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Culture of Innovation

Culture of Innovation

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Published by Nesta
Arts funders and policymakers increasingly call on arts and cultural organisations to be more innovative. Yet, there is little clarity about what innovation means in an arts and cultural context. This report addresses this problem by proposing an innovation framework that can be used by arts organisations and funders alike.
Arts funders and policymakers increasingly call on arts and cultural organisations to be more innovative. Yet, there is little clarity about what innovation means in an arts and cultural context. This report addresses this problem by proposing an innovation framework that can be used by arts organisations and funders alike.

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Published by: Nesta on Sep 07, 2010
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10/09/2013

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Colour Chart was an exhibition at Tate Liverpool
devoted to the moment in twentieth-century
art when artists began to perceive colour as
‘readymade’ rather than as a vehicle of spiritual
or emotional content. Running from 29 May
to 13 September 2009, the exhibition featured
the work of 42 artists including Damian Hirst,
On Kawara and Marcel Duchamp. It attracted
more than 19,000 visitors, or 200 on an
average day.

As part of its promotion of the show, Tate
Online featured an exhibition website which
hosted a large amount of multimedia content
giving information about the exhibition
and the artists featured which could be
either downloaded or streamed, including a
multimedia tour that could also be downloaded

42

Table 16: Number of unique visits per page between 29 May 2009 and 13 September 2009

Page

Hyper-link reference

Visits

Colourchart Homepage www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/

38,693

Colourchart Games

kids.tate.org.uk/games/colour-colour/

20,222

Colourchart Photos

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/photos.shtm

9,045

Colourchart Introduction www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/intro.shtm

7,703

Colourchart Artists

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/artists/

5,832

Colourchart Visiting

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/visiting.shtm

4,461

Colourchart Tour

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/tour.shtm

3,769

Artist – DUCHAMP

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/artists/duchamp.shtm 3,246

Artist – WARHOL

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/artists/warhol.shtm

3,225

Artist – HIRST

www.tate.org.uk/liverpool/exhibitions/colourchart/artists/hirst.shtm

3,114

as an MP4 fle from iTunes. Although the
online content did not include webcams based
in the Gallery, the experience offered to online
visitors amounted to a ‘virtual tour’ of the
show, since they could access many of the
works in the exhibition in the context in which
they were shown.

The Colour Chart web pages also featured
educational resources and games geared at
younger online visitors. These proved to be
among the most popular pages (Table 16).
Furthermore, the Tate used Flickr to enable
members of the public to contribute their own
colour monochromes to create a constantly
changing Colour Chart. All the photographs
posted were shown on Tate Online, and 36
of the images were used to produce a glossy
Colour Chart poster which was displayed in the
Gallery.

Over the exhibition’s run the website attracted
66,190 visits. Because some online visitors may
have made multiple visits to the Colour Chart
webpages, this number is likely to overstate the
number of unique visitors to some extent.

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