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Thai Massage Manual

Thai Massage Manual

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02/28/2013

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•

-

.atural therapy for

fie. ibility, relaxation

and energy balance

MAN

MARIA

\ ..

-: ,-MERCATI

L ba treated people for over 1 000

ear

...

Stay relaxed and healthy through the healing power of [ouch ~ One : -,... c most ancient healing arts, Thai massage has worked wonders centuries, By pressing, pulling, stretching, and manipulating the you'll affect both the

joints and the soft

tissues, improve flexibility, alleviate pain, increase vitality, and offer a completely pleasurable,

relaxing experience. And you will enjoy it as much as the recipient. In fact, no other type of massage provides a more powerful cornbination of two people's energies.

Thai Massage Manual

• Here are sequences/or every part oftbe bodyover 150 of them - demonstrated by qualified experts .

• Set your body's natural healing powers into motion - with every touch, you'llfeel energy course through your system, restoring and refreshing you.

• Strengthen the bond between you and your partner - this technique facilitates closeness and provides a warm and intimate experience for both of you.

• The exquisite yoga-like stretches of Thai massage give you a feeling 0.[ mental calm and an enjoyable release 0/ muscular tension.

• See how to improve sports performance and relieve ailments such as sciatica and headaches.

Stcmocleidoma, ... -

Pectoralis major

Deltoid

Serratus anterior

Rectus abdominis

Rectus femoris

Varus lareralls

Gastrocnemius __ __l

SoleLIS ------

Technical illustrations a/the body's muscles are superimposed on mode/slur you to identify their locations easily

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Maria Mercati has trained extensively throughout Asia to become one of the world's acknowledged teachers and therapists in traditional Thai massage, Tui Na, acupuncture and Indonesian massage. This bestselling author has created a unique whole body Thai massage which is shown here for the first time.

Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.

New York

Cover photography by Sue Atkinson Cover illustration by Joanna Cameron

49725 01755

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MANUAL

Natural tberapvjor flcxibilit», relaxation

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and enel:[{},1 balance

MAI\IA Mt:RCATI

Ph()l()g)'{{/J/~I! (~)' Sue Atkinson

Sterling Publishing Co .• Inc.

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CONTENTS

A l\OTF. FROM THE AllTHOR

'/ ........ /

PART mJE

CHAIJllR ON[

TilE MllSCLES 1H

(II/WiT I{ NJO

I'ARI IVI/O

'!'IIM BO])'y'\VO]{K PI«)(;I<A\\\\E .. 4,~

Lesson Onp TilE FEET. 44

Lesson two' Tll l. FEET &. LE(;S .. S.~

Lesson t IIr('(' _. BOTII LE(;S &. BACK ... 7(1

Lessot, i ou: CIlEST 8: AB[lO\\EN Kh

lesson Five' AKV\S, II i\ NIlS, l\ ECK &. FAC E ()O

Lesson Six' L'r'IN(; ON EITIIEI{ SlllE 90

Lesson Seven.' P IW N E LYI N (; FACE ! ) ()\X.'\j 11 ()

Lesson Eight _- TlI E srrrr«: POSITIOi\ 124

f'lIRT THReE

TAILOI{-.\lAllE TI<EAT\IENTS. l,)~

Massage Routines to Ease Chronic PaiJl 15(l

A l'rograuune fur Begi nners I-l( I

Resou rces 141

Index 1-±2

Acknowledgemcms 1-::'1

'OTE FROM T,HE AUTHOR

uring the early 1980s ~ .hed with my family ": Indonesia for four

It was here that I ~ .zscovered the healing ~.:'-e_ Extensive travels ~ .h-east Asia eventually - : me to Thailand where _ - --:_ rreatment and training =- --jonal Thai massage, Since childhood I - ~ered from Perthes disease - a chronic

_=-~era(ive condition of the hip joint - and =- wonderful stretching effects of Thai seemed like a miracle cure. ~~(:y in my legs, including the affected

improved enormously and Thai has continued to enhance the --,,---,-,--,-,,[1,- and mobility of my body to the ~~~m day. However, Thai massage not only

-:ce the body's need for movement and

-~- .hing it also produces powerful feelings

- ell-being and happiness,

__ - interest in oriental medicine was aroused that I also undertook to Tui Na Chinese massage and _~ uncture in China. After several visits Cr.ina, I subsequently returned to Thailand _:Jd\- Thai massage at the sacred Wat Pho

» z o -I

::r::

temple in Bangkok and the Old Medical Hospital in Chiang Mai. I also received private tuition from Chaiyuth Priyasith, one of Thailand's most respected masters.

In order to give others the opportunity to experience these ancient, yet thriving oriental therapies, I established the BODYHARMONICS ® Centre 111 Cheltenham, England, Treatments and training in Thai bodywork and Indonesian traditional massage, Tui Na Chinese massage and acupuncture are provided there, Today all the members of my family share my passion for traditional oriental bodywork.

I believe that Thai traditional massage reaches those parts of the body and mind that other forms of massage fail to reach and I

.~.;,

hope that by reading this book you too will be

motivated to try it and experience it unique benefits yourself.

l> c -I I

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OPPOSITE: These ioonderfuliy ornate pagodas are characteristic of the \\at Pbo. the temple where the author experienced berfirst traditional Thai massage This manual unll help you to discover healing benefits of Thai massage for yourself, yourfriends and family.

PART ONE

INTRODUCTION

Thai rnassag is one of th anei nt healing arts of traditi nal Thai m licine the oth rs being h rbal medicine and spiritual meditation. The term 'massage' conjur s up images f som thing quite different from Thai rnassaz , whi h v n at its most basi , is a very rnplex sequ nee soft tissu 1 ressing, stretching, rwi ting an l j int manipulations. For this reason th author prefers to use the t r111 'Thai b dyw rk' rath r than 'rn ssag , which is us d frequ ntly throughout th book.

Thai bodywork has been in a process of constant

voluti n f r ov r ,000 years. It ls n t urpn 109, th r D re, t find many ubtl varian ns in til t hniqu ' used by different practitioners, and even greater differ nc s are ppar nt b tween the styles f bodywork

chara t risti f th N rth and S uth of Thailand. Th

techniques pr sented by Maria Mercati in this book are essentially a 'pot pourri' of those taken from various r glens of the country. B ginners will find them flowing and harmonious and very similar to what one c ulcl expe t to receive at the hands of a Thai master.

ABOVE: Tbe Thai script means 'ancient massage'.

OPPOSITE: Tbe authorperforms a Butterfiy Shoulder Streich on her son, Grabam (see page 131).

9

Traditional Thai Massage

Traditional Thaj massage h been practised in more or I irs present form for at lea t 1,.000 years. It is a member of the whole family of Orienral bodywork, which is basecl on the intrin sic energy flow and energ) balance [heal} of health and healing. Other members of thi family include 'Iui 1<) Chinese massage and manipulation, Ayurvedic Indian massage and Shiatsu Japanese massage. Tui Na and Ayurvedi massag both date back over 4,000 years an I it is in these systems that Thai massage ha: its roots. The Indian yogic influence is very obvious to both the bserv r and recipient of this unique form of massag . L 55 so, i. the

xtr mely disciplined I11Rnn r in which the energy channels known as Sen (see page J..J) are treated. In this respect, Thai bodywork mor los Iy resernbl s Tui Na, the theory and pra tic of whi h was already cI cumenred some 2,300 years ago. The first ever recorded Western commentary regarding Thai medicine wa 11'1a I in 1690 by II110n d la Loubere. a Fr n h diplomat, wh bs rv d: '\'(1, n any p [son is si kat lam he begins with cau ing hi whole body to be moulded by one who is, kilful her in, who g ts upon the body of the ick p rs n an I tramples him und r his D et.'

The role of Thai massage

Who n ds traditional Thai massage and manipulation? Y( u 1 , if Y ur body is -l)'ing

ut: 'Touch 111 " 'Stretch III \ ' [ue ze m " 'Hold me', 'Listen to me', 'Comfort me' or 'Heal me'. Such body cries often go unheard. This book will help you to discov r hw 'I'hai bodywork can e the answer to y ur bo Iy's pleas and it could be the first important step that leads you to seek its unique benefits.

Modern lifestyles are often dominated by the desire to achieve independence and fulfilment thr ugh the use of machinery and new technology: We aim to make our lives easy and convenient and, with ever more leisure time, hope that we will be healthy; youthful and I ainfree enough to enjoy life. There is a distinct trend towards self over-indulgence and this,

10

unfortunately goes hand in hand with increasing deprivation in areas such as regular exercise and interaction with others on a caring and compassionate level. This book is written In the firm belief that Thai bodywork involves just such an interaction, enabling you to share with another person in a mutual 'un-Thai-ing' of physicaJ and emotional knots, Interaction through physical .ontact has been fundamental to most Eastern cultures for th usands of years, yet th practice still remains quite foreign to most Westerners,

At this point it must be emphasize l that tradin mal Thai massag is not he same thing as the media-sensationalized a tiviries that take place in massage parlours throughout the

ourist centres of Thailand, It is not about se u I gratin .atic n but about whol n ss,

bala: ,health and happin 5S, Thai massag

means togetherness at a physical level which is quite outside the sexual but, for all of us thls is on f the vital cornp nents of a happy, balanc d lif that is so oft n la king in this modern I; oriel.

The origin of traditional Thai massage Like the origins F the Thai p pl tl ernselv s, rh history of tr ditional Thairnassage is ob. cure. Thailand was at the crossroads of the ancient rnlgratlon routes which saw many

'ave of diff r nt civilizations an I ultur s pas 'ing through. Th c mbination of Thailand' close proximity [0 China and its pos ition on one of the main trade rou tes from India has re lilted in many inter sting cultural and r Ligi U' influ nces, particularly Bu ldhism, bing brought to bear on the early inhabltants of thi area.

Folk tradition credits Jivaka Kumar Bhaccha, al known as hiuago Komparaj, with being the founder of Thai massage, A friend and

OrpOSITI!: A monk, in traditional orange robes, walks across the courtyard infront oftbe Wat P/:Jo temple, tbe national centre/or the teaching and preservation of traditional Tbai medicine.

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physician to the Buddha some 2,500 years ago he is stili revered as the 'Father of Thai medicine'. None of the information regarding massage procedures was written down and it was passed on from generation to generation by word of mouth. Medical texts that in luded derailed descriptions of Thai massage, as it was then practised, were eventually recorded in the Pali language on palm leaves. These were venerated as religious texts and held in safe keeping in the old capital city of Ayutthia. During the eighteenth century Ayulthia was overrun by Burmese invaders and many of the precious texts were destroyed. In 1832 King Rarna III had all the surviving texts .arved in stone as descriptive epigraphs at War Pho, the largest templ in Bangkok.

Wat Pho temple

'Wats' ar temp! s or m nast ri . Be. i Ie being focal points for the practice of Buddhism, the Wat' h.av Iways provi I d for th 11 alth needs of the people. The Wa Pho i. the 111 t famous of th m. It: dat s back ( the sixteenth c ntury and h uses th famous r dining Buddha, which is 46 metres (150 feet) Ion and 15 m tres ( 9.~ t) hi h, r g th r \\ ith {he largest collection of Buddha images in Thailand. Th re are sixty carv d epigraph that d scribe the Sen chann Is and ernb ely all the information fr m th Pall t xes that • till surviv cI. during the reign of King Rarna III. Outside the temp] are a collection of scone statu s that show vari us f th lassical Thai massage techniques.

War Pho is the national c ntre for the teaching and preservation of traditi nal Thai medicine, Most Thais are Buddhists and even to lay they ar devoted to Buddha's teachings of non-violence, loving kindness and compassion. Monks are still supported by gifts of food from the people and making regular offerings at the temples is regarded as virtuous. The monarchy is based on Buddhist teachings and has enormous popular support. The present king, Bhurnibol Adulyadej, is the ninth monarch in direct succession.

With its origins firmly rooted in Buddhist philosophy, it is not surprising that, for much of

12

.it history traditional Thai rna age ha been regarded as a religious rite. Until quite recently Thai massage was only officially practised by monks which, of course, precluded women as potential recipients. Various forms of folk massage were, and still are, practised within families where family members massaged one another.

The Sen lines

In Thai In dical theory the body's Vital life energy flows along channels called Sen. This

n rgy ow rs all the physical, mental and emotional processes which will only function normally when energy supply matches demand. The Chinese call this en rgy 'Qi' and [he Indians all it 'Prana': Any imbalance or blockage in rhe distribution of this nergy 'an cause pain and disea e. When the system is w rklng \\ 11 and en rgy distribution is balanced. vou feel happy, relaxed, energetic and fr e fr 111. tiffn . and pain.

Thai mage focus s on the main Sen channel'. The careful application of pressure along [he chann Is helps t I' 1 as any energy blockag s and stagnation. Pressing and '[retching mus I rnak s th m more r c puye to (hi flow. In Part Two of this book each Jesson be ln with a diagram f the S n channels to guide your pres ing as you then massage the relevant ecuon of the body. In addition to this, d [5 and ITOWS have b en sup rirnpo ed over [he colour photographs of many of the

( chniqu 0 that you can see clearly th

direction, and the full range of movement inv Ived in all the manipulatl ns.

hat Thai bodywork can do for you

ga i generally accepted as being an effective way of remaining healthy and flexible. However, receiving Thai bodywork is the ultimate lazy and simple way of obtaining all the benefits of yoga and more ~ without having to do it yourself. And when it is your turn to give your partner a massage, you will also feel the

benefit of being the giver. .

This book will guide you towards mastering a comprehensive range of Thai massage and manipulation techniques, and presents you

- .h a flowing' sequence that can be used to ~ intain the body in a youthful condition. The - _:hniques can also be used as a healing

eatrnent for chronic pain (see Part Three). tiffness and loss of flexibility are regarded as -- inevitable result of the ageing process in the stern world .. How you feel - physically, -eltalJy and emotionally - is more important

-- n your mere physical age. Thai bodywork is

- que in its ability to preserve youthfulness.

The secret of Thai bodywork

..-: r is the 'secret of Thai bodywork? The - swer is that it enables you to press your

-- scles and to balance energy levels. ThIS is

- ~I affects flexibility and equalizes the effects

z :nu des on both sides of the body. The ~ .. mt of movement a muscle can produce at UU] determined by the difference between .ength when relaxed and when fully

_ nzracred. When muscles arc tense, they me shorter, even when you are not _ - sciously contracting them. This can happen - n overworking them, by not using them

LEFT: These are two of tbe descriptive epigraphs that were etched in stone by order of King Rama 111. The complete series can be seen at Wat Pho and represents all the surviving ancient texts on Thai traditional massage.

enough or it could be due to emotional tension. Whatever the cause may be, the end result is progressively more restricted movement and the onset of stiffness, aches and pains which are all characteristic of the ageing process.

Muscles that shorten and become tense can create uneven forces on the spine - that allimportant container of the spinal cord. Thi , in turn, creates the back pain, neck pain and headaches that can so easily become a regular feature of daily life. With its unique abilirv [Q stretch all the most important muscles in the body systematically, Thai manipulations enable you to achieve effects which are unlike tho e of any other bodywork.

Thai bodywork should not be regarded as a mere physical experience. Indeed. if mar i all it turns out to be, then it h largely failed to achieve' its real potential. The giving and receiving of Thai bodywork is an ideal way of providing for the ubtle. yet powerful interchange of intrin ic energy between two individual . It i always a two-way process, and achievement depends on the caring and

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13

compassionate way in which it is given. Even in this day and age, Thai bodywork is a vital necessity for everyday life b cause it underpins health and well-being. It is the perfect vehicle for lWO people to come together with a view to

, attaining this mutual balancing of energy and life-force. Thai bodywork embodies all the harmony and rhythm often lacking in our live ""

Thai bodywork in practice

The many t chniques used in Thai b dywork are all designed to facilitate an I stimulate the flow of intrinsic energies and t releai e blockages tbat would otherwise preclude the attainment of balance that is essential for maintaining a healthy, pain-free bod)'. In thl context, 'healthy' and 'pain-free' refer nor only to the purely I hysical bur also [0 the 111 mal, 111 ti nal and spiritual sp cts of ( ne being.

In this book you will fin lover 150 different techniqu s that can be LIS d in a rna ·sage. Feet. palms, thumbs, elbows and knees are all U'" <.: to apply deep pressure along the Sen. Other. quite different techniques, are us d LO applv twists and stretch s, and th 'e resemble a kind of al ph I Y gao At all times the paLe l III asur cI an I, unhurrie I. Wh n moving rom one te hnique to the n xt [he mov rnent should b rhythmical, flowing, harm nious .md smooth.

Thai bodywork starts in the supine position - lying on the back - and then each side i. worked. This is followed by the prone position - lying face downwards - and the sequ nce finishes in th Sitting position. This routine always b gins with th f t, which are ub]e t d to a variety of presses, stretches and flexion that would even surprise a reflexologist! The leg' are systematically positioned through a range of postures that present the energy channels to their best advantage.

However, it is for its manipulations that Thai bodywork is renowned. These are designed [0 stretch every accessible muscle just a little more than it would normally be stretched under the action of strongly contracting antagonistic muscles. In the process, all the principal joints are likewise moved just a Little

14

more than when they are operating under their wn muscle power.

Touch me, stretch me

Touch is one of the greatest medicines. It soothes, releases and comforts. OUf wholeness j nourished by frequent and regular doses of this all-pervading medicine.

In this context, wholeness includes spiritual and emoti nal pect as well as the more easily b erved ph)' ical ones. When looked at with a

knowledge of \"'{le "tern medicine, it is easy to ee h w rn age and manipulation can stimulate the flow of blood and lymph (tissue fluid J. warm the ti sues, improve flexibility and ea, e pain. all f which are essentially physical.

Such 1" the power of touch (hat it also reaches far int th hidden r sses of OUf bemz. t has b en h wn th' t t uch can result m he relea e f h mical substan s within th nervou- y [111 call cI ndorphins, which c n eract pain and produce a powerful feeling

- ell-being.

Thai bodywork involves different forms of uch - pressing, stretching and twisting - hich h. ve b n h n d ro p rfection ov r the ~e. Those wh r ceiv Thai b dywork

regularly will xp ri n fling' f r laxation, peace )[ mind happin s, flexibility and \ ourhfulne ss.

Heal me

The word 'heal" suggests ill health or disease, but irs mearung in the context in which it is used here requir s a much wider definition of health [han i c mrnonly re ognized. Health is not ju [ phy leal 'iJ ell-being or general lack of eli eas : it i a taternent regarding the balance that exi ts between all those factors which cortrrlbute to our sense of 'wholeness', both internal and external. Whilst it would be difflculr to give any accurate, all-embracing definition of what constitutes health, it is characterized by feelings of vitality, flexibility, freedom from pain, contentment and a sense of wh lenes .

The healthy person has, above all else, a balance in his or her life. One of the adverse spin-offs from life in the fast lane is a

de turbance of this balance and when this

ppens, one has to have time and space in +hich to restore that elusive equilibrium. Sharing Thai bodywork with a partner or receiving it from a qualified practitioner is certainly one of the most effective means of doing this,

Stay young, stay healthy

Pain is the biggest single ob tacle to happin ss and pain of any kind, at any 1 vel, is a reflection

f irnbalan e. This results from too much of some things and not enough of others. The body will experience pain if, for example, it has ·00 much rich food or too much violent

xercise. But pains of no less a magnitude will e experienced if insufficient foodis eaten and no ex r is is taken. Pain will also be

xperien .ed when th lesires of the min I

remain unfulfill d but e [ually inc ns pain will e felt when desir is so r estri ted that there is '10 driving fore f I.' any progress.

The quest for health should be regarded as the search for balance in every facer of our lives. Rest and relaxation are wonci- rful ways of .alming the mind and bo Iy to help this halan lng I recess whi h W .ornmonly call

h aling and th re are many things that w 'an do in our daily liv s whi h 'an help to make it happ n. R. C iving Thai bodywork is one of them. Simultaneously, Thai bodywork can give a sublimely rhythmical workout that perfectly balances the body's need for IT10V rnent and '(retching, whilst it also provides a relaxed state in which ex .essive worry and desire seem [l evaporate away:

'The Four Divine States of Consciousness'

As I have mentioned earlier, traditional Thai massage was originally practised in Buddhist temples because of its religious significance. It was regarded as one of the many ways of working towards the 'Four Divine States of Consciousness' and for Buddhists these are a necessary prerequisite for complete happiness. The qualities ernb died in these states are:

• METTA: The desi-re to make others happy and the ability to show loving kindness

• I<ARuNA: Compassion for at. t: 70 and a desire to ease their sufferings

• M OITA: Rejoicing uitrb those t, bo - goodfortune and neuerfeeling e-m:l

• UPEKKHA: Regarding one's felloirs II i bo a prejudice 01' preference.

From the Buddhist viewpoint, th giver ~ massage should be motivated only by the desire to best w loving kindness with total c ncern ~ r the r cipient's physical and emotional pain'

ncl feelings. Massage given with thes motive f rernost is a healing experi nee for the giver a well as the receiver, and intrinsic Life energy will flow between the two.

Thai bodywork treatment

In ord r to give and to receiv Thai bodyw rk, you will n d a I artn r - your sp Lise, friend or p rhaps a rnernbe r of your family. It is most important that you sh ul avoid working with anyone who is much heavier than yourself, particularly when carrying out exercises that may involve heavy lifting or standing on your partner, Thai bodywork is, above all else, an intimate an I warm xperl - nc and it should b carried ut in an nvironrn - nt whi ch I r l110t s ih s features. A warm w ll-v ntilate I r m with diffus I or sub III d lighting is 111 sr conducive to the III ditativ state f the giver and the relaxation of the receiver. It is important that there should be no disturbances or excessive noise, although some people may prefer to have gentle background music played throughout th massage, As the bodyw rk 1. carried out on the floor, a soft but support: mat or blank t s11 uld bused, togeth r with a thin pillow to support the receiver" head, Adequate space should be provided (0 enable the giver to move comfortably around [he receiver.

Thai massage is applied to the clothed body but iris usual for the receiver to be barefoot, It is helpful if clothing takes the form f a thin, natural-fibre tra k suit or imilar type of loo e garmen t, and this is ideal wear for the giver who is also barefoot.

Before giving a massage to someone for the first time it is most important that you

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15

check their medical history and discuss any present health problems wlth them before commencing (see page 17). Immediately before any physical contact is made, you should take a moment to dear your mlnd of all extraneous thoughts so as to be totally centred on your partner's needs and to be able to attend to them in a calm and empathetic state. A few slow, deep breaths with controlled exhalation will help this relaxing process.

Before starting a massage, a Thai practitioner says a prayer to the Father of Medicine a king for guidance and help in relieving the physi al and emotional pain in the patient. You too can say a prayer if you wish.

Throughout the massage your partner should breath n rrnally except when receiving the 'Cobras' (see pages 120-123) and Lifting Spinal TWist (see page 109). Breathing in deeply before the lifts commence and breathing out as the ltfts take pla e encourages en rgy flow t the Int mal rgans, As with all D rrn of massage, pace, rhythm and pressure must be carefully controlled and, above all else there must be a sen f c ntinuou fl w, not only fr m technique to t hniqu but al f energies within the partnership between giver and receiver. In this book wherever po sible the first word usee! in the heading for the ex rises r fers t the a tion of the gi r r where appropriate, the b dy part used by the giver.

The duration of a massage

A Thai massage can take from two to tw -and-ahalf hours to complete but this doe not preclude the possibility of effective massage when there is less time. It is much better to restrict massage to those regions of th body that can be adequately treated in the time available than to speed up and attempt to do a whole body massage in a much shorter time. A selection of short programmes to treat specific conditions is listed in Part Three. In addition, a basic routine for the beginner is given at the end of the book (see page 141). If you are new to bodywork do not attempt the more advanced manipulations until you are able to do the basic routine smoothly and effectively

16

Beware of over-stretching Over-stretching can cause injury. After just a short experience of giving massage it soon becomes very apparent that every individual has a different pain threshold, sensitivity and overall flexibility. When applied to some people, deep pressure produces little more than a mild sensation, whereas for others mild pressure can - at times - be quite excruciating. Flexibility and tolerance of stretching show the same variability. It is most important that one learns to recognize quickly to what degree pressure and stretching can be used. Pressing can cause pain if applied too vigorously. Always start with light pressure and increase very slowly. Use visual clues from your partner to guide YOLl as to the maximum pressure to use.

It is always important t get verbal

confirmation from your partner that the stretches are not excessive. Age is no indication of supplen ss and pain threshold. Some very y ling people can b stiff whereas others in their seventies who have cared for their bodies can demonstrate a remarkable flexibility.

Caring for yourself

Good balance and posture are of vital significance for the giver of Thai bodywork as muscular strain can easily be sustained if unnatural an I str ssful po iti ns are ad peed. Leaning in with the full body weight is a far more effective way of applying pressure and performing some of the extensive stretching movements than trying to achieve thes with only the muscular power f the arms and shoulders. The giver should feel as comfortable as the receiver since any discomfort will interrupt concentration and destroy the harmony of movement that is so characteristlc of good Thai bodywork.

Rhythm and movement: a pure synthesis The words 'flowing' and 'rhythmic' exactly describe the essence of Thai bodywork with its sequence of unhurried presses, stretches and twists. For the beginner, the vast number, variety and the subtlety of technlques used may be somewhat bewildering. At all times, the position and movements of the giver in relation

to the receiver are every bit as important as the way in which the techniques are applied,

uances of tempo and pressure seem endless and orie technique dissolves into another with total smoothness and harmony. Form seems as important as movement. The symmetries and shapes developed and sustained are as dramatic as the way in which they evaporate away. There is never a suggestion of haste, and to the receiver time seems almost to stand still.

Thai bodywork is a fusion of techniques each of them with its own specific effect. Some techniques apply pressure to the Sen channels

(see page 14) while other produce the wonderful twist and trerches tha often resemble applied yoga. Pre ing i me means of stimulating movement of energy in the en channels and manipulations tretch . - les Feet, palms, thumbs, elbow and knees ar ::::e tools of the Thai therapist. The unhum . and smooth flow that characterize thls form ~ bodywork detracts from the very deep pr - re and powerful stretches that are u ed. Tha: bodywork is like a beau tifully choreographed duet: the basic theme is rep ated over and over again, but with subtle variation' for each body part that is treated.

CONTRA-INDICATIONS TO THAI MASSAGE

AD w words of caution must be stat ct. All those incredlbl shape' and flowing movements that constitute the t\ manlpulatlve side of Thai massage can be potentially damaging to both giver and receiver, 10 give a massage of this kind, at even a very modest level, requires great skllJ I strength and poise which call only be acquired with correct [raining. Even a flt young person can be hurt when subjected t retche and twists that ar inc rre tiy applied or

imply overdone. III addition, there are the usual contra-tndtcanons to the use of Thai massage which are essentially [hose that would apply to any form of massotherapy:

WHEN NOT TO USE THAI BODYWORK

• Do not massage anyone with a serious heart condition, btgh blood pressure or cancer • Thai massage is unsuitable/or those who suffererfrom brittie bones (osteoporosis) .

• Never massage anyone who has an artificial joint, such as a hip 01' knee replacement. • Those suffering from skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis or' shingles sbould not' receive massage on the affected areas.

• Many oftbe exercises in this book are unsuitableforpregnant women and Thai massage is not recommended during pregnancy.

• Varicose veins should not be deeply massaged.

. If tbe receiuer has any condition that raises doubts in. the mind of (be girer as /0 tbe suitabi llJ 0'" { 15 type of massage it is aiuiays best to err 017 tbe side of caution and to refer this person .0 bis or her doctor; who may be able to determine uibetber massage is contra-indicated.

Z -I ;::c

o e c

q

o z

CHAPTER 1

THE MUSCLES

TARGETS FOR THE THAI THERAPIST

Ageing is often more to do with how we feel than with the pa sage of time. Decreasing flexibility, stiffness tension, aches and pains all contribute to the feeling of getting old. Most chronic pain - even headaches - is associated with the mu culo- kef eta f J tem and originates from muscle which remain contracted (stay shortened) even in tbeir relaxed state. Muscles are the anatomical targets of the Thai masseur.

Skeletal mu c!e i contractile tissue. It provides the force (effot t) for all uoluntary mouement. Mu cle are atta bed to bone (or ometimes connective tis ue or cartilage) by means of tendons. These areflexible and enormously strong, inelastic structures thatarise from the connective tissue that couers the muscles. At their outer ends, tendon fuse with connect! e ti ue that covers the bone or cartilage. Whene er a muscle contracts it shortens and this create a pull that is transmitted through the tendons to bring about mouernent.

18

The superficial muscles of the body

In the living body; the superficial muscles cover layers of deep muscles which, in turn, may cover even deeper muscles. Seen here, the relationship between the body's natural curves and me uperficial muscles beneath the skin and subcutaneous fat is clear. Some deep muscle (shaded orange) can be glimpsed beneath the superficial muscles.

Trapezius

Iil--- Deltoid Infrasplnarus Teres minor 'Ieres major

"'"'Mf-l ..... -iH:-- Iarlsslmus dorsi

maxi m us

Rectus femoris

• "ledla1is

Biceps femoris

------ TibiaUs anterior

TIbialis pas enor --~~--- ~neu longus

Deep muscles

Superficial muscles

19

-f I m

s:

C VI n

r-

VI

How Muscles Work

deep into fhe muscle tissue. Indeed, all the organ of the body depend upon connective ti ue for support and to bind their various components together. It is connective tissue that form the supporting framework for the den e network of blood capillaries, nerves and lymph ve els that are essential components of the rnu cular system. It also provides the ultrasmooth urfac s that enable each muscle to move against its neighbours with almost no Irictlon. Painful adhesions OCCUl~ when this property of the connectlv tissue is disturbed.

Muscles act on the bones, and these form a very complex system of levers. A muscle i usually attached by its tendons to the bone positioned on either side of a joint. Whene\"er the muscle contracts, the j int act like a pivot and movement is created between the bone.

Muscle cannot work by itself. it depends upon many other tissues, such a rnyof cia. This not only provides the outer coverin "Of the muscle but also penetrates deeply '" thin the muscle, binding together bundl of mu le fibres and carrying nerve and blood ca ,"anes

th« bone

~--- Muscle fascicle - CI bundle of muscle jibl'es

Muscle fibre

r+-r-r-r-r-r-r-r- Myofascta - the connecuue tissue framework 0/ the muscle

Diagram of mu de i ue (enlarged)

This sectioned muscle sbous (he arrangement oftae tissues that provide/or its supporttng frameioork and its contractile ability.

The Central Nervous System

The brain and spinal corel make up the central nervous system (eNS) which is the controlling computer for all body parts, both involuntary (such as breathing) and voluntary, such as the skeletal muscles. Muscles are linked to the central nervous system by two kinds of nerves:

• Motor nerves: these carry nerve impulses from the CNS to make the muscles contract.

20

• ensory nerues. these carry nerve impulses from en e organ in the muscles to the CNS.

The en e organ in muscles are called spindle organs because of their shape. They provide con [ant information about the state of muscle contraction and any change in it. The tendons also COntain sense organs which tell the brain how much pull they are being subjected to as the muscles contract.

ANTAGONISTIC MUSCLES

Scapula

Humerus

- ep and triceps muscles are the antagonistic pailt: provide mucb of tbe effort ./OT /Zexing and 'ending the arm at tbe elbow, and raising the arm - etcards and forioards at tbe shoulder:

What is a muscle?

- ~"cle is a bundJe of vast numbers of muscle

- es. aU arrang d lengthwise and parall I with

- another. Muscle fibres are the basic

-:racrile elements within muscles. All muscl

have the ability to contract and thus - -:en. They contract in an 'all-Of-nothing' way _ .-;: i not possible for a muscle fibre to -:._--aC[ just a little. FuJI contraction Of no rracnon are the only tw possibilities.

_,iferent muscle fibres respond in different

_ - c:o the impulses that arrive through m tor <3--. ome have what is called low threshold ::.':: . e. This means that they contract under .-- .ow frequency of motor-nerve stimulation.

-e!'S are far less sensitive and need much _ er requency stimulation. These are said to _ -" 2. high threshold. Within the same muscle are rnu cle fibres with differing - sholds, to cover the complete spectrum low to high. The different re ponse

thresholds of the individual muscle fibres allow the muscle to contract smoothly and progressively as more of them come into action as motor-nerve stimulation increases.

s: c VI (i r-

VI

-; I m

Muscles at rest

Muscles can only contract, th y cannot actively stretch. 'When a muscle stops contracting it dep nds on its ant g rusts to str teh it back to its normal relaxed length when they contract. Even an apparently relaxed muscle ha a mall proportion of its fibres In a contracted tare These give a muscle its tone. Mu de one depends on a constant, lew-frequency rno 0"'nerve stimulation that originates in the brain _: is just enough to keep the lowe [ochre; . fibres contracted. Any disturbance 0" n ~"-'-tone can seri usly aff ct rnu de : .... - Deficient tone makes the mu de flaccid so that parr of its potential ~ ::-- _ _. -

used to 'take up the slack' in rea : _

movement. Too much cone dec _ ""'" --::: int thinking that the m de .... t: -=-_ -

so inhibits some of the contra antagoni t ,which graa

Functional muscle groups

Smooth, variable, co-ordinated movement results from muscles functioning in groups. A group that flexes a joint, for example, interacts with and opposes the action of one that extends it Two such groups of muscles are said to be antagonistic, Bicep and triceps are the main muscles from the antagonistic groups that flex and extend the elb w. Other major functional groups are the quadriceps muscles, which extend the knee and flex the thigh, and the hamstring muscles, which flex the knee and extend the thigh. Each of the four quadriceps and three hamstring muscles works slightly dlff r ntly from the others to include a degree of rotation in either directl n.

et'el) muse e jro

The Therapeutic Effects of Thai Bodywork

Pressing and stretching are where Thai bodywork excel. At this point it is appropriate to look ar what happens to our muscles and how pre ing and tretching can help them. One of the rna t common muscl.e problems is a gradual hortening of the relaxed muscle length. This ha many causes. Those who do too much heavy, repetitive manual work or weight [raining in the gym can develop 111U des with higher than normal tone. This is due to increased numbers of mus Ie fibres remaining contracted, ven when the muscle is in it- 'relaxed (ate. Oth r factors such as injury; poor posture and emotional stress can al 0 cau e chi to happen.

The rno [ immediate effect of muscle

hortenlng ! reduced movement at the j int where the mu. de w rks. Thi is becau the eli erence between the r laxed length and the contracted length f the muscl is I S5 than it

hould be. nfortunarely, it i this difference that determines how much movement the mu cle can produce, so stiffness and reduced joint mobllity is the result of muscle horterung.

Other unpleasant condition - can al 0

prevail. When a mus Ie b come ten and

harte ned , its spindle organ send impul es to the brain which tell it that the muscle i in a state of contraction. The brain now responds by reducing motor stimulation to its antagoni tic muscle. This muscle now loses tone and, if the condition persists, it will gradually weaken. Soon it will not even match the strength of its antagonist, which will shorten still further since it will not be pulled hard enough to stretch it. A state of imbalance quickly results which, in some cases, can produce' postural problems leading to chronic pain.

This is not yet the end of the story! The myofascia has large areas between its cells which contain fibres. Some of these are elastic; orne are not. The non-elastic ones serve to trengthen the tissue . .As a muscle shortens, the myofascia contracts and shortens with it.

Gradually it loses some of its elasticity, if it is nor repeatedly stretched to what should be the

correct relaxed length of the muscle. Elastic fibres become replaced by the non-elastic kind and the tissue becomes slightly wrinkled. Movement of the neighbouring tissues becomes less smooth and this can cause discomfort which can also lead to abnormal use of the affected parts. As the rnyofascia shrinks clue to lack of stretching, it thickens and becomes fibrotic impeding normal muscle stretching during relaxati n and further reducing movement and Joint mobility. All these interrelated effects mean pain, stiffness, lowered resistance to joint injury and reduced performance on the sports field,

The benefits of pressing and stretching

The deep pres s of Thai bodywork squash the mu des, stretching th my fascia sideways. Thi helps to break down fibrotic tissue and

tirnulates the production of elastic fibres.

Blood flow through the myofascial captllart s is enhanced and nergy flow thr ugh th en ts lmpr ved, Th se hanges help to all viate p in and make aU the t1ssues am nab\ to the eff cts

f stretching that are to follow.

The large-scale, sustained stretches that characterize Thai manipulations are applied In a myriad different directions. The practitioner constantly changes the angle f approa 11 by altering the relative p sitl 115 of different parts of the body. Str tching of muscles - even those that are abnormally shortened - takes them just beyond what their normal relaxed length would be. Muscle spindle organs respond to this by 'telling' the brain that the muscle is relaxed, inhibitory nerve impulses t the antagonistic mu de stop and they s on regain normal tone, Regular Thai bodywork stretches comprehensively restore balance within and between functional groups of muscles to ease pain, increase flexibility and improve posture.

Improving and maintaining flexibility

The overall flexibility of the body's movable joints starts to diminish from the early twenties unless positive steps are taken to work them

SHORTENED MUSCLES

.JlJIlWH-- Calf Muscle (Gastrocnemius)

T7Je gastrocnemius muscle shown here can be so seriously shortened as a result of wearing higb heels tbat uiatetng barefoot becomes painful. Thai massage eastty corrects this conduion.

through a wide range of movements at regular intervals. The practice of yoga could achieve this but reaching an adequate level of expertise requires much application and discipline. Thai massage, on the other hand, requires nothing more than placing your body in the hands of an expert practitioner. After a session lasting around two to two-and-a-half hours your muscles and joints will have received an intensive workout, the thoroughness of which YOLl could never hope to equal by yourself. The improvement in your flexibility will be noticeable immediately. This is because Thai bodywork always stretches muscles and manipulates joints just a little further than you would be capable of when unaided.

The treatment of many conditions Though unsuitable for people with serious health problems and those who have had

replacement surgery; for other Thai' .

can seem like a miracle in the way it treats - - - .::= conditions that result from phy iC':h ....::. - emotional stress. Repetitive strain injuries. ~-ez.:and tear and sports injuries are the commo .es; results of physical stress. The signals that warn you of its effects vary from stiffness weakness and pain to serious loss of performance. The indicators of emotional stress are vastly more complex. They can be purely emotional, such as worry, anxiety and anger, or behavioural, as with over-eating and alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse. Inability to relax, disrupted sleep patterns and general irritability are also observed. Eventually, emotional stress manifests itself through a range of physical symptoms that include headache , Indigestion, constipation, back pains and skin conditions.

Enhancing sports performance

A flexible body is one of the keys to fitness and performance. The other is a musculature with total balance between antagonistic groups, with every individual muscle able to assume its normal relaxed length when not contracting. This is probably a combination that even the most highly trained athletes fail to achieve. Including Thai bodywork as part of their training regime can help all sportsmen and women towards this ideal condition. It will enable them to undertake more intensive training with a significantly reduced risk of injury, and this will result in an ability to sustain even higher levels of performance safely.

Treating sports injuries

Most sports injuries involve damage to mu de fibres, myofascia or tendons and they are commonly caused by overuse of muscles tha are not functionally balanced with other muscles in their group and with their antagonists. A healthy, normal muscle has an amazing capacity to perform repeunvery without injury Thai bodywork received regularly provides maintenance that ae muscles need .. When injury does occur. _~ controlled stretches and manipulations ave zr; unrivalled ability to speed healing and restore normal pain-free function.

• The Muscles •

Head and Neck

REGION LESSON

MUSCLE

Head and neck Lessons 5 &

ATTACHMENTS (origin lmd insenton)

MUSCLE ACfION

KEY THAI MANLPULATIONS ACTING ON THE MUSCLE

Erector spinae (Sacrospinalis) (see also page 27)

Head and neck Lessons 3,5 & 8

Sternocleidomastoid

Trapezius

0: Lower-neck (cervtcal) vertebrae, upper-back (thoracic) vertebrae

I: Upper cervical vertebrae base of ,kUU and nb,

0: ,\1.3.>1 '-' bone bc::hn0 ear

\~

(Both Sides) Holds neck erect and bends it backwards.

(One side) flexes head and neck sideways

'Both sides) Tilts head

• Bow & Arrow pinal Tlvis[ (see page 78)

• Pulling the Turned Head (see page 96)

• Interfccked Hand/Neck Press (see

/Jage 126)

• Seated Lateral Arm Lever (see pag« 129)

• Butterfly boulder Stretch (see pC/ge 131)

• Butterfly Manlpulatlon (see page 131)

• Pulling the Tlrrned Head (see page 96)

• Stretching [he Neck & Shoulders (see page J 26)

• Seared l.areral Arm Lever (seepage 129)

, shoulder on

Levator scapulae Rhornboldeu

minor

Infra pinaru.

Erector spinae

Serratus anterior

Levator scapulae

Head and neck Lessons 3, 5 & 8

24

0: Firs[ tour cervical vertebrae

I: Top inner angle of [he shoulder blade (scapula)

Raise shoulder blade and pulls lr towards spine

• Bow & Arrow Spinal1\vist (see page 78)

• Pulll ng [he Th med Head (see page 96)

• I nrerlo eked Hand/Neck Press (see page 126)

• Seated Lateral Arm Lever (see page 129)

Head and Neck continued

r, REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION KEY THAI ~l.l,_\'1p['u.nO\S
LESSON (origin and insertion) ACTING ON THE MCsa..E
F!Zius Head and neck 0, Base of skulJ Rotates and rallies • Bow & Arrow Spinal TVli5t (ser> page
Lessons 3, 5, 7 (OCCiPL,t), eervlca! shoulder blades, • Lifti ng Head to S rralght Knees (see pog?
&8 vertebrae two (0 six via (One side) Flexes and • Lifting Head [0 Crossed Knees (see
the nuchal llgarnent, rotates neck page 8.5)
and the last cervical • Foot to Armpit Stretch (see page 92)
and all thoracic • Pu Lling the Arms (.,ee page 95)
vertebrae • PLllling the 'Iurned Head. (see page 96)
[, Outer end of • Rotatlng the Shoulder (see page 102)
collarbone (clavicle), • Lifting Spinal Twist (see page l09)
spine of shoulder blade • Standing Cobra. (see page 121)
(scapula) • Seated Laternl Arm Lever (see page 129) Shoulders

~$minor

Shoulder Lessons 3,5 & 8

0: Outer margin of shoulder" blade (scapula)

I: Back of the head of humerus

Rotates ~11.·m outwards

• Liftl11g Head to Straight Knees (see JJaglJ 85)

• lifting Head to Crossed Knees (see

page 85)

• Pulling tile Arms (see page 95)

• l3ackw;II"(1 Arm Lever (see pc./ge 127)

• Elbow Pivot Lever (see page 128)

• Stretching the Arm In the Triangle POSition (see /lage 128)

• Seated Lateral Ann Lever (see page 129)

• Buncl'ny Shoulder Srretch (see page 131)

-~major

Shoulder Lessons 3, 6 & 8

0: Lower hflif of outer rna rgln of or shoulder blade (scapula)

I: Inside margin on Lipper humerus

E.~Iends arm backwards and rotates i, Inwards

• llftlng He.lcI to Sml1g11t Knee,s(.~ee /Xl.gg 85)

• Urtir1g Head to Crossed Knees (see page 85)

• Pulling [he Arm in the Side Position (see pagrt ]04)

• Stretching the Arm In the 'n"lang)e Posltlon

(see page J 05)

• Backward Arm Lever (see page 127)

• Elbow PiVOI Lever (see page 128)

• Seated Lateral Arm Lever (se.e page 13

• Butterfly Shoulder Stretch (see page J ~

=_ PlQspinatus

Shoulder Lessons 5, 6, 7 &8

0: Shoulder blade above the spine (scapula)

I: Outer rnargln an top of humerus

.R~ tses ann (abducts)

• FOOl 10 Arm pit Stretch {lee fNll!e 91

• Pulling Spinal 'l\viS{ (see page 1

• Kneeling Cushton, Simng 5~ S::!...~ & Intimate Cobra tsee JY.i?i;::> : -!-.;

120, 12]& 123)

• Elbow Pivot t..e.-er _. _~ _"

• Butterfly Slmulder 5-=-...;.1'" ~ _- ~

-4a.spinatus

As for supr'lS,p' allis

Shoulder Lessons 5, 6, 7 &8

0: Inner shoulder blade L Back of head of humerus

Ro ra res ar n1 ou rwards

::;..;scapularis

Shoulder Lessons 3, 5, 6 &8

0: From of shoulder blade (scapula)

I: Inner surface of upper humerus

Pulls arm downwards, rotates arm towards chesr

-I .I m

s C

V1;

n I m V1

Shoulders contmued

LE REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACfION KEY THAI MANIPULATIONS
LESSO (origin and insertion) ACTING ON THE MUSCLE
id hnulder O: Collar bone and Raises (abducts) arm As for supraspinatus
Lc son 5,6. - outer shoulder blade (see page 25)
& r Humerus
tus houlder a Ribs 1·9 Antagoni lie to • Kneeling ushlon, Sitting Stool and
ior Less Il'-& 1 Inner ItLlfgln oi rhomboideus muscles, Standing Cobra (see pages J 18-119.
houlder blade helps 10 mbLLlZe 120 &121)
. pub snoukicr blade • feet to Back Stretch (.~ee page 132) Muse

Delta

Serra anter

Cbest and Abdominal tuscles

&8

0: Collnr bone. sternum

I: Front of humerus

Rotates arm toward chc t, adducrs arm

Pectoralis major

Lesson ' 5, 6, .,

Subs capularts

Pectoralis major

Rectus abdomlnls

• Pulling the Arms (see PltlJe 95)

• Romdng the houlder (see /Juge 102)

• houldcr to Opposite Knee Spinal Twisl (see P'18f! 105)

• Side Back Bow (see pa,ge 107)

• lateral & Crossed SciSSOl' Stretch (see pages 108 e- 122)

• Kneeling ushton, Sluing Stool & tanding Cobra (see pa,.r:!,es 118-119, 120 is- 121)

• Backward Arm Lever (see pC/ge J 27)

• Srrcrchlng "he AI'I11 ln the 'Irim,gle

Position (see page 128)

• Elbow Pivot Lever (site page 128)

• Butterfly Shoulder Stretch (see page Ij1)

• FCCl lO Back Stretch (see page lj2)

Rectus abdominis

Lessons 3, 6,7 & 8 I: Cartilages of 5th, 6,h, 7th ribs

Flexes spine forwards

Abdomen

0: Top of pubic bone

26

• The Half Bridge (see page 83)

• Side Back Bow (see /;age J07)

• Lateral & Crossed Scissor Stretch r-~ee pages 108 & 122)

• Kneeling Cushion, Sitting Stool & Standing Cobrll (see pages 118-119, 120 & 121)

• Feet [0 Back Stretch (see page 132)

Back

t, REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION lillY TBM MANIPULATIONS
LESSON (origin and insertion) ACTING ON THE MUSCLE
r spinae Back 0: Lower-neck CB!)~h sides) Extends • Chest to four Thigh Pressing (s
spinalis) Lessons 2, 3, 5 (cervical) vertebrae, ~pJ I'lC backwards. • 'Praying Mantis' (see p'tqe 6,l)
I
page &B upper-back (thoracic) (On<:: ide) 'I\vists spine • Rmalinl'\ the Hlps (se« pClge 78)
vertebrae and flexes [0 one skle • Hocking &. Rolling the Back (see
I: Upper-cervical • The Plough (see /Jag!.! SO)
vertebrae, base of sku II • Knedng the Buttocks (see page
and rlhs · hinning the Tllighs swpap,e B
• The Half Br'idge (see /!~I[!.e 83)
• Lifting Head to Straight Knees (.~
• I,lftlng Hcatl to Crossed Knees G
• Uftlrlg Splnal 'Iwlsr (see page lOt
• PI-t:sslrlg Head III Knees (Situ p(l,~ eepa'Jf?61

page.

8J) 2)

ee page 85) ~ee pti,qe 85) 9)

e 1,,0) • Butterfly M:mlpul<lUon (se« /m_r<(! IdJ)

uprusplnaius

Latissimus dorsi

Quad rarus I u mborurn

0: Lower slx

thoracic vertebrae, lumbar vertebrae, iliac crests

I: From of humerus

Rotates :II'm towards chest, pulls arm backwards and Inwards

Back

Lessons 3, 5, 6 &8

Back continued

CLE REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION KEY THAI MANIPULATIONS
LESSON (origin and insel'tion) ACflNG ON THE MUSCLE
mboideus Back 0: Last cervical and flrst Pulls shoulder blades • Bow & Arrow Splnal Iwlsr (see page 78)
rand Lessons 3, 5 & 6 fI ve rh 0 rae Ie vertebrae (scapula) towards spine • Lifting Head to Straight Knees (see page
r I: Inner margin of ' Lifting Head [0 Crossed Knee" (see page
shoulder blade ' Foot [0 Armpit Stretch (see page 92)
(scapula) • Rotating the Shoulder (see page 102)
• lifting Spinal 'J\vlst (see page 109)
dratus Back 0: lop of Iliac crests Sideways bending of • Baw & Arrow Sptnal Twtst (see pc/ge 78)
Drum Lessons 3, 6, 7 1: Lumbar vertebrae lower back • Stretching the Arm in the 'n'iangle
&8 and 12th rib Po~itlon (see pc/ge .105)
, Lifting Spinal 'l\vist (see page 109)
• Knee or Hand to Buttock/Back Backwai
(see page 115)
'Seated Lateral Arm Lever (see page f29) MUS

Rho mino majo

Qua lumb

HlP and Buttock

85) 85)

'd

Gluteus maxlmus

0: Sacroiliac joint, back edge of ilium

I: Below the head of femur on Its posterior surface

Draws leg backwards ;1J1l1 rotates thigh

o LI twa rds

Buttocks Lessons 2, :I & 6

Gluteus

, Chest [0 FOot Thigh Pressing (.,ee paBe 61) , 'Praying Manti' (see page 62)

• Romtlng the Hlp (see page 63)

• The Plough (see page 80)

• Kneeing the Backs of the Thighs

(see page 81)

, Shin Fling the Thlgl18 (see puge 82)

• Kneeing the Bmto ks (see page 82)

, LJftlng Head co Crossed Knees (see jJtlJ!,(185)

• Shoulder to Opposite Knee Spinal Twist (see page 105)

Piriformis

Piriformis

1: Top of femur (great trochanter)

Draws thigh outwards, rotates thigh outwards

0: Front surface of the

Hips

Lessons 2 & 6

sacrum

28

• 'Praying Mantis' (see page 62) , Rocking the Hlp (see ptlge 68)

• Shoulder [0 Opposite Knee Spinal 'Twist (seepage 69)

• Stretching Crossed Leg Horizontally (see page 69 and page 106)

Legs

-l I m

~ ~t:SCLE

REGION LESSON

ATTACHMENTS (origin find insertion)

MUSCLE ACTION

KEY THAI MANIPULATIONS ACTING ON THE MUSCLE

"'soas major

Legs

lessons 6 & 7

0: Transverse processes of all lumbar vertebrae and last thorucic vertebra

I: Femur just below hip joint (lesser trochanter)

Flexes rhlgh up towards abdomen, flexes spine forwards

• Swinging the Legs (see page 79)

• Knee Pivot HI [J Stretch (see page 10)

• Side Back Bow (see page 107)

• ReverseH ~11 f Lot u s Leg 1.i f! (see page 115)

• Knee or Hanel to Buttock/Back Backward,

(see page 115)

• Backward Seasaw Leg LiFt (see pClge 116)

• Standl rig Backward Leg Lifr (see pagf! 113)

• 1<J1eeling Cushion, Sltllng Stool and Standing andIntlmate Cobra (:~ee pages 118-119, 120 & 121)

• Latenll and Crossed SC15$01' Stretches (see

p&rge J08)

• Side and Prone Positions (,\'f:!e_/)aj!ps 99 (; 123)

• Wheelbarrow (see page 1~2)

• Knee to Calf Press (see page 12:3)

ilCUS

As for psoes major

Legs

Lessons 6 & 7

0, Froili of Iliac bones, top of SllCrUiTI

I: lbgctllCr wlth psoas rnalor

Flexes thigh II p towards abdomen

U mstrtngs:

E ceps femoris, Semitendinosus, ~mimembran;;sus

Legs

Lessons 2, 3 '* 6

0, (BIceps femoris) Ischium and pcstertor upper shaft (If remLlr; (Scmltcl'\di nOSlJS unci sem lrnembranosus) ischium

I: (BIceps femorl~) HCH,I of Abula; (Semuendrnosus) Inner surface of tlblal shaft: (Sernlrnernbranosus) Inner condyle of [he rlbla

Flexe~ knee, raises lowe I' leg, rotates th 1),\ h inwards

• Chest to Foot Thigll Pressing (.w:e

page (1)

• 'Praying Mantis' (.~ee page 62)

• ''ILI.g of W,II" (see pC/Ba (6)

• Pressing in the Splits Poslrion (seepage 70)

• Half Lotus Buck Rock & Roll (see pa,ge 72)

• Vertlcwll;11 F WeLlS Thigh Press (.w:e page 72)

• Illli~lxl 1'00[ Leg Stretch (.'fee page 74)

• Venlcallcg Stretch (see page 74)

• The PI.ough (see page &0)

• Lifting Head \0 SII''Jlght Knee (see /Xlf!t' -

• Knee to I'll p Flex (see page 1(6)

• S t I'C rc II I ng til C C I'OS se cl Leg Hol'1Zl)l:' (.w;a pClge 106)

Legs

Lessons 2 & 6

0: Lower margin of pubic bone

J: Inner surface of tlblal shaft

Flexes knee, rotates knee Inwards. adduces thlgh

• 'lllg of W~1t" (see page 66

• P ressl n gin rile SplifS Po~-

page 70)

• Half Lotus Press tsee p.;; _ ",

• Half lotus Bac_.: It! '_ -'" :=

• C orkscrew be:<'. <="_

• Grape Pn:;;.~ - JXr:]t! 1

• K.'1l:'e?-

Legs continued

MllSCL

E REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION KEY THAI MANIPULATIONS
LESSON (origin and insertion) AGrING ON THE MUSCLE
rius Legs 0: Frnru of illnc bone FI exes thigh, ro La tes • Presslng the Th rned-ln Leg (see page
Lessons 2 & 7 I, Inner surface of lhi)lh outwards • Lateral and Crossed scissor Stretches
upper tibia (see pC/gel OS s 722)
• Standing Backward Leg Lift see page
• Knee to Buttock/Backward L.eg LIFt
(see page J 15)
• Reverse Half torus Leg Lift (see pc/ge
· , .. J 67)

Sarto

113)

115) Backwai d Seesaw Leg Lift (see page 1/6)

• Whcelbm','ow (see pClge 122)

Peroneus longus

major

Illacus

vastus lateralls

Gracilis

vasrus intermedius

Adductor.

Biceps femoris Semitendinosus Semi rnern br-a nasus

ReCtLlS femoris

artorlus

vastus medialis

Gastrocnemius

Tibialis anterior

Tibialis posterior

30

Legs continued

REGION LESSON

ATIACHMENTS (origin and insertion)

MUSCLE ACTION

_r':SCLE

Legs

Lessons 2, 3, 6 &7

KEY TR..IJ ~ll,_\l?t_..::

ACTL -G OX lliE ~~ scz

.Jadriceps:

0: (RF) Ilium of pelvis (Vast i) Femur

I: Via patellar (kneecap) ligament co ubla

Extends leg at knee, flexes thigh at hip

Biceps femoris

Peroneus longus

• 'Praying Mantis' (see page 62)

• Pressing the Turned-in leg (. ee fXlge 6-

• Cork 'crew (see page 73)

• The Half Bridge (seepage 83)

• Pressing the Back of the Extended Leg (see page 99)

• Pressing the Flexed Leg (see pC/ge 99)

• Shoulder to Opposlte Knee Spinal Twist

(see pc/ge 105)

• Knee Pivot Hlp trercb (see page 107)

• Side Back Bow (.,ee {)age J07)

• foot Cracker (see pelge J 12)

• Pressing F ct to Burl ck (see page 113)

• Standing Backward Leg un (.<;ee pC/ge 113)

• Reverse FIlII f Lows Leg Flex (see page 11q)

• Reverse Half Lotus Leg Lirl (see IX/Be 1.15)

• Knee LO Bunock/Backward Leg Lift

(.wJepli/l1! 115)

• Backward Sec~tII\I Leg Lift (sao page 116)

• Whcclb~llTOW (see {)age 122)

• Lateral and Cro sed Scissor Stretches (see pages 108 & 122)

• Knee to Calf Press (see jJt/ge 123)

(J t= m Vl

31

Legs continued

Aca

-:- I iEG:O.· AITACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION KEY THAI MANIPULATIONS
:..=.s5O. " (origin and insertion) ACTING ON THE MUSCLE
~ .:.......~ 0: Pubic bone and Draws leg towards • Pressing the Leg in the Tree Position (see
1.=1'05 ~ 3&6 Ischium midline (adduction) page 56)
1: Inner margin of • Half Lotus Press (see page 71)
upper femur • Half lOlUS Back Rock & Roll (see page 7-
• Corkscrew (see page 73)
• Pressing in the Splits Position (see
page 70)
• Swinging the Legs (see pC/ge 79)
• The Plough (see page 80)
• Uftlng Head to Crossed Knees (see page 85
• Grape Presses in all positions (see pC/ge 1
• Knee pivot Hlp Stretch (see page 107)
• Lateral and Crossed Scissor Stretch (see
perge 108)
neus Legs 0: Upper, outer surface Flexes rOOt downwards • Pressing the feet Sideways (see page 45)
us Lesson 1 of fibula and turns it outwards • Pressing tile Crossed Feet (see page 45)
I: Base of first (everts) • Pressing the Feet Backwards lind
rnetatarsa! Forwards (see page 17)
lis anterior Legs 0: Outer margin of Flexes foor upwards at • Pressing Feet lind Ankles (see page 45)
Lessons 1 & 7 lbia ankle and turn u • Pressing the feet Sideways (see PCIg_f:! 451
r·. ~...., cl TrI<::\ :I;"r ru Inwards • Pressing the Feer F (wards & Backwards
bones (see page 45)
• Pressing the Crossed Feet (see pag« 45)
• Stretching the Arched Foot (see page 50
• Pressing Thigh to Calf (see perge 64)
• Pressing Heel to Butrock (see page 112)
• Pressing the Thigh & Pulllng the Foot
(~'ee page J J 2)
• Foot Cracker (see pc/ge l.l2)
• Reverse Half l, tus Leg flex (see page 11
lis Legs 0, Postertor of Tibia Flexes foot arch, turns • Pressing the Feet Sldeways (see page 45)
erior Le son 1 and Fibula upper shafts fOOL Inwards and • Pressing the Feet Backwards and
I: Third and fourth su pports the arch Forwards (see page 47)
metatarsals • Flexing the Ankle Backwards (see page 4
rocnemius Legs 0: Inner surface and Extends fOOL • Flexlng and Stretching [he Leg (see page 6"
Lessons 2, 3, 6 Outer surface of lower downwards and flexes • Pressing in the Splits Posit.ion (see page 70
&7 femur leg at knee • Reeking & Rolling [he Back (see page 80
1: Heel bone • !Jfling Head to Straight Knees (see page 8
(calcaneus) • Ver!lc~1 Leg Stretch (see page 74)
• Stretching the Crossed Leg Horizontally
(see page 69 & 107)
• Knee to Calf Press (see page 123)
us Legs O:Backofupper!lb~ Extends foot As for gastrocnemius
Lessons 1, 2,3,6 and fibula downwards • Press ing th e Feet Backwa rds and
&7 1: Heel bone Forwards see a e47 ".~

Pero tong

Tibia

Tibia post

Gast

Sale

(calcaneus)

o p g ? • Flexing the Ankle Backwards (see page 48)

32

[) 00)

4)

8)

6) D D 5)

Arms & Hands

- REGION ATTACHMENTS MUSCLE ACTION KEY THAI ~1AN PULAT10NS
LESSON (origin and insertion) ACTING ON THE MUSCLE
Arm 0: Scapula (twO heads) Flexes arm at elbow • Lifting Head rn rrnight Knees tsee pm!!! 8
Lessons 3, 5 & 8 L Radius • Pulling the Arms (see page 95
• Feet to Back Stretch (see page j~
5 Ann 0: Humems two Extends arm at elbow • Stretching the Arm in the Triangle
Lessons 5. 6 & 8 heads), scapula Poslrion (supine and side) (see
I: Ulna j)uges 92 & 105)
• Backward Arm Lever (see page Ill)
• Elbow Pivot Lever (see page 128)
• Butterfly Shoulder Stretch (see page 131
and hand Arm 0: Humerus, radius, Extend palms of hands • Rotating the WriSt (see page 94)
sors Lesson 5 ulna backwards at wrist, ~tncl
1: WI'iSl bones, hand all the fingers ancl
bones, tlnger and thumbs
rhumb bones
and hand Am1 0: Humerus, radtus, f'1 'x patrns of han Is • Stretching the Arm In the Irlangle
Lessons 5 & 6 ulna upwards at wrist, and PO$itiul1 (su pine and side) (se« jJCl.ge.1
1: WriSt bones, hand ~lngel'S and thumbs 92 &- J05)
b ncs, finger OInd • Knee to Hand Pressing (seepage 94)
thumb bones • Roratlng the \'i1rist (.w:e page!)4) -i :c m

S C V'l (] r m U'l

6)

)

33

I

CHAPTER 2

THE MECHANICS OF THAI MASSAGE

To create the fundamental effect 0.1 pressure that is needed for Thai bodJ W01-k, force is applied by the masseur. c oft ti ue massage' and 'manipulation' de cribe the tuo aspects of Thai bodywork. In soft tissue 1nassage pressui e i used directly f01!" the de ired effect. Per the manipulatiue techniques pre ure i used to achieve tretching and twi tin . Traditional Thai bodywork 7nassage is 1 emarleable for the number ofdifferent po itions in iobicb the re ei et body is presented to the masseur. iobo al 0 ba to adopt a corresponding ai iety of bOC(I' po ition .

Many of the manipulations in Thai bodywork involve sub tantial leverage. Tbi often ioorks to the advantage of the practitoner by enabling a

mall effort to achieve a large effect. Thi will also bene/it the receiver provided that care is taken to avoid ouerstretcbing which could occur if manipulations were performed hastily.

34

Soft Tissue Pressure Techniques

Pre sing is the basis of all soft tissue massage techniques. Skilful application of pressure .:::ill affect different levels within the tissues and

nhances the flow of energy. The application _ z a force through a larger body surface, such - he palm or the sale of the foot, creates a ~- ure which is spread out and does not

penetrate too deeply. If the same force is applied with the thumb or the tip of the elbow to cover a smaller area, a much more focused and penetrating pressure resulr , For all pressure techniques, always start with li h pressing and increase gradually. Some people find very deep pressure extremely painful

• SINGLE THUMB PRESSING

the single thumb pressing ethod, pressure is always applied .. mg the pad of the thumb. The

. p of the thumb is never used, :nai bodywork is unique in

- equently combining hurnb esstng whll tretchlng a body at the same time, Pressing :-ects the underlying tissues in 'a)' char makes them more =ienable co the flow of energy d rhe drainage of IYI11 ph.

• THUMB WALKING

the left and pres un:> IS _ I- ~-~ The right thumb is me. ~ ~ ... :

This method is used to stimulate the energy channels (see page 14). Movement can be in either direction along the lines. The thumbs are placed with their tips almost touching and pressed alternately as they progress along the energy Lines, If movement. is towards the left, the left thumb is lifted and moved two to three centimetres [0

and m-er

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• PALM PRESSING

The palmar surfac~ of the hand is extensively used for applying trang pressure over larger areas of the body than would be possible with the thumbs. Pressure can be applied and su rained without movement either for a few econds or up to everal minutes. Palmar pr ing can be u ed to create a rocking action and thi i achieved with horr

CAUTIO!

For all pressure techniques, star! with ligbt pressing and gradua/{J' increase.

ingle Palm Pressing: Th mphasls [ often on the heel of the hand

and this technique is used for applying firm pressure to the major soft tissue masses of the body, such as the back, buttocks and thighs.

Double Palm Pressing: Here, concentrating the pressure is achieved by placing one hand directly on top of [he other.

36

duration presses. The upper body weigh t over the anTIS is used to generate strong and sustained pressure. To achieve the effect required without fatigue, the arms are usually kept straight. There are three different way' of pre ing with the palmar surface - Single Palm Pres ing Double Palm Pressing and Butterfly Palm Pressing as B Haws:

Butterfiy Palm. Pressing: This method involves slm ultaneous pressure using both hands with the heels of [he palms touching. It spreads the force over an even wider area of the body.

• KNEE PRESSING

pre sing frees the hands for »v- Bing stretches while, at the time, exerth de p pressure. ed mainly on the backs f

~ and buttocks.

FOOT PRESSING

z: [is ideally shaped to apply re over large areas of the

On trongly curved parts, thighs, the arch is used but !lIckl~1 muscled buttocks and muscular areas, the heel Of .:. nt of the sole can create

~. penetrating pressure .

. e manipulations require that ~ me body are pulled against . l [Q give a powerful stretch ~ foot pressure,

• ELBOW PRESSING

Elbow pressing with the tip of

the elbow enables the masseur

to apply deeper pressure than is possibJe with the hand, It is used on the thighs, buttocks and upper shoulders, where the muscles are thick. If the elbow tip causes too much pain, the upper forearm can be used instead to spread the force and to reduce pressure.

CAUTIONI

For ClU pressure techniques, start witl.? lig/.?t pressing Cl11.d gradu,lf~y increase.

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• BUTTOCK PRESSING

Controlled sitting, where more or less of the weight is taken on the practitioner's feet or knees, is sometimes applied This is particularly useful as a means of anchoring one pan of [he body duriog a manipulation,

CAUTION!

For all pressure techniques, start wilb ligbt pressing and Braduaj~l' increase,

• STANDING PRESSURE

Foot pressure from a standing position can be extremely penetrating and should be applied with great care, It is used on [he back, buttocks, legs and feet,

THE BENEFITS OF PRESSING

Pressure sense organs in the skin produce pleasu ra ble sensations ioben subfeaed /0 large scale and sustained pressing, Too

mu h pressure, bouieuei; creates discomfort orpain. Concentrated pressure on tbe energy channels boosts energy/low and deep pressure on tbe tissues encourages tbe release q( adbesions in tbe connective tissue (myofascia) that surrounds the muscles. Blood floto in superficial capillaries and lympbatic drainage is also aided by all kinds of pressing.

Manipulation Techniques

'/!aniPulation is the controlled movement of _ V one or more parts of the body relative to zhers to achieve specific effects such as -rrerching and twisting.

It always involves leverage. The masseur ~ -t hav a high sensitivity to its effectiveness vhich can result in very powerful stretches and

twists with relatively little effort. A lack of this sensitivity could result in injury. In order to avoid serious back strain caused by lifting and moving in the wrong way the giver hould also be constantly aware of his/her own po ture and position relative to the receiver.

• STRETCHING

-:-tIe Vertical Leg Stretch is a +ianipulation which involves werfu I leverage. A careless or ensitive I1'U1SSeur could easily er tre ch the hamstring, gluteal

and even rile lower back muscles • [he receiver, Always watch your anner's expression, which will

uickly react t ven a him f

en [retching,

-i a: rn

THE BENEFITS

OF MANIPULATIONS

~

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Tbai manipulations /lJol'k 0'/1 the IbeOI)I thai to be ~flec{lve, tbe manipulation must always take tbe movement just a tittl« further tbau tbe recipient would be capable oj doing tbemselues unaided. A good Thai pracuttoner always knows exactiy boiofar C/ movement can be wken untbout

ausing pain or il~/'Ilry /0 tbe recipieni l?egld'l1· Tba! hO~(Jlwo/'k progressiue(v deoetops CI degree o] _/7e."(·ibilily and mobilily in the body iohtc» many reatpientsftnd

mira UIOll~'

Wi't/) Tba! manipuiations tbere is CI compte.", interaction beuoeeu giver and receiver This attous certain parts of "be body 10 be

r iacbed 1 ha 1 01 berforms of massage {eave untreated.

39

them at the expense of pressing techniques. This is a serious mistake. Pressure on the soft tissues prepares the receiver physiologically so that the greatest. benefit can be derived from the manipulations that follow them. It is the pressure techniques that are most effective in the treatment of pain and in stimulating the fl w of energy in the Sen channels.

Preparation for Manipulation

A II the different parts of the body are 1\ manipulated during Thai bodywork and manipulation is achieved through pulling, pushing, lifting, shaking and rotating. The end result of these manipulation is [retching and twisting.

So very impre ive are me Thai manipulation that th therapi r can be tempted to ernph size

• lIFTI G

\10. t marupu - r .... involve orne

lifun \\ htch n, ulling again r

the receiver v.c,.,..h A lift ~ a simple manipulaa !1 v. here the

body pan: c r:u: me

force of gr:m

• SHAKING

-ru b oJ eel

This technique I .... I..~med OUt on

th limb and I( 3_ mv olve an

up and down movement A light pull creates a de ree 0 - raction which make the shakin even more effective.

40

• ROTATION

.,. a 3600 movement about

n . uch as [he wrists, ankles, ulders, hips and neck. It is the ult of alternate pushing and ~ng techniques. Even joints

=ected by osteoarthritis can have rmal mobility restored through egular rotation.

• PULLING AND PUSHING

'henevcr a body part is pulled, it J r be anchored at its ther end. rnetimes the subject'S body

eight achieves this. How vel', the trongest pulling often requires an po ing push. Thai therapists -equently use their feet for this. "he most powerful sustained pulls re achieved when the pracdtioner' rydy weight is used to generate

• e effort. Leaning away from the ubject creates til is effect.

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(

PART TWO

THAI BODYWORK PROGRAMME

The sequence shown I r sents a unique, whole body programme devised by Maria Mercati and based on a synthesis of techniques from northern and southern Thailand. In Thailand there are many subtle variations in both the t hniqu 5 and the massag equence.

Each step is demonstrated by a photograph, sam photos have arrows superimpo e l to show you xactly wh r to apply 1 r SSUf ) and the healing benefits and key mus les used in each mas age ar listed alongside. Caution box s indicat wh re you hould take care with a particular te hniqu ) but it 11 uld b mpha iz l h r again that Thai massage is not r c rnrn nd I during pregnancy.

The Thai Massage Routine

s

LESSON POSITION OF SUBJECT PART or BODY MASSAGED
One Supine (Lying on [he back) a) Beth feet slmulmneously
b) l1ach fOOL lndlvldually
noo Supine a) Emil reet and legs strnuhaneously
b) L 'f, leg nl)'
c) Rlglu leg ani),
Three Supine Bmh legs simultaneously and back
Foul' luptne 11) Abd men
b) Chest
'lve Supine a) Arms and hands Indivldually
b) Face. neck, shoulders and head
ix Lylng on the left or right side Repel ltlon of all pans of the body that can
reached in [he side position. (Note: The le
side is a mirror image of (he rtght slde.)
even Prone (lying face a) Legs
downwards) b) Back
c) Arms
Eight Silting a) Shoulders and neck
" be Ft

}

5

b) Face

c) Head

43

Lesson One

THE FEET

The massage starts here and, since this is the first pbysical contact beuoeen the giver and receiver, tbe scene should be set very carefully (see page 17). To receive massage, your partner should he lying very comfortably in the upine position (lying on tbe back) with arms in a relaxed POSition down tbe sides of tbe bodv and with Legs apart leaving a gap of one body-width between the feet.

The aim ofLesson One is to stimulate tbe smooth energy JZow through the en (energy lines) o] the feet and legs. Refer to Part One Chapter Two (see pages 34-41).101" the basic techniques of pres ing and manipulation:

Sen channel on the feet

There are fiv Sen channels on rh sis f the feet. Th Y all 'tart t point on the front margin of [he heel pad on the midline. The en channel radlat fr m this pint t th oes.

Thumb press from the centre heel point towards each toe, working both feet t g th r. Pr ss the S n eh nn I as marry times as the strength of your thumb permits. Feet bear the weight

f th whole bocly as well as moving to walk and run, so they require borh flexibility and strength. Working thr ugh the techniques in this Ie on will help your partner maintain foot flexibility anel avoid injury.

ABOVE: These are the five Sen on the sales ofthefoot:

Thorough pressing of tbese Sen is regarded as a Vital prelude to overall enel:1D1 balance.

44

l' PRESSING FEET & ANKLES

Kneeling between your partner's .egs, grasp both feet. Keep your arms straight so that your body weight can be transferred through zhern. Rock forward and outwards or from side to side, increasing pressure through the palms. Move vour palms clown the inner' margins of her feet towards her toes using pressu re at each position.

Massaging both feet

HEALING BENEFITS

• \Warms and loosens tbe feet, and bas a relaxing e_fTiJct on tbe recipient.

• Twists tbe lbigbs ouriuards and exercises tbe hlp

r= m VI VI

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-n m m ~

2 PRESSING THE FEET SIDEWAYS

Press your partner's feel' outwards (evert) as far as they will stretch and hold them in place for a few seconds. Release her feet, place your hands across the top part of the feet and press them inwards (invert) as shown, left. Repeat the sequence once or twice.

3

PRESSING THE CROSSED FEET

Bring your partner's feet together to cross one foot over the other. Apply gentle sustained downward pressure on them, then reverse positions and press again.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Loosens "be ankles, arches and toes, so increasing tbe j1e,xihilily 0/ the tarso-metatarsal joints.

HEALING BENEFITS

• lmproues an/de jle:!f:tbllfly.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED ':1 PRESS1NG FEET & AXKl..ES Stretched: Ttbtalls anterior (all/wards)

• 2. PRESSING THE FEET SlDEWAYS

Stretched: Tibialis anterior (outwards), tibialis posterior (in u/ards), peroneus longu.s (imrards)

• 3. PRESSIXG THE CROSSED FEET

Stretched: Peroneus longus, tibiolis posterior

45

4 SQUEEZING THE FEET

5 FLICKING THE TOES

Place the heel of your hand under your partner's toes and close your fingers above all [he meso Slide your hands off the roes, flicking (hem upwards as you do so.

Then repeat Technique I.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Produces a pleasant, relaxing sensation for tbe recipient.

46

Grasp the tops of your partner's feet and squeeze firmly and progressively clown towards

the toes. Repeat several times.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Improves flextbilily of tbe feet

6

PRESSING THE FEET BACKWARDS & FORWARDS

7

PRESSING POIN1S ON ANKLES & FEEt

-

::..

Place the heels of your palms under your partner's toes and flrrnly push towards her head, Theil with your palms on top of the toes, press downwards,

HEALING BENEFITS

• ImprOIJesjle:'CihtUIY of tbe Clnkles tin cllbe j(J(1I,

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 6, PRESS1NG THE~EET BACKWARDS & FORWARDS Stretched: Peroneus longus (upwu'l'd), l/bic/./fs posterior (lIpwclrd). soleus (upward), li/J'itdls anterior (&lownll/md)

Thumb press deeply into the three ankle points, marked here with dors, on both your partner's feet (I-ee left). Then thumb pre- ... ar nd the margins of [he undersides 0:'" her heels, Now rhumb press a: n~ the energy lines between er heel and roes (see page 38 ,

HEAUNG BE Ems

• Balance: tbe energies irttbtn tbe reproduclil'e s:I stem ana argans of tbe touer back,

47

Massaging each foot individually

1 FLEXING THE ANKLE BACKWARDS

48

--

f

Grasp your partner's foot with both hands, pressing your thumr down into the centre of her fror'ankle crease. Then lean forward . press her foot backwards against this pressure.

HEALING BENEFITS

• tncreasesflexibility of tbe ankle

• Beneficiai for those wbo suffer front beadacbes.

2 PRESSING THE TENDONS OF THE UPPER FOOT

With circular rnov rn n ,thumb press into the space between your partner's tendon. Begin at the

h llow at th centre f th t p of ea h ankle and x rk your way towards her roes. Follow each tendon in tum.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Has an invlgOl"tlJing effec: upon the recipient.

• increases blood/low around the tendons (tissue wbicb is normally very inert) which helps to maintain healtby/eet.

3 PULLING & CRACKING EACH TOE

Hold each of your partner's toes, lean back and pull vigorously in turn. During (his technique a cracking sound may be heard.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Loosens toe joints and increases blood circulation:

4 TWISTING THE FEET

Support your partner's foot with ne hand and bend the free edge -~ her foot up and down with a isting, flicking action, Do this 7' 0 ro three ti mes whilst working

HEALING BENEFITS

• timulaies tbefoo! and increases kueral flexibility,

• The intrinsic muscles of thefoot are well stretched during {he ·U'isling movements,

5

MASSAGING THE TOES

-ouch Me/bod One: Fast Toe ulling tart by rapidly pull ing all ,,. osrtner; {Des. 'se [/))) UJ" _as strnultaneously and work

'h a rapid snapping action as the are r I ased.

towards her toes, Repeat the sequence on the opposite side of her foot.

'Ibucb Method 71,1)0: Rotating & Squeezing Rotate each of your psrmers t. e. ) oth n/a)<s. F. )) lV this with a flrrn squeezing action towards the tip of the toes and

r I ase with a 51i ling mov J11 nco

...,

Z

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 1, FLEXING THE ANKLE BACJ<WARDS

S[I' tched: Peroneus longus (UpUlClr,o., tttJt(;(fts posserror

(uP WCll'd) , soleus,

Touch Method Three .. Toe Tip Massage Here, the toe i held between rw finger and the extreme tip is massaged \i. o. with a circular motion .

• Brings tbe recipient's arvness

into tbe (ips of the toes u i .. tb is botb stimutanr: ami n?ia.YinG•

• tarring poims ~r tbe Sen channels are nl&.~ /0 affect oceratt ene'ID balance t'e,:!' posiril'e{l:

49

6 STRETCHING THE ARCHED FOOT

Grasp your partner's foot with your thumbs over the from of her ankle. Lean back as you press down with the base of your thumbs to stretch her foot into

an arched position, Repeat this str-etch twice: first, with your hands around her instep and then again nearer her toes which are arched downwards.

HEALING BENEFITS

• improves tbe taterclljlexibility of {be /001 and strengthens the instep.

7 ROTATING THE FOOT

\'.(fhile supportin your partner leg above [he ankle. firmly ra, p her foot from below and rotate I[ several times in both direction.

/

50

8

ROTATING THE HEEL

Grasp your partner's heel as shown and then rotate it with a imultaneous squeezing action.

9 PRESSING THE FOOT SEN

Grasp your partner's foot in both hands so that your fingertips are .ined LIp along the energy channels see page 38) on the sale, Using

[he fingers of both your hands

imulraneously dig your fingertips righr into tbe sole and press deeply "ich a squeezing fiction into the

10 PUMMELLING THE HEEL

central and then the two lateral Sen channels in turn. Then thumb press along aJI five Sen channels.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Promotes tmproved foo: ./le.;r;ibllity and stimulates en energy/low

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 6 STRETCHl:'\G THE ARCHED fOOT

rrerched; Faa" jlerors. tibialis anterior

• - ROI.~G THE FOOT

"ret.c..;ec_ ~~~_-'Jm e:r;en_'OT"S and Sexoss

- --¥~~~~J'_- "-" :..w~ feet. creauttg a -: • of growuiedness

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Lesson Two

THE FEET & LEGS

The first PClTt qf Lesson Two is a prelude to the more intensive leg

. manipulation which follow. Refer to Part One Chapter Two (see pages 34-41 f01- tbe basic techniques of pressing and manipulation. The receiver lies in the upine position (lying on the back) and each leg is held straight and tborougbly pressed using the palms and thumbs. Ensure that all the Sen channels are equally stimulated along the entire length of the leg

In the second part of Lesson Two, the leg is placed in every position possible to give complete access to the en (see below right), The techniques are appliedfirst to one leg and then repeated on the other.

Sen channels on the legs

Energy balance in th leg en is essential for energy balance in the spin . Thr ughout the b Iyw rk, Thais plac much mphasis n the legs as en rgy flow through them strongly affects the health of the upper body. There is no gen ral a r merit as to th exact curs of th S n channels r ev n the precise number but many experts consider there to be three lines on the inside and thr e n the utside of ach leg. This cones onds to the Chin se en rgy m ridians th exact courses of which have been confirmed by RUSSian seien nsts.

Inside Leg Sen Channels

The Sen channels on the inside of the leg are located asfollouis.

• G) - Chinese Spleen meridian. This begins under the inner ankle bone and runs jus along the inner edge of the shin bon to just b neath th knee. It then runs up the thigh to the top of the groin,

• <.V - Chinese Liver meridian. This starts in front of the inner ankle bone and runs up the middle of the inner side of the calf muscle to just below the knee level. It restarts above the knee and funs roughly parallel with channel G) to the groin,

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• @ - Chinese Kidney meridian. This begins between th chilles tendon and the inner ankle bone and runs along the calf to a point just 011 the back knee crease. It continues above the knee to deep inside the groin.

Outside Leg Sen channels

Sen channels on the outside of tbe Leg are Located as fotlou: :

• CD - Chinese Stomach meridian. This starts on the from of (he ankle and runs parallel to the outer edge of the shin bone (tibia) to a point ju st below th knee. It restarts on the thigh just above and in line with the outer edge of the patella, and runs directly towards th hip joint.

• @ - Chinese Gallbladder meridian. Thrs begins on [he lower fr n edge of me ankle bone and runs towards the sid of th knee di ergin 1I~ lulv fr m channel CD as it goes. It restarts on the side of the thigh, about one thumb-width behmd chann 1 CD and runs roughly parallel to it t wards th hip jom .

• @ - Chinese Bladder meridian. This starts between the Achil e e u er ankle bon . It runs Lit th midline of the back of the L~ I;~ ~'1\.. the back midline of the thigh.

n d e an es u

ABOVE: Tbe tbree inner Sen and the nco outer Sen channels.

Tbe third outer Sen channel is under tbe straight leg and cannot be seen in Ibis position

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Simultaneously palm press your partner's feet and ankles rocking them outwards or from ide to side. Then proceed up the inner margin of her leg [0 the grain,

and back again. Do not pr her

knee directly but lightly rub it. Repeat everal time .

Pressing the legs

1 PRESSING THE INNER FEET & LEGS

: .~

Remember to maintain an even rhythm as sharp discontinuities in the technique will spoil the relaxing flow for the reciplent.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Loosens btp joints and unblocks .be Sen channels in boll.? legs.

• The gentle rocking motion has a pleasantiy calming effec: on your pari ner

2 PRESSING THE INNER RIGHT LEG

Touch Metbod One: Palm Pressing Kneel between your partner' leg facing the inside of her right leg. Starting above and below her right knee, palm press with both hand Simultaneously up the thigh and down the calf, and then return.

54

You could also ran III r above the ankle 1..1 ing both han - ide by side and gradually palm pres up the leg and down again. Repeat, palm-pres in each en channel.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Assists myofascial reiease and stimulates energy jlow in tbe Sen.

3 PRESSING THE OUTER RIGHT LEG

Now change position [0 outside the ri.ght leg and repeat the palming and thumbing sequences on the aliter energy lines of your partner's right leg. Repeat on the left leg.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Assists the ftoio of energy in the legs and can also relieve sciatic pain.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 1. PRE ING TffE INNER FEET 'lEG

rrerched: Soleus. astrocnemius; adductors

• _ P~_Ii\G lliE 1;\;\'ER GHTLEG

adauaors

PRES r; G TI-lE OLlER RlGHT1.EG

Touch Method Tuio: Thumb Pressing Using the thumb walking technique, thumb up Sen channel CD to YOUl' partner's knee, down line ® to

her ankle, up line @ to her knee and down line tWO again. Repeat this sequence several times.

When you have finished thumbing the lower leg, move up and repeat the sequence on the upper Sen channels spanning

the knee to the groin. Finish

by palming her leg once more.

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Massaging the right leg only

1 PRESSING THE LEG IN THE TREE POSITION

Touch Method One Place your partner's right leg in the tree position, keeping the foot lucked against her straight leg. upporr her left hip with your light hand while you palm up and down the inner Sen channel of the bent leg

t,

with a slight rocking action. Do not hurry vour movementsthe pre es hould be 'U rained.

Touch Metbod Iico: Thumb Pressing Proceed from palming [0 thumbing which i carried OUt in exactly the arne wav d cribed earlier c: ee page 3-').

2 BUTTERFLY PRESSING THE LEG IN THE TREE POSITION

Slightly alter your position facing directly cowards your partner's flexed knee. Using both hands Simultaneously, butterfly press the entire length of [he flexed leg.

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-

HEALING BENEFITS

• Aidsj7exibilily and relaxation 0/ tbe knee and bip.

• Promotes energyfkuo in channels that aflect "be urinegenital organs.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Even the sti.IJesl hips and knees can be coaxed into a state of relaxation and release.

• Especially belpfui]»: tbose iobo experience spasms and stiffness in the adductor muscles of tbe tbigh.

3 FOOT PRESSING THE LEG IN THE TREE POSITION

thigh with your toes and the ball of your foot. Rock forward slowly to attain the necessary pressure.

- __ :1 rance, balancing yourself _.:hdy leaning on your partner's - _ and knee. Use your right foot

zn age her bent leg. Press fully and deeply all along her

HEALING BENEFITS

• Tight and spasming /bigh

- 'duaor muscles respond well "J thejbol pressing methods.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Helps 11gb/. or spasming cal] muscles to relax, slimulalil1g blood and lymph pow.

• treats calfmusclesporss injuries.

Touch Method Two \'(Iith a slight change in your position, heel press along your partner's calf muscles using your body weight [0 achieve controlled pressure,

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 1, PRESSI G THE LEG IN THE TREE POSITION

• 2, BUTI'ERFLY PRESSING THE LEG IN THE TREE POSITION

• 3. FOOT PRE SING THE LEG

I THE TREE POSI:TION Stretched: Adductors, sartorius Pressed: Adductors, soleus, gracilis, semimembranosus, semitendinosus, gastrocnemius

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HEALING BENEFITS (4, 5, 6 & 7)

• These pouierful recbniques 'relax the inner bamstrings, enhance knee mobility and boost Sen energies,

• Some types of scietica are eased.

• Useful for treating hamstrings injured tbrougb sport.

4

'SINGLE GRAPE PRESS'

Place the sale of your left foot against your partner's right thigh just behind and above the knee Hold both of her feet and lean back while you pres up the thigh towards the groin and back again

as if you were treading grapes,

5 'SINGLE GRAPE PRESS & TWISTED VINE'

Now tuck your left foot snugly behind your partner' kne and cross her leg across your shin, tucking her toes behind yOUL" knee to give the impression f a twisted vine. Hold her heel to keep the foot in this posltlon while you

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bring your rtghr foot across and place it under her right thigh. w press progre ively with your right foot cowards her groin and back again keeping a ready low rhythm and firm pressure.

Repeat several times.

6

'DOUBLE GRAPE PRESS'

7 'GRAPE PRESS & SQUEEZE'

Now place your right foot on your partner's inner thigh and slide your left foot. under the leg.

queeze and press both the inner and outer thighs together, Stan at [he knee, pressing and squeezing

up the thigh and then back to the knee, Lean yow' body back with each press and squeeze.

Release your partner's right foot from the locked position but continue to hold her ankles.

Now press up and clown her thigh u sing yo u r feet al tern a rely Repeat several times.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• '-I. ' li\lGLE GRAPE PRESS' tretched- Adductors, sartorius, waci{is

Pre ed: Adducto:rs, hcnnslrings

• :; ·:r:,\GLE GRAPE PRESS & l\nSTED vixs

G~ 1J>E PRE5 ..

eel Nidllaors. sartortus. wa lit-

Pre:>~ .. \ddllc 0,"" bamssrtn .

• -, 'GRAPE PRES- ~ ... EE7..£

rreiched. TIJiRIJ ada tc: n; sartorius, graCilis

Pressed; AdduCiOTS bamstrn

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8

'Z-STOP'

Keep your feet tucked in snugly behind your partner's knee and cross her lower leg across both your shins. Her leg will become bent at a sharply acute angle that resembles a 'Z' shape (below). Slide forward a llnle to grasp the

HEALING BENEFITS

from urface of her thigh and pull it cowards you. Pull alternately with both hands along the length of her thigh (belou: right).

• Promotes limb relaxation. increased bip and knee jlexibi

• Stimulates (be enelX!' channels.

9 PULLING THE CALF

Touch Method One Llft your partner's flexed leg and lock her foot between your knees. Place your hands behind her calf muscl and pull it towards you, rocking gently backwards. Repeat at different positions along the calf

HEALING BENEFITS

• Stimulates energy flow in the central Sen channel to ease fibrotic and adhesive

connective tissue .

• Goodfor foo1belll and "ugby players.

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moving towards the ankle. Repeat. Touch ;I/Jef/Jod Tim Place your' left hand behind your partner's tipper calf muscle. queeze and slmultaneou Iy drag the rnusd to your left. Change hands and repeat in the opposite direction.

l 10

PRESSING THE UPPER THIGH

-:?uch Method One Interlock the fin er of both your hands and

p ce them across the top of your partner's thigh just above the top

f her knee (below). Squeeze "':rmJy with the heels of your hands - cover the cull length of the upper leg to the groin. Repeat several times.

Ibucb Method Two Pummel inner and outer thighs and calves ar the same time. Repeat several times.

11

CHEST TO FOOT THIGH PRESSING

Lift your partner's right leg and

lace h I' foot n y UI' chest. <upport her knee with your rlghi 'land and, with your left hand,

'"Ire. s firmly into the thigh muscles, Gently rock her ina forwards-and-

ckwards motion as you press LIp and clown the thigh muscle.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Glues myofascl'al release to Ibe hamstring group oj muscles .

• Eases hip pain and sciatica.

HEALING BENEFITS

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• Powerful myofascial release occurs and the energy.fl.ow in tbe major cbannels i unblocked.

• Benefits sciatica sufferers.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

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• 8. 'Z-STOP'

Stretched: Qllcldriceps, adduaor:

Pressed: Hamurtngs. adductors. quadriceps

• 9. PULLING THE CALF

Pressed: Gastrocnemius. soleus

'10. PRESSING THE UPPER

TI-J1GrJ

Pressed: Quadriceps, sartorius, graCilis, sem i7ne111 branosus

• 11. CHEST TO FOOT THIGH PRE ING

Stretched: Gluteus maxlmus, quadriceps, erector spinae PI" essed: Hamstrings

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12 'PRAYING MANTIS'

Touch Method One Slide your partner's foot into the area of your left groin. Stabilize her right

knee with your left hand and with your right hand, palmar press your way along

the inner margin of her thigh. Pressure applied in this way will force the leg

outward into an everted position, but you should only attempt to press it onto the floor If your partner is very flexible.

Toucb Method Ttuo Swing your partner'S knee (/"ighl) across her left hip. Use yOUL" right hand [Q keep it in position and palmar press the outer margin of her thigh with your" left hand,

Note: In both of these positions, pressure should be applied

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rhylhmica!J~ and progre si\'eJr through smooth to-and-fro rocking movements (like the characrertsttc motion of a praying mantis insect)"

HEALING BENEFITS

• Improuesfiextbility oj the bip.

• Stretches buuoch as well as thigb muscles.

• Can be used to relieve chronic lower back pain.

13 ROTATING THE HIP

HEAliNG BE EFITS

• ImproL'esjlexibifit) o/hip paints. arthritic bips. pain in tbe groin

a rea associated u. fIb sciatica and lower back pain

Hold your partner's ankle with yOU!' right hand and support the top of her knee with your left. Lean forward and rotate her thigh using small, circular movements, increasing to larger circles but without causing pain.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 12. 'PRAYING MANTIS' Stretched: Adducl.Ors, gluteals. erector spinae, quadriceps pi'r!/onnis

Pressed: Semimembranosus, semitendinosus, bicepsfemorts, vas/us lateralis

• 13. ROTATING 'fHE HIP Stre; hed: Gluteus maximus, p;r~/brmis, sacrospincdls, quadriceps

14

KNEEING THE THIGH

• 14, KEEING THE THIGH Pressed: l-lamstri17gs

Llfr your partner's right I g and place your left knee against th back of her thigh. Hold her heel and kne and, with a gentl acri n, pull her thigh against your knee. Relax the pulling force, lower' your knee slightly and pull again.

ReI eat several times to knee-press progressively the enti re length of the back thigh.

HEAL.ING BENEFITS

• Good [01' tb« treatment o[ tense and spasming bamstrings caused '~)I sports fnj/lly, repel it.i(Je strain, bClcla pain a /I d sc iait ca.

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15 PRESSING THIGH TO CALF

With your left knee directed

toward your partner's light leg, place the calf of her right leg across your thigh. Press down on her

knee and foot. Adjust the position of her leg to press the whole of her calf progr sslvely

HEALING BENEFITS

• Assists myofascial release calf muscles and eases (be _ and spasming tbat can be by sports injury.

16 'ARM CRACKER'

'iLl k YOLIl' I Ft wri t and forearm cighrly in behind your I ann rs knee. Now press her foot downwards to give a very strong stretch across the entrapped arm. Repeat two to

three times.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats knee pain, spasming bCl'I1'Isirlng and calfmuscles.

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17 FLEXING & STRETCHING THE LEG

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 15. PRESSING THIGH TO CALF Stretched: Anterior tibialis Pressed: Gastrocnemius, soleus, posterior tibialis

Grasp your partner's right heel underneath and support the side of her knee. Flex her leg at the knee by pushing the knee and then sharply extend it to maximum effect by JJlIWng the heel, assisted by a quick pull On the knee.

Repeat this exercise

everal times.

• 16. ~AR.M CRACKER'

trerched. Alltel"ior tibialis, ankle and foo! flexors Pressed: Hamstrings; gaslTUCllemius

• 1- FlE.XI.."G . STRETCHrNG THE LEG

tretched. CliSlro<nemills. so/ells (leg extended] bamstrines. gill/ellS (Iegjle>:ed)

HEALING BENEFITS

• Powei:lirl~)llooselling Wid s/imllltltillg on tbe hneejotnt.

CAUTION!

This technique must nOI be practtsed on tbose who baue bad (IllY kind qf knee or /:nj) surgery.

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18 PRESSING FOOT TO THIGH

Grasp your partner's right foot. Place your right foot diagonally with the arch across the back of her thigh. Lean back, pulling the leg towards you to generate a

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats sports injuries 10 the bUll/strings, 1011'6''- back. bip pain and ome forms of ciattca:

19 'TUG OF WAR'

From the same I osition as th

PI' vious t chni [ue, push your partner's left knee forwards while, at the same time, reposlrioning your [Des s that they ar-e grasl ing the lower edge of h r pelvic girdle.

strong, sustained pressur-e all her hamstrings, Release the pressure, move the foot to a lower position and pull. Repeat several times to cover the whole of the thigh.

Pressing in with vour foot. lean back strongly [0 tr:J.j hten her leg find lift her hip onto your toes.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Vel)' ellec/ivelol' Lower b6lCk and sctat tc pain

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20 PRESSING THE TURNED~IN LEG

If your partner is flexible enough, place her leg with the thigh turned in and the lower leg evened, If not, use your own knee to support her knee, Single or butterfly pre the aliter margin of the thigh.

21 PRESSING THE LEANING LEG

HEALING BENEFITS

Reposttion your partner's leg

so that it now lean against her straight one, Palmar press the

exp sed thigh area 5 veral times, Finish by placing one hand over th hip [olnt and the oth r on the knee, and pressing very firmly, Hold for .H least tell seconds,

• loosens tbe bipjoin, 10 give enbancedflexibili(lI and stimulates energy Jlow in tbe outer channels,

• Aids mobility of tbe ~1)il1e and belp to relieue lotoer back pain,

HEALING BENEFITS

• Irel)! effectiue fortoiaer back and sciatic pain

HEALING BENEFITS

• Vel)! effective in the treatment of sciatica and it also improves /IIobility of the knees,

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED • 18, PRES ING FOOT TO TH1GH

Pres ed Hainstrin 'S

• 19. 'TCG OF \,'AIr

Pres eel: Hamstrin -. gracilis trerched, Anterior tibialis, quadriceps

• 20. PRE$SC\G THE TURNED-TN LEG

rrerched, QlIadn'ceps, sartorius Pres ed: Vas/us lateralis, vast us intermedius, rectus femon's

• 21. PRESSING THE LEANING LEG Pressed vastus latemlis, bic-eps femoris, tensorfasciae latae

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22 ROCKING THJ: H.IP

Place your partner's right leg over her left and locate the foot in position by placing the arch of your right foot lightly across her toes.

11.1ck your left hand under her right upper hip while pushing her right knee rewards the mat on her left side. Establish .1 to-and-fro rocking movement aiming to get the knee closer tache floor with each rock.

• Atds {ower IJ(/C~ mid hip J7e.\"ibi!ill·"l~oodIDT tbose If bo suffer/rom lo« er back pain

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23 SHOlJLDER TO OPPOSITE KNEE SPINAL TWIST

As you finish the previous technique, hold your partner's right knee down in its

most extreme

position, place your left hand on the front of her right shoulder and press smoothly and firmly Hold for

at least ten seconds.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats lumbar and bip pain.

• increases spinal mobttuy.

CAUTION!

Wben pre. ing your partner's shoulder doum. fbi' must he done carefully witb fut! auareness of

you r partner 's reactions

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24

STRETCHING THE CROSSED LEG HORIZONTALLY

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 22, ROCKING THE HIP Stretched: Quadratus lumbol'um, pir~ronnis

Pressed: vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tensorfasciae latae

\[0 e to the other side of

\ our partne r and ext rid her right I r a r S5 h I" I ft hip holding her right ankle and pressing clown on her right hip, Stretch the leg by

• 23, HOULDEH TO OPPOSITE KNEE PINAl. T\'VI T

tret ihed. Quadratus lumborurn, piriformts

Pressed: vastus taterahs, rectus femoris, bfcepsfemoj'I~~

pu hing i[ toward her h ad with your kn

Kc p the leg 5 raight and only str tch as far as j, comfortable.

HEALING BENEFITS

• 24. S'rRETCHING THE CROSSED LEG HORIZONTALl.Y Stretched: Gassrocnemtus, btcepsjemoris; pin!brmis, gluteus maximus, soleu Pressed: Gluteus maximus

• Improves bip jle:>:;lbiliZl', eases tension in tbe buttocks and hamstrings:

• Treats Lower back pain and sciatica.

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25 PRESSING IN THE SPLITS POSITION

Spread your partner's leg apart as far as is comfortable and hold them in this position with your feet. Palmar and thumb pre the inner Sen channels in her lower leg and the thigh,

HEALING BENEFITS

• Eases groin pain and treats injuries to the thigh adduciors

• Helps lympbattc d1"(Ainage jrort: the lower leg

26 SWINGING THE LEG IN THE SPLITS POSITION

Support the top of your partner's thigh (rigbt) with y lit" right hand and grasp her heel with th th r.

win her leg alit t the side as far as is comfortable for her, Then swing backwards and forwards several times.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats pain In the lbigb adductor'S and groin;

• Aids hip mobilit)!.

27 HALF LOTUS PRESS

Touch Method One (below) Lift your partner's leg into a Half Lotus position with her ankle lying above her left knee, Should she be very

tiff, you will need to support her flexed leg across your knee. With your right hand holding clown her left thigh, press up and down the inner energy Sen of her flexed leg with a rocking motion.

Touch Method Iioo (rigbt) Repeat using the thumb walking technique.

28

HALF LOTUS HIP ROCK

With your partner stU! in the Half Lotus posttion, lift her

tralghtened left leg across your right thigh. Holding the foot and knee of her flexed right leg, rock the knee to and fro sideways.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Aidsflexibility 0/ the ankles,

knee- and hips .

• Prot ides intense stimulation of the inner en to help remoce energJ' blocks,

HEALING BENEFITS

• Improues knee and bip mobilit) and treats {ower lumbar' sacral and sciatic pain.

Stretched: .4dduaors. gradlis gasrrocnemtus; bamSlrillgs Pressed' All the stretcbed muscles

• 26 Il...'\GL'\'G TIlE LEG ['\: THE PU PO rnox

crerched, Adductors, gracilis, gastrocllemlus, hamstrings Pressed: .411 tbe stretched muscles

• T HALF LOW PRESS (fetched, Adduaors, gracilis Pressed: Adductors, gracilis

• 28, HALF LOTUS HIP ROCK Stretched; Hamstrings (straigbt leg), gluteus maximus (flexed leg)

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29 HALF LOTUS 'BACK ROCK & ROLL

CAUTI.ON.!

Do not attempt large-scale rocking with elderly, .fi-agile or 11m:)! sl!f! partners:

HEALING BENEFITS

• 1:./;/S&S bacle pain and hnproues back and !Ji}) mobifily.

Sti II in tile Half Lotus, hold your partner's right heel and push her right leg forward over her head while stabilizing her buttocks with your Other

hand. Establish a to-and-

fro rocking action.

HEALING BENEFITS

30 VERTICAL HALF LOTUS THIGH PRESS

Maintamlng rhe Half Lotus. 11Ft you!" partner's straightened left leg into a vertical position, suppornng her ankle against your shoulder. Hold the ankle of her other foot and palmar press the exposed thigh from knee co buttock keeping your atom straight and rocking forward with each press.

• Treats lotuer back pain and sciatica and improves mobiLily In. tbe !Jip and knee,

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31 CORKSCREW

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 29. BAH LOTUS BACK ROCK & ROLL

Stretched: Hamstrtng: (slraigbl leg), adductors, gracilis

(fle.:r:ed leg)

• 30. VERTlCAL HALF LOTUS THIGH PRESS

Stretched: Gluteus maximus (ben/leg); soleus, gastrocnemius, ba mstrings (strcdght leg)

With your partner's right leg still firmly in the Half Lotus, hold ber left leg vertically, Move forward

and step over her flexed right leg with your left one, Place you I' left foot so that your toes are under her armpit and keep your knees slightly flexed. Tuck your right leg against the outer margin of her vertical leg and LIse it to support her leg. By gradually straightening your left leg you will exert a backward pressure on her flexed leg and this will generate a twi ·[.ing action all the hips and lower back. Knead the sole and th h el of her left foot with Y L1f right elbow.

CAUTION!

• 31. CORKSCHEW

rretched: Adduciors, vas/us medialts, gracilis (flexed I.eg), I(lLStrocllemilis. soleus;

/xIII «nn« (straigh/ teg)

• 7h!(lf.l lumbago ami sciatica

• IIICr(!CISCS IJip (I rid lot: er back fie:·.;lhilf(l'.

Be camjul 110110 overdo the

twisting actton. Ifyour p(n'lI~el' is ve1Ji s,~!/,' slcmdiurther back wilb YOUI' rlgbl leg Cl11C/ on~)i raise and pusb her straight leg CIS hl' CIS it 1./JilL comfortably go untboui IUJisl./11g tbe hips wttb your otber le.g. Do not use on elderzy people.

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32 RAISED FOOT LEG STRETCH

HEALING BENEFITS

Grasp your partner's right heel and lift her leg while pressing clown on the top of her thigh

with your other hand, As you Lift, Simultaneously press clown on the sole of her foot with your forearm.

• Helps myofascia! release in tbe calf muscles /.0 ease pain and tension.

33 VERTICAL LEG STRETCH

Ral e your partner' right leg to a. .. near vertlcal as i com enable and support her heel or ankle again t eh fr nt of your houlder. Keep her leg straight with your other hand across her knee. Kn el \ el") lightly across her left thigh (0 hold i.t clown. Gently push the leg forward several times, each time slightly increasing the stretch.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats and relaxes tense 01' spasming calf and bamstring nutsdes resulttngfron: sports injuries, sctatlca and back pain

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~~ SEESAW LEG STRETCH

er= lighrry all your partner's ~ groin facing her feet Grasp -==- right foot with both hands

-= hft me leg towards you.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Relieves knee ligament pain and treats spasming or injured calf and hamstring muscles.

CAUTION!

our partner is uery stiff, C611'e 1.I.Sl be taken not to I ~ft tbe leg /(u: Do 1101 even attempt tbt» nique uutb art ekierlv partner:

CAUTIONl

Take CCI1'e wbe1'/. kneeling cdong {be top ofJ OUl' partner 's (blgh.

:0 increase the stretch d wn the back of her leg, pull the front of me foot g ntly downwards and rock ro and fro. Use small rotary movements to rotate the hlp joint.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 32. RAI ED FOOT L.EG STRETCH Stretched: Hamstrings, peroneus longus, gr.tsll'ocl1emius. soleus

• 33. VER'nCAL LEG TRET H Stretched: 116mlslrlngs, gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus (fool pressed clown)

·34. SEESAW LEG STRETCH Stuetched: Gastrocnemius, hamstrings

Pressed: Q~tadl-iceps

75

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Lesson Three

BOTH LEGS & BACK

Sen channels on the legs and back

The aim of this le Oil is to timulate energy flow betueen (be trunk and leg. healthy backbone need to bend and rotate in many direction.'). Pain Il1 tbe lumbar area is eel) common and can be

cau ed not only by sports injuries. but by jJOO1~ posture. Acute pain call be triggered by udden tioi ring of (be ioaist or li/tin!!: beary load. ill/an) of tbe technique featured bere proride potuerful muscle stret .bes tcbtcb can correct postural imbalance and relay spasmin muscles thereby relieving back pain.

• @ - Chinese Bladder meridian. Thi. star - between th Achilles tendon and th outer ankle bon and runs up til back of t11 I g approxlmar I)' n th midline to the lower border of the buttocks.

• @ - Thai bodywork uses two ba k en chann along the Chinese Bladder meridian. There are two lines on each Side of the spi ne. The inner one is abou t tw finger-widths and he outer on four fingerwidths from the midline of the spine.

ABOVE: Shown are tbe [bird outer en channel on eacb leg and tbe uoo Sen on eitber side of [be spine, the bealtb of which depends on the free floui of energy througb them.

76

1 PRESSING THE INNER FEET & LEGS

Repeat the first technique in Lesson Two (see page 56). Re-establishing contact with the feet encourages a sense of body and mind integration and general

well-being. As the inner" Sen start on the feet andleg , pressing the inner legs stimulate energy flow between [he legs and trunk.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 1. rxsssr G THE INNER FEET & LEGS

Stretched: Adductors

• 2. LE BLOOD STOP Pressed: Adduct01'"$

2

LEG BLOOD STOP

Your partner should be lying

up: ne j n ,I totally relaxed posicion with his legs slightly apart. Kneel and ] alrn up both his thighs until your palms reach the groin area. Press clown and adjust your hands until y u fe I his blood pulsing through the femoral arteries beneath the h cis of your palms.

Now lift your I ody by srralghtening your leg. or arching your buttocks This will focus your weight on your palms, thus increasing I res sur n his arteries to restrict ehe ~ow of blood through them, Holel for thirty to fifty S ends.

HEALING BENEFITS

• \\ 1"Jf:1I V/CJUl/ flon into the le~s is interrupted. (be enure circulattou inctudim; " mpl atu: dr"ill(iR.t' is rectllcud or comp/elell Slopped 77111 SII ill rusb afblood tmo 'be te._u.s is accompanied hI £1 sud dell spread of U'({ rmtb dUIl'I] to tbe feel asfntt ctrcukutou is restored tVrer tbts treatment the leg feel I'el:]' I igb/,

CAUTION!

Do not attempt to earn' Qui Ibis technique on those with CP1Jl killd of circutatory problem sucb as liar! ose ueins, bigb blood presstu: or beart disease.

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77

3 BOW & ARROW SPINAL TWIST

Tuck your right heel behind your partner's left flexed knee and grasp and pull his left forearm towards you (below), keeping his left leg firmly located on the mat. Now lean across and grasp under his left houlder (inset right) with both hands and pull it

up cowards you.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats louer hack pain, improves spinal mobility and aligns {he spine.

/

Pull along the shoulder and down your partner's side with alternate hand movements which should be kept slow and rhythmical.

CAUTIONI

Do not use on those who have bad .wrgeOlon tbe lower back.

4 ROTATING THE HIPS

Lift your partner's flexed leg '0 that his knees are directly over his 'abdomen. Your legs should be astrid his ankles with YOLII' hands just below his kn s. Starring with just a small amplitude rotation of th

kn es, gradually increase. Keep both knees together. Rotate about fifteen times in each direction.

78

HEALING BENEFITS

• I las CI soot bing effec! on tbose uilso experience slil/ness in tbe bip region, sciatica and lower bach pain; In addition to tbe rotation imposed on tbe bi.p joint, a twisting acuon on tbe lumbar uertebral also OCClll'S and ibis relaxes muscles in [be hip,

5 SHAKING THE LEGS

Grasp your partner's ankles, lean back slightly to create traction and shake his legs up and down rapidly with a small-amplitude movement, Shake the legs ten to twenty times.

HEALING BENE.FITS (5 & 6)

• Essential/or those sulfen·ngfrom lower back pain and sciatica, Tbese techniques can also be used all (bose who suJ.ferj}·om uaricose reins.

6

SWINGING THE LEGS

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 3. BOW & ARROW SPINAL TWIST Stretched: Quacb'atus lumflorun/) I'b01nboide,1iIs mafor and minor; fe'f)t;lIOI'SCapulae, trapezius, ereCIQT spinae, iliacus, psoas mef/a/"

Now hold your partner's legs at the ankles and swing from side to side at least fifteen times. Stan with small, slow swings that gradually gel bigger and faster,

• 4. ROTATING THE HIPS Stretched. elI/leu.', maxim ItS, quadriceps (slight stretch). quadratus tumborum

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7 ROCKING & ROLLING THE BACK

Use your ['ight hand to hold your partner's heels so that both his legs are straight. Push his feet for .. vard over his head using your other hand to help lift his buttocks. Determine how far he can comfortably [oil back and then proceed to rock and rail to-and-fro up [0 this limit.

This requires a veil' smooth and controlled rocking action from you,

CAUTION!

Care must be taken not to over· stretch anyone 10 tvh01n you CIHJ giving massagefor Ibe/iI'slti'lne.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Helps /'0 ease middle and upper bClck pain.

8 THE PLOUGH

Spread ~ our partner'< legs nut into an open .\' and step through them to adopr 1I new posmon astride hls

body with your feet tucked under his armpits. Bend you r knees slightly towards the mid-line, Increase the 'Y' angle between his legs and draw them around your knees. Press his feet together and then press lightly downwards.

Hold for- a few seconds, then open his legs again, draw them back around your legs and push the feet torward and clown a little further

in the directlon of his head. In a very flexible person the feet

will much the floor. Repeat this until you fi nd the J1l osr extre III e position that is comfortable for him. Hold the position for at

least ten seconds.

80

9 KNEEING THE BACKS OF THE THIGHS

-: vour partner is released from ~ previous position retain your d on his feet and step back

""'Iugh his legs again. Hold hls - 0 [hat his legs are slightly enr. sing your body weight,

- both knees simultaneously

-~o (he backs of his thighs whilst,

- the same time, pushing his feet

"ward, Press progressively along

• e entire length of his thighs.

CAUTION!

• Do !l01 use ibis exercise 011 tbe efderl:y (AI ui ioau for at /rJ({.I'1 /!/'O hom'S ((.1'011.1' partner bas eel/en (I Icnge meal.

HEALING BENEFITS

• This si mp!e technique is good fO'I' sufferers of sciatica and those tuba experience problems with their hamstring muscles.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 7. ROCKING & ROLLING THE BACK

tr rch c:I: Ere tor spinae, . gastrocnemius,

• 8. THE PLOUGH

tretched: Adductors. so/ells, hamstring . gllt/eu maximus. erector spinae

1

·9 f\XEEIXG THE BACKS OF THETIITGHS

Stretched Ere tor spinae, gluteus maxima

Pressed Hamstrings, lower pari cf gluteus maximus

HEALING BENEFITS

• Aids mobility of tbe bip joints and counters pain in the pelvic region and lower back.

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81

HEALING BENEFITS

10 KNEEING THE BUTTOCKS

Lift your partner's buttocks off the mat and support with both hands while you knead them deeply with circular movements of your knees.

• Ireats sciatic pain.

11 SHINNING THE THIGHS

Good balance i. requir d for (he

c rr ct x cution of thr technique Bend your partner' rt hr eg im right angle 0 that ht tru h l" vm against hi abdomen. Hold the

nth r leg u rward and th n 1t"aJ1 your left knee inward 0 (hat your shin presses against his thigh. hin progressively along the entire length of his thigh with a to-and-fro rocking motion between each shin press,

HEALING BENEFITS

• Another excellent treatment/or SCiCII/CCI,' ,,,Iso uery effeaiue]»: myofascia! 'release around the

ba mstrings, 1)CI1'licular~v for those tobo do a great deal ofsport.

82

1.2 THE HALF BRIDGE

Press your partner's knees down --'wards his abdomen and, with ur feet slightly apart, bend your snees forward against the arches ~ his feet.

Grasp his knees between our interlocked hands. Lean back with your full body weight, .:il the same time bending your egs until they form a 90° angle. .'lur partner's buttocks will be -aised from the 1118 t an c1, at the "'10st extreme position (below),

nil' his head, shoulders and JIm.., will still remain on the I

'"'1<1t. Hold for at least

if teen seconds, giving is back a big stretch.

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HEALING BENEFITS

• increases btoodfioio to tbe head and neck to give your partner em alert and lively.feeling

• Eases lon-er back pain.

CAUTION!

Do not use Ibis lecbl1iqlll! on tbose tuitb cardiac problems (lnd high blood pressure.

MUSCLES STR.ETCHED & PRESSED

• 10. KNEEING THE BUTTOCKS Stretched, Erector spinae, Gluteus maxlmus

Pressed: Gtuteus maximus

• .11. SHINNING THE nnGI-IS Stretched: Gluteus maxtmus Pressed: H6ln1sll'ings

• 12. THE HAtF BRIDGE Stretched: Quadl'l'ceps, reclus abdomtnts; er(1C'/OI· spinae

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83

13 INTIMATE BACK STRETCH

Kneeling, push your partner's legs forward until his buttock lift and slide you r knees and thigh' under them. When you are in position, grasp your hands around hi legs just above knee level and. leaning backwards, hug hi le again t you to give his back a ood stretch. This is a afe and geode back trerch compared \"\ ith the Half Bridge.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Treats tension and patn In tbe tou-er btl J..t

84

14 LIFTING HEAD TO STRAIGHT KNEES

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

-~zn your partner's legs firmly _:::llnst the front of your own and ean forward to grasp each arm

- und the wrist, Lean your weight Kwards and pull his upper body ...... -a.rds and upwards,

Hold the extreme position for ~ to ten seconds and then gently

'er hi upper body onto the

ar, Repeat this exercise twice and znnrain a slow, steady rhythm roughout.

• 13, INTIMATE BACK STRETCH Stretched: Erector spinae (lower back), bamstrings

• 14, LIFTING HEAD TO TRAIGHT KNEES

[retched; Teres major & minor; biceps, latisstmus dorsi, trapezius, rbombotdeus, erector spinae, bamstTings

• 1') urnxc HEAD TO CRO EDKXE

treiched Teres major & minor; rbomboideus. biceps, trapezius; erJK10r spmae, ~/lIlel.l.s maximus, latISSimus dorsi

HEALING BENEFITS (14 & 15)

• Improves sboutder ClIIeI I. ip mobflily. AI/ tbe stretched muscles a re rei a."iI:ed.

• Gall Gas sctattc pain.

15 LIFTING HEAD TO CROSSED KNEES

As you finish the previous exercise, flex your partner's legs at the kn es and cross his ankles, adjusting their position so that the side of each ankle rests against the front of your

shins just below yOLlL" knees, Now grasp his wrists and mise hi LIpper body towards you, JUSt a' you cUd in [he last technique. Hold for at lease ten sec nds and then rep at.

CAUTION!

Goodjle.-..:ibility ll'br!ll (be legs are straight is not necessarily an 'accurate guide to YOllr partner's jle.xjbi/i~)' toben his legs are crossed. Some people have Vet)' restricted latera! mooement in tbeir bip andtor ankles but good mobility 117 tbe!onvardlbackwal"d direction.

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Lesson Four

CHEST & ABDOMEN

T be techniques demonstrated in Lesson Four stimulate tbe energies oj tbe internal oroan Deep and thorough abdominal massage boosts the immune _ stem. Aluays allou. three hours after a meal before uorletne the abdomen

Dectdins 011 u bat deere 01 pressure is just Tigbt for a particular indiridual call be di Icult. People rary enormou 1:y in their abilit)) to tolerate pressure. in rCe-tt!171 ultures people are unused to having their abdomen deeply mas aged 11)a;' met ssage technique f01- the abdomen are deeply penetrating. Be atten it to your partner

facial expressions and body reactions and altray obtain uerbal confirmation that (be pressure exerted is tolerable.

Sen channels on the abdomen

There ar nine PI'S, ure area or zones in the abdomen, with the navel in the centre, Start in the lower right section and alway pre around the abdomen in a cl kwis dir ction.

Ther are two main techniques. Fit rly, thumb walk the lines on the diagram. tart at zone CD and thumb walk all around [he edge to zone ®. You can then vary this pattern by going CD - @ - CD - ® - ® - @ - ® and then CD - ®.

Secondly, double palm press zones CD - @ on the right side and then move to [he left ide and press zones ® - ®.

ABOVE: These are the nine pressure points on tbe abdomen, which must be tborough~v pressed !f enel;_'?J! balance tn tbe internal organs is to be achieved

86

1 PRESSING THE CHEST, SHOULDERS & ARMS

With your arms straight, palm your partner's upper pectoral region using a slow, rocking movement of your body to generate pressure.

Take care not CO press this area too hare!' II your partner is a man, you can palm the en ti re pectoral area,

1 ow extend the palming down the

HEALING BENEFITS

• Techniques 1, 2 and 3 are designed to tone tbe internal organs, particularly tbe lungs. and benefit astbma/broncbtus sufferers • Palming tbe arms contributes to the overall energy balance wi/hill the body.

arm - to the hand keeping the pressure even throughout. Palm back up the aJ111 and repeat the palming of the pectoral .

2 PRESSING THE CHEST

Maintaining your position, use both hands as shown r palm press clown [he rni lline of your partner's chest on the breastbone. Press with a to-and-fro pu hina movement ro creuc a rocking effect and, with a female partner always restrict your pres ing to these areas.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED • 1. PRESSlN"G THE CHEST, HOL1DERS & ARMS

Pressed: Pectorals, deltoids, biceps, wrist extensors

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87

3 PRESSING BETWEEN THE RIBS (INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES)

Touch Yfelbod One Thumb press the inrercosral spaces between your partner's ribs simultaneously outwards from [he sternum Start with both thumbs either side of the

ternurn ju sr below the collar bone and progre s downwards. If you have a female partner, be prepared

to pr "orne of the intercostal

spac U1 the centre only. Also, be <en ... iuve [ rho e for whom the rib ";;'".lL~ are major tickling spors:

Touch Method 71.00 Now use

your three middle fingers of both hands co press across the ribs with a small circular motion. Again, progress downwards, observing the same precautions as for the Intercostal pr ssing.

4 THUMB WALKING THE ABDO E

Kneeling on your partner's right; use the thumb walking technique and start just above her groin on the right side in zone CD. Thumb walk slowly, rhythmically and cI eply

with lit causing pain to Ole right side across the abdomen ju t below the rib line, and clown the left side to just above the pubic bone from zone CD to zone ®.

Repeat chis circuit several times and then thumb down the mid-line a few times. You can vary this

pattern by thumbing clockwise around the two triangular areas shown on page 86.

88

• EIlCQU enQ'ZI tbrot 10 relax tbe ad 1IIUlllII!IKles

5

PALM PRESSING THE ABDOMEN

Imagine your partner's abdomen divided into nine equal zones with the navel In the centre. Begin in zone CD. As she exhales, press with the heels of both hands aiming towards the navel and gradually and carefully increase the pressure. Holel for up to two minutes.

Ask her to take a deep breath as you release the pressure. Repeat for zones ® to @. Move to her left and continue on zones ® [Q ®.

6 PRESSING FEET TO STOMACH

it between your partner's legs, hold !l r hands and carefully place th balls of y ur feet side by side on [he upper abdomen. Press

L lrernat Iy with care to cover

[he whole ab 10111el1.

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MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 3 PRES rNG BE'TWEEN T,I-IE RIBS

Pressed: lntercostais

• 4. Tl UMB WAtKlNG THE ABDOMEN

Pressed: All abctOI'n.1 nals

• 5. PAI.M PRESSING THE ABDOMEN

Pressed: All abdominals

• 6. PRESSING FEET TO TO.\l-\CH Pressed: 1111 abdorntnals

9

Lesson Five

ARMS, HANDS, NECK & FACE

An .: rita! enel.''''' into tbe bodv's organ systems and need thorough treatment to ensure inootb energy j70 It), boulders store tension which cau es neck pain and beadacbes. tretcbing the shoulders and neck reliere tbe ten-ion. u-bile pressure 011 tbe bead energizes and calms the mind.

Sen channels on the arrrs

@ Inner Sen channels

• CD - Starts behind the thumb under the wrist and ends on deltoid muscle.

• ® - [arts on th und rsid of th wrist in th midlin and passes b tween r dlus and ulna bon 'towards the armpit, wh re it ends.

• @ - Starts on the underside

f th wrist b hind th littl @ ®

fing r and ends in the armpit.

® Ou tel' Sen Channels

• CD - Starts on the wrist creas behind th thumb and pa s s along the edge of the radius to the outer elbow and up to th front f the sho lid r.

• ® - Starts on the middle of the wrist creas and passes betw en the radius and ulna and then over the humerus to the deltoid muscle,

• ® - S arts on the wrist crease behind the little finger and passes up to the back of the armpit.

Tbe Inner Sen channels (left) are: CD - Chinese Lung meridian, ® - Chinese Pericardium meridian, ® - Chinese Hean meridian. Tbe Outer Sen channels O'igbl) are. CD - Chinese Large Intestine meridian, ® - Chinese Sanfiao meridian, ® - Chinese Small intestine meridian:

90

1

PRESSING THE INNER ARM

I

Touch Xletbod One: Palmar Pressing Place vour partner's arm at right angle- [0 her body wtrh [he palm uppermost Palm the inner Sen (far Irq/i) keeping your arms straight and bnng your body weight forward [0 create slow

deep pressure. Do ehis evera, times, both up and down the Sen 'Ioucb Method nco. Thumb Pressing Thumb [be three en channels (see inset) using the rhumb walking technique .• \laintain a slow, steady rhythm throughout and cover the channels, working

up and down at least three times.

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2 PRESSING THE OUTER ARM

Ioucb Method One Lift your partner's arm and place it palm downwards across her chest. This exposes the outer Sen channels which can now be palmed and rhurnbed U ing exacrlv rhe same techniques a tho e u, ed on [he inner Sen channels.

Touch Metbod Tu'o Place your partner's arm palm downwards

on [he mat. Change your kneeling position to one behind her arm. Palm and thumb [he outer Sen channels again.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Reliel'es patn and stiffness ill wrists. etbou» (mel upper {InTIS Balances wn enertnes.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 1. PRESSlt"lG THE INNER ARj\1 Pressed: Biceps, umssflexors

• 2. PRESSING THE OUTER ARM Pressed: Deltoids, wrist extensors

91

HEALING BENEFITS

• Stretches tb« sboukler muscles to relieve tension.

3 FOOT TO ARMPIT STRETCH

Hold your partner's left hand and carefully place your foot in her armpit. Lean back to creare a strong pull against the pressure of your foot. Hold for ten seconds.

CAUTION!

Aluiays ensure thai the arcb oj YOUI'/OOI is placed across tbe actual armpit of you r partner so that little pressure is exerted on the iympt: nodes,

4 STRETCHING THE ARMIN THE TRIANGLE POSITION

Place [he palm of your partner's left hand on the mat with her fingers directed towards her shoulder. Palm the exposed area from elbow to armpit and back again.

92

Now place your left hand on the upper thlgh and your right hand on her elbow. Press down with both hands simultaneously to create a strong stretch across the trunk between arm and thigh.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Provides a rare treat /0'" the triceps muscles wbtcb are {be recipient of (be palming.

• Eases pain and improves mobility in tbe shoulders.

5 PRESSING THE TENDONS OF THE UPPER HAND

_ ... lOg from the wrist each time, ....... rnb press along and across each ~ 'he five main tendons on the

- - a[ your partner's hand.

HEALING BENEFITS

rengtbens the bands and eases 1;1es>.

6

ROTATING, PRESSING & PULLING THE FINGERS

~:.JIICIJ N./ethod 011e Holding .ach finger in turn at the finger'rp , rotate the fingers several 'imes in both dlrecnons.

Ioucb Mel/:;od Ttoo Now squeeze up and clown each finger using your index fing r and thumb. Squeeze flrst along the top and underside of euch finger, follow d by lateral squeezing.

'Ibucb Method Three Pull each finger in turn and use a strong, slidU:I'g'}ILCi'!.1rrltTLfcm:C:'"tt,Ie:-) ,'CeESSDl' f'

xtension, Do not be deterred by any cracking sound [hat l'OU hear when sharply extending [he Anger joints a" these are not harmful.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 3. FOOT TO AR1\I[PIT STRETCH Presse l; Deltoid, rhomboideus, trapezius, lnfrasptnatus, sllprCISpil1.CIIUS

• 4, STRET J-llN THE ARM IN THE TRIANGLE PO mON Stretched: triceps, taussimus dCJI:,i, pectoralts major; tarts: ./le.'lo.;o'I'$

Pressed: Iricep»

HEALING BENEFITS

• Strengtbens tb '/ll1gers and guards agains! osteo-artbrttts.

93

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8 INTERLOCKED HAND PRESSING

With your partner's palm upper- 1110se, interlock your fingers with those of your partner as Follows: • The fourth finger between fingers Ave and four.

9 ROTATING THE WRIST

94

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• 'i.lur rizhr-rtand fifth finger bern een tinge rs three and rwo I lour third and fourth fingers

upport your partner forearm near the wrl [and u e an interlocked finger grip 10 rotate her wrist strongly fir [ one way and then the oth r.

Press your partner's left palm against your knee or upper hin to [lex the wrist and fingers backwards. Thumb press the heel of the palm and the wrist.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Relieues carpal funnel syndrome, numbness and stiffne

between index flnger and thumb

lide your fingers under the back of her hands leaving )IOU!' thu mbs free to press her inside wrist and palm. 'I'll I'll your hand'

utwards so the sides F your pann - r's palms ar lull d d wnward leaving them '11' h I ancl str tched Pr 55 d eplywherever you can,

HEALING BENEFITS

• Gh'€s C( poioerfut bucklumds srreid: 10 tbe band and d(r4fls, Cllld relieues numbness aud slfOile,\~~.

HEALING BENEFITS

• lmproues ooeraii wrist m,ohilily ~md relieves numbness of tbe turists and bands.

10

PULLING THE ARMS

Touch Method One: Vertical Arms Standing behind your partner's -houlders, grasp both her hands and then pull both arms lip and

... own, llfting each shoulder

3.1 te rna tely

Touch Xletbod Two: Bactetoard Pull Sll\\ rep back from your partner and pull borh her arms togeth r leaning with your' body weight

[0 create [he pull.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 7. KNEE TO HAND PRESSING Stretched: Handflexors

• 8. INTERLOCKED HAND PRESSING

Stretched: Handfiexors

• 9. ROTATING THE WRIST Stretched: rVdst & hand flexors & extensors

• lO. PULL1NG HiE ARlVlS Stretched: Irapeaus, deltoids, InthlSpinat us, rbomboideus, biceps, pectoralis major

HEALING BENEFITS

• Reduce: tension ill (be sboutrlers 011[1 improoes mobilttv oftbe shoulders.

95

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Kneel behind your partner's hea l. Press and push the top of her shoulders with both hands, initially sustaining the press for several seconds, Then press and pu h alternately without holding [he presses Finally. thumb pres: along the upper b rder of her collar b ne and over the upper region,' f the pectoral muscles.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Helps take tenstonfront the neck and sboutders. (mel tmprooes boulder /IIobifity.

96

12 PRESSING THE NECK

Su pport the base of your partner's head with onehand, lifting it sllghrly fO"W<II'cI so chat your other hand can press up 'Inc! down the muscles on one side f her ne k.

wap hands to I r 55 the other si I

'tum your partner's head co the right so that it rests on the right temple. Press along the full length of the srernoclel lornastoid muscle with your left rhumb.

13 STRETCHING THE NECK

Place both hands under YOU'" partner's lower neck and pull them tov arc! you to .reat a l11ilel traction n th ne k. el eat several times, K eping a slight traction, press with your fingers

into the soft tissue i rnrnediately behind the base of the skull. Hold for lip « one rnlnute, Allow til

w ighr of th h ad t generate the pressure.

14 PULLING THE TURNED HEAD

Place your right hand under your partn r's chill and your left hand under the base of her skull using equal pressure with both hands. Pull her head back very gently and carefully. Hold the pull for at least ten seconds.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Relaxes tbe neck muscles, eases headaches and imp roues mobility of tbe neck.

15

MASSAGING THE FACE & HEAD

16

MASSAGING THE EARS

Cup and cover your partner's eat with the palm of your hands to create a suction. Hold for 30 seconds and then release.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Clem'S blocked ears.

Sitting behind your partner's head. place both thumbs on tOP of her forehead on the halrltne, Pre evenly on either side of her face following the directions of [he arrows as shown.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Relaxes tbe lace, eases headaches, calms Ibe mint/, relieves nasal congession, improves beartng

and massages the gums.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED

• 11. PRES I G THE SHOULDERS Pressed: Irapeztus

• 12. PRESSING THE NECK Pressed: Srernacleidomastoid, levator scapulae

• 14. PUWNG THE TURNED HEAD

Stretched: Sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, erector spinae, levator scapulae

97

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Lesson Six

LYING ON EITHER SIDE

Tbe techniques featured in tbis lesson give access to the Sen energl' channel. in tbe side position and provide an opportunity to reach . muscles tbat cannot be effectiuely treated in tbe other positions. Each side of tbe body is treated ;11 turn, first with yowl' partner on one side using Exercise 1-23. II hi bare tben repeated when he is lying on the otber side, If you decide 10 do OI1Zl some of tbe techniques shown, remember to repeat each one 011 tbe other side of {be body. Refer to Part One Chapter Tioo (5 e pages 34-41) for the basic te bniques of pressing and manipulation.

Sen channel in the side position

The en hannels in th I g. and ack are de crib cl and illustrat d anatomi ally

in L ssons 1W an I en (see paves 51- -3 ClJ1d 110). In the sid p slti n th

inside and back of the straight kg expo e..: the Inner @ - Chinese Kidney meridian) and the Outer ® - Chine e Bladder meridian. The kidneys and bladder control wa r balance ill th bod, 3..' well treating low r b tic pain, The b nt

l. g expos 'til Outer 1: - G lIblaclcl r rnendian, 2Jl 1 th ut r

@ - Bladder. The energi s of the Gallbladder meridian treat leg pain and nurnbn 55 resulting from sciatica.

ABOVE: Sen channels accessible in the side position. The Sen channels on the back treat all the internal organs of the body.

98

1 PRESSING THE BACK OF THE EXTENDED LEG

"bud: Metbod One:' Palmar Pressing oeloiu) Draw your partner's right eg up in front of him so that it

-- rms an angle of about 90° with is body. Keep your arms straight znd palm with both hands along - ie inner en of the straight

leg using your body weight ro generate deep pressure. Palm outwards from the knee and back again several times. Keep a steady rhythm using a slow, to-and-fro rocking movement. Then butterfly palm the entire leg.

Touch Method Two: Thumb IXlcliking (rigb/) Starting on your partner's inside lower leg, thumb walk deeply along the S 11 channels.

2 PRESSING THE FLEXED LEG

First, palm the outer Sen charm Is

of your partner's f1exed leg, Then

thumb walk th 11 nergy

channels 011 the lower and the upper leg in [Urn.

HEALING BENEFITS

• Stimulates mouement of intrinsic energy and helps 10 release blockages which cause pain and snffness. Eases and sootbes

sciatic pain in tbe legs.

HEALING BENEATS

• Pressing tbe inner Sell cbarm 's /]1'"01110IeS energy mouement tbrou ' II: e abdomen and Isgoodfor PJrT genua! problems and swellillg.

MUSCLES STRETCHED & PRESSED • I. PRESSI I THE BACK OF DED LEG

Pressed: oleus, gastrocnemius, bamSlrillf?,s. adductor I11USC/r:!S

• 2, PRES [NG TI-IE FLEXED LEG Pressed: Gluteus maximus; btoepsfemoris, tensorfasciae latae, uastus lateralis it!o·libial traa

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99

3 PRESSING AROUND THE HIP JOINT

With your partner's right leg still in the flexed position, press deeply with your thumbs and palms around his hip joint. Finally elbow press by Iearung in gradually with your body weight to give more pressure.

HEALING BENEFITS

o Wonde/jii/()I effeatue in {be treatment a/sciatica.

4 SIDE SINGLE GRAPE PRESS

Gra p both your partner', ankles and u e your light foot to pre. and down his thigh. Generate pres ure by leaning back and pulling both his leg.

HEALING BENEFITS

o Eases hip pain.

o Encourage: relaxation aI/he bamsJring niusctes.

5 SIDE SINGLE GRAPE PRESS s TWISTED VINE

As y u complete the previ us technique, tuck Y Lit' foot b hind your partner's right knee and cross his right foot over your right shin, Tuck his toes in behind your kne J holding

his heel'with your right hand. Press up and down his thigh using your left foot.

100

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