,

Form 990 Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax

Under section 501(c), 527, or 4947(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code (except black lung

Department of the Treasury benefit trust or private foundation)

Intemal Revenue ~ The ma have to use a of this return to

A For the 2004 calendar vear or tax vear beainnina Plea.. C Name of organization

u •• ,RS HUDSON INSTITUTE INC.

B~Ck If applICable
Addrss:s
r-- change
Name change
r--
lrunet tenrn
r--
FU'\81 ret .... n
f-- Amended
r-- return
Application
'-- pendmg 2004 and endin 09/30/2005

D Employer Identification number 13-1945157

10/01

,ab.'or prtnt or type

- ( "

Spaclflc f-'1:.0=1.:::5---"'1"'5'-'T:..oH!.....!S~T~RE=E""""T---"NW:..:..:.... ---1....::S~T,_,E"--6~0=0-l1-e-'t..:2=..:0:..:2=-::~ }2:2_,,3'r-....:7....:7:....7:...:0'T---. __

I" ~~lIng U Cash ~ Accrual

1 _I Olher_(sPoclfy) ~

Number and street (or PObox If maills not delivered to street address) Room/suite

E Telephone number

lnstruc- City or town, state or country, and ZIP + 4

uons WASHINGTON DC 20005

• Section 501 (c)(3) organizations and 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts must attach a completed Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) .

H and I are not applicable to section 527 orgamzatlons

H(a) Is this a group return for affiliates? D Ves [i] No

.::G:...._~W~e.::.bs:.:l=te:...._~::._..!WWW!.!!.!!...!. • .!;H~U~D~S!:!.O=N!..:.c.!0'4'R""G; ...,.-..------..--...,..---1 H(b) If "Ves," enter number of affiliates ~

J Organization type (check only one)~lx 1501(c)( 3 ). (Insert no) I 4947(a)(1) or 1 1527 H(c) Are all affiliates Included? II ;e~ D-N~

..... U (If "No," attach a list See Instructlol;sr'

K Check here ~ If the organization's gross receipts are normally not more than $25.000 The

H(d) Is trns a separate return filed by an II II

organization need not file a return with the IRS, but If the organization received a Form 990 Package orqamzancn covered bv a crouo ruhng? 1 L Ves I X I No

I Group Exemption Number ~

In the mall. It should file a return wrthout financial data Some states require a complete return.

M Check ~ U If the organization IS not required

L Gross receipts Add lines 6b. Bb, 9b, and lOb to line 12 ~ 9 896 485. to attach Sch 6 (Form 990. 990·EZ. or 990-PF)

Iimi D Revenue, Expenses, and Changes in Net Assets or Fund Balances (See page 18 of the mstrucnons.)

1 Contnbutrons. gifts. grants. and Similar amounts received

a Direct public support •.•••••

b Indirect public support •••.•.

c Government contributions (grants)

1a

5 322 532.

d Total (add hnes 1athrough 1c) (cash $ 5,334,068. noncash$ _

2 Program service revenue including government fees and contracts (from Part VII, line 93) •

3 Membership dues and assessments •••••••

4 Interest on savings and temporary cash Investments

11 536.
) 1d 5 334 068.
2 1 764 934.
3
4 23 725.
5 241 415. c 10 a b

1b

1c

• • 6c ) 7

d Net gain or (loss) (combine line 8c, columns (A) and (8». • . • • • • . . . • . . • . • . . . rS:..:d=t- ""8~9..L.:!0:..:5"_'4~.

9 Special events and activities (attach schedule) If any amount IS from gaming, check here ~·O·

a Gross revenue (not including $ of

contributions reported on hne 1 a). • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • Ir9:...;a=..III-- -i

5 Divrdends and Interest from secuntres

6 a Gross rents • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

b Less rental expenses .••••••••.•...•

c Net rental Income or (loss) (subtract line 6b from line 6a)

7 Other Investment Income (describe ~

S a Gross amount from sales of assets other (A) Secunlles (6) Other

than Inventory • ~~A:r~~~T. ~ ~ . . . . 1- __ ...:9:..:3=..4::...L...::.6=3..:..7...:..--t-"-S""a+- -=1:...L..:5::..;5::..:3::...L...::.0=2..=l...:. • .,

b Less cost or other baSIS and sales expenses. 967 266. Sb 1 431 338.

c Gain or (loss) (attach schedule) • • • • • • • -32 629. Sc 121 683.

: r6~r

6b

~
c::&
c:::lI
~
I.r.)
......-4
::z:
:::>
__,
0
W
Z
Z a.
:J
<t: c::
a.
0 >
a.
en II:: b Less direct expenses other than fundraismq expenses. • . • • • • • L.:9:..;b::.J.... ---l

Net Income or (loss) from special events (subtract line 9b from line 9a) h' I r9:..;c=t- _

Gross sales of Inventory, less returns and allowances •••••••• p.0a,,_"I-- -1

Less cost of goods sold •••••••••••••••••••••• hc:..:.O=.bl- -1

c Gross profit or (loss) from sales of Inventory (attach schedule) (subtract line 10b from line 10a) 1Oc
11 Other revenue (from Part VII, line 103) .... . . . . . . . . . . . 11 44 685.
12 Total revenue (add lines 1 d, 2 3, 4 5, 6c 7 8d 9c. 10c, and 11) • 12 7 497 88l.
13 Program services (from line 44, column (8)) .•••• 13 5 729 033.
VI 14 Management and general (from hne 44. column (C» • 14 1 325 246.
a.
VI
c:: 15 Funcrarsinq (from line 44. column (D) 15 107 01l.
8. .......
>< 16 Payments to afflhates (attach schedule) ••••••• 16
w
17 Total expenses (add lines 16 and 44. column (A)). 17 7 161 290.
.l!l 1S Excess or (deficrt) for the year (subtract line 17 from hne 12). . • •• • • • .• 1S 336 59l.
a. Net assets or fund balances at beginning of year (from line 73 cOlu~n~.GI;:~V~£?- 0
VI 19 19 10 481_,596.
VI
~ 20 20 590 649.
.. Other changes In net assets or fund balances (attach explanat pn) ••••• S:r~t .1. •• CIJ
a. Net assets or fund balances at end of year (combine hnes 18 -. 1o..II.Al.v. fi· ~ . j006. 0
z 21 21 11 408 836.
For Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notice, see the separate m b'tI tions. I U.! Form 990 (2004) Lb
JSA L - !:5
4E10 101000 OGDEN, UT
51283J 1394 V04-8 Form 990 (2004)

13-1945157

Page 2

,

'd'" Statement of

F . IE

All organizations must complete column (A) Columns (B), (C), and (D) are required for section 501(c)(3) and (4) organizations

unctiona xpenses and section 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts but optional for others (See page 22 of the Instructions)
Do not mclude amounts reported on tme (A) Total (8) Program (C) Management (D) Fundralslng
6b 8b 9b 10b or 16 of Part I services and qeneral
22 Grants and allocations (attach schedule) I
I
(cash $ NONE noncash $ NONE) 22 NONE NONE
23 Specific assistance to mdrviduals (attach schedule) 23
24 Benefits paid to or for members (attach schedule) 24
25 Compensation of officers, directors, etc 25 293 772. 196 684. 97 088.
26 Other salaries and wages . 26 2 960 930. 2 368 744. 510 439. 81 747.
27 Pension plan contnbutions 27
28 Other employee benefits 28 326 271. 261 017. 57 407. 7 847.
29 Payroll taxes ........ 29 256 072. 204 858. 45 527. 5 687.
30 Professional fund raising fees 30
31 Accounting fees . 31 53 800. 43 040. 10 760.
32 Legal fees 32 79 983. 63 986. 15 997.
33 Supplies ..... 33 47 770. 38 216. 9 44l. 113.
34 Telephone .... 34 88 015. 70 412. 17 417. 186.
35 Postage and shipping 35 25 003. 20 003. 4 839. 16l.
36 Occupancy . . . . . 36 522 225. 417 780 . 104 445.
37 EqUipment rental and maintenance. 37 29 88l. 23 905. 5 976.
38 Printing and pubhcations ...... 38 92 149. 73 719. 18 155. 275.
39 Travel ................. 39 262 344. 209 875. 48 926. 3 543.
40 Conferences, conventions, and meetings 40 354 220. 283 376. 70 844.
41 Interest .......... r t '1:3' 41
42 Deprecratron, depletion, etc (att~c ~ edule). 42 112 686. 90 149. 22 537.
43 Other expenses not covered above (Itemize) 8~My _2_ 43a 1 656 169. 1 363 269. 285 448. 7 452.
b 43b
--------------------------
c 43c
--------------------------
d -------------------------- 43d
e 43e
--------------------------
44 Total functional expenses (add lines 22 through 43)
Orgamzatlons COmpletl['!J columns (8)1D), carry 44
these totals to lines 13· 5. . . . . . . . . . . 7 161 290. 5 729 033. 1 325 246. 107 011.
Joint Costs. Check ~ U If you are followmq SOP 98-2. Are any JOint costs from a combmed educational campaign and fundrarsmq sohcrtauon reported In (8) Program services? ••••• ~ DYes [i] No

If "Yes," enter (i) the aggregate amount of these JOint costs $ , (II) the amount allocated to Program services $ _

(Iii) the amount allocated to Management and general $ , and (Iv) the amount allocated to Fundrarsmq $

1:F.1UIiI Statement of Program Service Accomplishments (See page 25 of the instructions.)

(Grants and allocations $

Program Service Expenses (Required for 501 (c)(3) and (4) orgs, and 4947(a)(1) trusts, but optional for others )

What IS the organization's primary exempt purpose? ~ __ S_T~ __ 3 _

All organizations must descnbe their exempt purpose achievements In a clear and concise manner State the number of clients served, publications Issued, etc Drscuss achievements that are not measurable (Section 501 (c)(3) and (4) organizations and 4947(a)(1) nonexempt charitable trusts must also enter the amount of grants and allocations to others)

a ~~_~ _

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ------ - ----- (G~a_;'ts- ~~d- ~11o~~tio_;,;$- - - -----------NONE)

5 729 033.

b

c

d

e Other program services (attach schedule) (Grants and allocations $ )

Total of Program Service Expenses (should eguailine 44, column (8), Program services) ~ 5,729,033.

JSA~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~----~~~~~~

4El020 1 000 Fonn 990 (2004)

51283J 1394

V04-8

/

/

13-1945157

,

'HiM! Balance Sheets (See page 25 of the Instructions)

Form 990 (2004)

Page 3

Note: Where required, attached schedules and amounts vattnn the descnpuon (AI (81
column should be for end-of-year amounts only Beginning of year End of year
45 Cash - non-mterest-beannq . . . . . . . . 235 316. 45 442 845 .
46 Savings and temporary cash Investments. 46

47a Accounts receivable .......... 47a 412 880
b Less allowance for doubtful accounts 47b NON 362 675. 47e 412 880.
48a Pledges receivable ........... 48a 72 086 -
b Less. allowance for doubtful accounts. 48b NON 97 596. 48e 72 086.
49 Grants receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . ... · .... . . .... 311 487. 49 1 275 000.
50 Receivables from officers, duectors.trustees. and key employees
(attach schedule) ............. · ... . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 50
51a Other notes and loans receivable (attach . 151a 1
en schedule) ................ - -
.. b Less allowance for doubtful accounts 51b 51e
III
en
en 52 lnventones for sale or use 52
< ........ . . . · ..........
53 Prepaid expenses and deferred charges. . . . · .......... 33 754. 53 38 166.
54 Investments - securities (attach schedule) .s1t:i':t' .5. ~D Cost Ii] FMV 10 841 709. 54 12 492 228.
55a Investments - land, bUildings, and
equipment baSIS ............. · .... 55a
b Less accumulated depreciation (attach ---
schedule) ................ 55b 55e
56 Investments - other (attach schedule) .. . . . . · .. . . . . . ... 56
57a Land, buildmqs, and equipment basis .. 57a 1 461 470.
b Less accumulated fjPreclatlon (attach .-
schedule) . ~T~~ ............. · .... 57b 664 306 1 514 431. 57e 797 164.
58 Other assets (describe ~ ) 58

59 Total assets (add lines 45 through 58) (must equal line 74). ........ 13 396 968. 59 15 530 369.
60 Accounts payable and accrued expenses 432 071. 60 1 220 105.
61 Grants payable ............................ 61
62 Deferred revenue. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 483 30l. 62 2 901 428.
en 63 Loans from officers, directors, trustees, and key employees (attach
III
:e schedule) ........................ 63
:c 64a Tax-exempt bond liabilities (attach schedule) ..... 64a
ell
:::J b Mortgages and other notes payable (attach schedule) 64b
. . . . ..
65 Other liabilities (describe ~ ) 65

66 Total liabilities (add lines 60 through 65) . ................. 2 915 372. 66 4 121 533.
Organizations that follow SFAS 117, check here ~ ~ and complete lines
67 through 69 and lines 73 and 74
en 67 Unrestricted ...... 9 781 000. 67 10 706 273.
III
u 68 Temporarily restricted 700 596. 68 702 563.
c ........
ell
iii 69 Permanently restricted ...................... 69
III Organizations that do not follow SFAS 117, check here ~ D and
'tI
e complete lines 70 through 74
::::I
u..
.. 70 Capital stock, trust principal, or current funds. . ............ 70
0
en 71 Paid-In or capital surplus, or land, butldmq, and equipment fund .... 71
..
III 72 Retained earnings, endowment, accumulated Income, or other funds. 72
en
en Total net assets or fund balances (add lines 67 through 69 or lines
< 73
.. 70 through 72,
III
z
column (A) must equal line 19; column (8) must equal line 21) ... .. 10 481 596. 73 11 408 836.
74 Total liabilities and net assets I fund balances (add lines 66 and 73) . 13 396 968. 74 15 530 369. Form 990 IS available for public inspection and, for some people, serves as the primary or sole source of Information about a particular organization How the public perceives an organization In such cases may be determined by the Information presented on ItS return Therefore, please make sure the return IS complete and accurate and fully describes, In Part III, the organization's programs and accomplishments

JSA

4El030 1 000

51283J 1394

V04-8

/

13-1945157

a revenue, gains, a

per audited financial statements , . ~f-=+-~'-'!..!"-"!..L.::!"",-,,'-'-I

b Amounts Included on line a but not on b Amounts Included on line a but not

line 12, Form 990 on line 17, Form 990.

(1) Net unrealized gains (1) Donated services

and use of facilities "'s _

(2) Pnor year adjustments

reported on line 20,

Form 990 •••.. .:,S _

(3) Losses reported on

line 20, Form 990 .:,S _

(4) Other (specify)

S

590,649.

on Investments (2) Donated services

and use of facilities .:,S _

(3) Recovenes of pnor

year grants . • (4) Other (specify)

S

_______ ~S _

Add amounts on lines (1) through (4) ~f-=-+------'=!<..L==-:...j

c tme a minus line b .

d Amounts Included on line 12, Form 990 but not on line a:

(1) Investment expenses

not Included on line

6b, Form 990 •.• "'S _

(2) Other (specify)

______ ~S _

Add amounts on lines (1) through (4).

t-=+-....!....L2!.~....._,:<..><.=....:., C Line a minus line b .

d Amounts Included on line 17,

Form 990 but not on hne a:

(1) Investment expenses

not Included on line

6b, Form 990 •.. "'S _

(2) Other (specify)

______ "'-S _

Add amounts on lines (1) and (2) .

______ "'-S _

Add amounts on lines (1) and (2) .

e

the Instructions)
(6) Title and average (C) Compensation (0) Conlnbutlons to (E) Expense
(A) Name and address hours per week (If not paid, enter employee benefit plans 80 account and other
devoted to oosnion -0. ) deferred compensation allowances

SEE STATEMENT 6 485 439. 23 018. NON 75 Old any officer, director, trustee, or key employee receive aggregate compensation of more than $100,000 from your orqaruzatron and all related orqarnzatrons, of which more than $10,000 was provided by the related organizations?

If "Yes," attach schedule- see page 28 of the Instructions

E

~ DYes

[i] No

JSA

4E1040 1 000

51283J 1394

V04-8

Form 990 (2004)

Form 990 (2004)

13-1945157

N/A
83a X
83b X
84a N/~
84b N/ ~
85a N/~
85b N/~ l:F.TiillYJI Other Information (See page 28 of the mstructions.)

• 76 Old the organization engage In any activity not previously reported to the IRS? If "Yes," attach a detailed descnptron of each activity

Were any changes made In the organizing or governing documents but not reported to the IRS? • • • .. .•

If "Yes," attach a conformed copy of the changes

78 a Old the organization have unrelated business gross Income of $1,000 or more dunng the year covered by this return?

b If "Yes," has l!filed a tax return on Form 990- T for this year? • • • • • • •• • •••••••...••••••••

77

79 Was there a liquidation, dissolution, termination, or substantial contraction dunng the year? If "Yes," attach a statement 80 a Is the organization related (other than by association With a statewide or nationwide orqarnzanon) through common

membership, governing bodies, trustees, officers, etc, to any other exempt or nonexempt orqarnzation? .••.•.•

b If "Yes," enter the name of the orgamzatlon~ HUDSON ANALYTICAL SERVICES INC.

________________ and check whether It IS U exempt or ~ nonexempt

81 a Enter direct and indirect political expenditures See line 81 Instructions •••••••••••••••• "1~8.!1!!a.JI .!:N~O:!!N~E

b Old the organization file Form 1120-POL for this year? •••••••••.••.••••••••••••••.

82 a Old the organization receive donated services or the use of matenals, equipment, or facilities at no charge or at substantially less than fair rental value? ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

b If "Yes," you may Indicate the value of these Items here Do not Include this amount as revenue In Part I or as an expense In Part II (See Instructions In Part III) ••.••

83a Old the organization comply With the public Inspection requirements for returns and exemption apphcanons? b Old the organization comply With the disclosure requirements relating to quid pro quo contnbunons? .•

84 a Old the organization solicit any contnbutrons or gifts that were not tax deductible? •••••••••••

b If "Yes," did the organization Include With every solicitation an express statement that such contnbuuons

or gifts were not tax deductible? • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • •• •••••••

85 501 (c) (4), (5), or (6) orqenizeucns a Were substantially all dues nondeductible by members? •.••••

b Old the organization make only In-house lobbying expenditures of $2,000 or less? ••••••••••

If "Yes" was answered to either 85a or 85b, do not complete 85c through 85h below unless the orqarnzanon received a waiver for proxy tax owed for the pnor year

c Dues, assessments, and Similar amounts from members. • •••••••

d Section 162(e) lobbymq and political expenditures ••..••••.•

e Aggregate nondeductible amount of section 6033(e)(1 )(A) dues notices •• t Taxable amount of lobbYing and political expenditures (line 85d less 85e)

g Does the organization elect to pay the section 6033( e) tax on the amount on line 85f? h If section 6033(e)(1 )(A) dues notices were sent, does the organization agree to add the amount on line 85f to ItS reasonable

Page 5
Yes No
76 X
77 X
78a X
78b NJ~
79 X 80a

X

X

81b

X

82a

85c N/A
85d N/A
85e N/A
85t N/A
. . . . . . . . .. . . 85g N/A. estimate of dues allocable to nondeductible lobbymq and political expenditures for the following tax year? .•

86 501 (c) (7) orgs Enter a Initiation fees and capital contnbutrons Included on line 12 • ~8=-6=-a=+ .!:N~I/c.;.A~_----I

N/A

b Gross receipts, Included on line 12, for public use of club Iacilmes ••••• 87 501(c)(12) orgs Enter a Gross Income from members or shareholders ••• b Gross Income from other sources (Do not net amounts due or paid to other sources against amounts due or received from them) •••••••••••

N/A

86b

87a

N/A

87b

and enter the amount of tax-exempt Interest received or accrued dunng the tax year

85h

N/~_

88

X

89b

X

~ ____.N"-'O~N=E

~ NONE

Form 990 (2004)

JSA

4El041 1000

51283J 1394

V04-8

Form 990 (2004) 13-1945157 Paqe 6
. III Analysis of lncome-Produclnq Activities (See page 33 of the instructions.)
Note: Enter gross amounts unless otherwise Unrelated business Income Excluded by sec lion 512. 513, or514 (E)
indicated (A) (8) (C) (0) Related or
BUSiness code Amount Exclusion code Amount exempt function
93 Program service revenue Income
a INDEPENDENT
b RESEARCH 583 840.
c
d
e
f MedlcarelMedlcald payments • . . . . . . .
9 Fees and contracts from government agencies. 1 181 094.
94 Membership dues and assessments ••
95 Interest on saVings and temporary cash Investments 14 23 725.
96 DIVidends and Interest from secunties • • 14 241 415.
97 Net rental Income or (loss) from real estate
a debt-financed property .......
b not debt-financed property .....
98 Nel renlal mcome or (loss) from personal property
99 Other Investment Income • • • • • •
100 Gain or (loss) from sales of assets other than Inventory 18 89 054.
101 Net Income or (loss) from special events
102 Gross profit or (loss) from sales of Inventory .
103 Other revenue a
b ROYALTY 15 1 856.
c RECOVERY OF
d RECEIVABLE 34 333.
e MISCELLANEOUS 8 496.
104 Subtotal (add columns (B), (D), and (E)) • 356 050. 1 807 763. 105 Total (add line 104, columns (B), (D), and (E) •••••••••••• Note' Lme 105 plus Ime 1d, Part I, should equal the amount on hne 12, Part I

2,163,813.

l:l:Tiill'JIII Relationship of Activities to the Accomplishment of Exempt Purposes (See page 34 of the mstructions.)
Line No. Explain how each activity for which Income IS reported In column (E) of Part VII contributed Importantly to the accomplishment
T of the organization's exempt purposes (other than by providmq funds for such purposes)
STMT 7



1:l:Tilt:. Information Regarding Taxable Subsidiaries and Disregarded Entities (See page 34 of the instructions.)
(A) (8) (C) (0) (EJ
Name, address, and EIN of corporation, Percentage of Nature of actrvmes Total Income End-o -~ear
cartnershro. or disreuarded enntv cwnersmp Interest asses
STMT 8 % NONE NONE
%
%
%
1:.Emi.:. Information Regarding Transfers Associated with Personal Benefit Contracts (See page 34 of the Instructions)
(a) Old the organization, dunng the year, receive any funds, directly or Indirectly, to pay premiums on a personal benefit contract? • • • • • • • t:J Yes tiJ No
(b) Old the organization, durmq the year, pay premiums, directly or Indirectly, on a personal benefit contract? Yes No Note: If "Yes" to (b), tue Form 8870 and Form 4720 (see instrucuons)

Under penalties of penury, I declare that I have examined trus return. including accompanying schedules and statements, and to the best of my knowledge and belief, It IS true, correct, and co plete De iaranon of preparer (other than officer) IS based on ali Information of which preparer has any knowledge

Paid Preparer's Use Only

Please Sign Here

Preoarers SSN or PTIN (See Gen InSI W)

Firm's name (or u If self-employed), address, and ZIP + 4

34-6565596

INDIANAPOLIS

IN

317-280-3400

JSA

4E1050 1000

Form 990 (2004)

51283J 1394

V04-8

Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service

Organization Exempt Under Section 501(c)(3)

(Except Private Foundation) and Section 501(e). 501(f). 501(k). 501(n). or Section 4947(a)(1) Nonexempt Chantable Trust Supplementary Information· (See separate instructions.)

~ MUST be com leted b the above or anizations and attached to their Form 990 or 990·EZ

OMS No 1545·0047

Name of the organization

~@04

SCHEDULE A (Form 990 or 990·EZ)

Employer Identification number

HUDSON INSTITUTE INC. 13-1945157

Compensation of the Five Highest Paid Employees Other Than Officers, Directors, and Trustees (See page 1 of the instructions. List each one If there are none. enter "None.")

(a) Name and address of each employee paid more (b) Title and average (d) Contributions to (e) Expense
hours per week (c) Compensation em ployee benefit plans & accou nt and other
than $50,000 devoted to position deferred compensation allowances
~~9~_~~_~~~ __________________ SENIOR FELLOW
1015 18TH STREET, N.W
WASHINGTON DC 20036 40 HRS/WK 180 456. 10 500. NON
~J~~~_~9~9~~~~ __________________ SENIOR FELLOW
1015 18TH STREET, N.W
WASHINGTON DC 20036 40 HRS/WK 185 001. 14 800. NO
~J~~~~_~~~~ ____________________ SENIOR FELLOW
1015 18TH STREET, N.W
WASHINGTON DC 20036 40 HRS/WK 167 731. 13 418. NON
~J~~~~_~~~~ __________________ SENIOR FELLOW
1015 18TH STREET, N.W
WASHINGTON DC 20036 40 HRS/WK 185 001. 1 850. NO
~~-~~Q~~~-~~~g~~----------------- SENIOR FELLOW
1015 18TH STREET, N.W
WASHINGTON DC 20036 40 HRS/WK 175 001. 11 064. NONE
Total number of other employees paid over
$50,000 . . . . ............. . . . . .~ 30
1:F.Ti111 Compensation of .the Fi'~e Highest Paid Independent Contractors for Professional Services E

NE

E

NE

(See page 2 of the Instructions. List each one (whether Individuals or firms). If there are none. enter "None.")

(a) Name and address of each Independent contractor paid more than $50,000 (b) Type of service (c) Compensation
~~~-~~-~~-----------------------------------
4226 BRANDYWINE ST NW WSHTN DC 20016 CONSULTING 55 000.
~~~~~-~~~~y§~~~---------------------------------
1111 PARK AVENUE NEW YORK NY 10128 CONSULTING 55 814.
~~~~~~_J~_~9~P9~J_J~~~_~~ ______________________
10 WEST STREET; NEW YORK NEW YORK 10004 CONSULTING 191 667.

------------------------------------------------
** SEE STATEMENT 12
------------------------------------------------
Total number of others receiving over $50,000 fori
professronal services .~ NONE For Paperwork Reduction Act Notice. see the Instructions for Form 990 and Form 990·EZ. JSA

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990·EZ) 2004

4E1210 1 000

51283J 1394

V04-8

Page 2

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

13-1945157

Statements About Activities (Seepag_e 2 of the instructions_)

Yes No

1 DUring the year, has the organization attempted to Influence national, state, or local legislation, including any attempt to Influence public opinion on a legislative matter or referendum? If "Yes," enter the total expenses paid

or Incurred In connection With the lobbYing activities ~ $ (Must equal amounts on line 38,

Part VI-A, or line I of Part VI-B) , , _ , , __ , __ , __ , " " ,_" _ , , "

Organizations that made an election under section 501 (h) by filing Form 5768 must complete Part VI-A Other organizations checking ''Yes,'' must complete Part VI-B AND attach a statement giving a detailed descnption of the lobbYing activities

2 DUring the year, has the organization, either directly or indirectly, engaged In any of the followmq acts With any substantial contributors, trustees, directors, officers, creators, key employees, or members of their families, or With any taxable organization With which any such person IS affiliated as an officer, director, trustee, majority owner, or pnncipal beneficiary? (If the answer to any question IS 'Yes," attach a detailed statement explammg the transactions)

Sale, exchange, or leasmq of property? , ,

_ _ 1--1'--1--_i--=-X:__

, _ , _ _ _ , , _ , _ _ , , _ _ , , _ _ , _ _ , _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _, " ,_ r-=2.::.a-+-_-+-..::;X:__

a

Lending of money or other extension of credit? ,

b

x

2b

,S,Ttof'l' , ~

Furnishing of goods, services, or facilities? __ ,

x

2c

c

d Payment of compensation (or payment or reimbursement of expenses If more than $1 ,OOO)? _ ,FP~, 9_9.0. ,~AA!l', V. _

x

2d

e Transfer of any part of ItS Income or assets? , , , , , " ,,' __ , _ _ _ , _ _ _ _ 2e X

3a Do you make grants for scholarships, fellowships, student loans, etc? (If ''Yes,'' attach an explanation of how

you determine that recrpients qualify to receive payments) , _ , Do you have a section 403(b) annuity plan for your employees? ,

_ S, Tt1'l' , 1, 0_

X

3a

b

X

3b

4a Old you maintain any separate account for participating donors where donors have the nght to provide advice

on the use or distnbunon of funds? , " "_, _ , _ , , _ , " ,_" _ _ _ _ _ _ ,

b Do YOU provide credit counsehnq, debt manaqement, credit repair, or debt necotration services? _ , , __ , _

X

4a

X

4b

':mIN

Reason for Non-Private Foundation Status (See pages 3 through 6 of the instructlons.)

The or aruzatron IS not a private foundation because It IS (Please check only ONE applicable box)

5 A church, convention of churches, or association of churches Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(I)

6 A school Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(II) (Also complete Part V)

A hospital or a cooperative hospital service orqaruzanon Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(III) A Federal, state, or local government or governmental Unit Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(v)

7 8 9

A medical research organization operated In conjunction With a hospital Section 170(b)(1)(A)(III) Enter the hospital's name, City,

and state ~ _

10 D An organization operated for the benefit of a college or urnversity owned or operated by a governmental unit Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(lv) (Also complete the Support Schedule In Part IV-A)

11 a [i] An organization that normally receives a substantial part of ItS support from a governmental unit or from the general public Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(vl) (Also complete the Support Schedule In Part IV-A)

11 b D A community trust Section 170(b)(1 )(A)(vl) (Also complete the Support Schedule In Part IV-A)

12 D An organization that normally receives (1) more than 331/3% of ItS support from contnbunons, membership fees, and gross receipts from activities related to ItS charitable, etc, functions - subject to certain exceptions, and (2) no more than 33 1/3% of ItS support from gross Investment Income and unrelated business taxable Income (less section 511 tax) from businesses acquired by the organization after June 30, 1975 See section 50g(a)(2) (Also complete the Support Schedule In Part IV-A)

13 D An orqamzauon that IS not controlled by any disqualified persons (other than foundation managers) and supports organizations described In (1) lines 5 through 12 above, or (2) section 501 (c)(4), (5), or (6), If they meet the test of section 509(a)(2) (See

section 509(a)(3) )

Provide the Iollowmq Information about the supported oroaruzatrons (See oace 5 of the mstructrons )

(b) Line number from above

(a) Name(s) of supported orgaruzanorus)

14

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

51283J 1394

V04-8

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004 13-1945157

Page 3

IQftiIWsupport Schedule (Complete only If you checked a box on line 10, 11, or 12) Use cash method of accounting. , Note: You may use the worksheet In the mstructtons for converting from the accrual to the cash method of accounting

Calendar year (or fiscal year beginning in) • (a)2003 (b) 2002 (c) 2001 (d) 2000 _(e) Total
15 Grfts, grants, and contributions received (Do
not Include unusual grants See line 28 ) .. · . 6 291 896. 8 126 784. 5 620 649. 6 416 250. 26 455 579.
16 Membership fees received ..•...... · . NONE NONE NONE NONE NON
17 Gross receipts from adrrussrons, merchandise
sold or services performed, or furnishing of
facilities In any activity that IS related to the
organization's charitable, etc, purpose •••• 2 267 725. 943 568. 1 170 953. 977 333. 5 359 579.
18 Gross Income from Interest, dividends,
amounts received from payments on securities
loans (section 512(a)(5», rents, royalties, and
unrelated busmess taxable Income (less
section 511 taxes) from businesses acquired
by the organization after June 30, 1975 ... · . 240 198. 315 237. 362 907. 565 460. 1 483 802.
19 Net Income from unrelated business
activities not Included In line 18 ....... · . NONE NONE NONE 9 250. 9 250.
20 Tax revenues levied for the organization's
benefit and either paid to It or expended on
ItS behalf .................. · .
21 The value of services or Iacihues furnished to
the organization by a governmental unit
without charge Do not Include the value of
services or Iacrlmes generally furnished to the
public without charge . • . . • • • • • • • • · .
22 Other Income Attach a schedule Do not
Include gain or (loss) from sale of capital assets
23 Total of lines 15 through 22 8 799 819. 9 385 589. 7 154 509. 7 968 293. 33 308 210.
24 Line 23 minus line 17 ........... 6 532 094. 8 442 021. 5 983 556. 6 990 960. 27 948 631.
25 Enter 1 % of line 23 ............ 87 998. 93 856. 71 545. 79 683.
26 Organizations descnbed on lines 10 or 11: a Enter 2% of amount In column (e), line 24 . . . . . . . . . . ... .. ~ 26a 558 973.
b Prepare a list for your records to show the name of and amount contributed by each person (other than a
governmental unit or publicly supported organization) whose total gifts for 2000 through 2003 exceeded the
amount shown In line 26a Do not file thiS list with your return. Enter the total of all these excess amounts ~ 26b 5 462 240.
c Total support for section 509(a)(1) test Enter line 24, column (e) . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . ........... ~ 26c 27948631.
d Add Amounts from column (e) for lines 18 1,483,802. 19 9,250.
22 26b 5,462,240. ~ 26d 6 955 292.
e Public support (line 26c minus line 26d total) · ........... . . . · . ... .~ 26e 20993339.
f Public support percentage (hne 26e (numerator) divided by line 26c (denominator)) .~ 26f 75.1140 %
" E

27 Organizations descnbed on line 12: a For amounts Included In lines 15, 16, and 17 that were received from a disqualified person," prepare a hst for your records to show the name of, and total amounts received In each year from, each "disqualified person" Do not file this list with your return. Enter the sum of such amounts for each year

(2003) (2002) (2001) li.9_T _ _p...?..?_L_Ij::~_Lj: __ (2000) _

b For any amount Included In line 17 that was received from each person (other than "disqualified persons"), prepare a list for your records to show the name of, and amount received for each year, that was more than the larger of (1) the amount on line 25 for the year or (2) $5,000 (Include In the list orqaruzanons described In lines 5 through 11, as well as individuals) Do not file this list with your return. After computing the difference between the amount received and the larger amount described In (1) or (2), enter the sum of these differences (the excess amounts) for each year

(2003) (2002) (2001) (2000) _

c Add Amounts from column (e) for lines 15 ~

1 6 ~ ~ _

17 20 21 ~ 27c
d Add Line 27a total and line 27b total •. ~ 27d
..
e Public support (line 27c total minus line 27d total) ........ . . . · .. . . : ~"2'7; " ~ 27e
f Total support for section 50g(a)(2) test Enter amount from line 23, column (e) .. ..
g Public support percentage (line 27e (numerator) divided by line 27f (denominator)) .. ~ 27a %
h Investment Income narcentaae (line 18 column (e) (numerator) divided bv line 27f (denornmatorn . .. ~ 27h % 28 Unusual Grants: For an organization described In line 10, 11, or 12 that received any unusual grants dunnq 2000 through 2003, prepare a list for your records to show, for each year, the name of the contributor, the date and amount of the grant, and a brief descnption of the nature of the grant Do not file this list with your return. Do not Include these grants In line 15

Schedule A (Fonn 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

JSA

4E1221 1000

51283J 1394

V04-8

13-1945157

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

Imri Private School Questionnaire (See page 7 of the instructions.)

(To be completed ONLY by schools that checked the box on line 6 in Part IV)

NOT APPLICABLE

Page 4

29 Does the organization have a racially nondiscriminatory policy toward students by statement In ItS charter, bylaws, Yes No

other governing Instrument, or In a resolution of ItS governing body? f---=2:..::9-+-_-+- __

30 Does the organization Include a statement of ItS racially nondiscriminatory policy toward students In all ItS

brochures, catalogues, and other written communications with the public dealing with student admissions,

programs, and scholarships? . f---"3_;_0-+-_-+- __

31 Has the organization publicized ItS racially nondiscriminatory policy through newspaper or broadcast media dunng

the penod of solicitation for students, or dunng the registration penod If It has no solicitation program, In a way that makes the policy known to all parts of the general community It serves? .

If "Yes," please descnbe, If "No," please explain (If you need more space, attach a separate statement)

32 Does the organization maintain the following:

a Records Indicating the racial composition of the student body, faculty, and administrative staff? . 1-'3::..:2:..:a=+-_+-_

b Records documenting that scholarships and other financial assistance are awarded on a racially nondiscriminatory

bass? 1-'3::..:2::..:b=-t-_-t-_

C Copies of all catalogues, brochures, announcements, and other wntten communications to the public dealing

With student admissions, programs, and scholarships? . 1-'3:.;2=.;c=+-_-+- __

d Copies of all matenal used by the organization or on ItS behalf to solicit contnbunons? . 1-'3::..:2:..:d=+-_-+- __

If you answered "No" to any of the above, please explain (If you need more space, attach a separate statement.)

33 Does the organization discnmmate by race In any way With respect to'

a Students' nghts or pnvileqes?

31

33a

b Admissions pohcres?

C Employment of faculty or administrative staff?

33b

33c

d Scholarships or other financial assistance?

33d

e Educational pohcres?

33e

f Use of facilities?

33f

9 Athlenc programs?

33a

h Other extracurncular activities?

33h

If you answered "Yes" to any of the above, please explain. (If you need more space, attach a separate statement)

34 a Does the organization receive any financial aid or assistance from a governmental agency? .

34a

b Has the organization's right to such aid ever been revoked or suspended?

If you answered "Yes" to either 34a or b, please explain uSing an attached statement

34b

35 Does the organization certify that It has complied With the applicable requirements of sections 4.01 through 405

of Rev Proc 75-50 1975-2 C.B 587 covenng racial nondiscrimination? If "No" attach an explanation 35

51283J 1394

V04-B

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

JSA

4E1230 1 000

ScheduleA Form 990 or 990-EZ 2004 13-1945157 Pa e 5

Lobbying Expenditures by Electing Public Charities (See page 9 of the instructions)

(To be completed ONLY by an eligible organization that filed Form 5768) NOT APPLICABLE

Check ~ a I Ilf the orqamzatron belongs to an affiliated group Check ~ b I Ilf you checked "an and "limited control" provisions apply

Limits on Lobbying Expenditures (a) (b)
Affiliated group To be completed
totals for ALL electing
(The term "expenditures" means amounts paid or incurred) organizations
36 Total lobbying expenditures to Influence public opinion (grassroots lobbYing) . 36
37 Total lobbyinq expenditures to Influence a legislative body (direct lobbymq) 37
38 Total lobbying expenditures (add lines 36 and 37) ..... 38
39 Other exempt purpose expenditures ..................... 39
40 Total exempt purpose expenditures (add lines 38 and 39) 40
.........
41 l.obbymq nontaxable amount. Enter the amount from the following table -
If the amount on line 40 is • The lobbying nontaxable amount la-
Not over $500,000 ....... • • • • • 20% of the amount on ,,",., • • • • • • • • • }
Over $500,000 but not over $1,000,000 $100,000 plus 15% of the excess over $500,000
Over $1,000,000 but not over $1,500,000 •. $175,000 plus 10% of the excess over $1,000,000 41
Over $1,500,000 but not over $17,000,000 •. $225,000 plus 5% of the excess over $1,500,000
Over $17,000,000 •..•...••••• $1,000,000 •••...•.••.••.••
42 Grassroots nontaxable amount (enter 25% of line 41) ......... .. 42
43 Subtract line 42 from line 36 Enter -0- If line 42 IS more than line 36 ....... 43
44 Subtract line 41 from line 38 Enter -0- If line 41 IS more than line 38 ....... 44

Caution: If there IS an amount on either une 43 or line 44, you must file Form 4720 4-Year Averaging Period Under Section S01(h)

(Some organizations that made a section 501 (h) election do not have to complete all of the five columns below

See the Instructions for lines 45 through 50 on page 11 of the instructions)
Lobbying Expenditures During 4-Year Averaging Period
Calendar year (or fiscal (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)
ye!lr. beginnlng!n) ~ 2004 2003 2002 2001 Total
l.obbymq nontaxable
45 amClLint .......
l.obbyrng ceiling amount
46 (150% of line 45(e))
4 7 Total lobbymg' .. n"nrlrt'''''~
Grassroots nontaxable
48 amount " .......
Grassroots ceiling amount
49 (150% of line ~(ell ..
Grassroots lobbYing
50 expenditures .... . .
.0001II.·J~:. Lobbying Activity by Nonelecting Public Charities NOT APPLICABLE b Paid staff or management (Include compensation In expenses reported on lines c through h.)

c Media advertisements .

d Mailings to members, legislators, or the public .

e Publications, or published or broadcast statements .

f Grants to other organizations for lobbYing purposes .

g Direct contact with legislators, their staffs, government officials, or a legislative body 1----11-----1--------

h Rallies, demonstrations, seminars, conventions, speeches, lectures, or any other means .

Total lobbymq expenditures (Add lines c through h) .

DUring the year, did the organization attempt to Influence national, state or local legislation, Including any attempt to Influence public opinion on a legislative matter or referendum, through the use of

a Volunteers

If "Yes" to any of the above, also attach a statement giving a detailed deSCription of the lobbying activities

e 11 of the Instructions.

Amount

Yes No

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

JSA

4E1240 1 000

51283J 1394

V04-8

Form 990 or 990-EZ 2004 13-1945157

Pa e 6

Information Regarding Transfers To and Transactions and Relationships With Noncharitable Exempt Organizations (See page 11 of the mstructions.)

51 Did the reporting organization directly or Indirectly engage In any of the following with any other organization descnbed In section 501 (c) of the Code (other than section 501 (c)(3) organizations) or In section 527, relating to political organizations?

a Transfers from the reporting organization to a nonchantable exempt organization of

(i) Cash .

(ii) Other assets .

b Other transactions

(i) Sales or exchanges of assets with a noncharitable exempt organization. (ii) Purchases of assets from a nonchantable exempt organization.

(iii) Rental of facihtles. equipment, or other assets.

(iv) Reimbursement arrangements .

(v) Loans or loan guarantees .

(vi) Performance of services or membership or fund raising sohcnatons

c Shanng of facihtres, equipment, mailing lists, other assets, or paid employees.

d If the answer to any of the above IS "Yes," complete the followinq schedule Column (b) should always show the fair market value of the goods, other assets, or services given by the reporting orqarnzatron If the orqaruzatron received less than fair market value In any transaction or sharing arrangement show In column (d) the value of the goods other assets or services received

Yes No
51 a( i) X
alii) X
b(i) X
b(ii) X
b(iii) X
bCiv) X
b(v) X
b(vi) X
c X (a) (b) (e) (d)
Line no Amount Involved Name of non charitable exempt orqamzauon Oescnptron of transfers. transactions. and shanng arrangements

N/A 52a Is the organization directly or indirectly affiliated With, or related to, one or more tax-exempt organizations

descnbed In section 501 (c) of the Code (other than section 501 (c)(3)) or In section 527? . . . . . . . . .. ~ DYes [i] No

b If "Yes" complete the follOWing schedule
(a) (b) (c)
Name of organization Type of orqamzatron Descnpuon of relationship

N/A JSA

4E1250 1 000

Schedule A (Form 990 or 990-EZ) 2004

51283J 1394

V04-8

HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

FORM 990, PART I - OTHER INCREASES IN FUND BALANCES

---------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------

DESCRIPTION

NET CHANGE IN UNREALIZED GAIN/(LOSS) ON INVESTMENTS

TOTAL

51283J 1394

V04-8

13-1945157

AMOUNT

590,649.

590,649.

------------

------------

STATEMENT 1

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til fII o U,:Q,:QUE-t O,:Q HUl:l: E-t HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

13-1945157

FORM 990, PART III - ORGANIZATION'S PRIMARY EXEMPT PURPOSE

----------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------

THE PRIMARY EXEMPT PURPOSE OF THE HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC. IS TO RESEARCH NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL ISSUES FOR EDUCATION OF THE PUBLIC.

STATEMENT 3

51283J 1394

V04-8

HUDSON

INSTITUTE

PROGRAMS AND SCHOLARS

2005

1015 15TH STREET, N.W. SIXTH FLOOR WASHINGTON, D.C. 20005 202.974.2400 MAIN 202.974.2410 FAX WWW.HUDSON.ORG

STATEMENT 4

,

ABOUT HUDSON INSTITUTE

Hudson Institute is a nonpartisan policy research organization dedicated to innovative research and analysis that promotes global security, prosperity, and freedom. We challenge conventional thinking and help manage strategic transitions to the future through interdisciplinary and collaborative studies in defense, international relations, economics, culture, science, technology, and law. Through publications, conferences, and policy recommendations, we seek to guide global leaders in government and business.

Since our founding in 1961 by the brilliant futurist Herman Kahn, Hudson's perspective has been uniquely future-oriented and guardedly optimistic. Our research has stood the test of time in a world dramatically transformed by the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of China, and the advent of radicalism within Islam. Because Hudson sees the complexities within societies, we focus on the often overlooked interplay among culture, demography, technology, markets, and political leadership.

Our broad-based approach has, for decades, allowed us to present well-timed recommendations to leaders in government and business. Thus, in the I 970s, Hudson's scholars helped tum the world away from the no-growth policies of the Club of Rome; in the early 1 990s, we helped the newly liberated Baltic nations become booming market economies; at home in the mid-l 990s, we helped write the pioneering Wisconsin welfare reform law that became the model for successful national welfare reform. Today, we are developing programs for political and economic reform across the Muslim world, as well as approaches to the growing strategic and economic challenges posed by the Asian world, most notably China and India.

Our current research agenda includes:

~ the War on Terror and the future of Islam ~ the rise of Asia and U.S.-Asia relations

~ human rights in Asia and Africa

~ civil justice reform and judicial policy ~ agricultural and biotechnology policy ~ civil society and global philanthropy

~ market reforms and the 21 51_century welfare state ~ Latin American studies

Hudson scholars regularly consult with policymakers in London, Tokyo, Paris, Berlin and other international capitals. They frequently appear on major media such as ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox News Channel, CNN, BBC, France 2, and NHK; and they contribute to Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Weekly Standard, The Sunday Times (London), The Wall Street Journal, Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo), Le Figaro (Paris) and The New Republic.

Hudson Institute is a registered 501c3 nonprofit organization. Our work is made possible through the tax-deductible contributions of our supporters, including individuals, foundations, and corporations. In addition to helping Hudson Institute continue its important work, donors receive institute publications, updates on our research, and invitations to special Hudson events.

Hudson Institute's Leadership

WALTERP. STERN

Chairman

Walter Stem is chairman of Hudson Institute. He is also vice president of The Washington Institute for Near East Policy; vice chairman and a director of Capital International, Inc., a large investment management firm; and chairman emeritus of two global funds, the New Perspective Fund and the Emerging Markets Growth Fund. A Chartered Financial Analyst, Stem is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a director and advisory board member of the The American Committee on Foreign Relations, a member of the Board ofYisitors of the Monterey Institute and a member of the CFA Center Advisory Council. He is also former chairman of the Institute for Chartered Financial Analysts and the Financial Analysts Federation and former member of the Board of Directors of Temple-Inland, Inc. Prior to joining Capital in 1973, he was a senior executive vice president and director of Drexel Burnham & Co. in New York, where he was responsible for research, institutional sales and investment management. Currently he is responsible for following financial and political developments in New York and worldwide. Stem received a bachelor's degree (Phi Beta Kappa) from Williams College and an MBA, with distinction, from Harvard University.

HERBERT I. LONDON

President

Herbert London became president of Hudson Institute on September I, 1997. He has been a member of the Hudson Institute Board of Trustees since 1974 and has been a senior fellow for more than thirty years, founding Hudson's Center for Education and Employment Policy. He is the former John M. Olin University Professor of Humanities at New York University, responsible for the creation in 1972 of the Gallatin School, where he served as dean until 1992. London graduated from Columbia University in 1960 and received his Ph.D. from New York University in 1966. He is a tenured professor of social studies at New York University.

KENNETH R. WEINSTEIN

Chief Executive Officer

Kenneth Weinstein is chief executive officer of Hudson Institute. He oversees the institute's research, project management, external affairs, marketing, and government relations efforts. A political theorist by training who has taught at Claremont McKenna College and Georgetown University, Weinstein has written on policy areas ranging from European and Middle Eastern politics to labor and education policy and the future of Japan. He graduated from the University of Chicago (B.A. in General Studies in the Humanities), the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (D.E.A. in Soviet and Eastern European Studies), and Harvard University (Ph.D. in Political Science).

,

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

Hudson research in global affairs is conducted in six main areas: future security strategies; Islam, democracy, and the future of the Muslim world; Middle East policy; Latin American studies; U.S.-E.U. relations; and the rise of Asia and U.S.-Asia relations. Four senior fellows, S. Enders Wimbush, Hillel Fradkin, Meyrav Wunnser, and Jaime Daremblum, direct research centers that oversee multiple projects. Other fellows-James Clad, Mary Fitzgerald, Charles Homer, Laurent Murawiec, William adorn, and Max Singer-work on miscellaneous projects reflecting their backgrounds and sense of issues of critical importance in global affairs today.

HUDSON INSTITUTE

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

S. ENDERS WIMBUSH Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR FUTURE SECURITY STRATEGIES

The Center for Future Security Strategies seeks to explore evolving, emerging and imaginable international security environments and to assess the implications of possible alternative futures for security strategies. Its director S. Enders Wimbush brings to his research ten years of experience in the private sector analyzing future security environments for government and corporate clients and three decades of experience consulting for the Office of Net Assessment of the Secretary of Defense.

Using a variety of innovative tools and techniques, the center aims to identify trends, attitudes, ideas, and other forces that will contribute to the shape of the future, going far beyond forecasts that simply project visible trends. It seeks to analyze critical variables that might alter the trajectory of influences and events and to consider the potential impact of powerful nonlinear forces, or wildcards, that might radically alter outcomes. Ultimately, the center seeks to understand the dynamics that could influence actors' formulation of strategies for dealing with the future; to characterize those strategies; to explore where and how strategies of different actors could intersect, converge, or collide; and to identify challenges and opportunities that could

result from these interactions.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Pakistan Futures. This project, through a series of workshops and commissioned papers, examines alternative futures for Pakistan by examining possible emerging pathways and the forces that influence them, and by identifying areas of uncertainty and wildcards.

Asia 2030. This project, through a series of workshops, considers strategic movement in Asia over the next several decades that could influence defense and military planning. The project features two teams of researchers and strategists, one from the United States and one from India. Its deliverable is a scenario-based net assessment report.

Nuclear Futures V. This project is the fifth in a series of workshops that examine the nature of security competition around the year 2030. This project revolves around a new understanding of the uses of nuclear weapons (such as new nuclear reactors with small arsenals) and of nuclear asymmetries, which might alter the way actors build nuclear weapons into doctrines of deterrence and/or use. The project will feature a workshop in Paris with American, French, and British participants.

Radical Islam: A Net Assessment. This is ajoint project with Hudson's Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World. It involves a comparative analysis of military, technical, political, economic, and other factors governing the current and prospective competitive capabilities of radical/Islamic groups and the United States. The net assessment portion of the project will focus on deep-rooted values that influence the competition; on relative strengths and weaknesses; and on areas of greatest opportunity and risk.

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PLANNED PROJECTS

Taiwan Regional Forum. The center plans to partner with the U.S.-Taiwan Business Council to create an annual Taiwan Regional Forum to be held in Asia or in the U.S. Seminars and workshops would showcase Taiwan's importance in Asia's strategic dialogue and its maturity as a destination for foreign investment and business. The forum would convene strategic thinkers from many Asian countries, the U.S., and elsewhere to discuss and debate future security issues, to assess the U.S. role in the region, to explore potential new alliance opportunities, and to envision scenarios for "alternative Asias."

Islam in Europe: Strategies. This will be ajoint project with Hudson's Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World to examine the growth of Islamic populations in Europe. Using analysis and scenarios, the project will highlight problems and threats and elucidate policy options. Its deliverables include a workshop and final report.

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HILLEL FRADKIN Senior Fellow

CENTER ON ISLAM, DEMOCRACY, AND THE FUTURE OF THE MUSLIM WORLD The mission of the Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World is to research and analyze political, religious, and social developments in mostly-Muslim countries around the world as they affect American interest and policy; to examine the role of radical Islamic ideologies and seek out and support moderate and democratic alternatives; and to develop and propose policy options. Hillel Fradkin, the center's director, is a scholar with wideranging areas of expertise: ethics, foreign policy, Islamic and Jewish thought, and the relationship between religion and politics. He served as president of the Washington, D.C.-based Ethics and Public Policy Center before coming to Hudson.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Ideology Consortium. This is a collaborative project of leading international scholars of Islam with the purpose of tracking and analyzing developments within radical Islam and its ideology. The project publishes semiannually Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

Global War on Terrorism and American Foreign Policy. This is ajoint project with Hudson's Center for Future Security Strategies. It is designed to provide a net assessment of the global war on terrorism; to help American policymakers anticipate future developments in the struggle with radical Islam; and to create strategies to contain and roll back its influence. Pilot studies are planned in Pakistan, Morocco, and the U.S.

Islam and Democracy. This project is an ongoing series of seminars and conferences with leading Muslim and non-Muslim scholars on the present and future relationships between Islam and democracy. Upcoming conferences feature speakers from the Middle East. A conference on women in contemporary Muslim politics is planned.

Future of Political Islam. This project publishes papers and organizes conferences on political dynamics within Islam, at home and abroad. It currently is planning a conference on the emergence of Islamic political parties around the world and an event assessing the current situation in Saudi Arabia.

Education in the Muslim World. This project, through conferences, examines the form and content of education in the Muslim world. Recently the project held a joint conference focusing on education in the Middle East and prospects for reform. The center and its partners, Herbert Quandt Stiftung of the Federal Republic of Germany and Michigan State University, are planning a series of follow-up events.

PLANNED PROJECTS

Islam in Europe: Strategies. Ajoint project with Hudson's Center for Future Security Strategies, this project will examine the growth of Islamic populations in Europe. Using analysis and scenarios, it will highlight problems and threats and elucidate policy options. Its deliverables include a workshop and final report.

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MEYRA V WURMSER Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR MIDDLE EAST POLICY

The Center for Middle East Policy seeks to present a frank and accurate account of developments in the Middle East utilizing primary sources from both Israel and the Arab world to provide thorough, credible, and timely analysis of events, ideas, and trends. It is directed by Meyrav Wurmser, a leading scholar of the Arab world and former executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Revitalizing Lebanese Democracy. This project is the outgrowth of a one-day conference that featured former Lebanese prime minister Michel Aoun and Congressman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.). The project assesses the future of Lebanon by evaluating the current political situation and the relationship of the current government with Syria, which has occupied Lebanon for more than two decades. This project will provide a strong foundation for a broader effort to strengthen Lebanese civil society.

Reducing Saudi Influence over U.S. Foreign Policy. The center has convened an expert working group to examine ways to reduce U.S. dependence on Saudi oil. The working group has commissioned papers focusing on alternative oil sources, instability in the monarchy, Saudi funding of terror networks, and the Saudi use of oil as a tool of statecraft and oil funding to undermine policy goals in the region.

Promoting Middle East Democracy. This project, through publications, conferences, and media appearances, promotes democracy and peace in the Middle East. Research includes prospects for Palestinian democracy, regime change in Iraq, Islam and modernity, and the future of the "Roadrnap to Peace."

PLANNED PROJECTS

Assessment of U.S. Aid to the Palestinian Authority. Given current plans of the intemational community to make significant foreign aid contributions to the Palestinian Authority, this project will assess the state of Palestinian legal and economic institutions to evaluate the extent to which they meet conditions that justify aid. Evaluation will be conducted in accordance with standards set out in academic literature and by the U.S. Millennium Challenge Account.

The Future of Zionism. The Center for Middle East Policy is launching a multi-year project to examine the future of Zionism and its implications for the State of Israel. Israel faces an ideological crisis: As the recent Gaza pullout showed, societal divisions between secular and religious Israelis and between left and right wing camps have become so pronounced that they threaten to overpower the Zionist consensus that traditionally unified the nation. This project will examine the crisis of Israeli identity, investigate its root causes, and seek to identify ways to invigorate the Zionist enterprise. It will address the potential decline of Zionism, its implications for Israel's future and security, and its impact on America's vital interests in the Middle East.

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JOHN O'SULLIVAN Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR EUROPEAN STUDIES

The Center for European Studies promotes understanding among U.S. policy makers, business leaders and informed public opinion about the nature and challenges of the E.U. and European countries; notes important issues and trends in religious, social, economic and security affairs; advances understanding in Europe of the American "point of view" in such matters; and promotes active dialogue with and between leaders in government, business, churches, the academy and cultural bodies on both sides of the Atlantic. Center director John O'Sullivan is also editor-at-Iarge of National Review and former editor of The National Interest.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Hudson-European Think Tank Network. The center is in the process of forming relationships with a number of leading European think tanks. The purpose is to coordinate research, achieve a wider audience for each others' scholarship, hold joint conferences, and establish a program for exchange of visiting fellows.

Euro-American Lectures and Debates. This monthly program features well-known speakers whose speeches are subsequently published online and in Hudson papers. Topics discussed so far include the French riots and the impact ofblogs on European-American politics. Anticipated topics include trade and regulatory disputes, as well as cultural trade issues.

PLANNED PROJECTS

Pizza Politics. This series of discussions will feature Hudson scholars engaging with younger Washingtonians (junior staffers on Capital Hill, journalists, students of advanced degrees, interns from this and other think tanks, etc.) over pizzas and sodas.

Grand Atlantic Prize. This award will be given out once every five years or so, to the European or American who has done the most for transatlantic relations.

Quarterly Journal. This publication will target U.S. government policymaking circles as well as analysts and commentators in think tanks, the media, and academia. Topics covered may include defense and security, economics, as well as cultural and social studies.

European Journalism Fellows Program. Editors from major European news media will be invited to spend 1-3 months in residence at Hudson.

Euro-American Blog. This continually updated web interface would aim to attract an audience of specialists on Euro-American issues across both continents.

Founding Fathers of Atlanticism Seminar Series. This series on the founding fathers of Atlanticism from Adenauer to Raymond Aron would feature discussion led by distinguished public intellectuals who could also contribute personal knowledge of the giants they were discussing.

Film Series. This project would feature the presentation of films followed by debates and commentary on current social and political issues.

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JAIME DAREMBLUM Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

The Center for Latin American Studies provides analysis of key economic, social, and political developments and trends throughout Latin America to decision makers in business and government. Its director, Jaime Daremblum, is a scholar of Latin America, international politics, and international economics and was Costa Rica's ambassador to the United States from 1998 to 2004.

The center draws, in part, on the legacy of research conducted by the late Hudson senior fellow Constantine Menges. Through seminars, workshops, publications, and conferences, the center facilitates dialogue between leaders in Latin America and the U.S. in order to advance policies that promote freedom, democracy, and economic opportunity. The center focuses on critical emerging issues, such as the increasing role of China in Latin America, possibilities for increased regional cooperation on energy issues, and avenues for improving U.S.-Latin American

relations. The center also generates scenarios through workshops with leaders in government and the policy and business communities.

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LEWIS LIBBY Senior Advisor

Lewis Libby, former chief of staff to Vice President Richard B. Cheney and assistant to the vice president for national security affairs, focuses on issues relating to the War on Terror and the future of Asia. He also offers research guidance and advises the institute on strategic planning.

Libby first entered government service with the United States Department of State in 1981 as a member of the Policy Planning Staff in the Office of the Secretary. From 1982 to 1985 he served in the United States Department of State as director of special projects in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs. Libby also served as the legal. adviser to the U.S. House of Representatives' Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the Peoples' Republic of China, commonly known as the "Cox Committee." During the administration of President George H. W. Bush, Libby served in the United States Department of Defense as principal deputy under secretary (Strategy and Resources), and later was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as deputy under secretary of defense for policy.

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WILLIAM E. ODOM

Senior Fellow

A former director of the National Security Agency, General William Odom's research focuses on U.S. strategy globally and more specifically on Europe, East Asia, and the Middle East-Persian Gulf region. Additionally, he has worked on intelligence reform, defense policy, and Russian politics. His op-eds have appeared in several newspapers, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal. His articles have appeared in Foreign Affairs, World Politics, The National Interest, and Current History among others. He is a frequent guest on radio and television shows, and interview subject in the print media. Odom's latest book, America's Inadvertent Empire, was co-authored with Robert Dujarric, with whom he also coauthored Commonwealth or Empire? Russia, Central Asia, and the Transcaucasus. Odom has authored six additional books: Fixing Intelligence for a More Secure America; The Collapse of the Soviet Military, for which he was awarded the Marshall Shulman Prize; America's Military Revolution: Strategy and Structure after the Cold War; Trial After Triumph: East Asia after the Cold War; On Internal War: American and Soviet Approaches to Third World Clients and Insurgents; and The Soviet Volunteers.

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CHARLES HORNER

Senior Fellow

A China scholar with expertise in Asia-Pacific affairs and international science and technology relations, Charles Homer formerly served as deputy assistant secretary of state for science and technology and associate director of the United States Information Agency.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Rising China's Grand Design. This project examines important intellectual influences on China's rising leaders as they develop a "grand design" and a "grand strategy." It was conceived to aid in the U.S. understanding of how China might manage a strategic map of the world 30 years hence. The approach is historical and historiographical. Deng Xiaoping's socioeconomic reforms have been accompanied by a wholesale reexamination of the country's history, especially modem history. The Chinese are now able to debate major issues of interpretation. In the process, their understandings of received verdicts about "success" and "failure" of previous policies in the Qing and Republic eras are open to question. The project examines relevant materials and relates them to arguments about the future, as the Chinese themselves understand it.

Responding to the Chinese Strategic Threat. This project is intended to produce a research monograph to highlight America's need to deal with what could become a significant Chinese strategic challenge. It focuses particularly on America's need to have the capacity to fight two different kinds of wars simultaneously: the man-to-man combat of the war on terror and the possibility of an eventual high-technology engagement with China. The monograph will begin with a scenario-based analysis of a U.S.-China conflict several decades from now, presenting a strong and modernized Chinese military versus American and allied forces focused on the more localized combat of the war on terror. A multichapter analysis of China's quest for high technology will follow, drawing on many of to day's well-known analyses of China's growing high-technology capacity. The study will conclude with a second scenario-based analysis of U.S.-China conflict after a directed U.S. and allied military modernization effort.

PLANNED PROJECTS

Future of Sino-Islamic Relations. Ajoint project with Hudson's Center for Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World, this project will address present and future relationships between China and the 28 majority-Muslim societies of the greater Middle East. The immediate objective will be to bring a broader understanding and perspective to American policy and strategy discussions concerning the challenges of the war with radical Islam and the rise of China. The project will focus on analytic essays, workshops, scenario building, and field research to examine possible strategic landscapes that could emerge between China and the greater Middle East.

Future of Sino-Japanese Relations. This project will use historical perspectives to analyze the relationship between China and Japan and assess the implications of this relationship as it moves forward in the twenty-first century. It will also seek to understand Japan's changing views of China in light of the past twenty years of developments in Asia, including the collapse of the Soviet Union, the rise of China, and the war on terrorism.

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MARY FITZGERALD

Research Fellow

The author of numerous articles on Soviet and Russian military topics and an expert on defense and national security issues, the U.S. military, and Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian studies, Mary Fitzgerald is part of Hudson's National Security Studies group as well as a research fellow.

CURRENT PROJECT

Sino-Russian Strategies for Future Wars. This project provides analysis of Sino-Russian military views on the "space-information" continuum; existing and prospective technologies for waging "space-information" wars; evolving "space-information" operations; technical and operational counters to the global positioning and other space systems; asymmetrical and offensive counters to the U.S. national missile defense system; and implications of these issues for U.S. defense strategy and acquisition.

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MAX SINGER Senior Fellow

Max Singer, a cofounder of Hudson Institute in 1961 and its president until 1973, is an expert in the Middle East, economic development, and political warfare. Concurrently, he is also a senior research associate at the BESA Institute of Bar Han University in Israel.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Foreign Political Action Programs and Their Potential Effect on U.S. Force Requirements-Conventional and Nuclear. This project creates scenarios and recommends strategies for political action to achieve U.S. objectives of containing hostile forces. It explores measures for understanding enemy strategy and the international environment that serve to protect U.S. security. The project will generate reports on strategies for encouraging democracy in the Middle East.

Radical Islam's Confrontation with West and East: Origins, Directions, Strategies. In conjunction with Hudson's Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World and the Institute for Policy and Strategy in Herzlyia, Israel, this project will provide an integrated analysis of the current and future state of the relationship between Islam-as both religion and political culture-and the West. The objective is to bring about a broader understanding of Islam and the Middle East in order to widen the current perspective on policies related to the war on terrorism, the threat ofradical Islam, and the Middle East generally.

PLANNED PROJECT

U.S., Russia, and China Democracy and Security Project. Since U.S. policies toward both Russia and China affect their political evolution and foreign policies, this project would focus on the strategies of U.S. policy toward both countries. Its research will add to the fund of knowledge and provide information, analysis, and policy ideas to leaders and experts in the U.S. policy, business, and labor communities, the media, and the general public.

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JAMES CLAD Adjunct Fellow

A journalist, diplomat, and National Defense University professor, James Clad has decades of experience reporting, analyzing, and participating in interventions by the U.S. or other external countries in conflicts and failed states. After the 9/11 attacks, he worked on Afghan and Iraq issues in a variety of U.S. agencies, including the Agency for International Development, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the Department of Defense.

CURRENT PROJECT

Postconflict Incompetence: Causes and Effects. U.S.-dominated occupation structures promise quick stabilization after the American military's elimination of hostile regimes in Afghanistan and Iraq. Yet postwar occupation too often fails us, as well as those we temporarily govern or guide. This project will provide intellectual leadership in identifying causes of post-conflict incompetence and offering remedial paths. By surveying the comprehensive nature of official American post-intervention incompetence, the project will offer doable measures to regain field competence, curtail interagency clutter, and streamline procurement requirements.

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LAURENT MURA WIEC

Senior Fellow

Formerly a senior international policy analyst with the RAND Corporation, Laurent Murawiec is an expert in military affairs and information warfare. Before moving to the United States he advised France's Ministry of Defense.

CURRENT PROJECTS

The Mind of Jihad (Part I). Part of an ongoing three-part project, the Mind of Jihad investigates the origin and development of Gnostic millenarianism in the Arab Muslim world, notably from the nineteenth century's Jamal ai-Din ai-Afghani, and its progress in the world of Islam. It shows how terrorism is thus not only a technical means of waging war, but also a reflection of the mind of jihad.

U.S.-Japan Strategic Summit. The U.S.-Japan Strategic Summit seeks to serve as a channel for the development of defense, economic, and social initiatives to serve the mutual strategic interests of the U.S. and Japan for East Asia. A critical focus will be on the deployment of economic tools to address national security objectives. The project will provide a means for continuous focus on, and improvement of, the relationship between the U.S. and Japan as partners for achieving important governmental objectives in Asia, including security, democratization, and the maintenance of democracies and economic development. The project relies on the participation of high-level political, business, academic, and government leaders from the U.S. and Japan. Its resources will include a restricted-access website and weblog that will promote daily discussions and exchanges of views, as well as serve as a central site for the presentation of monographs and articles. The project anticipates that actual summits, consisting of a variety of in-person meetings of summit members, other leaders, experts, and scholars, will be held twice per year, once in Tokyo and once in Washington.

SCIENCE, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY

Hudson's projects in science, environment, and technology, conducted by Senior Fellows Dennis A very and Michael Fumento, concentrate on global food issues; global warming and environmental studies; and science, health, and biotechnology.

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DENNIS AVERY Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR GLOBAL FOOD ISSUES

The Center for Global Food Issues (CGFI) serves as a broker between urban and fanning communities, helping to educate city dwellers about the importance of modem fanning while helping fanners see their role in a broader light. The center monitors national and global farm production and consumption trends, new technologies that affect fanning and food demand, and farm/food policy changes. The center's director, Dennis Avery, formerly an agricultural analyst for the Department of State, is an expert on a range of issues relating to food, including agriculture, the environment, world hunger, and biotechnology and pesticides.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Global Warming. Coauthored by Dennis Avery and S. Fred Singer of the University of Virginia, a forthcoming book, Global Warming Every 1500 Years, Naturally (Roman and Littlefield, spring 2006), will challenge global warming premises that provide the basis for the Kyoto treaty. The authors argue that the current change in temperatures is not a marked increase caused by pollution, but rather is slight and due to a regular I ,500-year temperature cycle.

Earth Friendly, Farm Friendly Seal. CGFI, in conjunction with independent academic, consumer, and farm policy and practice experts, has designed a program of farm and process management practices that are independently verifiable as both farm and environment friendly. CGFI's "Earth Friendly, Farm Friendly" seal assures the public that all products bearing it are produced in a manner consistent with the best available scientific, environmental, and quality standards and technologies. The program is based on fanners' adoption of environmentally sound and economically sustainable practices that do not limit their freedom to farm.

Milk Is Milk. This project aims to counter misleading milk and dairy marketing practices by some in the dairy industry who seek to increase sales of niche products by creating false fears and driving consumers away from affordable, nutritious dairy products. CGFI is part of a broadbased coalition that has filed state and federal complaints about these marketing practices. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced it will review the claims and take action. CGFI also has launched a grassroots campaign of concerned consumers to educate food and dairy retailers about false and misleading labeling and marketing practices.

PLANNED PROJECT

Feast or Famine. Feast or Famine is an educational program focused on telling the public how their food is produced and on explaining fanning's impact on the environment. The series will look in-depth at agricultural, earth, and environmental sciences. Each segment will be shot on location, with expert interviews from leading scientists, thought leaders, and award-winning researchers. The project will cover such topics as plant breeding, pest management, sustainable meat production, and feeding the world in 2050.

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MICHAEL FUMENTO

Senior Fellow

An author, journalist, and attorney with wide-ranging expertise in science and technology, health, legal and environmental issues, and biotechnology, Michael Fumento has written four books and numerous articles. His nationally syndicated Scripps Howard column is sent out to 400 newspapers and numerous websites.

CURRENT PROJECT

Project on Science, Health, and Biotechnology. This project aims to educate the public on the benefits derived from new medical and science technology. It focuses on applied technology currently or soon to be available. It examines a range of issues from biotechnology to genetic engineering to AIDS treatments and more. A forthcoming book will investigate nutritional supplements.

LAW , CULTURE, AND SOCIETY

Six Hudson fellows-Robert Bork, Michael Horowitz, John Fonte, William Schambra, Amy Kauffman, and Amy Kass-oversee projects involving law, culture, and society. Their research explores such topics as civil justice and tort reform, international religious liberty, American common culture and democracy, and civil society and philanthropy.

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ROBERT BORK Distinguished Fellow

CENTER ON LAW, CULTURE, AND SOCIETY

Directed by Judge Robert Bork, renowned as ajurist and analyst of American culture, the Center on Law, Culture and Society conducts research, publishes books and papers, and convenes conferences and seminars that analyze the crisis facing American law and interests. This crisis has two primary aspects.

First, American constitutional law has become detached from its proper grounding in the U.S. Constitution. That law has, instead, become prey to the dominant trends of opinion among the intelligentsia, thus forcing minority values (radical versions of individual autonomy) on the American public. This development increasingly frustrates republican self-government, presses the culture to the left, and threatens social cohesion.

Second, parallel developments in international law may erode U.S. sovereignty by fostering regional and even global governance on subjects central to American interests. In addition to the United Nations' ambition to playa central role in all world affairs, nations now sign treaties that purport to bind even those countries that refuse to agree, while alleged changes in customary international law would further erode America's capacity to govern itself and conduct its own foreign policy.

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MICHAEL HOROWITZ

Senior Fellow

A practicing lawyer since 1967, Michael Horowitz is an expert in tort reforrn, welfare, federalism, Congress, and religious liberty. Between 1981 and 1985, he was general counsel for the Office of Management and Budget.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Project on Civil Justice and Tort Reform. This project looks at innovative means for tort reform in the United States and at current issues on welfare reform. Its current focus is an ethics petition initiative. Ethics petitions have been filed before fifteen state supreme courts challenging excessive attorney fees in personal injury cases on the grounds of attorney fiduciary responsibility. The project aims at a series of strategic tort initiatives that focus on expanding rather than reducing the rights of injured parties through early offer, choice, and attorney fee overreach refonns.

Project on International Religious Liberty. This project promotes democracy and fights religious oppression around the globe. Currently, it seeks to promote a bill that encourages democracy in countries now under dictatorial rule and a bill to deal with domestic sex trafficking in the United States. It also has drafted model legislation to deal with parental child abduction to foreign countries. Among its goals, the project aims to ensure effective implementation of the Trafficking Freedom Protection Act and to ameliorate religious and human rights violations of the regimes in North Korea and Sudan.

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JOHN FONTE Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR AMERICAN COMMON CULTURE

The Center for American Common Culture provides analysis and policy advice on issues of citizenship, patriotism, civic education, the assimilation of immigrants, democratic sovereignty, and American common culture. It focuses on strengthening American liberal democracy, civic identity, and citizenship in an age of increasing transnational connections. Its director John Fonte joined Hudson in 1999 after directing the Committee to Review National Standards, under the chairmanship of Lynne Cheney, as a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Patriotic Assimilation of Immigrants. This project works to strengthen the means whereby immigrants receive education on core American civic values and awareness as part of the assimilation process. It has worked with Congress to establish the United States Citizenship and Immigrations Services (formerly Immigration and Naturalization Service, now part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security).

Challenges to U.S. Democratic Sovereignty and the Principles of Liberal Democracy from Ideological Forces within the UN, NGOs, and Elements of the Legal Profession. This project seeks to clarify and strengthen U.S. democratic sovereignty, the principles of liberal democracy, and a serious American internationalism. This is in contrast to forces at home and abroad that aim to diminish both democratic self-government and American influence in the world in the name of "trans-nationalism" and "global governance." The project has worked with Congress on these issues. A forthcoming book on "post democracy" will address these issues.

Strengthening Civic Education in American K-12 Schools. The project works with governments and schools to evaluate and improve school curricula. The goal is to get schools to include citizenship education and thereby strengthen American identity.

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WILLIAM SCHAMBRA Senior Fellow

BRADLEY CENTER FOR PHILANTHROPY AND CIVIC RENEWAL

The Bradley Center for Philanthropy and Civic Renewal aims to encourage foundations and charitable donors to direct more resources toward support of small, local, often faith-based grassroots associations that are the heart of vital civil society. Its director William Schambra served as director of programs at the Bradley Foundation in Milwaukee. He has written extensively on the Constitution, the theory and practice of civic revitalization, and civil society.

The center undertakes critical examination of current giving practices of American foundations, which, in supporting large, expert-driven projects, often undercut small civic associations. The center also provides practical advice and counsel to funders with an interest in designing grantmaking programs that support civic renewal.

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AMY KAUFFMAN

Research Fellow

An expert in campaign and election laws, campaign finance reform, politics, and U.S. elections, Amy Kauffman joined Hudson in 1999 after serving as director of Campaign For America, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization dedicated to campaign finance refonn.

CURRENT PROJECT

Pew Discussion Series at Hudson Institute on Preserving and Strengthening Democracy at Home and Abroad. With the support of the Pew Charitable Trusts, this project will convene two distinct series of roundtable discussions to explore critical themes on the vitality and perpetuation of democracy. The seminar series will examine the state of democracy in the U.S. and efforts to promote democracy abroad. Rather than explicitly or implicitly seeking to promote particular policy outcomes, the series, aimed primarily at busy congressional staffers, would

have a more didactic focus: it would seek to help support and sustain a more civil and thoughtful discourse on key issues in American constitutional democracy and foreign policy, and thereby point toward more responsible and public-spirited approaches to fundamental policy questions. Senior Fellow Amy Kass will assist with the project and lead some of the discussions about democracy at home.

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AMyKASS

Senior Fellow

For over 25 years Amy Kass been an award-winning teacher of classic texts in the College of the University of Chicago. Her areas of expertise are philanthropy, civic leadership and education, and citizenship.

CURRENT PROJECT

Project on Civic Philanthropy. This project seeks to foster discussion on ethical issues and critical issues facing civil society to provide guidance for thinking on philanthropic decision making. It promotes dialogue on dispositions and attitudes rather than on procedures and rules regarding philanthropy. It conducts symposia on civic philanthropy around the nation for leading foundation officials and charitable donors. It works in conjunction with Hudson's Bradley Center, the Council on Foundations, and the Association of Family Foundations. The project will eventuate in a volume of readings, tentatively titled "The Perfect Grant."

INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE

Hudson international governance projects, conducted by two fellows, Carol Adelman and Anne Bayefsky, explore such areas as global health and international health care initiatives, foreign aid and economic development, and the role of the United Nations in promoting human rights.

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CAROL ADELMAN Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR SCIENCE IN PUBLIC POLICY

The Center for Science in Public Policy seeks to apply the highest scientific standard and rigorous analysis to public policy issues. Recognizing the amount and complexity of information on global issues, particularly health care, foreign aid, and trade, the center strives to underpin its analyses with data and sound scientific methods. Carol Adelman, the center's director, has expertise in foreign aid as well as international health, trade, and development, gained through over 30 years as a public servant and as a consultant to private businesses and nonprofit groups.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Philanthropic Effort in Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis. This project provides research and analysis assessing global government and private philanthropic activities in the prevention and treatment of tuberculosis. It monitors international scientific developments, provides overall strategic planning, and brokers public/private partnerships toward this end.

Global Health, International Organizations, and U.S. Government Programs. This project researches, publishes, and conducts seminars on global health issues, specifically focusing on international health and development projects conducted by both private and government donor organizations. Analysis focuses on determinants of health status in developing countries, effectiveness of programs addressing health care problems, and public policies that affect the delivery of health care services.

International Health Care and Pharmaceutical Issues. This project researches, publishes, and conducts seminars on the effect of governments' and international organizations' policies on pharmaceutical formularies and the pharmaceutical trade; health care infrastructure and quality; and intellectual property rights. It monitors international health care initiatives such as WHO programs and the Global Fund for HIY/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. It also explores innovative opportunities for public/private partnerships with health care providers and government.

PLANNED PROJECT

Center for Global Prosperity. The center will publish an annual index of global philanthropy documenting and categorizing international philanthropy from private U.S. sources. It will track and report on advances in economic development and will provide case studies of private-sector success stories in economic development initiatives.

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ANNE BA YEFSKY

Senior Fellow

Anne Bayefsky is an expert in international and constitutional human rights law, and equality rights. In 2003 she launched www.bayefsky.com. a website dedicated to enhancing the implementation of the human rights legal standards of the United Nations. She is a member of the Ontario Bar and has taught at Columbia University Law School. In 2005, she launched www.eyeontheun.org, a website dedicated to drawing attention to the UN's failure to expose and fight human rights violations around the world.

CURRENT PROJECT

United Nations and Middle East Policy. This project monitors the ongoing operations of the United Nations and its impact on Middle East policy, the war against terrorism, and the international protection of human rights. Particular attention is paid to the activities of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, the General Assembly, and the Security Council, as well as related activities of human rights and nongovernmental organizations. Project activities include publications, speeches, media outreach, and the development of a website on these issues.

ECONOMICS AND ENERGY POLICY

Hudson research in economics and energy policy seeks to offer future-oriented analyses of macroeconomic and microeconomic policy developments. Our major areas of research include monetary and fiscal policy, regulatory and tax policy, international trade, energy policy, employment policy, and housing and financial market studies. Hudson's economic policy research team includes noted economists with distinguished policy backgrounds, such as Irwin Stelzer, Diana Furchtgott-Roth, and John Weicher.

DIANA FURCHTGOTT-ROTH Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR EMPLOYMENT POLICY

The mission of the Center for Employment Policy is to research and publicize factors driving sound economic policies that give employers flexibility to hire workers. The center's director Diana Furchtgott-Roth spent two years as chief economist at the Department of Labor before joining Hudson in 2005. She also served as chief of staff and special adviser to the president's Council of Economic Advisers.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Hudson Economic Reports. Hudson Economic Reports are issued every week and posted on Hudson's website. These reports analyze the major economic data series, with a focus on labor data, and provide a context in which to evaluate them. They' are sent to financial reporters monthly.

Monthly Conference Series. This project focuses on key issues affecting employment, such as legal reform, a reduction in burdensome regulation, broader availability of low-cost fringe benefits, taxation, immigration, and workforce training. Each monthly conference focuses on one key issue, featuring the presentation of an invited academic paper followed by discussion by a panel of prominent experts.

Barriers to Entrepreneurship. This project examining barriers to entrepreneurship is made possible with support from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. Topics at a series of conferences include the contribution of entrepreneurs to employment growth; entrepreneurs' access to capital; Mexican-American entrepreneurs; the taxation of entrepreneurs; and the effects of household savings on entrepreneurship. Discussants will include experienced entrepreneurs who can add a practical perspective to the conference.

Analyzing Expenditures of Organized Labor. New U.S. Department of Labor regulations will require the reporting of heretofore unreported data on union finances and spending, in particular political contributions. Until now, unions have escaped the financial transparency requirements to which other sectors of the economy have had to submit. The center will gather, examine, and report newly available data on union financial activities.

Using Community Colleges for Workforce Training. The use of community colleges for training unemployed workers has been relatively limited due to federal regulations. An attempt is being made to restructure these regulations in order to give unemployed workers the advantages of the broad choices of vocational training that community colleges offer. A kick-off conference on October 21, 2005, will feature a paper by Professor Robert LaLonde of the University of Chicago showing how earnings of displaced workers are affected by different community college course offerings. This will be followed by additional research into other aspects of community college training.

HUDSON INSTITUTE

INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE

IRWIN STELZER Senior Fellow

CENTER FOR ECONOMIC POLICY

The Center for Economic Policy provides timely analyses of both macroeconomic and microeconomic developments. Special attention is paid to developments in international trade and exchange rates, monetary and fiscal policy, energy policy, and regulatory policy. The center's director Irwin Stelzer is the U.S. political and economic columnist for The Sunday Times (London). Before joining Hudson in 1998, he was resident scholar and director of regulatory policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. He was also previously a director of the Energy and Environmental Policy Center at Harvard University and advisor to, among others, former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher.

..

HUDSON INSTITUTE

INTERNATIONAL GOVERNANCE

JOHN WElCHER Senior Fellow

CENTER ON HOUSING AND FINANCIAL MARKETS

The mission of the Center on Housing and Financial Markets is to examine public policy issues that affect the functioning of the housing and mortgage markets, with an immediate focus on promoting home ownership. Its director John Weicher served from 2001 to 2005 as the Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) assistant secretary for housing and federal housing commissioner. He previously served as assistant secretary for policy development and research at HUD and as chief economist at both HUD and the Office of Management and Budget.

Among the issues to be explored by the center are sustaining the record high home-ownership rate in America; rising housing prices in metropolitan areas; the future of the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac; and predatory lending. The center will conduct ongoing research, commission papers, and hold seminars and conferences.

HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC .

13-1945157

. FORM 990, PART IV - INVESTMENTS - SECURITIES

--------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------

DESCRIPTION

ENDING BOOK VALUE

BOND MUTUAL FUND STOCK MUTUAL FUND US TREASURY BILLS HEDGE FUND

1,186,819. 4,856,485. 3,257,068. 3,191,856.

TOTALS

12,492,228.

---------------

---------------

STATEMENT 5

51283J 1394

V04-8


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HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

13-1945157

FORM 990, PART VIII - ACCOMPLISHMENT OF EXEMPT PURPOSES

-------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------

EXPLANATION OF HOW EACH ACTIVITY FOR WHICH INCOME

LINE IS REPORTED IN COLUMN (E) OF PART VII CONTRIBUTED

NO. IMPORTANTLY TO THE ACCOMPLISHMENT OF EXEMPT PURPOSES

93 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH CONTRACTS ALLOW THE INSTITUTE TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES ON NATIONAL AND WORLD SECURITY, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND POLITICAL VALUES AND ATTITUDES.

103 REVENUE FROM THESE ITEMS PROMOTES THE INSTITUTE'S PURPOSE THROUGH EDUCATION OF THE PUBLIC ON CURRENT MATTERS OF INTEREST.

STATEMENT 7

51283J 1394

V04-8

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HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

13-1945157

SCHEDULE A, PART III - EXPLANATION FOR LINE 2C

----------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------

SEE SCHEDULE A, PART II

STATEMENT 9

51283J 1394

V04-8

HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

13-1945157

SCHEDULE A, PART III - EXPLANATION FOR LINE 3A

----------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------

FELLOWSHIPS ARE GIVEN TO STUDENTS BASED UPON A NATIONWIDE SEARCH. ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE SENT TO UNIVERSITIES AND OVER ONE HUNDRED APPLICATIONS ARE RECEIVED. AN INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE CHOOSES INDIVIDUALS ON A NONDISCRIMINATORY BASIS. HOWEVER, THERE ARE ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS WHICH MUST BE MET ON THE APPLICATION IN ORDER TO QUALIFY FOR THE FELLOWSHIP. OCCASIONALLY GRANTS ARE MADE TO QUALIFYING UNIVERSITIES AT THE BOARD OF DIRECTOR'S DISCRETION.

STATEMENT 10

51283J 1394

V04-8

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HUDSON INSTITUTE, INC.

13-1945157

FEDERAL FOOTNOTES

-----------------

-----------------

FORM 990, PARTS II AND V, AND SCHEDULE A, PART II

HERBERT I. LONDON IS COMPENSATED AS AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR THROUGH HERBERT I. LONDON, INC. FOR THE SERVICES THAT HE PROVIDES TO HUDSON INSTITUTE. THESE FEES ARE INCLUDED ON LINE 43 OF PART II UNDER "CONSULTANTS."

STATEMENT 12

51283J 1394

V04-8


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,

Form

8868

Application for Extension of Time To File an Exempt Organization Return

OMB No 1545-1709

(Rev December 2004)

Department of the Treasury

Internal Revenue SelVlce ~ File a separate application for each retum

• If you are filing for an Automatic 3·Month Extension, complete only Part I and check this box •.•••.••.......• ~ X

• If you are filing for an Additional (not automatic) 3·Month Extension, complete only Part II (on page 2 of this form).

Do not com lete Part" unless ou have alread been ranted an automatic 3·month extension on a reviousl filed Form 8868. Automatic 3·Month Extension of Tlme- Only submit original (no copies needed)

Form 990· T corporations requesting an automatic s-month extension- check this box and complete Part I only ...••••••• ~ D All other corporations (includmg Form 990-C filers) must use Form 7004 to request an extension of time to file Income tax returns. Partnerships, REMICs, and trusts must use Form 8736 to request an extension of time to file Form 1065, 1066, or 1041.

Electronic Filing (e·fUe). Form 8868 can be flied electronically if you want a 3·month automatic extension of time to file one of the returns noted below (6 months for corporate Form 990·T filers). However, you cannot file it electronically If you want the additional (not automatic) 3·month extension, instead you must submit the fully completed signed page 2 (Part II) of Form 8868. For more details on the electronic filing of this form, visit www.irs.govlefile

Type or Name of Exempt Organization

print HUDSON INSTITUTE INC.

I Employer Identification number 13-1945157

File by the due date for filing your return See instructions

Number, street, and room or suite no If a PObox. see Instructions.

1015 18TH STREET N.W

STE 300

City, town or post office, state, and ZIP code For a foreign address, see Instructions WASHINGTON DC 20036

Check type of return to be flied (file a§e arate application for each return):

~ Form 990 Form 990-T (corporation)

Form 990-BL Form 990- T(sec. 401 (a) or 408(a) trust)

Form 990-EZ Form 990- T (trust other than above)

Form 990-PF Form 1041-A

Form 4720 Form 5227 Form 6069 Form 8870

• The books are in the care of ~ DEBORAH HOOPES, CONTROLLER

Telephone No. ~ 317 859-6456

FAX No. ~

• If the organization does not have an office or place of business in the United States, check this box • . • • . . • . • • • •• • D

• If this is for a Group Return, enter the organization's four digit Group Exemption Number (GEN) . If this is

for the whole group, check this box ~ D . If it is for part of the group, check this box ~ U'--'--a-n-d-a-tt-ac-h-a-I-ist With the names and EINs of all members the extension will cover.

1 I request an automatic 3·month (6·months for a Form 990·T corporation) extension of time until 05/15 , 2006 to file the exempt organization return for the organization named above. The extension is for the orqaruzaficn's return for:

~ 0 calendar year or

~ [i] tax year beginning 10/01, 2004, and ending 09/30 , 2005 .

2 If this tax year IS for less than 12 months, check reason: D Initial return 0 Final return D Change in accounting period

3a If trus application is for Form 990-BL, 990·PF, 990- T, 4720, or 6069, enter the tentative tax, less any nonrefundable credits See instructions •.••..•.•...••••••.•••••.•.•••••••.••. b If this application IS for Form 990-PF or 990- T, enter any refundable credits and estimated tax payments

made. Include any prior year overpayment allowed as a credit ..•.•••••••••..•••••••.... c Balance Due. Subtract line 3b from line 3a Include your payment With this form, or, if required, deposit With FTC coupon or, If required, by using EFTPS (Electronic Federal Tax Payment System). See Instructions

$ 0

$ 0

Caution. If you are gOing to make an electrcruc fund Withdrawal With this Form 8868, see Form 8453·EO and Form 8879-EO for payment Instructions.

$ 0

For Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notice, see Instructions.

Form 8868 (Rev 12-2004)

JSA

4FB054 3 000

5UGOG1 1394

V04-8

020-01583-430

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