; or (b) the recovery of royalties referred to in section 19.

67.1 (1) Les sociétés visées à l’article 67 sont tenues de déposer auprès de la Commission, au plus tard le 31 mars précédant la cessation d’effet d’un tarif homologué au titre du paragraphe 68(3), un projet de tarif, dans les deux langues officielles, des redevances à percevoir. (2) Lorsque les sociétés de gestion ne sont pas régies par un tarif homologué au titre du paragraphe 68(3), le dépôt du projet de tarif auprès de la Commission doit s’effectuer au plus tard le 31 mars précédant la date prévue pour sa prise d’effet. (3) Le projet de tarif prévoit des périodes d’effet d’une ou de plusieurs années civiles. (4) Le non-dépôt du projet empêche, sauf autorisation écrite du ministre, l’exercice de quelque recours que ce soit pour violation du droit d’exécution en public ou de communication au public par télécommunication visé à l’article 3 ou pour recouvrement des redevances visées à l’article 19.

Dépôt d’un projet de tarif

Where no previous tariff

Sociétés non régies par un tarif homologué

Effective period of tariffs

Durée de validité

Prohibition of enforcement

Interdiction des recours

Publication of proposed tariffs

(5) As soon as practicable after the receipt of a proposed tariff filed pursuant to subsection (1), the Board shall publish it in the Canada Gazette and shall give notice that, within sixty days after the publication of the tariff, prospective users or their representatives may file written objections to the tariff with the Board.
R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 12; 1997, c. 24, s. 45; 2001, c. 34, s. 35(E).

(5) Dès que possible, la Commission publie dans la Gazette du Canada les projets de tarif et donne un avis indiquant que tout utilisateur éventuel intéressé, ou son représentant, peut y faire opposition en déposant auprès d’elle une déclaration en ce sens dans les soixante jours suivant la publication.
L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 12; 1997, ch. 24, art. 45; 2001, ch. 34, art. 35(A).

Publication des projets de tarifs

67.2 and 67.3 [Repealed, 1997, c. 24, s. 45]
Board to consider proposed tariffs and objections

67.2 et 67.3 [Abrogés, 1997, ch. 24, art. 45] 68. (1) La Commission procède dans les meilleurs délais à l’examen des projets de tarif et, le cas échéant, des oppositions; elle peut
Examen du projet de tarif

68. (1) The Board shall, as soon as practicable, consider a proposed tariff and any objec-

86

Droit d’auteur — 11 juillet 2010 tions thereto referred to in subsection 67.1(5) or raised by the Board, and (a) send to the collective society concerned a copy of the objections so as to permit it to reply; and (b) send to the persons who filed the objections a copy of any reply thereto.
Criteria and factors

- 127 -

également faire opposition aux projets. Elle communique à la société de gestion en cause copie des oppositions et aux opposants les réponses éventuelles de celle-ci.

(2) In examining a proposed tariff for the performance in public or the communication to the public by telecommunication of performer’s performances of musical works, or of sound recordings embodying such performer’s performances, the Board (a) shall ensure that (i) the tariff applies in respect of performer’s performances and sound recordings only in the situations referred to in subsections 20(1) and (2), (ii) the tariff does not, because of linguistic and content requirements of Canada’s broadcasting policy set out in section 3 of the Broadcasting Act, place some users that are subject to that Act at a greater financial disadvantage than others, and (iii) the payment of royalties by users pursuant to section 19 will be made in a single payment; and (b) may take into account any factor that it considers appropriate.

(2) Aux fins d’examen des projets de tarif déposés pour l’exécution en public ou la communication au public par télécommunication de prestations d’œuvres musicales ou d’enregistrements sonores constitués de ces prestations, la Commission : a) doit veiller à ce que : (i) les tarifs ne s’appliquent aux prestations et enregistrements sonores que dans les cas visés aux paragraphes 20(1) et (2), (ii) les tarifs n’aient pas pour effet, en raison d’exigences différentes concernant la langue et le contenu imposées par le cadre de la politique canadienne de radiodiffusion établi à l’article 3 de la Loi sur la radiodiffusion, de désavantager sur le plan financier certains utilisateurs assujettis à cette loi, (iii) le paiement des redevances visées à l’article 19 par les utilisateurs soit fait en un versement unique; b) peut tenir compte de tout facteur qu’elle estime indiqué. (3) Elle homologue les projets de tarif après avoir apporté aux redevances et aux modalités afférentes les modifications qu’elle estime nécessaires compte tenu, le cas échéant, des oppositions visées au paragraphe 67.1(5) et du paragraphe (2).

Cas particuliers

Certification

(3) The Board shall certify the tariffs as approved, with such alterations to the royalties and to the terms and conditions related thereto as the Board considers necessary, having regard to (a) any objections to the tariffs under subsection 67.1(5); and (b) the matters referred to in subsection (2). (4) The Board shall (a) publish the approved tariffs in the Canada Gazette as soon as practicable; and (b) send a copy of each approved tariff, together with the reasons for the Board’s decision, to each collective society that filed a

Homologation

Publication of approved tariffs

(4) Elle publie dès que possible dans la Gazette du Canada les tarifs homologués; elle en envoie copie, accompagnée des motifs de sa décision, à chaque société de gestion ayant déposé un projet de tarif et aux opposants.
L.R. (1985), ch. C-42, art. 68; L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 13; 1993, ch. 23, art. 5; 1997, ch. 24, art. 45.

Publication du tarif homologué

87

Copyright — July 11, 2010 proposed tariff and to any person who filed an objection.
R.S., 1985, c. C-42, s. 68; R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 13; 1993, c. 23, s. 5; 1997, c. 24, s. 45.
Special and transitional royalty rates

- 128 -

68.1 (1) Notwithstanding the tariffs approved by the Board under subsection 68(3) for the performance in public or the communication to the public by telecommunication of performer’s performances of musical works, or of sound recordings embodying such performer’s performances, (a) wireless transmission systems, except community systems and public transmission systems, shall pay royalties as follows: (i) in respect of each year, $100 on the first 1.25 million dollars of annual advertising revenues, and (ii) on any portion of annual advertising revenues exceeding 1.25 million dollars, (A) for the first year following the coming into force of this section, thirtythree and one third per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year, (B) for the second year following the coming into force of this section, sixtysix and two thirds per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year, and (C) for the third year following the coming into force of this section, one hundred per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year; (b) community systems shall pay royalties of $100 in respect of each year; and (c) public transmission systems shall pay royalties, in respect of each of the first three years following the coming into force of this section, as follows: (i) for the first year following the coming into force of this section, thirty-three and one third per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year, (ii) for the second year following the coming into force of this section, sixty-six and two thirds per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year, and

68.1 (1) Par dérogation aux tarifs homologués par la Commission conformément au paragraphe 68(3) pour l’exécution en public ou la communication au public par télécommunication de prestations d’œuvres musicales ou d’enregistrements sonores constitués de ces prestations, les radiodiffuseurs : a) dans le cas des systèmes de transmission par ondes radioélectriques, à l’exclusion des systèmes communautaires et des systèmes de transmission publics : (i) ne payent, chaque année, que 100 $ de redevances sur la partie de leurs recettes publicitaires annuelles qui ne dépasse pas 1,25 million de dollars, (ii) ne payent, sur toute partie de leurs recettes publicitaires qui dépasse 1,25 million de dollars, la première année suivant l’entrée en vigueur du présent article, que trente-trois et un tiers pour cent du tarif homologué, la deuxième année, soixantesix et deux tiers pour cent et payent cent pour cent la troisième année, ces pourcentages étant calculés selon le tarif homologué de l’année en cause; b) dans le cas des systèmes communautaires, ne payent, chaque année, que 100 $ de redevances; c) dans le cas des systèmes de transmission publics, ne payent, la première année suivant l’entrée en vigueur du présent article, que trente-trois et un tiers pour cent du tarif homologué, la deuxième année, soixante-six et deux tiers pour cent et payent cent pour cent la troisième année, ces pourcentages étant calculés selon le tarif homologué de l’année en cause.

Tarifs spéciaux et transitoires

88

Droit d’auteur — 11 juillet 2010 (iii) for the third year following the coming into force of this section, one hundred per cent of the royalties set out in the approved tariff for that year.
Effect of paying royalties

- 129 -

(2) The payment of the royalties set out in subsection (1) fully discharges all liabilities of the system in question in respect of the approved tariffs. (3) The Board may, by regulation, define “advertising revenues” for the purposes of subsection (1). (4) The Board shall, in certifying a tariff as approved under subsection 68(3), ensure that there is a preferential royalty rate for small cable transmission systems. (5) The Governor in Council may make regulations defining “small cable transmission system”, “community system”, “public transmission system” and “wireless transmission system” for the purposes of this section.
1997, c. 24, s. 45.

(2) Le paiement des redevances visées au paragraphe (1) libère ces systèmes de toute responsabilité relative aux tarifs homologués. (3) Pour l’application du paragraphe (1), la Commission peut, par règlement, définir « recettes publicitaires ». (4) Lorsqu’elle procède à l’homologation prévue au paragraphe 68(3), la Commission fixe un tarif préférentiel pour les petits systèmes de transmission par fil. (5) Le gouverneur en conseil peut, pour l’application du présent article, définir par règlement « petit système de transmission par fil », « système communautaire », « système de transmission par ondes radioélectriques » et « système de transmission public ».
1997, ch. 24, art. 45.

Effet du paiement des redevances

Definition of “advertising revenues” Preferential royalty rates

Définition de « recettes publicitaires » Tarifs préférentiels

Regulations

Règlements

Effect of fixing royalties

68.2 (1) Without prejudice to any other remedies available to it, a collective society may, for the period specified in its approved tariff, collect the royalties specified in the tariff and, in default of their payment, recover them in a court of competent jurisdiction. (2) No proceedings may be brought for (a) the infringement of the right to perform in public or the right to communicate to the public by telecommunication, referred to in section 3, or (b) the recovery of royalties referred to in section 19 against a person who has paid or offered to pay the royalties specified in an approved tariff.

68.2 (1) La société de gestion peut, pour la période mentionnée au tarif homologué, percevoir les redevances qui y figurent et, indépendamment de tout autre recours, le cas échéant, en poursuivre le recouvrement en justice. (2) Il ne peut être intenté aucun recours pour violation des droits d’exécution en public ou de communication au public par télécommunication visés à l’article 3 ou pour recouvrement des redevances visées à l’article 19 contre quiconque a payé ou offert de payer les redevances figurant au tarif homologué.

Portée de l’homologation

Proceedings barred if royalties tendered or paid

Interdiction des recours

Continuation of rights

(3) Where a collective society files a proposed tariff in accordance with subsection 67.1(1), (a) any person entitled to perform in public or communicate to the public by telecommunication those works, performer’s performances or sound recordings pursuant to the previous tariff may do so, even though the royalties set out therein have ceased to be in effect, and

(3) Toute personne visée par un tarif concernant les œuvres, les prestations ou les enregistrements sonores visés à l’article 67 peut, malgré la cessation d’effet du tarif, les exécuter en public ou les communiquer au public par télécommunication dès lors qu’un projet de tarif a été déposé conformément au paragraphe 67.1(1), et ce jusqu’à l’homologation d’un nouveau tarif. Par ailleurs, la société de gestion intéressée peut percevoir les redevances prévues

Maintien des droits

89

Copyright — July 11, 2010 (b) the collective society may collect the royalties in accordance with the previous tariff, until the proposed tariff is approved.
1997, c. 24, s. 45.

- 130 -

par le tarif antérieur jusqu’à cette homologation.
1997, ch. 24, art. 45.

PUBLIC PERFORMANCES IN PLACES OTHER THAN THEATRES 69. (1) [Repealed, R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 14]
Radio performances in places other than theatres

EXÉCUTIONS EN PUBLIC AILLEURS QU’AU THÉÂTRE 69. (1)  [Abrogé, L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 14] (2) En ce qui concerne les exécutions publiques au moyen d’un appareil radiophonique récepteur, en tout endroit autre qu’un théâtre servant ordinairement et régulièrement de lieu d’amusement où est exigé un prix d’entrée, aucune redevance n’est exigible du propriétaire ou usager de l’appareil radiophonique récepteur; mais la Commission doit, autant que possible, pourvoir à la perception anticipée, des radio-postes émetteurs des droits appropriés aux conditions nées des dispositions du présent paragraphe, et elle doit en déterminer le montant. (3) En ce faisant, la Commission tient compte de tous frais de recouvrement et autres déboursés épargnés ou pouvant être épargnés par le détenteur concerné du droit d’auteur ou du droit d’exécution, ou par ses mandataires, ou pour eux ou en leur faveur, en conséquence du paragraphe (2). (4) [Abrogé, L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 14]
L.R. (1985), ch. C-42, art. 69; L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 14; 1993, ch. 44, art. 73; 1997, ch. 24, art. 52(F).
Exécutions par radio dans des endroits autres que des théâtres

(2) In respect of public performances by means of any radio receiving set in any place other than a theatre that is ordinarily and regularly used for entertainments to which an admission charge is made, no royalties shall be collectable from the owner or user of the radio receiving set, but the Board shall, in so far as possible, provide for the collection in advance from radio broadcasting stations of royalties appropriate to the conditions produced by the provisions of this subsection and shall fix the amount of the same. (3) In fixing royalties pursuant to subsection (2), the Board shall take into account all expenses of collection and other outlays, if any, saved or savable by, for or on behalf of the owner of the copyright or performing right concerned or his agents, in consequence of subsection (2). (4) [Repealed, R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 14]
R.S., 1985, c. C-42, s. 69; R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 14; 1993, c. 44, s. 73; 1997, c. 24, s. 52(F).

Expenses to be taken into account

Calcul du montant

70. [Repealed, R.S., 1985, c. 10 (4th Supp.), s. 15] COLLECTIVE ADMINISTRATION IN RELATION TO RIGHTS UNDER SECTIONS 3, 15, 18 AND 21 Collective Societies
Collective societies

70. [Abrogé, L.R. (1985), ch. 10 (4e suppl.), art. 15] GESTION COLLECTIVE RELATIVE AUX DROITS VISÉS AUX ARTICLES 3, 15, 18 ET 21 Sociétés de gestion 70.1 Les articles 70.11 à 70.6 s’appliquent dans le cas des sociétés de gestion chargées d’octroyer des licences établissant : a) à l’égard d’un répertoire d’œuvres de plusieurs auteurs, les catégories d’utilisation à l’égard desquelles l’accomplissement de tout acte mentionné à l’article 3 est autorisé ainsi que les redevances à verser et les modalités à respecter pour obtenir une licence;
Sociétés de gestion

70.1 Sections 70.11 to 70.6 apply in respect of a collective society that operates (a) a licensing scheme, applicable in relation to a repertoire of works of more than one author, pursuant to which the society sets out the classes of uses for which and the royalties and terms and conditions on which it agrees to authorize the doing of an act mentioned in section 3 in respect of those works;

90

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->