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DDG Engineering Training

DDG Engineering Training

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Published by: Concho on Sep 08, 2010
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10/31/2011

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Simulator Factor

Important for
Increased Use

Supports
Increased Use

Hinders or Limits
Increased Use

Physical location

Onboard the ship
or close by

Close by; readily
available

Not close or readily
available

Fidelity

High

Medium

Low or poor

Operationally
realistic

High; closely
resembles operating
conditions and/
or environment.
Depicts near-actual
scenarios

Nearly, but some
differences

Little in common
with operating
conditions,
environment. Does
not adequately
represent
operation

Range/number of
exercises that may
be performed

Numerous, many
or few, but
important
for readiness

Some, but not all

Few

Equipment

Closely resembles
onboard
equipment

Nearly resembles;
some differences

Does not resemble

Training time
available for use

Flexible

Available, but
limited

Infexible to unit’s
needs

Simulator
confguration
updates

Updated/upgraded
as ships are
updated

Generic, but close

Not updated/
upgraded over time

Training standardsCommon

Different

Return on
Investment

Provides a proven
training beneft
and/or savings

Helps training with
little or no savings

Provides little
training beneft
and/or savings

Simulator cost

Training value
exceeds costs

High or low cost;
good training value

High cost; little
training value

Risk

Reduces

Some reduction

Little reduction

Pros and Cons of an Engineering Simulator 51

investment and simulator costs are closely related and may alone sup-
port or not support increased use of simulation. Risk reduction is a
critical factor that would support and drive increased use of a simula-
tor. Overall, we posit that simulation should be pursued as a training
alternative when it can sustain readiness, enhance a capability, save
resources, or reduce risk.
How will simulators gain more widespread use? Tey must
be realistic and present an adequate representation of events that
would be encountered live. Tey also must be able to show increased
performance—that is, they must save time or money or make crews
more profcient and have an adequate return on investment.
We turn next to the policies and resources that could support

simulator use.

53

CHAPTER SIX

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