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Peace Corps Small Project Assistance Program USAID (Annual Report) Cooperation PC AID Report to Congress February 1986

Peace Corps Small Project Assistance Program USAID (Annual Report) Cooperation PC AID Report to Congress February 1986

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Peace Corps Small Project Assistance Program USAID (Annual Report) Cooperation PC AID Report to Congress February 1986
Peace Corps Small Project Assistance Program USAID (Annual Report) Cooperation PC AID Report to Congress February 1986

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Categories:Types, Brochures
Published by: Accessible Journal Media Peace Corps Docs on Aug 14, 2010
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08/07/2015

Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs) have become an
important third partner in development with the Peace
Corps and AID .

PVOs generally provide both material and
technical assistance to local activities assisted by the
other two agencies.

Today there are over a hundred
projects in thirty countries where this trio cooperates
in helping communities.

AID usually plays the role of funder, the Volunteer is
the grassroots promoter and animater, and the PVO
provides various types of intermediation between the
other two.

In addition, a key fourth partner is
represented by host country organizations and local
officials.

PVO/Peace Corps cooperation often precedes AID funding.
Volunteers frequently identify projects and initiate
activities which require outside resources to continue in
any meaningful way.

For example, a forestry Volunteer in
Burkina Faso sought out and received support from Foster
Parents Plan International for construction of a tree
nursery.

Volunteer extension workers obtained goats and

advice from Heifer Project International for a project in

Ecuador.

A Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines
cooperated with the Asia Foundation in the development of
a fish hatchery.

AID financial support was provided in

each case.

In other cases, AID takes the initiative which in turn
presents additional opportunities for participation of
the Peace Corps and PVOs in the country development
strategy.

For example, in the South Pacific the AID
Officer worked closely with the Peace Corps Director and
several PVOs to initiate a small grants "umbrella
project." Save the Children Federation, the Foundation
for the Peoples of the South Pacific and the
International Human Assistance Program used AID funds and
Volunteers in an interesting mix of community development
and income-generating activities.

In August 1984, AID'S Office of Private and Voluntary
Cooperation and the Peace Corps' Office of Training and
Program Support cooperated in publishing A Guide to
AID/Peace Corps/PVO Collaborative Programming, which

details many more cases of this threefold partnership
around the developing world.

An analysis of collaboration among the three in the Guide
highlights several ingredients for success, including:

o

The field genesis of most projects; few were
dreamed-up in Washington.

o

Early agreement on Volunteer skills and timing.

o

Written agreements that clarify roles and

obligations.

Participation

evaluation.

by all parties in planning and

o

o

Free flow of information and documentation.

Ongoing coordinating committee to guide cooperation,
especially at crucial stages.

o

Spirit of cooperation and good will among all
parties.

Future cooperation should draw on these lessons and
generate new ones.

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