P. 1
mims indo

mims indo

|Views: 234|Likes:
Published by dayostar

More info:

Published by: dayostar on Sep 08, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/16/2012

pdf

text

original

Sections

  • I. INTRODUCTION
  • A. Significance
  • B. Objectives
  • C. Methodology
  • II. SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
  • III. MAIN REPORT
  • A. Industry overview
  • B. Market size
  • C. Standards and technical regulations
  • D. Trade and industry policy environment
  • E. Export policies and incentives
  • F. Import practices
  • G. Distribution system of pharmaceutical products in Indonesia
  • H. Pharmaceutical sales promotion and pricing in Indonesia
  • I. Maritime transport services
  • J. Packaging
  • K. Export credit and finance
  • L. Trade promotion
  • M. Conclusions and recommendations
  • N. Useful addresses
  • REFERENCES
  • COMPANY/PRODUCT PROFILES

SOUTH-SOUTH TRADE PROMOTION PROGRAMME

INDONESIA

SUPPLY AND DEMAND SURVEY ON PHARMACEUTICALS AND NATURAL PRODUCTS

June 2004

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products - Indonesia

The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the International Trade Centre (ITC) concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. While every effort has been made to verify the information contained in this document, ITC cannot accept any responsibility for any errors that it may contain.

This report has not been formally edited by the International Trade Centre (ITC).

- ii -

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products - Indonesia

Table of content
Page I. INTRODUCTION A. B. C. II. III. Significance Objectives Methodology 1 4 4 4 6 8 8 9 18 19 27 27 29 32 34 35 39 41 44 48 50

SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS MAIN REPORT A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. Industry overview Market size Standars and technical regulations Trade and industry policy environment Export policies and incentives Import practices Distribution system of pharmaceutical products in Indonesia Pharmaceutical sales promotion and pricing in Indonesia Maritime transport service Packaging Export credit and finance Trade promotion Conclusion and recommendations Useful addresses

References

Annex
Company/product profiles 53

- iii -

Indonesia The following abbreviations are used: ACCSQ ACTR AFTA APEC ASEAN ATL CCB CEPT CIF CPO EDL EPZ GMP ITC ITIS JCP JICT MRA OTC TRIPS UCI VAT WHO WTO ASEAN Consultative Committee for Standards and Quality ASEAN Common Technical Requirements ASEAN Free Trade Agreement Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Association of South East Asian Nations Accelerated Tariff Liberalization Corrugated Carton Boxes Common Effective Preferential Tariff Cost. Insurance.iv - . Freight Crude Palm Oil Essential Drug List Export Processing Zone Good Manufacturing practice International Trade Centre International Trade Institute of Singapore Jakarta Container Port Jakarta International Container Terminal Mutual Recognition Agreement Over-the-Counter Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Universal Child Immunisation Value Added Tax World Health Organization World Trade Organization .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .

INTRODUCTION Following are the 21 categories of medicines (covering 128 groups) that are manufactured in Indonesia and a subject of this survey: -1- .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia I.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia -2- .

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia -3- .

This applies also to the pharmaceutical industry. the distribution channels employed and their relative importance. However. and practices. export financing. duties. -4- . B. etc. Primary sources included one-to-one discussions conducted on-site in Jakarta by Mr Vicky Mukhi. and suggest remedial action Indicating possibilities for augmenting supplies and new investment opportunities Determining technical assistance requirements in the areas of product development. joint export marketing. market promotion. costing and pricing. and suggest remedial action To identify the major impediments affecting exports. The pharmaceutical industry represents one of these sectors. layers of middlemen. Objectives The objectives of this survey are as follows: • • • • • • • To outline the current market size and be able to project the future potential To understand the complexities of the market structure and its characteristics viz.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Not all companies operating in Indonesia have profited from the increased consumption of pharmaceutical products. To identify the major impediments affecting imports. however.Indonesia Source: MIMS Indonesia A. packaging. along with the economy. in Indonesia. etc. i. rules and regulations. customs valuation. To highlight the Import Policy and procedures. there has been a big gap between "potential" and its realization. training in export marketing. C. Many firms are beset with difficulties amid fierce competition. and other independent players in the Indonesian marketplace. as in other large developing countries. ITC National Consultant with members of Gabungan Perusahaan Farmasi Indonesia (Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers). the pharmaceutical industry in general has grown. Indonesia has been regarded as a huge potential market. etc. Methodology The survey has been based on findings from Primary as well as Secondary sources.e. The prospects of a big market have prompted domestic as well as many foreign investors to develop industries producing goods and services. Significance With a population of around 220 million people.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Central Bureau of Statistics other agencies of the Government of Indonesia. and Governments of other ASEAN nations.Indonesia Secondary data was compiled from a variety of publications and a wide variety of World Wide Web sources. -5- . The background information on the business was obtained through various statistics and publications of the Indonesian Ministry of Trade and Industry.

while the Philippines was $19.2 trillion (US$1. which until now has yet to be stable. However. However. the value is still small. around $80 million per year.1 per person. the 27 % growth rate recorded in 2001. complicated import clearance and the slump of the Indonesian Rupiah against the US dollar.8 with a population of 63 million. Strict competition due to a small market size.500 employees jobless. and according to recent media releases (in the Jakarta Post. around $1. Aventis. Sanbefarma. are the bitter pills for the local industry to swallow. and Nigeria and Uganda in Africa. Kimiafarma (stronger and profitable) and Indofarma (loss making generics producer) to reduce unnecessary competition between state-owned companies. Novartis and Mead Johnson and local pharmaceutical companies. SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS During the five years. currently there were 198 pharmaceutical producers operating in the country from 223 in early 1997.2 with its population of 78 million and Thailand $23. The country's five biggest pharmaceutical manufacturers in terms of market share were Kalbefarma.5 billion). Local manufacturers are currently unable to compete with foreign companies due to the lack of investment and research resources for inventing new medicine. which is higher than the Indonesian market value. Laos. leaving more than 12. Vietnam. The country's overall drug market size grows by around 20 % every year. 25 local pharmaceutical manufacturers went bankrupt. but the value is still small. Local companies can only copy the foreign companies and sell at lower prices by buying the formula and changing the name of the drugs. Local manufactures are helped by their ability to export the cheap. a multinational manufacturer can spend US$350 – US$400 million. With a population of 210 million the country's consumption of drugs only reached $7. The market value for 2002 was estimated to stand around Rp 15. It is estimated that the market size grew only by 25 % in 2002 or two percentage points below. Cambodia in Asia. Indonesia is the lowest. Roche.e. which have less crowded markets. To invent one new product. and mostly non-prescription drugs. June 2004) there is serious consideration to merge the two i. Dexamedika. Most of the bankrupt companies have shifted their business to produce food supplements or medicinal herbs. The last two companies are owned by the state. If compared to other South East Asian countries the Indonesian market value is the same as the Philippines and Thailand. Around 70 % of the market volume is controlled by 35 foreign manufacturers including the world's giants Pfizer.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . The annual budget allocated for research can reach $2. Kimiafarma and Indofarma. face immense competitive pressures. if compared to the average consumption of drugs per person.and medium-sized operations.5 billion. According to GP Farmasi (Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies). especially small. -6- .Indonesia II.5 billion. from the start of the economic crisis in 1997 until 2001. copied drugs to other poor or developing countries such as Myanmar.

far lower than the 500 % increase in operating costs during the same period. smuggled and fake products which have continued to pour into the country since 1998. thereby minimizing resource commitments to the market. and that has also seriously hurt the local industry. Pharmaceutical prices in Indonesia have increased by 200 % since late 1997. A new entrant to the Indonesian marketplace could initially choose to either export finished products through established channels. Moreover. has made it vulnerable to the fluctuation of country's currency against the US dollar. Around 95 % of raw material for the industry is imported. which makes the timing of import clearance very important for a company to run efficiently and compete with others. Such vulnerability leads to inflexible production costs and price of products.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . as was evident in the skyrocketing API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) prices during the economic crises that saw the Rupiah tumble against the US dollar. A scale up could then follow with either setting up a pharmaceutical plant fed through raw materials produced abroad (in a captive plant or procured from third party suppliers) or by establishing a basic ingredient plant that feeds the domestic industry and markets outside of Indonesia. -7- . foreign or domestic. The dependency of the pharmaceutical industry on imported raw materials. the local industry is also threatened by cheaper.Indonesia Lack of transparency in customs procedures make it difficult to legally import drugs as well as allowing many illegal drugs to flood the country.

5% of GDP in other low-income countries (World Bank data). and this will have negative effects on health service delivery. and the government has therefore been actively promoting private healthcare provision. Demands on the system are increasing: demographic trends show an increasing number of people over 60 years of age. Maternal health is a major problem. The drugs market has typically been growing by about 20% per year. The country has recently implemented an essential drugs list. Generic drugs are now produced by 4 government and 26 private companies. Indonesia has fallen behind in terms of investment in infrastructure and financial resources for health since the economic crisis of 1997-98.Indonesia III. both for prescription drugs and for -8- . There is currently a policy of zero personnel growth in the public sector.6% of GDP. MAIN REPORT A. owing to budgetary constraints. Annual consumption of drugs per head was estimated at US$4 in 2000. Introduction The level of healthcare in Indonesia is poor and subject to considerable regional inequalities. State-owned companies are the main source of pharmaceuticals. which are cheaper and readily available.2 years in 1990 to 68. particularly at secondary and tertiary level. Average life expectancy has been rising. Overall. and growing migration to the cities. Compared with other low-income countries. and infant mortality is high at 39 in every 1.6 years in 2002. but a WHO report found that it was not only the prices of services and drugs that accounted for the low level of use. the huge currency devaluation and subsequent rise in drug prices has led to a sharp fall in demand. multi-drug combinations and injections. but also travel time and cost as well as time lost from other productive activities. Industry overview 1. In 1998-99 Indonesia’s total health spending accounted for 1. Medicines are expensive relative to average incomes. from 61. compared with an average of 4. but this is from a low base. There is still a buoyant market in traditional medicines. 2.7bn. and prices are controlled in the private sector. Private healthcare facilities are expected to expand The public sector’s ability to invest in healthcare provision is limited. Use of public (and private) health services is low. significantly below the US$11 recorded in Thailand and Malaysia. Essential drugs are subsidised in the public sector. Indonesia is coming under mounting international pressure to open its healthcare services to international competition. resulting in a considerable decline in the excessive use of antibiotics. The increasing role of the private sector in healthcare raises questions about access.000 births. although private facilities are required to provide subsidized services to the poor. resulting in an increase in degenerative diseases.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . and the market value in 2003 was estimated at US$3.

while only 3. such as Cancer and Cardiovascular disease which are the two greatest causes of death. and the company announced that it intended to focus on the production of generic medicines. but not yet further afield. but weak market conditions have prevented the sales. the prevalence of tuberculosis is some 2. with an annual growth rate of 1. which was included in the privatisation programme for 2003. infant mortality has declined from 140/1000 to 54/1000. Universal Child Immunisation (UCI) was achieved in 1992. Local manufacturers lack the financial resources to undertake research. The local pharmaceuticals industry is currently operating at 60-70% of capacity. Kimia Farma and Indofarma. The population rate is likely to double by year 2040 giving a population of some 400 million people.5% per annum. which account for 85% of Indofarma’s output. In early 2003 the government announced that the sale of a 51% stake in Kimia Farma. and Vitamin A deficiency has almost been eliminated.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .5 million) are aged over 65. manufacturing a limited range of products. There have been some dramatic improvements over the last 30 years: life expectancy has risen from 42 to 62. are growing rapidly. There is.5 million babies are born annually. cataracts -9- . and 3. The merger of Kimia Farma and Indofarma is to take place after the two companies have completed restructuring. which account for 53% of production at present. which encourages the production and distribution of generic drugs. Some 56% (or 120 million) of the population is aged under 25. and pharmaceuticals exports were over US$100 in 2003. B. But problems remain. In May 2003 two subsidiaries of Kimia Farma were created to operate in the retail and distribution sectors. The pharmaceuticals sector is tightly controlled by the government In 2002 there were 198 pharmaceuticals manufacturers in Indonesia. and generally either produce drugs under licence from foreign drug companies or distribute generic drugs. growing demand overseas. Degenerative diseases. and profitability is low. Hepatitis B is carried by 60 million people. 4. Market size Indonesia is the fourth most populous country in the world: the population is estimated to be around 220 million. at a rate of 7 per minute. including four state-owned and 35 foreign-invested companies. would be delayed until 2004 because the company needed more time to restructure. Foreign-owned companies have threatened to relocate to cheaper locations such as Thailand following the utility price increases.4/1000. and the crude death rate has halved from 14/1000 to 7/1000. but some preventable diseases such as polio. diphtheria and measles remain prevalent.7 years.Indonesia 3. Having reported a large loss in 2002. as demand has suffered in the wake of the financial crisis. Malaria has largely been controlled on Java. The industry is heavily controlled by the government. companies have been hit hard by the recent increases in utility prices.8% (or 7. however. The government has repeatedly declared its intention to merge and then privatise the two largest state-owned pharmaceuticals companies. in mid-June 2003 Indofarma forecasted falling sales in 2003 because of the government’s decision not to raise the prices of generic medicines. Local pharmaceuticals companies tend to be small-scale The majority of pharmaceuticals companies are small.

10 - . A lack of confidence in the domestic health system traditionally resulted in many people seeking medical services outside Indonesia. physical investments to improve service quality. is still a priority for the Government of Indonesia focusing particularly on mother and child healthcare and nutrition. Preparations for the Government’s regional autonomy is in process and this includes the Ministry of Health. all of which are currently in line to be merged into one SOE by the Government’s overall privatisation by 2004. as part of the social safety net programme. There are four state-owned pharmaceutical companies in Indonesia. There are more than 250 pharmaceutical companies in Indonesia.Indonesia and iodine deficiency remain common. . as an additional Government Tax. PT Kimia Farma. however this has reduced dramatically with the continuation of the economic crisis. A market for refurbished medical equipment also exists. In the longer term. Government funds for new equipment and projects are still extremely scarce. Patients who may have previously sought overseas treatment are now being treated in private hospitals in Indonesia. Decentralisation will give responsibility to the local district level (of which there around 300 nation-wide) and this process for health provision is now completed. These companies have experienced difficulties during the post economic crisis era due to the reduced demand for branded drugs. If this legislation is adopted it may be seen. The national insurance premium is likely to be 6% for all employers regardless of whether they already have a medical scheme for their staff.125 trillion (about 2% of total government expenditure). in addition to recent problems with official drug registration by the Ministry of Health’s Food and Drug Division. These are PT Indofarma. developing locally appropriate solutions and improving health services quality. The aim is to improve the health status of the people by enhancing service coverage. and support for locally adapted health sector reforms. But the provision of primary healthcare.800 beds. there has been a rise in the popularity of generic medicine and a reduced demand for branded drugs. although multilateral donor programmes do include healthcare projects and opportunities within these do exist.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .145 hospitals in Indonesia. health professionals and communities in identifying health needs and priorities. and patients who may have previously been able to afford private treatment in a private hospital are now seeking treatment at the state run hospitals. The total government expenditure for 2003 is Rp 253.7 trillion and the allocation for the healthcare sector is Rp 5. The four companies are in the preliminary stage of synergising their businesses. in some quarters. (70% of blindness is due to cataract) and AIDS is spreading rapidly. Latest health figures state that there are 1. providing a total sum of around 124. the Government plans to sell shares in the single company that will result. Approximately 90% of raw materials for pharmaceutical production are imported and therefore with the weakening of the Rupiah companies have been forced to raise their selling prices leading to a decrease in sales volume. PT Phapros and PT Bio Farme. and a further dispensation of responsibility by DEPKES. quality and utilisation of health facilities. The Ministry of Health (DEPKES) is currently in the process of drafting new regulations to introduce a compulsory "National Health Insurance" scheme (JPKM) in the form of a managed care system. The objective is to assist local governments. As a result of the economic crisis. albeit on a restricted basis. The economic crisis in 1997 had a major impact on the healthcare sector. The project will comprise building and training activities. Recent legislation allows foreign medical personnel to practice in Indonesia. But up to 600 new private hospitals are still needed.

Riau ....K..... to this point..................….............. Bali 1 ............ Yogyakarta 5 ....... Aceh . Java (West) 72 .…...... So far the country has produced a limited quantity and few types of basic (active) ingredients................. 1...I.... Sumatra (North) 10 .................................. Jambi 1 .……....................................................... Sumatra (West) 2 .........................Indonesia Eventually opportunities are likely to be good in most areas of the health sector including hospital design and construction................………………………. Bandar Lampung ...........……..……........................................... comprising 259 manufacturers and the following is a geographical spread of companies in the industry in Indonesia: Province No....... Sumatra (South) 3 ...... of factories 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 D......... Java (East) 54 .……....…...................................... Production capacity Pharmaceutical factories in Indonesia are "formulation" factories since most basic (active) ingredients are imported.....................…. only include firms with legal operating licenses...... hospital management................ Bengkulu .…............ D..... D.................I... GP Farmasi (Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies) members... Banten 22 ..............................………............................I......................................................………............. ................…….....……...Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .......... Jakarta 58 ................... Suppliers are urged to maintain contacts within the market............... education and training and the supply of equipment.............11 - .................................…..….……....……............................ Java (Central) 31 ...............……...............

......................... Kalimantan (South) ...…...................................................................................................Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .............Indonesia 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Kalimantan (West) ................................................. - Total .................................. Source: GP Farmasi (Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies) 259 ................... Irian Jaya .…… Maluku & Maluku (North) .............…............................. Sulawesi (North-East) .................................... Sulawesi (South) ....…...........…................ Kalimantan (East) ...............…… Sulawesi (North) & Gorontalo ......……… Nusa Tenggara (North-East) ............…...................................... Kalimantan (Central) ..................12 - .……......... Sulawesi (Central) ...........…...................................... Nusa (North-West) ...............

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .500 employees jobless. are the bitter pills for the local industry to swallow. .Indonesia 2. leaving more than 12. The economic crises and production changes The table below captures the installed production capacity of the Indonesian pharmaceutical industry.13 - . Most of the bankrupt companies have shifted their business to produce food supplements or medicinal herbs. complicated import clearance and the slump of the Indonesian Rupiah against the US dollar. During the five years of the economic crisis (1997 – 2001) 25 local pharmaceutical manufacturers went bankrupt. which have less crowded markets. which until now has yet to be stable. Strict competition due to a small market size.

According to the Indonesia Association of Pharmaceutical Companies.356 with trade names. (a) Imports Imports account for roughly 95% of the basic ingredients needed for the country's pharmaceutical industry. the principal companies abroad may not be anxious to transfer their technology to their Indonesian partners. In addition. Import – Export After a lengthy period of government policies promoting import substitution. there were 9. however.14 - . A producer of basic ingredients faces many problems. This regulation. producing pharmaceutical basic ingredients requires high technology and expensive research facilities. companies have been able to meet all essential medical needs in Indonesia. including 2. Ninety-five % of basic (active) ingredients for Indonesia's pharmaceutical factories are imported. Since the late 1980s. This is the case largely because the government (in a bid to reduce dependence on imports) has required foreign joint venture companies to produce at least one basic ingredient domestically. could not be effectively enforced because only a few joint venture companies were able to comply with it.Indonesia 3. For one thing. imports (legal) of pharmaceutical products account for only 2% of the total demand (see table below). . By contrast. only a few products have needed to be imported.890 with generic names and 6. However. investors have shown genuine interest in building factories to produce antibiotic basic ingredients in Indonesia.246 pharmaceutical products of different formulas being produced in the country.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .

00 38.00 69.00 2004 55.00 48.00 80.484.00 33.095. 72.00 72.00 593.00 Source: Bank Indonesia .15 - 549.250.00 46.00 47.671.679.00 44.057.603.693.00 40.00 40.00 50.236.144.27 593.070.618.00 49. 75.639.00 65.00 57.573.312.00 660. 57.00 .00 46.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 81.185.058.616.00 36.00 75.00 38.194.813.200.677.00 45.454.77 Feb.51 45.415.316.191.00 43.494.00 40.00 44.194.684.85 Sep.991.00 113.00 41.00 54.000. 64.792.00 52.00 42.00 55.052.515. 48.480.00 50. 91.485. 218.322.69 2002 38.768.395.007.57 Jul.00 43.00 55.527.426.00 45. 68.771.00 41.048.496.812.00 39.860.145.179.00 639.223.053.549.708.00 42.00 61.00 73.00 59.458.265.00 29.00 45.771.00 656.523.00 63.939.00 44.00 43.00 48.820.00 65.00 45.380.00 46.262.00 40.354.455.00 39.00 43.00 88.00 43.856.00 54.498.00 51.00 45.83 May.034.00 24.00 71.196.934.379.Indonesia Import Value of Pharmaceutical Products (in ‘000 USD) 1992 Jan.287.49 Apr.014.564.00 48.340.00 544.134.789.00 53.00 49.673.00 46.00 52.07 1993 78.00 720.62 Jun.586.493.734.98 Nov.183.550.00 1994 35.00 41.14 Total 1.387.00 45.00 2000 33.497.00 40.411.410.750.947.00 51.00 47.266.45 40.00 42.281.00 45.915.761.012.00 48.893.17 Oct.926.00 41.105.00 569.00 1995 51.510.00 51.278.881.542.564.912.00 38.288.561.00 34.933.00 50.00 108.08 Aug.487.00 43.466.00 84.00 48.00 39.00 1996 78.345.662.226.157.859.00 39.00 58.00 1998 45.773.961.251.00 22.313.331.670.00 60.00 41.00 61.00 38.056.334.00 2003 58.313.00 52.00 54.00 34.368.00 46.288.291.470.746. 79.521.476.000.922.786.00 52.942.00 39.00 1999 34.168.704.00 48.00 56.00 39.00 54.00 42.113.999.721.743.00 64.00 39.081.202.148.00 51.00 47.00 64.00 65.252.94 24.21 Mar.00 44.645.00 2001 50.00 49.311.00 535.772.00 36.00 46.484.327.052.00 45.412.050.00 1997 57.003.127.182. 114.00 44.136.576.00 35.569. 86.00 83.00 531.00 58.00 40.520.68 47.695.00 48.36 Dec.687.00 47.

Italy.16 - . However due to stiff competition from countries like China (an active ingredient supplier to Indonesia).00 Source: Various sources (processed) .00 69920.00 100000. Indonesia has exported pharmaceutical products for a long time.00 59870. PR China. Basic ingredients for drugs are imported from Germany. (b) Exports Despite heavy dependence on imports for basic raw materials. The adjoining table is an extract of data processed from figures published by the Pharmaceutical Products and Food Supervisory Board (B-POM). Australia and others.S. and it is reflected as “Others” under the category of Industrial Exports. provitamins and vitamins. the BPS (Statistics Indonesia) and Bank Indonesia do not publish as detailed statistics on export of pharmaceuticals. the Netherlands. Japan. exports have been rather miniscule.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . and other secondary sources. France.00 44400. glycoside and organo therapeutic gland antisera. Export Value of Pharmaceutical Products (in ‘000 USD) Year 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Exports 60390.00 97980.00 61030. Consequently. and India (with its prowess in generics). the U.Indonesia Imported products and basic ingredients can be divided into the following groups: antibiotics.. hormones.

the improved health and increased per capita income of Indonesians led to increased demands to provide better quality health care and health care products. The low consumption follows from the high prices of medicines relative to average incomes and consumers' weak purchasing power.5 billion. if compared to the average consumption of drugs per person. Potential consumption Prior to the economic downturn. In that year the Rupiah fell nearly 80 % from its level in 1997. If compared to other South East Asian countries the Indonesian market value is the same as the Philippines and Thailand. Singapore. November 5." has continued to show significant growth over the last few years. Many Indonesians are now tending to rely only on self-medication as prices of prescription medicines and over-the-counter (OTC) products have also increased. but the value is still small.Indonesia An examination of the customs data indicates that Indonesia mainly exports quinine and its derivates as well as herbal medicines. even. Many people here prefer to use traditional medicines. U. especially "fitofar. Singapore. This market value for 2002 was around Rp 15..2 trillion (US$1. and Canada. Vietnam.S. the situation changed dramatically. thanks to. increasing awareness could not. Indonesia is the lowest. U. the traditional herbal medicine industry has been able to boost production and increase exports. only 1. Of the as many as 40.. Source: Indonesian Commercial Newsletter. Spain. The traditional herbal medicine industry has managed to survive and grow and. The hardships of 1998 today remain fresh in many people's minds. 4. . Another factor. which has contributed to the growth of the traditional herbal medicine industry. Consumption The country's overall drug market size grows by around 20 % every year. Exports of herbal medicine go to Pakistan.K. Malaysia. Iran. is the growing trend of "back to nature. Taiwan. this figure is relatively small. Sales volumes for prescription drugs dropped markedly when the economic crisis began in 1997 and have not yet fully recovered. and Hong Kong (the three largest markets for Indonesian herbal exports) and others including Bangladesh. by itself.5 billion).000 kinds of plants growing in Indonesia. the readily available supply of basic materials from local sources and the use of sophisticated processing technologies. 5. Exports of quinine and its derivatives mainly go to Germany. around $1." The demand for traditional medicine. With a population of 210 million.17 - . including traditional herbal medicine.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Indonesia’s consumption of pharmaceutical drugs only reached was estimated at US$4 per capita. diversify its export destinations. and Germany. amongst others. 2002 Export Of Traditional Herbal Medicine Worth US$ 29 Million Amidst the economic crisis. After the crisis hit the country.. However. which the traditional herbal medicine industry can take advantage of.000 kinds are used as basic materials for medicine.g. the Philippines US$6 – population of 78 million. the Netherlands. which are cheaper and readily available. Thailand US$11 – population of 63 million. Still another factor is the fact that Indonesia is rich in natural resources. answer all public health problems. and Malaysia US$11). Yet. Libya. Compared to other ASEAN countries (e. Yemen.

.Indonesia Combined with an annual inflation rate of 10 % at the end of 1998. Nonetheless. the Indonesia EDL has fewer items. distribution and utilization of drugs. This deviation must be approved by the hospital director and reported to the National Committee on the NEDL.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Due to budget limitation the total value of these deviations should not be more than 25% by value. Use of drugs outside of the NEDL is not allowed in community health centers but is allowed in hospitals. The Indonesia EDL is stratified to reflect requirements at different levels such as hospital. primary health center and village drug depots. In the private sector. provides licenses for drugs imports and exports. C. Compared to WHO EDL. which translates to an incremental monetary value of US$150 – 225 million per annum. Standards and technical regulations The Indonesian National Drug Policy was established in 1983 with the objectives of ensuring availability of essential drugs through equitable distribution. Drug regulatory authority At the central level. while the WHO EDL is not stratified into different levels of health care. as well as promoting the rational use of drugs. Sales volumes for prescription drugs dropped markedly when the economic crisis began in 1997 and have not yet fully recovered. monitors and supervises for implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). to control production. and to supervise and control the supply of drugs for the public sector. Public hospitals and community health centers are obliged to use drugs on National Essential Drug List (NEDL). of which an estimated 60 to 80 % are imported. controls drug promotion. the Rupiah's real depreciation then was one of the largest experienced by any nation in the post-war era. assures the quality of drugs before and after in the market and monitors distribution of drugs. The private sector is not obliged to follow the NEDL. DG DFC performs drugs registration. Some of the first inputs into public health to be affected by the 1998 depreciation were pharmaceuticals (including vaccines and contraceptives). Its main functions are to formulate policies and programs on drugs. the regulatory authority for pharmaceuticals is the Directorate General of Drug and Food Control (DG DFC). which are cheaper and readily available. Limited surveys conducted by World Bank indicated that drug prices increased by 200 to 300 % between November 1997 and March 1998. The Directorate General of Community Health Services coordinates with DG DFC to develop Standard Treatment Guidelines for primary health care. ensuring drugs efficacy and safety. the long run forecasts for the pharmaceutical industry in Indonesia are bullish and the GP Farmasi (Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies) projects a 10 – 15 % growth per annum. 1. Many people here prefer to use traditional medicines. The revisions are a result of meetings and consultations organized by the Committee for Essential Drugs List Formulation and Revision appointed by the Minister of Health.18 - . Many Indonesians are now tending to rely only on self-medication as prices of prescription medicines and over-the-counter (OTC) products have also increased. 2. Selection The Indonesia Essential Drug List (EDL) is revised every three years.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products - Indonesia However, some private hospitals have started using the NEDL as a reference for developing their own hospital formulary. 3. Production and quality assurance

There are 287 registered pharmaceutical companies consisting of 40 multinational, 243 national and four government companies. In terms of value, 95% of all drugs for public and private sectors are produced locally. The national private pharmaceutical companies produce almost all drugs including vaccines on the NEDL. Drugs for the public sector and generic drugs are mainly produced by government-owned pharmaceutical companies. The National Quality Control Laboratory (QC Lab) and the 27 provincial QC Lab were developed with the assistance of WHO. The government controls for quality by taking samples from the field to be analyzed in the quality control laboratory. Implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) in pharmaceutical factories was started in 1971.

D.
1. Overview

Trade and industry policy environment

In 1992, the ASEAN Economic Ministers formed the ASEAN Consultative Committee for Standards and Quality (ACCSQ), which set up a Pharmaceuticals Product Working Group (PPWG) in 1999, with Malaysia as the lead country. The objective of this group of experts is to harmonise differences of regulations in the ASEAN member states, and to develop harmonised guidelines with the aim of arriving at a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA). The National Agency of Drug and Food Control (Jakarta, Indonesia) confirms that Indonesia observes patents for a period of 20 years, and is very keen to be regarded as a reliable partner in the World Trade Organization (WTO, the international organisation dealing with rules of trade between nations) and agreements like TRIPS (Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights). 2. (a) Major agreements TRIPS

Indonesia is of the view that TRIPS will delay the introduction of generics, increase prices and reduce access to medicines for the majority of patients in developing countries, TRIPS will on the other hand increase foreign direct investment as well as technology transfer, and enhance local innovation. In order to compensate the protection of innovative medicines, testing and regulatory approval of generics will be allowed before patent expires. Also parallel importation without the consent of the patent holder, and Compulsory License (marketing authorisation granted without permission of the patent holder) is allowed in defined cases.

- 19 -

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products - Indonesia

(b)

ASEAN mutual recognition agreements

AFTA aims to eliminate all tariff rates, non-tariff barriers and technical barriers to trade. In order to reach this challenging goal, product standards need to be harmonised through alignment with existing international standards e.g. ICH, and by implementing Mutual Recognition Agreements (MRAs). The Bureau of Trade, Industry and Services, ASEAN Secretariat, Jakarta, outlines that MRAs help to avoid duplication of testing, reduce costs for industry and encourage innovation. In 2000, the ACCSQ signed a Memorandum of Consultation with the USA. There is also an EU Regional Cooperation Programme on Standards, Quality, and Conformity Assessment to be implemented in the ASEAN region. For the pharmaceutical industry, however, the most important ASEAN MRA is the Agreement on Common Technical Requirements (ACTR) and subsequently on a Common Technical Dossier (ACTD) in this region. The plan is to agree on the ASEAN CTR first, followed by an agreement on the ASEAN CTD. (c) ASEAN Common Technical Requirements (ACTR)

In a first phase, the experts compared existing registration requirements, and developed the ASEAN Common Technical Requirements (ACTR). The workload was split between the countries as follows: • • • • 3. (a) ACTR – Administrative Data: Malaysia ACTR – Quality: Indonesia ACTR – Safety: The Philippines ACTR – Efficacy: Thailand Customs procedures in general Structure of the tariff schedule

Indonesia applies a nine-digit tariff nomenclature based on the Harmonized System. The tariff schedule has six columns showing the import duty rates as well as the rates of additional import duties, value added tax, sales tax on luxury goods, and import trade procedure regulations. The last column is reserved to accommodate other provisions, which are not yet accommodated in the previous column. (i) Tariff rates Import are classified in four broad groups for tariff assessment purposes, with the highest duties applying to the least essential items: Group A for most essential items such as, rice, flour, certain iron and steel products, certain organic chemicals and pharmaceuticals, cotton, medicine, some fertilizers and insecticides, agricultural and industrial machinery and equipment, and some raw materials. Group B includes essential items, i.e. materials and spare parts for industry.

- 20 -

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products - Indonesia Group C for less essential items, and

Group D covers luxury goods, some consumer goods; and in the case of manufactured goods and machinery, finished goods and those that lessen the need for manpower are subject to higher rates of duty. In general, tariffs are high on goods less essential for economic development and basic consumer needs and goods competing with locally produced items. (ii) MFN MFN duty rates range from 5% to 30% based on the CIF value. All food items are dutiable at a maximum of 5%. Motor vehicles are dutiable at up to 80%, with automotive parts dutiable at 15%. Distilled spirits and certain basic chemicals are dutiable at 170%. In the agricultural sector, some products such as wheat, rice flour, yellow soybeans, cane sugar, coconut and palm oil are zero-rated. (iii) Bound rates Bound rates are set on about 38.4% on all goods, 47.3% on agricultural goods, and 36.8% on manufacturing goods. (iv) Temporary reduced duties Duty reductions and suspensions are granted to investment import destined to selected internal market oriented industries and certain service activities. Goods imported for use in the manufacture of export products are exempt from import duties, value-added taxes, and sales taxes, as are goods imported for use in foreign-funded government projects. The main exemptions or reductions cover the importation of capital goods and raw materials used in the production processes of projects approved by BKPM. There are also schemes of drawback and exemption, which provide for the importation of inputs free of tariffs and licensing requirements. Also, the Finance Ministry may grant additional tariff exemptions to promote certain industries, e.g. certain cable makers and producers of electronic products for imports of polyethylene. On January 2001, the government has decided to reduce import tariffs between zero and 25 % on over 1,000 product items. The import tariff reduction affects a wide range of products including paint, varnish, cosmetics, woven cotton clothes, gold (not coin), platinum, cooking wares, screws, gloves, bed covers, toys, synthetic flowers, watches, electrical devices and many other products. (v) Preferential duties under trade agreements As the vast majority of Indonesia imports are subject to MFN rates, Indonesia tariff preferences are essentially confined to ASEAN partners. Duty rates under the Common Effective Preferential Tariff (CEPT) scheme are only valid for imported goods bearing certificates of origin from ASEAN countries except goods valued under US$ 200 FOB. The preferences relate to the implementation of the AFTA scheme, since the vast majority of Indonesian imports are subject to MFN rates.

- 21 -

Laos. Laos and Myanmar which joined the group in 1997. including trade and investment. No common external tariff is planned. In 1992. the four ASEAN's latecomers. Consequently. ASEAN members called for the formation of an ASEAN Free Trade Area. and Thailand. Malaysia. In addition. Malaysia. tariff rates on imports from non-Asean countries will continue to be determined individually. gems and jewellery. the six original founding members of ASEAN. will complete the reductions by 2005. energy. Singapore. Singapore. Singapore. Malaysia. would advance the implementation of AFTA from 2003 to 2002. The ATL initiative aimed to achieve a zero target for almost all the sectors by 2005. member countries agreed to implement open and free trade among themselves by 2020. since 1 of January 2003. Thailand and Vietnam. Indonesia. Philippines. ASEAN aimed at promoting economic. the Philippines. cultural and scientific ties.e. the Philippines. In December 1998 members agreed to implement the AFTA by 1 of January 2002. Myanmar. Canada. Malaysia. Cambodia. At their 1997 meeting in Vancouver. Japan. the ASEAN countries have announced the abolishment of tariffs on 60 % of traded goods and the introduction of a 5% on import tariffs within its six original members. as well as a mutual recognition agreement concerning telecommunications. Mexico. Indonesia. environment. will introduce the 5 % tariff cap only in 2010. with advanced industrialized nations realizing the trade liberalization goal by 2010. Russia. And good excluded from the tariff-reduction agreement are goods of key industries in some of the member countries. As for Cambodia. Lao People's Democratic Republic and Vietnam. i. for example.Indonesia Indonesia is a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) together with Brunei. Singapore and Thailand. Chinese Taipei. Brunei Darussalam. Hong Kong. Thailand. . Brunei. Other areas of cooperation among ASEAN members include harmonization of standards. and Vietnam. reciprocal recognition of tests and certification of products. as well as trade and monetary policies. Peru. Products affected essentially by this measure are electronic products. the Philippines. New Zealand. of Korea. and Malaysia will shelve the cap on car imports. and toys. APEC is a multilateral forum formed in 1989 so that Asian and Pacific economies can promote economic cooperation and mutual assistance in developing key economic sectors. Papua New Guinea.22 - .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Rep. Indonesia and the Philippines will delay the 5% cap on sugar and petroleum. fish and fish products. chemicals. until 2005. In this regard. a minimum of 85% of the tariff lines in the Inclusion List of these nations would be reduced to 0-5% by 2000 and 90% by 2001. Chile. machinery items and petrochemicals. Cambodia joined ASEAN in 1999 and will complete the tariff reductions by 2010. Brunei. social. Indonesia is also a member of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) along with Australia. Vietnam which joined ASEAN in 1995 would implement its tariff reductions to 0-5% by 2003. On 15 of November 1994. Myanmar. China. the United States. forest products.e. medical equipment and instruments. APEC leaders agreed on Voluntary Sectoral Liberalization (EVSL) to take place in 15 sectors and the tariff elements of nine sectors were identified under the accelerated tariff liberalization (ATL) package i.

(c) Valuation The customs value of imported goods is the transaction value which is the price actually paid or payable for the goods and may be adjusted in accordance with the provisions of article VIII of the agreement on Implementation of Article VII GATT 1994 (WTO Valuation Agreement). or where the buyer and seller are related. payment can be done through electronic transfer. unprocessed and/or natural products). Payment of the taxes can be done through foreign exchange bank or directly through Customs Office during office hours before submission of customs declaration. Sales Tax On Luxury Goods with rates vary from 10% .5% for Registered Importers and 7. it may be done manually or using diskettes (semi-computerized). or The import price has already included production cost and profit. while the others are passed through green channel. High-risk means that physical inspection shall be applied only based on customs intelligence information or by random sampling automatically determined by computer.23 - .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . In other offices. that the transaction value is acceptable as long as it does not influence the price. if any. Customs examinations. Inspection Indonesian Customs has been using EDI (Electronic Data Processing) to process customs declarations submitted by the importers. Physical inspections shall be focused particularly on high-risk imported goods. Insurance and Freight) basis. which is 2. . The Agreement provides that transaction value between both the buyer and seller can be accepted as long as both sides are not related.5% for Unregistered Importers.g. Income Tax. The imported goods that should be physically examined are passed through red channel which are not more than 10% of total import.75%.Indonesia (b) Fees (Customs duties and tariff nomenclature) Customs duties and import-related taxes currently applicable are: • • • • • Import duties which vary from 0% to 170% rates. consisting of document verification and/or physical inspection. Anti-dumping and countervailing duties. Several basic principals used by the customs to determine whether or not the relationship influence the price are as follows: • • • (d) Where the price paid is based on normal transaction in trade of the industry. The above taxes are on CIF (Cost. At Customs Offices where EDI system is fully implemented. are applied for imported goods based on very selective basis. The Indonesian Customs has implemented the agreement fully since 1 January 2000. The import price is relatively the same as the selling price to the unrelated party. The system is done especially in major ports such as Tanjung Priok Seaports and Soekarno-Hatta Airport branch offices. Value Added Tax (VAT) which is 10% except for certain goods (e.

For example. Indonesia has fully implemented WTO Valuation Agreement since January 1. Indonesia is in the process of accession to the ATA Convention. 1997. Also. If the period has passed without any decision made. . In April 1.Indonesia Indonesian Customs has set up a standard time frame for each step of cargo clearance. Indonesia enacted a new Customs Law No 10/1995 which has come into effect since April 1. he or she still has the chance to file written appeal to the Board of Tax Dispute Settlement within 60 days after the taxes due have been paid. some measures have been taken to improve customs services.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . may file a written objection to the Director General of Customs and Excise within 30 days of the date of the assessment by depositing a security promise at the amount of the taxes due. Any person/importer who is not satisfied with the decision made by the Customs regarding tariff classification and/or valuation. 1997. These include: • In April 1. 1998. the objection shall be deemed accepted and the security must be returned. The Tax Appeal Court has been operated since April 1998. Indonesia is developing Harmonized Trade Data Element in accordance with the implementation of UN/EDIFACT. and when the physical examination is needed. Indonesia has provided an Advance Tariff Classification facility. once the Convention is completely revised. The Law accommodates some basic elements to provide. Since April 1. The facility enables traders and importers to have a written information on tariff classification and import duty rate of goods. red channel or green channel decisions must be done within 4 hours since the import declaration was submitted. If the person/importer is still unsatisfied with the decision made by the Director General regarding classification and valuation. when there is no indication of cheating. To meet this challenge. Indonesia has taken several customs related actions to implement the TRIP’s Agreement by the year 2000. which will be imported prior to the lodgment of customs declaration. among others. it must be ready to be conducted within 12 hours and finished not more than 40 hours. (e) Activities/Measures The Indonesian Customs Authority has taken all necessary steps to better facilitate export and import. Indonesia has applied Harmonized System Convention as a basic nomenclature for its customs purposes. It also has been working diligently to transform itself from merely an agent of revenue collection and law enforcement to amore trade facilitator. better trade facilitation. 1995. Indonesia will ratify the Kyoto Convention on he simplification and harmonization of customs procedures.24 - • • • • • • • • • . Indonesia has fully applied the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) system in some of its main customs service officers. The Director General should make the decision on the objection within 60 days period. 2000 by providing necessary procedure on customs valuation. the cargo can be released before the document clearance for importer’s own good.

Consistency. Summing up.go. Indonesia has further improved the implementation of Risk Management Approach in order to enhance the expeditious flow of goods. however. Additionally Indonesia has prepared to work together with all member economies to better simplify and harmonize customs procedures in the region by fully taking into consideration the principles of Facilitation. (a) Import restriction Import licenses Import into Indonesia maybe conducted only by companies having import license procured from the Ministry of Industry and Trade. a state owned limited liability company (Persero) or a cooperative. particularly in customs valuation area. brochures) in strategic locations such as airports and seaports. Under an emergency situation. By using Post Clearance Audit Methods.Indonesia • Indonesia also provides necessary information (e. and has introduced the Indonesian Customs Web Site (http://www. Transparency. which can be a limited liability company (PT). Indonesian Customs Administration intensifies its efforts on combating fraud. The ingredients are processed into generic medicines for sales to the public and government institutions through usual channels of distribution. Indonesia has been active in the work of the Sub Committee on Customs Procedures.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . there are no quotas or restrictions in importing pharmaceutical products. Indonesia implements a specific customs clearance procedure called “Rush Handling”.beacukai. Indonesia follows the general rules if importation which are WTO compliant. • • • In achieving the Bogor goal.com). 4. the Ministry of Health has allocated around US$ 180 million to import pharmaceutical ingredients by an appointed importer. a company must have import license from the Ministry of Industry and Trade and be registered as a pharmaceutical wholesaler with a permit from the Ministry of Health. In accordance with the main principles of WCO Guidelines on Express Consignment Clearance. and Simplification.25 - . To import pharmaceutical products. (c) Bans There are no special arrangements to prohibit import of pharmaceutical products from any country.g.id) and the Indonesian APEC Customs contact point (soegito@innocent. a company wishing to import pharmaceutical products should have the following: (a) A permit as a pharmaceutical wholesaler or a pharmaceutical manufacturer from the Ministry of Health (b) An import license from the Ministry of Industry and Trade . (b) Quotas Officially. Accountability. Import licenses are extended to any company incorporated in Indonesia.

(c) Profit Repatriation requirements Not applicable (d) Foreign Exchange Balancing requirements Not applicable . potable water. Therefore. The Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) is now also making the necessary preparations to grant more authority to Local Government Authority to issue investment licenses. such as the operation of harbors.545/1997. In the absence of the same. Beyond this period the incentive can still be extended up to 12 years maximum if certain requirements are met. has been substantially simplified. (a) Investment requirements in general General Policy In order to drive investment. Foreign investment’s application with a value of up to US$ 100 million (which formerly needed the President’s approval) is now only subject to the approval or the Minister of Investment/Chairman of the Investment Coordinating Board. Investment application. including approval procedure. The minimum capital requirement for foreign investment has been eliminated.20/1994 provides that foreign investors are allowed to acquire 100% shares of the company established in Indonesia. 546/1997.31/95 provide that foreign investors are allowed to acquire 100% shares of the company. A joint venture is only required in eight investment sectors vital to the public interest. 5.26 - . Equity restrictions/requirements • • • • (b) Government Regulation No. and pharmaceutical sector is open for foreign direct investment. Tax incentive to the investor for 22 categories of manufacturing activities.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . the company concerned should have an arrangement with a laboratory appointed by the Ministry of Health to test serums and vaccines An import license is non-transferrable.Indonesia (c) Adequate room and equipment to store serums and vaccines (d) Laboratory facilities particularly to test and evaluate serums and vaccines. general policies of Indonesian Government among others are: • Government Regulation No. and 135/2000 provide exemption or deduction of import duty for production machines. public railways and nuclear power generator. there is no equity restriction implemented in connection with investment regulation in Indonesia. power generator.297/1997 jo. telecommunication. Ministry of Finance Decree No. It is also apply to industries which restructuring their production capabilities (such as diversify and improve the quality of the products). shipping lines. equipment and raw materials for new investment. The basic period of enjoying the tax incentive is three years for Java and Bali.20/1994 and Presidential Decree No.No.

Export policies and incentives 1. This policy is to drive companies to do an R & D activity in order to improve performance of the company and to invent new technology. replaced non-tariff barriers with more transparent tariffs with the aim of encouraging foreign and domestic private investment. Research & development The Ministry of Finance Decree No. although bound rates are. export controls are in a state of rapid change as the government works to implement reforms associated with the IMF program. in many cases.45/1996 provides the tax incentive to an investor for 22 categories of manufacturing activities.on all imported products except motor vehicles and alcoholic beverages. coffee. This is stipulated in the Decree of Ministry of Finance No. Many of the restrictions and taxes placed on exports affect agricultural products. The long-term liberalization policy has been reinforced by consecutive IMF programs in which Indonesia committed to implement a three-tier tariff structure . 4. 3. particularly with the weak economy in recent years. Export restrictions and controls are applied by the government to a number of food commodities. 5 or 10 % . simplified the tariff structure. and copra. except those for health or safety reasons.0. Indonesia's applied tariff rates range from 5 to 30 %. Indonesia has liberalized its trade regime and taken a number of important steps to reduce protection. much higher. by the end of 2001. Since 1996. Trade barriers Despite the severe economic crisis of the past four years.Indonesia E. palm oil. F. 1. including major cash crops like rubber. in an effort to ensure adequate domestic availability and stable prices of such products. .770/1990.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .27 - . 2. removed restrictions. Indonesia also committed to eliminate all non-tariff barriers. Tax incentive The Government Regulation No. Import practices In recent years. The basic period of enjoying the tax incentive is three years for Java and Bali. Beyond this period the incentive can be extended up to 12 years maximum if certain requirements are met. Human resources development The similar incentive is also applicable to those upgrading the capability of their human resources through training activities. most notably crude palm oil (CPO) which remains subject to a 5 % export tax. the Indonesian Government has issued a series of deregulation packages that have reduced overall tariff levels. Export controls Like Indonesia's import tariff regime.769/1990 provides that Research and Development cost could be deducted from gross income of the company. Indonesia has maintained its policy of steady long-term tariff liberalization.

the Indonesian importer takes care of the process. such as alcoholic beverages. the Customs Directorate of the Ministry of Finance has operated a post-entry audit system. 3. laser discs and other entertainment products for both exhibition and private use. other spices. lifting most restrictions in March 1998. psychotropics. importers are now required to notify the Customs Office in the first stage by submitting the import documents on a standard form computer diskette. telecommunications equipment. Import licenses and restrictions According to the Directorate General of Customs and Excise the following goods are still subject to import restrictions. The government controls the import of videotapes. paper. Indonesia opened its wholesale and largescale retail trade to foreign investment.S. Some retail sectors are still reserved for small-scale enterprises under another 1998 decree. unregistered food and beverages at the Department of Health. special certificates. government continues to monitor the situation. and plywood were eliminated in February 1998. licensing and/or prohibition: narcotics. fireworks. chicken parts. The U. cloves. ozone-depleting substances and goods containing ozone depleting substances. which relies primarily on verification and auditing rather than inspection to monitor compliance. culturally valuable goods. In 2000. although such requirements may not be consistently applied. and customs was also introduced and is slowly being adopted. banks. engines and pumps. companies operating in Indonesia have reported problems with Customs procedures and valuations made by Indonesian Customs. 4. medicines. certain books and printed materials. color photocopying equipment and parts and equipment thereof. artificial sweeteners.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . dangerous materials. rice and lube oil. commercial invoice.28 - . explosive materials. hand tools. wastes. Import restrictions and special licensing requirements have been or still are imposed on other goods. A paper-less electronic data interchange system that links importers.Indonesia Indonesia has liberalized its distribution system. Customs Valuation Since April 1997. bill of lading. insurance certificate. Indonesia is in compliance with the WTO Customs Valuation Agreement but U. Large and medium scale enterprises that wish to invest in these sectors must enter into a partnership agreement with a smallscale enterprise although this may not require a joint venture or partial share ownership arrangement 2. certain species of fish. pesticides. tractors. including ending some restrictions on trade in the domestic market. According to the Indonesian Customs Law that came into effect in April 1997.S.S. Customs Inspections of imported goods may be made after they are imported in the importer's warehouse. Typically. restrictive marketing arrangements for cement. certificate of origin. which has been the basis of a trade dispute between the two countries. Import documentation requirements The government requires the following for most imports: pro-forma invoice. audio and /or visual recording media. and other items. endangered wild fauna and flora and parts thereof. firearms and ammunition. . Such goods are subject to review by a censor board. For example. the Government of Indonesia banned the import of U.

parents face the special jeopardy of the (U. Foreign companies with U. G.S. Indonesia also has several bonded zones or areas that are designated as entree ports for export destined production (EPTE). The procedure takes two months to a year. Free trade zones and warehouses/Import provisions/Temporary entry The government encourages foreign investors who export to locate in bonded or export processing zones (EPZ). ASEAN members are phasing in a Common Effective Preferential Tariff (CEPT) scheme. the most well-known being Batam Island. of course. The registration procedure can also be quite lengthy and expensive. Other free trade zones include a facility near Tanjung Priok. Through AFTA. Labeling and marketing requirements Food labeling regulations requiring labels in the Indonesian language and expiration date (rather than the standard "best used by" date) are in place but are not being enforced. Indonesia is party to the ASEAN Free Trade Agreement (AFTA). There is a duty drawback facility (BAPEKSTA) for exports located outside the zones.S. Foreign pharmaceutical companies report ongoing problems obtaining timely registration of new products from the Ministry of Health.S. which will be completed for most traded goods in 2003. There are a number of EPZs in Indonesia. exporters have expressed concern that these regulations could act as non-tariff barriers to imports of packaged food products. a pharmaceutical company must apply to the Indonesian Department of Health. New regulations issued in July 2000 have helped reduce some of the backlog in new registrations. also near Jakarta. Indonesian importers and U. Membership in Free Trade Agreements As a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). 7. . south of Singapore. A product registration regulation is also in place that requires detailed product processing information so as to approach proprietary information. which is sometimes very inefficient. The main problem is the government bureaucracy. This practice is common in Indonesia. located 20 km. Previously Indonesia limited pharmaceutical imports to those that incorporated high technology and were the product of their own company's research. it is illegal. Companies are encouraged to locate in bonded zones or industrial estates whenever possible. and a bonded warehouse in Cakung. Companies who apply for a license eventually get one. depending on the product. Distribution system of pharmaceutical products in Indonesia To get a license for a new product. Foreign and domestic investors wishing to establish projects in a bonded area must apply to the National Investment Coordinating. Producers located within the bonded areas are allowed to sell up to 15% of their product into the local market.29 - . Jakarta's main port.) Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in this context.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . although. The market for foreign pharmaceuticals has been open since the October 1993 Deregulation Package.Indonesia 5. Sometimes "facilitating fees" may have to be paid to officials to get the license easier and on time. 6. The 1993 package also relaxed the registration requirements for pharmaceuticals approved in other countries.

The products sold by toko obats are usually cheaper than those sold by apotiks. the Indonesian government. They are highly regulated by the government. control the quality of drugs in the market. which are sold by toko obats and wholesalers. . because there are regulations against selling imitation products. many importers have been known to resort to illegal operations since the government ban on imports. On one hand. A growing number of companies have been attracted into this line of business. By contrast. which previously operated as importers. Although Indonesia has officially established a system of Patent Rights. the business is relatively safe. sell OTC drugs. Increasing requirements for wholesale companies to serve as both distributors and promotional agents has made the distribution business more interesting. On the other hand. apothecary or dispensary. However. Most of them are cheaper. Thus. On the other hand. factories are not allowed to sell their products directly to the consumers or retailers. along with some fakes and illegally imported drugs from the gray market. since the pharmaceutical producers pay most of the costs. meaning medicine shops. Indonesia banned imports of most medicinal drugs in 1976. Local producers. due to the continuing demand for drugs. which enable the country to be "selfsufficient" in providing drugs to the people at minimum cost. 30% are distributed to toko obats and the remaining 20% are distributed directly by practicing physicians and hospitals. there are still lots of fake products in the pharmaceutical market. but name brand products that are cheaper to import because production costs in those countries are lower. Most apotiks are agents of particular pharmaceutical firms.30 - ." There are also some imported fakes from Taiwan and Hong Kong. Singapore or Hong Kong are not all fakes. According to one estimate. do not have to fear competition from imported products. Products smuggled from Taiwan. the government attempts to maximize national capabilities including ownership of pharmaceutical production and distribution. Some "look alike" brands are still legally permitted. Some wholesale companies. Imports accounted for only 2% of the country's consumption of pharmaceuticals by the end of the 1980s. and must be managed by certified pharmacists. Producers are largely required to leave the promotion and distribution tasks to wholesale companies. 50% of the pharmaceuticals produced in Indonesia are distributed through apotiks.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Apotiks caught violating these regulations may be fined or even closed by the government. they must go through wholesalers. have turned to illicit trade. at the same time. such as smuggling and/or producing unauthorized imitations in order to survive. These products are cheaper than the "originals. Most of the products sold via the gray market are nonregulated OTC drugs. The government has taken some measures against companies found engaged in illegal activities. Apotik is the Indonesian term for pharmacy. therefore. Apotiks sell prescription drugs and a small number of OTC drugs. like many others. As the major link between the pharmaceutical industry and the market.Indonesia In Indonesia. especially those produced by local companies. the government has encouraged previous importers to operate as distributors. has been concerned with the safety of drugs offered. Apotiks and hospitals do not buy gray market products. The distribution pattern and the state of the pharmaceutical industry in general is characterized by two distinct government policies that are partially conflicting. There are two major types of retail establishments that distribute pharmaceutical products to the public. Toko obats. most apotiks do not sell fakes. It is financially attractive because of the relatively low cost. and sold by toko obats that have to comply with few regulations in this regard. in order to help the "local" pharmaceutical industry to grow and.

5% of the total number in the country. The number of apotiks increased by 92. Toko obats sell pharmaceuticals at relatively cheaper prices.Indonesia Therefore.2 % compared with 1985. strong drugs are even sold by cigarette retailers on the street (see exhibit below). often 10% to 20% less than apotiks.8% of the total number in the country.31 - . Toko obats. There are 1. There exist approximately 2000 registered toko obats.211 apotiks registered in the country and are located all over the country. stronger drugs are also available at the toko obats outside metropolitan areas. compared to 1201 in 1985. buy from toko obats rather than from apotiks.150 apotiks on Java. . toko obats act like apotiks. although the government has tightened licensing procedures. Many people therefore. toko obats serve in the role of apotiks in small towns and rural areas. As is the case with wholesale companies and apotiks. apotiks play an important role in Indonesia's pharmaceutical industry. Jakarta alone has 318. The number of toko obats operating in Indonesia has also increased. Java remained on top with 68%. on occasion.012 toko obats on Java. most are on Java. accounting for 50. The role of toko obats is also important. Many of them are not properly registered.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . or 68. Java has the largest number of toko obats. There are 1. Effectively. are spread more evenly than apotiks. and. however. In addition to OTC drugs. In these locations. There are some 2.

such as the Index of Indonesia's Medical Services (IIMS). as in the developed countries. Then the doctors contact the detailer later by phone. in order to segment the market. 1. Ethical products are advertised through medical and pharmaceutical magazines. most companies now conduct seminars and workshops to introduce new products. The government health authorities also discourage the use of detailers because they are considered to be "disturbing the established order. Under the current system in Indonesia. A description of the price calculation system used can be summarized as follows. Pricing pharmaceutical products According to a regulation set by Indonesia's Food and Drug Supervision Directorate General. Also. and especially through promotional seminars. Some producers continue to hire "detailers" pharmaceutical salespeople) to promote their products directly to practicing physicians. manufacturers promote products containing the same active ingredients under different names and labels. Instead. Some estimates in the industry point that promotional costs account for up to 30% of the price. Informasi Spesialis Obat (Indonesia) (ISO). Distribution System of Pharmaceutical Products in Indonesia for a description of retail establishments distributing pharmaceuticals to the public).Indonesia H. rather than use detailers. The long distribution line is also a factor in pricing. as is the practice in industrialized countries. an apotik (dispensary) is to sell its product at a price 1.425 times the buying (net) price (see the section. because most MDs do not like to meet detailers in person. Such detailing is not always effective. radio and billboards. doctors tell their nurses to pick up the samples. companies present papers and lab results in conjunction with marketing their products.32 - . pharmaceutical factories distribute their products through a wholesaler in order to service apotiks. Consequently. At these seminars. . Pharmaceutical sales promotion and pricing in Indonesia Pharmaceutical factories advertise their nonethical products through the media such as newspapers. toko obats and hospitals. however. magazines. especially government hospitals. Promotion costs are high and constitute an important factor in price calculations.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products ." Detailers are no longer allowed to go into hospitals.

rural people obtain drugs from government-run health centers.33 - . called Puskesmas and Pos Yandu. Consequently. whereas most apotiks and toko obats are located in cities. It is not well equipped and cannot treat severe illness. Complicating the matter further. A Pos Yandu is a rural area public service center that functions as a multipurpose service and firstaid post.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . .Indonesia Source: Various Sources (processed) In Indonesia there are only 3000 apotiks and toko obats to service the country's 210 million people. A Puskesmas is a subdistrict public health center served by two or three "junior" doctors and nurses. It also serves as an information center for government family planning. Its’ staff typically includes a nurse and several social workers. most Indonesians live in rural areas. but provides adequate services for general sickness and first aid before patients can be treated at a hospital. but no doctor. nutrition and welfare programs.

sea transport of raw materials and agricultural goods is extremely important and well developed. 2. While in 2000. however. . Because Indonesia is an archipelago. the number of national merchant fleet increased from 6. Semarang and Cirebon on Java. and mainly influenced by the development of surrounded strategic environment Over the years. from 1996 to 2000. The development of shipping and port services throughout the country has long been a priority of the Indonesian government. Availability Indonesia is heavily dependent on maritime transport for international as well as for domestic trade.724 companies in 2000. Maritime transport services 1. Belawan-Deli and Palembang on Sumatra and Ujungpandang in Sulaweisi and Merauke in West New Guinea.280 tons. Suitability Indonesia’s infrastructure is well developed around the population centers on Java. The above measures reflect the liberalization policy on maritime transport services has created an extensive network of shipping services provided by a large number of foreign shipping lines and a few domestic shipping lines which have supported the country’s growing international trade. investment. the surface transportation infrastructure is not as advanced. Outside of the major cities. JCP is strategically located in the industrial heartland of West Java and serves as Indonesia's national hub port.287. and also accords no different treatment for overseas vessels to access to/use of port facilities. The principal ports are Jakarta. monetary and other sectors. it increased to 417. Surabaya. the number of shipping companies has increased. Indonesia has no bilateral/unilateral cargo reservation schemes except for “cabotage” and specific government cargoes.411 tons. From 1. From 1996 to 2000. and Bali. In 1996.Indonesia I. taxation. Deregulation of the maritime sector started in 1985 and has progressed to the current stage where it allows foreign shipping lines to call at all ports in the country which are opened for international trade. The volume of sea born trade also increase by the average growth of 3% per annum. and on Java and Sumatra. Sumatra. In addition. the volume of cargo by sea transport amounted to 365. A redevelopment project of is currently underway which will increase JCP's annual handling capacity to over 3 million TEU. Each of the major islands has at least one significant port city. finance.34 - .156 units in 1996 to 9. Jakarta Container Port (JCP) is Indonesia's largest container terminal and comprises both Jakarta International Container Terminal (JICT) and KOJA Terminal. In these areas.156 companies in 1996 to 1. In the same period. there are substantial road and rail connections for both passenger and freight transport.196 units in 2000.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Indonesia’s maritime industry has evolved from a very extensive public sector involvement and restrictive licensing and regulatory regime to a much more liberalized and decentralized system.634. This is part of the entire deregulation program in various economic sectors such as trade in goods.

The Indonesian industry is able to service its market in terms of quantity. but despite some improvement. J. .6 million were set-up. These materials have a 71% market share. the furniture industry. printing ink. The largest increase occurred in 1996. plastic and jute – paper and board are the leading materials. the cosmetics and pharmaceutical industry. paper and board sales shrank sharply. or a 32. Besides. from the main raw materials down to auxiliary materials. etc Among the six packaging types – steel. The jute industry is also being revived. aluminium foil. adhesive. But paper and board demand was hit hard by the economic slowdown of 1998 which deepened into sharp recession in 1999. with a planned investment of Rp 41. aluminum foils. In 1997. consumption reached 4. plastic sheets. Packaging 1. is mostly supplied by local producers. such as cardboard and kraft paper.040 tons in 1995 to 1.1 billion.2 million tons. Indonesia’s packaging industry and methods of packaging In line with the fast growth of the consuming industries like the food and drink industry. However per capita paper and board consumption was low by world standards. This is a direct result of environmental concerns or "green"campaigns.3 million tons. both board paper and specific packaging paper. which are regarded as far more manageable than plastic and metal. production of the two material types had increased from 767. The upgrading and expansion of JCP will further contribute to Indonesia's economic development. demand for packaging paper materials. an increase of 15. from 51% in the early 1990s.Indonesia JCP plans to construct an additional 300 meters of berth with a depth alongside of 14 meters below chart datum and a further 32 hectares of back up area. automotive component industry. There is increasing pressure for more environmentally friendly materials to be used for packaging. for the last two years (1998 u 1999) five investors joined the paper packaging industry.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . four foreign investment projects (PMA) with a total investment of US$11. 2.8% rise from the previous year. from 809.5/kg/yr in 1998. Indonesia’s packaging industry is still quite attractive to investors.000 tons in 1994 to 1. paper. at 5. This development is in line with the increasing demand for packaging paper used to pack light and heavy products. board. During the period of January through August 1999. Currently. In that year. Paper and board Paper and board demand in Indonesia showed strong growth before 1997. the packaging industry has also improved in performance prodded by development of the function of packaging from just packaging proper into means of transmitting information and as means of promotion at the same time for the product concerned. plastic film. During the last five years (1994 u 1998). According to The Capital Investment Coordinator Board (BKPM).0% per year. the electronic and electrical household appliance industry. The above development has turned the packaging industry into a rich business ground for suppliers of products.000 tonnes.07 million ton. Indonesia managed to achieve an increase in paper and board consumption in 1998 as well. building material industry and many other industries using packaging. the quality of some of the products is inadequate. Paper and board. have given rise to an estimated paper and board consumption in 1996 of 700.35 - .

Corrugated carton boxes (CCB) Corrugated carton boxes (CCB) are typically multi-layer boards used for folding carton packaging. According to the Indonesian Pulp and Paper Association (APKI). Italy.9 million tons per annum and an average utilization rate of 65%. The paper and paperboard industry is highly dependant on the pulp and paper industry.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Moreover. as a result of the collapse in the value of Rupiah and low local consumption rates. the country also imports CCB from other countries (in small volume). Indonesia does not only require machinery. The industry's growth is supported by the high export volume of paper products to various countries in the world. driven by market demand from consumer industries also located in the same area. Producers and capacity Currently. complemented by its cheap labor costs. The total import of pulp products reached $1. Packaging is a labour intensive industry. Indonesia is a main consumer and leading of exporter of CCB in the Asia-Pacific region. strength). so Indonesia will continue to benefit from its abundant supply of inexpensive labour. and the UK therefore account for 50% of the world’s packaging. Local companies. CCB is considered as a commodity and is mostly used in consumer and agricultural industries for packaging purposes.36 - . France. which would make it competitive in the world arena. the pulp and paper industry in Indonesia has enjoyed an average annual growth of eighteen % for the last five years. but also training and staff development. Despite the sluggish growth in the country's overall economic condition.1 billion in 2000. Imported products generally are of higher quality than the local products and are mostly used for packaging of export commodities. About 75% of the companies are small to medium size companies. however. But the economy was on track to drive this indicator beyond the pre-crisis peak by 2002. Besides local production.9 million metric tons in 2000. . although this was a fourteen % increase from 3. 3. The industry is a capital intensive one that is impacted by the development of technology resulting in improvements in product design and properties (e. according to the Indonesian Central Bureau of Statistics. mainly from the Philippines and USA. total paper and board demand in the country was still below pre-crisis highs. At the end of 2001. Indonesia has a competitive advantage in the industry due to an abundant supply of pulp and paper from its tropical forests. Indonesian CCB producers are also leaders in regional CCB production. pulp imports were ranked as number seven among the top ten import commodities in Indonesia in 2000. Japan. in Indonesia there are 108 companies engaged in the industry with a total installed capacity of 1. The carton box has been produced in Indonesia since the 1970s and started to expand enormously in the 1990s caused by the fast growing manufacturing sector. 4.g. The main raw material of CCB is waste paper produced by the paper industry.4 million metric tons in 1999. are far behind their global rivals in terms of technology applied in their business. the national paper consumption was only 3. an increase of sixty-five % from 1999 at $647 million. Most of the producers are located in Java particularly in Jakarta and its surroundings. USA. The industry is also opened to foreign investors and many importers import the products from other countries (subject to an import duty of 10%).Indonesia Indonesia's good economic result for 2000 helped to rescue paper and board demand. Germany. Indonesia’s comparative lack of purchasing power has meant that it is not always capable of obtaining the leading edge machinery.

Thus. . If raw material prices increase.Indonesia 5. Source: Worldwide Corrugated Packaging industry statistics report. medium paper and kraft liner. the CCB industry.000 tons. When the economic crisis hit in 1998. The following figures reflects on corrugated production/shipments (million square meters) for the full year 2001 with comparisons to 2000. which might result in excess supply in the next few years. packaging companies may experience a margin and profit squeeze due to the difficulty in passing on the increased production costs to customers in a timely manner. PS (polystyrene) and PVC (PolyVinyl Chloride) plastics in 2000 had again reached 1. Raw materials represent 50% to 70% of the cost of goods sold. The consumption of PE (polyethylene).Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Currently.37 - . dropping to 900. the recycled board box is not popular in Indonesia at the moment since the raw material for recycled board box is still imported with 15% higher cost than CCB’s raw material cost. Competition The industry now is facing increasing competition from larger producers with the ability of vertical integration forcing some small to medium size companies to stop production and close their businesses. Competition also comes from recycled board box producers whose products have been used extensively in the Asia Pacific region caused by more concerns over environment.6 million tons.3%. 6. Plastic and flexible packaging Plastics usage in Indonesia after the economic recession has experienced only adequate growth. 2001 7. The recent recovery in the sector was accelerated by strong demand from food and beverages industries. Competition comes from the mini box industry. However. but with higher prices than CCB products. PP (Polypropylene). Paper prices are based on pulp prices and are very cyclical driven by its nature as a commodity product. Indonesia’s production for CCB increased substantially by 17. which usually have better printing machinery to produce higher quality products. including. consumption of plastics decreased by more than 40% from the year before. raw material cost fluctuations remain an inherent risk in the packaging industry. Raw material availability and vertical integration Raw materials for CCB are linerboard. many of the remaining companies are seeking to increase their production capacity. mostly produced by local paper mills.

3 trillion. BOPP has been well applied in the packaging industry. Overall packaging remains strong Indonesia saw a surge of investment activity in packaging during the past decade. In 1999 production realization was registered at some 64% of capacity and in 2000 projected at no less than 70% of capacity. Cigarettes companies are the largest industrial consumer of BOPP films. ICI of the UK and Toyobo of Japan. particularly of the big category. Instead. And the use of flexible packaging has been found to be one solution. The food industry sector has been the biggest consumer of flexible packaging.605 tons per year. The consumers of BOPP films vary widely. the use of flexible packaging can help lower production cost. the BOPP films are ordered from companies. have been able to achieve a real output of above 80%. specialfilm made from polypropylene. there were 187 companies worldwide engaging in BOPP film production.Indonesia The flexible packaging industry generally using as raw material plastic film like BOPP film. with an output of over 2. It is primarly used by the packaging industry in packaging. In all. with an intake of 66. such as Mobil of USA. Demand for corrugating materials was affected by the 1998 economic slide. has up to now been faring quite well. biscuit industry and candy industry. The expansion and diversification of Indonesia's manufacturing sector has been the main driver behind this strong demand trend. PET film.2% of total consumption in 1999. Several companies in this industry. In Indonesia. which convert the BOPP film into the finished product from the raw material. the production of this industry in 1999 was valued at Rp 1. . the biggest flexible packaging users are the instant noodle industry.38 - . BOPP plastic BOPP film is a high performance biaxially oriented. Manufacturing growth has also been a key driver behind the rise in production and consumption of boxboard. Since its introduction in the 1960’s. Of the food industry. textile outwrapping. lamination.8% of total consumption.5 million tonnes. Most of the country's packaging production is destined for domestic consumption. followed by instant noodle producers. In 1997. CPP film. In Indonesia there are now no less than 60 flexible packaging producing companies with a total capacity of 106. but the sector suffered less than other grades of paper and board. In the prolonged economic crisis situation most companies in the industrial sector have been struggling to stay in business by pressing down production cost as much as possible. aluminium foil. cigarette wrapping and reverse printing. with the pharmaceutical & cosmetics industry and other sectors accounting for 33. capacitors.000 tons per annum 9. the snack industry. 8. PVC film. These companies however do not order directly from the BOPP producers. adhesive tapes. Besides being practical and presenting a nice appearance. etc. biscuit producers and manufacturers of confectioneries. But there are also companies with an output rate of under 50% of capacity. there are at least nine companies that produce BOPP film with total production capacity of 123.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .

Brief description of banking system The Indonesian banking system comprises of Bank Indonesia.Indonesia K. private banks. Corporate loan restructuring has progressed very slowly. Next to the banking sector the government has privatized the Jakarta Stock Exchange in 1992. while non-banking financial institutions consist of leasing. lending by foreign banks and joint venture banks has resumed on a modest scale to selected customers. primarily exporters. state banks. it was the banking sector. factoring and the insurance business. Indonesia's banking system has only partially recovered from the crisis. leaving the interest earned on bank recapitalization bonds as the prime source of income for many. While the banking sector is no longer in a state of collapse. Unprecedented levels of corporate debt have limited the ability of many private sector firms to obtain trade or project financing. foreign banks and joint venture banks. Banks were at ground zero of the 1997-98 financial crisis.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . These economic factors coupled with lingering political instability have led to steep declines in both imports and direct foreign investment. and most Indonesian firms find that obtaining trade and project financing has become significantly more difficult. When the economic crisis hit Indonesia in 1997. . When the smoke cleared.39 - . as the central bank. While local banks are not expected to return to normal levels of business in the near-term. and many banks remain technically bankrupt or are hamstrung by very low capital reserves. venture capital. which then became an important source of capital for Indonesian enterprises. Therefore. 27 stateowned regional development banks. 120 private banks. not counting jointventure banks and foreign banks' representative offices). and the cost of imported capital goods has risen substantially in the wake of the Rupiah's devaluation. The Government of Indonesia (GOI) launched a massive bank recapitalization program in 1999 that has stabilized the banking sector but is not yet completed. The banking industry has rapidly developed after the issuance of several regulations aiming at liberalizing the banking sector. Many local companies can neither meet requirements for new loans nor service their existing bank debt. Letters of credit remain difficult to come by and can face difficulties in gaining acceptance abroad. This fluctuation was worsened by the fall of the construction and property industry causing bad loans to soar and leaving a financial drought within major players in this industry. and 10 foreign branches. the total number of banks had declined from 238 pre-crisis to 162 (5 state-owned national banks. and private capital inflows have remained strongly negative since 1998. Export credit and finance 1. The goal was to achieve higher efficiency in the mobilization and channeling of funds to various investment projects. which received the hardest impact arising from the sharp depreciation of the Rupiah. it has not yet recovered to pre-crisis levels. These reforms were immediately welcomed by investor giving birth to dozens of new banks that rapidly spread throughout Indonesia. Banks remain reluctant to make new loans outside of the consumer sector. and several large state-owned banks continue to lose money.

5% and 4.40 - . No prior permits are necessary to transfer foreign exchange. given the fundamental restructuring underway in the banking system. World Bank. Indonesia is now heavily dependent on official financing. Improved export earnings have enabled Indonesia to have a positive current account balance. Despite the new restrictions on offshore transfers of Rupiah. which entered into force in April 2000. A third BI circular relaxed the requirement that banks liquidate equity positions in a debtor company after 5 years or when the company achieves net profits in two consecutive years (the latter provision was changed to require divestment only once a company achieves a cumulative profit). and major bilateral donors. . The GOI (Government of Indonesia) has accumulated foreign exchange reserves above the targets set in its IMF program. the Indonesian economy has shown some signs of recovery. Indonesia has no system of capital controls and foreign exchange flows freely in and out of the country. The regulations place limits on the quantity of Rupiah that onshore banks may transfer to offshore parties without underlying trade or investment transactions. primarily from the Asian Development Bank (ADB).Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . many of these relationships are no longer in effect. Continued improvement is the indicators will strengthen the overall lending environment. The government does not place restrictions on outward direct investment. but are showing signs of increasing again. and other multilateral and bilateral donors meet periodically in the Consultative Group on Indonesia (CGI). The World Bank. According to the World Bank. Prior to the financial crisis. and if sustained. currently set at $3 million. apply to both each transaction and to a bank's cumulative derivative transaction position. Foreign Exchange Law No. could lead to increased demand for trade financing in the mid-term as well as enhanced opportunities for exporters. General availability of financing In June 2000 Bank Indonesia (BI) announced a package of regulatory changes designed to encourage bank lending. These measures include amendments to BI's prudential regulations concerning the recalculation of capital-asset ratios to permit additional credit expansion. 24/1999. Inflation and interest rates have declined dramatically from their mid-crisis levels.Indonesia Despite lagging progress on bank and corporate debt restructuring. including trade financing. However. swaps. With the sharp drop-off of private capital flows since the economic crisis. 2. Foreign exchange controls affecting trade Bank Indonesia introduced new foreign exchange regulations in January 2001 that have significantly cut back the flow of Rupiah to offshore markets. including forward sales. the GDP growth stood at 3. requires the reporting of all foreign exchange transactions above $10. ADB. These limits.000. a large number of Indonesian banks maintained correspondent relationships with American banks. and option contracts. Foreign investors have the right to repatriate capital and profits at the prevailing rate of exchange. 3. A second amendment to the prudential regulations extends until May 2001 (or December 2002 for loans restructured through the Jakarta Initiative) the time limits by which all banks must comply with BI's legal lending limit (the limit concerns the %age of bank credit which may be allocated to individual firms).0% for the years 2002 and 2003 respectively.

It is also the coordinating and regulatory agency for counter trade deals.go. Although U. Ex-Im. Trade promotion 1. is not processing applications in Indonesia currently. Export-Import Bank. 5.Indonesia 4. although most imports were financed with letters of credit.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Indonesia will rely on this assistance to a larger extent.) Local bank financing has sometimes been arranged. once bankers have a reasonable assurance that stability is returning to Indonesia. investors will rely on creative financing options more than ever.S.g in the case of the United States.41 - .S. L. Government insurance for repayment of trade financing extended by Indonesian banks (set up in late 1998. primarily the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the World Bank. the Government of Indonesia has taken a number of steps to encourage private sector lending.C. either normal commercial trade financing or export credits from the source country's export credit agency (for e. Once the economy recovers. all forms of import and export financing were available in the Indonesian market and frequently used. Ex-Im Bank located in Washington.id) The Ministry of Trade and Industry's mission is to promote Indonesian small and medium enterprises to the global market place. including: Establishment of a $1 billion collateral fund deposited offshore to encourage acceptance of Indonesian letters of credit (set up in mid-1998). How to finance exports/methods of payment Since the onset of the crisis. . Establishment in July 1999 of Bank Ekspor Indonesia. Short-term financing was readily available.S. depending on the customer or the agent/distributor involved in the transaction. Indonesia now secures a substantial portion of its development funding from the multilateral development banks. including the U. Ministry of Trade and Industry (http://www. Creation of a $1 million short-term credit guarantee program in collaboration with foreign export credit agencies. The May 1999 foreign exchange law requiring banks and other businesses to report large foreign exchange transactions for monitoring purposes has not had a significant effect on capital flows.dprin. Indonesian buyers have generally preferred the supplier to provide the necessary financing for a commercial transaction. Types of available export financing and insurance Prior to the financial crisis. but little used). The GOI has also implemented specific measures aimed at increasing the supply of trade financing. Indonesia retained an open capital account with no foreign exchange controls both during and after the crisis. D. the U. a Trade Maintenance Facility arising from the June 1998 "Frankfurt Agreement" (renewed in May 2000). proposed reforms in the banking sector should make local financing a more favorable option than it has been in the past. along with other export credit agencies and foreign banks. Some larger banks were providing longer-term financing of up to 2-3 years. some with Ex-Im Bank guarantees. Several American banks have shown initiative in arranging trade-financing packages for their customers.

These products include handicrafts (i. agricultural and cottage industry products. NAFED s goal is to assist the Indonesian business community and the country s exporters in particular. National Agency for Export Development (http://www.Indonesia 2.go. and wood carvings).nafed.id) (KADIN) The major trade association in Indonesia is the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KADIN).kadinnet. Members include representatives from private industry.. In addition. Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (http://www. It is proactive in identifying manufacturers with suitable products for sale overseas as well as identifying new markets overseas. cooperatives. The Agency places special emphasis on expanding the export of non-oil and gas commodities. hand-woven fabric. . for years once the mainstay of the economy. public corporations. utilities. A substantial portion of Indonesia s export growth is a result of the activities of NAFED together with private companies in penetrating new and non-traditional markets. The mission of Nafed are as follows: • • • • To formulate policy and establish guidelines for encouraging and supporting the expansion of non-oil and gas exports To provide information services and market co-ordination To implement and co-ordinate export promotion To expand the range of export products and markets The Agency maintains a database of thousands of Indonesian manufacturers classified by product as well as another database of foreign buyers who may be of interest to Indonesian exporters. as a non-profit organization. The agency will also assist foreign buyers and importers in establishing contacts with Indonesian companies.id) The Indonesian Government established the National Agency for Export Development within the Ministry of Trade to promote the export of less renowned products. which is undertaken through technical support from domestic and international experts and co-operation between Government.e. to produce and export products which attract market interest and fulfill market demands. 3.go. An important means of achieving this is the product adaptation and development programme. there are numerous other specialized and professional organizations that represent the interests of various other sectors and trades in the economy. NAFED acts as a facilitator linking buyers and sellers. and new manufactured products.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . batik. private sector and university institutions. as well as state-owned enterprises. encouraging and implementing the development of national export through market information services and implementation of export promotion. The role of the NAED involves coordinating. All NAFED services are free of charge and. jewelry.42 - .

Indonesia has brought thousands of business leaders and key entrepreneurs from all parts of the world into personal contacts. The KADIN is an independent. GP Farmasi (Gabungan Perusahaan Farmasi Indonesia) / Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies (www. KADINDA.I (Gabungan Apotik Seluruh Indonesia) – Pharmacy/Dispensary Association 2.500 dispensaries and 5.Indonesia Business and government leaders of Indonesia officially established the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry in 1968 as a result of the joint efforts. As of September 2002. G. 6. business/trade Associations. It also serves as a forum and a facilitator for promoting and enhancing the vital roles of businessmen in Indonesia. With economic cooperation as one of its main focus. The association has the following constituents: 1.F.43 - . Kadin Indonesia regularly holds various kinds of meetings. the KADIN consists of (Central) KADIN Indonesia.S.I. (Persatuan Importir Pharmasi Indonesia) – Pharmaceutical Importers Association 3. business meetings and one on one meetings.A. P. both private and governmental. . GP Farmasi’s members only include firms with legal operating licenses.A. bilateral or multilateral. As an economic organisation uniting national entrepreneurs.I (Gabungan Industri Farmasi Indonesia) – Pharmaceutical Industry Association (others including manufacturers) The objectives of the association are to promote sharing of the pharmaceutical domain knowledge within the economy.500 distributors. non-profit making economic/business organisation . 4. workshops. Kadin Indonesia established committees. 2. representing all private enterprises and State enterprises. Over 200 business associations are part of the Chamber structure. the 'Himpunan' or other national economic organisations and the Committees of Foreign Economic Cooperation. Kadin Indonesia provides direct services to 26 provincial chapters and more than 300 regencies' branches. It is constantly reviewing its activities to be relevant to the situations.I. In its present form it came into existence on the 19th August 1969.the sole organisation uniting Indonesian entrepreneurs and the business world. comprising 198 manufacturers.000 drug stores. issues publications and establishes an information network to facilitate contact and exchange of information among businessmen.org) GP Farmasi is the reference point for the pharmaceutical industry in Indonesia.PH.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . G.gpfarmasi. and to contribute to the development of the national economy by providing inputs to the government (on matters concerning healthcare and the pharmaceuticals industry). and forms linkage and collaborates with key regional and international groups and chambers. It is constantly reviewing its activities to be relevant to the situations. nongovernmental. whose objectives and purposes are similar to its own. To co-ordinate its activities with other countries or regions. Kadin Indonesia directs its activities to bridging the gaps which exist among the entrepreneurs and functions as a mediator between business communities and the government. increasing business interaction and enhancing regional economic growth.

Overview The pharmaceutical industry in Indonesia has been well established compared with other industries in the country. (see table below) . Central Java had 31 (number unchanged to the current period) and Yogyakarta had 4 (currently 5). such as wholesalers. Of interest to a foreign company aspiring to enter the Indonesian market would be the tally of the 40 foreign joint venture companies. it is not surprising that most of Indonesia's pharmaceutical plants are located in Java. Outside Java.4%). The number of plants continued to increase after the introduction of the Investments Law. In 1955. North Sumatra topped other regions with 16 factories (currently 10). It has particularly developed since 1955 when there were only seven pharmaceutical plants in the country. although small in number. have established a strong market share in Indonesia. and currently there are 198 such plants (the 1997 economic crisis being responsible for the decline in the numbers). The development of the pharmaceutical industry was paralleled by other related businesses. Conclusions and recommendations 1.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Already in 1966 this number had risen to 130. East Java had 49 (currently 54). It then began to grow significantly in the 1960s.Indonesia M. in 1984 there were 273 and in 1988 the figure rose to 285. These two regions had a total of 159 factories in 1985 (currently 130). By 1975 there were 230 factories.7% of pharmaceutical plants operating in Indonesia were located in Java (currently 93.44 - . Most of them are multinational companies. Given the distribution of population. especially after the introduction of the Foreign Capital Investment Law in 1967 and the Domestic Capital Investment Law in 1968. with the largest number in Jakarta and West Java. skills and infrastructure. 243 or 88.

T. sharing 12. Respiratory system drugs are the second largest selling group of pharmaceuticals. Antibiotic sales from apotiks accounted for 26. In tropical and developing countries. These two pharmaceuticals make up 38. which shared 10. This %age corresponds to the pattern of common diseases in the country. with one exception: upper and lower respiratory tract cases have increased from 38.3% in 1987 to 41.45 - . Details are shown in the table below.6%.3% of the country's total sales of pharmaceuticals.3 million Indonesians suffered from upper and lower respiratory tract diseases. Market and types of products The market for medicines depends largely on the pattern of the common diseases in a country. Apotik sales of medicines reflect the characteristics of the pharmaceutical market in Indonesia. each year.5% of cases. infectious diseases are the most common.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Skin and hypodermic diseases are third.0% in 2003 (possibly due to the considerable air pollution in all population centers).2% and cardiovascular diseases for 2. This composition has not changed much during the last several years. 5. . Drugs for the neuromuscular system held 11. Tooth and gum disease are second in prevalence. For example. placing third in sales followed by vitamins and minerals.9% of the country's total drug sales. attacking 8.6% of the pharmaceutical market. accounting for 7. Corinthian (CIC) 2.6% of the country's total sales of pharmaceuticals. topping other pharmaceuticals in sales.0% of the population.Indonesia Source: P. Eye and adnexa diseases amount to 6.3% of the market.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .T.46 - . Corinthian (CIC) The recommendations are outlined as follows: .Indonesia Market share of pharmaceutical products (by sales) Source: P.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .) i. etc. Establishing pharmaceutical plants in Indonesia (supplied with imported basic ingredients) The large market demand for pharmaceutical products has not encouraged investment in basic ingredient manufacturing. Such captive local plants are least affected by changing supply conditions barring the economic crisis (which skyrocketed the costs of imports). For a multinational company. Exporting For a company at the beginning of the learning curve (re the Indonesian pharmaceutical market). 4.e. Glaxo. only 5% come from local sources. are among the obstacles discouraging investors from committing to this business. coupled with the difficulties of obtaining manufacturing licenses from foreign principals. the following exhibit best encapsulates the target and strategy for the Indonesian market. to set up a pharmaceutical plant in Indonesia. which is supplied by basic ingredients and raw materials that they produce overseas. Foreign joint venture companies receive basic ingredient supplies from their parent companies abroad and. 5. Despite government encouragement. without government requirements. Squibb. Notwithstanding the tremendous government support such a venture is anticipated to receive. the problem of economies of scale would be paramount.Indonesia 3. exporting through pharmaceutical wholesalers in Indonesia is good strategy before committing greater resources to the market. This is the strategy taken by many multinational companies in Indonesia (Merck. Bayer. Schering. and an entrant under this mode would need a complimentary strategy of exporting (active ingredients) from its Indonesian base. and are stronger than the local pharmaceutical companies. would most likely eliminate their costly chemical plants in Indonesia. About 95% of the basic ingredients are supplied through imports. no domestic investor has been interested in venturing into the pharmaceutical basic ingredients industry. Establish a plant to produce active ingredients Finally a company can enter the Indonesian market by establishing a plant to produce active (basic) ingredients. Technological and marketing problems.47 - . . Imports are expected to fill the basic ingredient supply in the future. The relatively small active pharmaceutical ingredient market in Indonesia raises the question of profitability of such a plant.

R.Indonesia N.48 - .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Jakarta 12950.go.go. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 5201590 Website: www. H. Rasuna Said Blok X/5 Kav 4-9. Gatot Subroto Kav. 52-53. Jakarta.id Ministry of Health Jl.id Website: www. Useful addresses GOVERNMENT BODIES & INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS Ministry of Industry And Trade . Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 5252194 Facsimile: (62-21) 5261086 E-mail Address: pusdata@dprin.id .dprin.go.depkes.The Republic of Indonesia Jl.

com Website: www. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 3860940. Dr. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 525 2008 Fascimile: (62-21) 525 4945 Email: sysadm@bkpm. Jakarta. 4244755.org.bkpm.nafed. Jakarta 10310.org Website: www.44. 29.Indonesia Directorate General of Drugs and Food Control Jl.H. Sutomo 6-8. 20 A Kemayoran.id Investment Coordination Board (BKPM) Jalan Jenderal Gatot Subroto No. Percetakan Negara No. Jakarta 10710.go. 8. 3858201. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 634 1082 Facismile: (62-21) 633 8360 Email Address: nafed@nafed.go.id Central Bureau of Statistics Jl. Jl. Jakarta. 3858194 GP Farmasi / Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies Jl. Jakarta Pusat – 10260. 3858195.go.org Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KADIN) Gedung Chandra 3rd Floor. 4244688 Directorate General of International Trade Jl.id Website: www.go.49 - . 4244691. munas@gpfarmasi. M.bps. Gatot Subroto Kav.id Website: www. Jalan Gajah Mada No. Jakarta 1210. Angkasa No.go. 52-53.kadinnet. Thamrin 20.com National Agency For Export Development (NAFED) Ministry of Industry and Trade. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 350 7057 Facismile: (62-21) 385 7046 Website: www. Jakarta 10350. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 324000 Email Address: Inquiry@kadinnet.id .gpfarmasi. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 4245459. Indonesia Phone: (62-21) 4203040 Facsimile: (62-21) 4203047/48 Email: sekertariat@gpfarmasi.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .

A supply and demand survey on active ingredients/raw materials for Indonesia. The Exporter’s Encyclopedia 2000/2001. Vol. 2002 16.com) . Development of Paper and packaging industry”. Department Of International Health. Pacific Bridge. Bukhari 5. November 5. P. Developments from ASEAN’s ACCSQ Pharmaceuticals Product Working Group. UNIDO. Shafiq. Corinthian (CIC) World Wide Web Resources 1. Ames Gross. Worldwide corrugated packaging industry statistics report. Market Access sectoral and trade barriers database. Healthcare Markets And Regulatory Issues In The Region: Presentation At Raps.eu. International corrugated case association. Indonesia 2. Update On The Asian Economies And Major Healthcare Trends.50 - . Sulaeman Krishnandhi. GP Farmasi / Indonesian Association of Pharmaceutical Companies (www. P. MIMS Indonesia 14. School Of Public Health. Pacific Business and Industries.tradeport. Indonesia: General features of trade policy. Andreas Bunanta. Inc. Survey ON Pharmaceutical industry in Indonesia. Dun and Bradstreet International. Indonesia: Strategy for manufacturing competitiveness. September 1998 4. August 2001 3.Indonesia REFERENCES Publications ASEAN Meeting Report 1. 2000 13. Pacific Bridge. 8. 2000. Promoting Rational Use Of Drugs at The Community Health Centers In Indonesia. Retrieved on 06 Nov 2002 from http://www.org) 2.pl 12.III 1996. Jakarta. New York. US – ASEAN Business council (www. 2002. January 2000 15. Arustiyono. Retrieved on 06 Nov 2002 from: http://www. Boston University. Inc. Aulia. Rochaini. Michigan Business School 6.mkaccdb. Dhanani.us-asean. Ames Gross.org) 3. 2000. Gunter Dufey.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Indonesian Commercial Newsletter. President. (33): 44-49 11.. 2002 10. August 2001. Priscilla Rogers.int/mkdb/chksel. Overview Of Asia.org 9.gpfarmasi. Pharma – info (www.T. Pharma Indonesia.pharma-info. Manuel Zahn reports on the fourth meeting of the ACCSQ PPWG held 25–29 September 2001 in Bali. 2002. September 1999 7.T.

Inc (www.com) 6.umich.org.edu) 8.globalsources. Economist Intelligence Unit (www. University of Michigan (www.org.adb.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . Pacific Bridge. U.eiu.bi.go.tradeport.au) 12.id) 9.org) 11.org) 13.com) 5.atimes.51 - . Asia – Pacific Economic Cooperation (www. Global Sources (www.sg) 10.apecsec. Bank Indonesia (www.com) . Asian Development Bank (www.pacificbridgemedical.Indonesia 4.S Department of Commerce – National Trade Data Bank – (www.austrade.thejakartapost.com) 7. Asia Times Online (www. Australian Trade Commission –(www.com) 14. The Jakarta Post (www.

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia .52 - .

Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia ANNEX COMPANY/PRODUCT PROFILES .53 - .

9. Rukopori. 13. 15. 5. 17. 12. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics Antibacterials Antifungal Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. Kalcmalang. Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering Skin differentiation/proliferation Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: Antacids Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. antipyretics. 14. 21. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics.POB City . 11.Country Email: alomampa@cbn. 7. 19.beticd Year established: 1995 Website address of company: Mr Rusdiyanto / Mr Muchcis Arifin / Director PT Alomampa Persada / International Herbal Centre Jl. Sentra Niaga E71. 16. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics .Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . 18. 10. Jaktim Jakarta – Indonesia Tel: (021) 86612471 Number of employees: 30 Fax: (021) 86612472 Bank Ref: BCA / Mandiri Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer ⌧Manufacturer/Producer Countries previously imported/exported to: Importer ⌧Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 8.54 - . 6. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). 2.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 4. 20. immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: Antianginal Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Dermatological medicines (topical) Antifungal Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants I* E* 3.

resins. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. fats.Indonesia 22. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. gums. tinctures. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. 23. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech I* = Import. 25. such as jojoba oil. rhizomes. 26. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. leaves. balsams. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. 27. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. E* = Export . lacs.55 - . gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. 24. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal ⌧Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals ⌧Crude raw materials such as roots. natural gums. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 29. castor oil. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. fruits. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. Raw plant material ⌧Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae ⌧ 31. 35. fat and oil 33.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 34. 28.

Country Email: Year established: 1966 Website address of company: Mr Lim Susanto. 6. 8.POB City . Tbk 21 Rawa Gatel Sldk IIIs Kav 37-38. 9. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. 14. 21. medicines used to treat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics Antibacterials Antifungal Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. 16. 11. Indonesia Tel: 62-21-4682 2580 Number of employees: 800 Fax: Bank Ref: Wholesaler/Retailer ⌧Manufacturer/Producer ⌧Importer Countries previously imported/exported to: IMPORT: ASIA / EUROPE EXPORT: ASIA / AFRICA ⌧Exporter Activities Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 13. 7. 20. Kawasan Industri Pulogadung Jakarta. 17. 18. 5. 10. 2. . antipyretics. 4. 19. Assistant Director PT Dankos Laboratories.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: Antianginal Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) Antifungal Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: Antacids Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones.56 - .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 15. 12. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics I* E* ⌧ 3.

palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. 26. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. gums. 25. leaves. 35. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech 36. fats. fruits. Raw materials and excipients ⌧ I* = Import. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ 29. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. castor oil. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. 34. natural gums. 23. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. rhizomes.Indonesia 22. such as jojoba oil. balsams. 24. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. E* = Export . lacs.57 - . 28. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. resins. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. tinctures. 27. fat and oil 33.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .

Indonesia Tel: +62 21 725 8010 ext.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 13. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics Antibacterials Antifungal Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. 93 Jakarta 12130.POB City . 9.58 - . immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: ⌧Antianginal ⌧Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Dermatological medicines (topical) ⌧Antifungal ⌧Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: ⌧Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants I* E* 3. 18. 15. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). 6. 16.294 Number of employees: 1175 http://www. 2. 20.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . 14.Country Email: Ricardo. 5.com Year established: 1976 Website address of company: Mr Ricardo A. 21. 4. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: ⌧Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ . 17. 10.darya-varia. 12.sopacua@daryavaria. Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ Skin differentiation/proliferation Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: ⌧Antacids ⌧Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea ⌧Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. 11. Sopacua PT Darya-Varia Laboratoria Tbk JL. 19. Melawai Raya No.com Fax: +62 21 725 8009 Bank Ref: Activities ⌧Exporter ⌧Wholesaler/Retailer ⌧Manufacturer/Producer ⌧Importer Countries previously imported/exported to: Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. 7. antipyretics. 8.

35.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia 22. gums. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. rhizomes. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. fats. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. castor oil. such as jojoba oil. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 29. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water.59 - . Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. 27. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. 24. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. 25. fruits. tinctures. 28. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. leaves. resins. E* = Export . Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. 26. natural gums. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. balsams. fat and oil 33. 23. lacs. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech I* = Import. 34. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils.

other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens ⌧Insulin/other antidiabetic agents ⌧Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents ⌧Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: ⌧Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics I* E* ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 3. 8. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). 4. 5. General Manager PT Dexa Medica EL Nusa Building #5 Jakarta – Indonesia Tel: 62-816-881485 Number of employees: 1500 Fax: 62-21-78846465 Bank Ref: Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer Manufacturer/Producer Countries previously imported/exported to: Importer Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 19. 15. 21. Anaesthetics: ⌧General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics ⌧Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . 16.com Year established: 1972 Website address of company: Mr Hendra Purnomo.60 - . antipyretics. 11. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) ⌧NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics ⌧Antibacterials ⌧Antifungal ⌧Antiviral ⌧Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. 12.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 6. immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: ⌧Plasma substitutes ⌧Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: ⌧Antianginal Antiarrhythmic ⌧Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Antithrombotic ⌧Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) ⌧Antifungal ⌧Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: ⌧Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: ⌧Antacids ⌧Antiemetic ⌧Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. 17. 7. 14. 10. ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ .Country Email: hendrap@dexamedica. 18.POB City . 13. 9. 2. 20.

rhizomes. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ 29. balsams. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. 34. 23. E* = Export . 28.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. such as jojoba oil. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. castor oil. gums. resins. 25.Indonesia 22. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. 26. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. fruits.61 - . 35. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. natural gums. 27. fats. 24. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. fat and oil 33. tinctures. leaves. lacs. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech Active pmarma ceutical ingredients ⌧ I* = Import.

12. ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ .POB City . 11. Kawasan Industry Pulogadung Jakarta. Indonesia Tel: 62-21-46822422 Number of employees: 3819 www.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: ⌧Antianginal Antiarrhythmic ⌧Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) ⌧Antifungal Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent ⌧Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: ⌧Antiseptics ⌧Disinfectants ⌧Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: ⌧Antacids Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. 19. 10.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 13. 2. Product Manager PT Enseval Putera Megatrading Tbk Jl Polo Lentut 10. 4. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: ⌧Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics I* E* ⌧ ⌧ 3.com Fax: 62-21-460-9039 Bank Ref: Lippo Bank Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer Manufacturer/Producer ⌧Importer Countries previously imported/exported to: Trader ⌧Other: Trader & Distributor Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. Anaesthetics: ⌧General ansesthetics and oxygen ⌧Local anaesthetics ⌧Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. 14.com Year established: 1973 Website address of company: Mulyana. 16.62 - . 8. 17.enseval. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics ⌧Antibacterials ⌧Antifungal ⌧Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. 21. 20. 5. antipyretics. 15. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs).Country Email: mulyana@enseval. 9. 7. 6. 18.

Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin ⌧Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech I* = Import. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous ⌧Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. 34. fat and oil ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 33. balsams. 26. 23. 25. 24.63 - . palm kernel or babassu oil ⌧Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. gums.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products .Indonesia 22. 35. fruits. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. 28. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. tinctures. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ 29. Raw plant material ⌧Medicinal and aromatic plants ⌧Seaweed and algae 31. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. 27. castor oil. such as jojoba oil. lacs. E* = Export . tung oil and sesame oil ⌧Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions ⌧Waxes ⌧Cocoa butter. leaves. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant ⌧Thickening ⌧Extracts Agents ⌧Vitamins Other additives ⌧Proteins ⌧Perfumery oils ⌧Waxes Preservatives ⌧Oils ⌧ ⌧ 30. resins. natural gums. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. rhizomes. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and ⌧quinine ⌧ 32. fats.

TB Simatupang no. Director (Chemical Division) PT Merck Tbk Jl. 14.64 - . non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). antipyretics. 16.Country Email: Year established: Website address of company: Dr. PS Rebo. 2. 9. 12. R. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics Antibacterials Antifungal Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic. 10. 20. immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: Antianginal Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Dermatological medicines (topical) Antifungal Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants I* E* ⌧ 3. 4. 18. 5. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 8. 7. 17. Schnapke-Zinzius. Jakarta 13760 Jakarta Tel: 62-21-8413889 Number of employees: Fax: 62-21-8415537 Bank Ref: Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer Manufacturer/Producer Countries previously imported/exported to: Importer Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 21. 15. 8. 11. ⌧ Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering Skin differentiation/proliferation ⌧ ⌧ Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: Antacids Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. 6.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street .POB City . 19. 13.

gums. fruits. 26. such as jojoba oil. resins and starches ⌧Essential oils ⌧Fatty oils. fats. leaves. 34. 27. 24. 28.Indonesia 22. E* = Export . 35. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. castor oil.65 - . rhizomes.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 29. balsams. tinctures. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders ⌧ ⌧ Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. natural gums. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. lacs. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. 25. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. 23. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech I* = Import. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts ⌧Agents ⌧Vitamins ⌧Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils ⌧ ⌧ 30. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. resins. fat and oil 33.

⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ . 16. 17.id Year established: 1988 Website address of company: Mr Peter Sutandar. 14. 2. 18. 11. Indonesia Tel: 62-21-390 3093 Number of employees: 600 Fax: 62-21-390 3090 Bank Ref: Bank Mandiri – Bank Central Asia Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer Manufacturer/Producer Countries previously imported/exported to: Importer Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 13. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. antipyretics.Fahrenheit Jln Raden Saleh No. 12. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens ⌧Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: ⌧Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory ⌧Local anesthetics ⌧Miotics and antiglaucoma ⌧Mydriatics I* E* 3. Deputy President Director Mr Joelianto – Mr Adi Suberman PT Pratapa Nirmala . non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs).co. 10.co.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . 4.66 - .Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 4 Jakarta 10430. 5. 19. 6.POB City . 20. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics ⌧Antibacterials ⌧Antifungal ⌧Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic.Country Email: peter@fahrenheit. 21. 15.id joelianto@jahrenheit. 8. 9. immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: ⌧Antianaemia medicines ⌧Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: ⌧Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: ⌧Antianginal ⌧Antiarrhythmic ⌧Antihypertensive ⌧Used in heart failure ⌧Antithrombotic ⌧Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) Antifungal Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: ⌧Antacids ⌧Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic ⌧Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones. 7.

castor oil. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. 25. such as jojoba oil. fruits. 28. resins. lacs. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents Obsessive compulsive disorders 29.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 34. E* = Export .Indonesia 22. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. rhizomes. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31.67 - . balsams. 26. 23. fats. gums. natural gums. leaves. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. 35. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral ⌧Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. 24. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. 27. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders ⌧Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. tinctures. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. fat and oil 33. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech I* = Import.

7. 5. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: ⌧Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: Antianginal Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure ⌧Antithrombotic ⌧Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) Antifungal ⌧Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: ⌧Antiseptics ⌧Disinfectants Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: ⌧Antacids ⌧Antiemetic ⌧Antihaemorrhoidal ⌧Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones.16. 10. Fransiscus Ong PT Pyridam Farma Tbk J1. 15. 13. 18.POB City . other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: ⌧Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics I* E* ⌧ 3. 12. 6.68 - . Kemandoran VIII No. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) ⌧NSAIMs Opioid analgesics ⌧Used to treat gout ⌧DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics ⌧Antibacterials ⌧Antifungal ⌧Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: ⌧For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic.Country Email: info@pyridam. 2. 19. 21. 14. 9. 8.com Year established: 1976 Website address of company: Drs. antipyretics. 17. 11.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 4. Jakarta 12210 Jakarta – Indonesia Tel: (021) 5307551-52 Number of employees: 473 (5 / 04) Fax: (021) 5329049 Bank Ref: BCA / NISP Activities ⌧Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer ⌧Manufacturer/Producer ⌧Importer Countries previously imported/exported to: Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1. 20. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics. ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ . 16.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street .

26. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. 34. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. E* = EXPORT . 23. tinctures. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. 35. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. rhizomes. 28. resins.Indonesia 22. fruits. such as jojoba oil. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. fat and oil 33. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. 25. 24. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ 29. lacs.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . gums. leaves. balsams. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. castor oil. 27. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal ⌧Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. natural gums. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech Active Ingredients Tool Manufacturing Contract Manufacturing ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ I* = IMPORT.69 - . fats.

immunosuppressives and medicines used in palliative care: Immunosuppressive Cytotoxic medicines Hormones and antihormones Medicines used in palliative care Antiparkinsonism medicines Medicines affecting the blood: ⌧Antianaemia medicines Medicines affecting coagulation Blood products and plasma substitutes: Plasma substitutes Plasma fractions fro specific use Cardiovascular medicines: Antianginal Antiarrhythmic Antihypertensive Used in heart failure Antithrombotic Lipid-lowering Dermatological medicines (topical) ⌧Antifungal Anti-infective ⌧Anti-inflammatory/antipruritic Astringent Skin differentiation/proliferation Scabicides/pediculicides Ultraviolet Diagnostic agents: Ophthalmic Radio contrast media Disinfectants and antiseptics: Antiseptics Disinfectants Diuretics Gastrointestinal medicines: Antacids Antiemetic Antihaemorrhoidal Anti-inflammatory Antispasmodic Laxatives ⌧Used in diarrhea Antidiarrhoeal (symptomatic) Hormones.POB City . Indonesia Tel: 62-21-520 1858 / 5155 Number of employees: 600 Fax: 62-21-520 4735 Bank Ref: HSBC Activities Exporter Wholesaler/Retailer Manufacturer/Producer Countries previously imported/exported to: Importer Trader Other: Description (please give generic names and specify if the product is indigenous) 1.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . 17. 5. Tromolpos: 1308 Jkt Jakarta 12950. 6. 11. other endocrine medicines and contraceptives: Adrenal/synthetic substitutes Androgens Contraceptives Estrogens Insulin/other antidiabetic agents Ovulation inducers Progestogens Thyroid hormones/antithyroid medicines Immunologicals: Diagnostic agents Sera and immunoglobulins Vaccines Muscle relaxants (peripherally acting) and cholinesterase inhibitors Ophthalmological preparations: Anti-infective Anti-inflammatory Local anesthetics Miotics and antiglaucoma Mydriatics I* E* ⌧ ⌧ 3. H. ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ ⌧ . Ogin Muntahar. non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). 19. 4. medicines used to threat gout and disease modifying agents in rheumatoid disorders (DMARDs) ⌧NSAIMs Opioid analgesics Used to treat gout DMARDs Antiallergics and medicines used in anaphylaxis Antidotes and other substances used in poisoning: Non-specific Specific Anticonvulstants/antiepileptics: Anti-infective medicines: Anthelminthics ⌧Antibacterials Antifungal ⌧Antiviral Antiprotozoal Insect repellents Antimigraine medicines: For treatment of acute attack For prophylaxis Antineoplastic.70 - . 18. antipyretics. 12. 8. 10.R.Indonesia COMPANY / PRODUCT PROFILE FORM “AsiaHealthCare 2004” Buyers/Sellers Meeting on Pharmaceuticals and Natural Products SINGAPORE 14-16 JULY 2004 Name and Title: Company name Street . 16. 20. Rasuna Said Kav. 7. 2. 9.Country Email: ogm@thetempogroup. 14. Export Manager PT Tempo Scan Pacific Jl.net Year established: 1970 Website address of company: Mr. Anaesthetics: General ansesthetics and oxygen Local anaesthetics Preoperative medication and sedation Analgesics.11. 15. 21. 13.

23. fats. 34. balsams. Vegetables (and animal) derived oils. Oxytocics and antioxytocics: Oxytocics Antioxytocics Peritoneal dialysis solution Psychotherapeutic medicines: Psychotic disorders Mood disorders Generalized anxiety and sleep disorders Obsessive compulsive disorders Medicines acting on the respiratory tract Solutions correcting water. resins. electrolyte and acid-base disturbances: Oral Parenteral Miscellaneous Vitamins and minerals Natural ingredients for pharmaceuticals Crude raw materials such as roots. 35.Supply and demand survey on pharmaceuticals and natural products . E* = Export . 27. waxes and their derivatives Colouring agents ⌧ 29. leaves.Indonesia 22. seeds and (root) barks to be used in herbal Medicines containing whole plant material or as raw material for the isolation of active substances or extracts Saps and extracts. Natural ingredients for cosmetics Plant Thickening Extracts Agents Vitamins Other additives Proteins Perfumery oils Waxes Preservatives Oils 30. all imported.71 - . palm kernel or babassu oil Fixed vegetable fats and oils and their fractions. resins and starches Essential oils Fatty oils. tung oil and sesame oil Animal or vegetable fats and oils and their fractions Waxes Cocoa butter. I* = Import. fruits. Colouring matter of vegetable or animal origin Essential oils and oleoresins Biotech We export the finished products but the raw materials. natural gums. fat and oil 33. 25. 28. gum-resins and balsams Other vegetable saps and extracts Ephedrine and quinine 32. fats and waxes Peanut oil & its fractions Coconut. castor oil. Vegetable saps and extracts Lacs. rhizomes. lacs. such as jojoba oil. 24. Raw plant material Medicinal and aromatic plants Seaweed and algae 31. 26. gums. tinctures.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->