P. 1
Culture of Innovation

Culture of Innovation

|Views: 351|Likes:
Published by Nesta
Arts funders and policymakers increasingly call on arts and cultural organisations to be more innovative. Yet, there is little clarity about what innovation means in an arts and cultural context. This report addresses this problem by proposing an innovation framework that can be used by arts organisations and funders alike.
Arts funders and policymakers increasingly call on arts and cultural organisations to be more innovative. Yet, there is little clarity about what innovation means in an arts and cultural context. This report addresses this problem by proposing an innovation framework that can be used by arts organisations and funders alike.

More info:

Published by: Nesta on Sep 07, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/09/2013

pdf

text

original

As with any organisation, business models in
the performing arts have to move with the
times. This is essential if theatres are to remain
artistically and fnancially viable. Demand and
fnancial support remain vulnerable today to
unforeseen events such as the global economic
slowdown, while there is also an imperative
for a leading cultural institution such as the
National to remain at the front line in terms of
artistic growth.

In maintaining a fexible and forward-looking
business model, the NT’s strategies can be
considered under several headings. Firstly,
in putting together the programme for a
forthcoming season, it must fnd the right
ratio between likely box-offce successes and
riskier productions. There is no clear line of
demarcation between these two categories,
and a risky work may become a hit just as the
expected box offce smash can fail to win the
expected audiences. The National is fortunate
in being able to have a suffciently large
volume of work underway at any one time that
the risk can be spread, allowing a disappointing
result for one production to be offset by a
success with another (Caves, 2000).

Another aspect of the National’s business
model involves pursuing opportunities for
onward marketing of NT productions through
West End transfers and in seeking other
revenue-raising sources. For example, a quick-
response investment fund is used to raise
capital at short notice for particular projects. In

28

addition, partnerships with corporate sponsors
and government agencies may enable new
sources of support to be tapped. An example of
a successful relationship with a funding body
is the cooperative arrangement between the
National Theatre, Arts Council, England and
NESTA. NESTA has provided fnancial support
for the NT Live experiment, on condition that
the lessons from the experiment are shared
widely with the sector.

The capacity of the National to adopt a
fexible and responsive business model that is
sensitive to, and integrated with, the artistic
development of the company is greatly
enhanced by its management structure. In the
executive team the artistic, managerial and
fnancial functions are closely linked, allowing
a unifed focus to planning. Management
is relatively lean, enabling quick decision-
making, and there is a high degree of trust
among the management personnel. In short,
the NT provides a good example of the sort
of adaptive business model for a cultural
institution that works well in encouraging
innovation in all the dimensions that we are
considering.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->