P. 1
Astrology of the Heart: Astro-Shamanism

Astrology of the Heart: Astro-Shamanism

5.0

|Views: 858|Likes:
Published by Michael Erlewine
Astrology of the Heart: Astro-Shamanism
by Michael Erlewine

532 pages, 450 color illustrations

Well-known astrologer/author Steven Forrest writes of Astrology of the Heart:

“As Castaneda’s don Juan would put it, Erlewine ‘moves fluidly between the worlds.’ But not just between the mental, intellectual constructs of those worlds. Michael, like a Druid’s apprentice or a Buddhist monk, has submitted to the spiritual direction of men and women he was humble enough to realize were wiser than himself. He has received initiations. He has gone down into the Dark, into the Great Silence, into the Luminous Void. He has, in other words, done something not enough astrologers do: mind-training. He has visited the worlds to which the astrological symbols refer. He speaks of them not with the authority of erudite footnotes, but with the authority of direct experience.

“Walking his talk, Erlewine has placed a stepping stone between two very different worlds. He stands on that middle stone, with white water roaring all around him. And his finger is pointing at the moon… I find myself filled with gratitude toward Michael, and also with a sense of encouragement… This is beautiful stuff.” — Steven Forrest

Astrology of the Heart will be of particular interest to the counseling astrologer or those astrologers who want to understand the shamanic nature of astrology at a deeper level. Many books are available about standard astrological techniques, but few about the inner meaning of astrology as it is understood and used by professionals.

This book is about life paths, rites of passage, climacteric years, turning points in the life, and how to find and understand them in your horoscope. Not a book of abstract theory, but a practical manual to understanding what out-of-the-body experience, the chakras, initiation, and other esoteric topics are really about.

As Erlewine says, “The esoteric is hidden in, of all places, plain sight! What is missing is our being able to grasp these experiences. This book shows you how.”
Astrology of the Heart: Astro-Shamanism
by Michael Erlewine

532 pages, 450 color illustrations

Well-known astrologer/author Steven Forrest writes of Astrology of the Heart:

“As Castaneda’s don Juan would put it, Erlewine ‘moves fluidly between the worlds.’ But not just between the mental, intellectual constructs of those worlds. Michael, like a Druid’s apprentice or a Buddhist monk, has submitted to the spiritual direction of men and women he was humble enough to realize were wiser than himself. He has received initiations. He has gone down into the Dark, into the Great Silence, into the Luminous Void. He has, in other words, done something not enough astrologers do: mind-training. He has visited the worlds to which the astrological symbols refer. He speaks of them not with the authority of erudite footnotes, but with the authority of direct experience.

“Walking his talk, Erlewine has placed a stepping stone between two very different worlds. He stands on that middle stone, with white water roaring all around him. And his finger is pointing at the moon… I find myself filled with gratitude toward Michael, and also with a sense of encouragement… This is beautiful stuff.” — Steven Forrest

Astrology of the Heart will be of particular interest to the counseling astrologer or those astrologers who want to understand the shamanic nature of astrology at a deeper level. Many books are available about standard astrological techniques, but few about the inner meaning of astrology as it is understood and used by professionals.

This book is about life paths, rites of passage, climacteric years, turning points in the life, and how to find and understand them in your horoscope. Not a book of abstract theory, but a practical manual to understanding what out-of-the-body experience, the chakras, initiation, and other esoteric topics are really about.

As Erlewine says, “The esoteric is hidden in, of all places, plain sight! What is missing is our being able to grasp these experiences. This book shows you how.”

More info:

Published by: Michael Erlewine on Sep 10, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/13/2014

pdf

text

original

As mentioned earlier, there are probably hundreds of
meditation techniques out there, but the kind of
techniques we need for our Astro-shamanic work are
actually quite simple, and remarkably enough, most of
the major Asian religions and philosophies use the
same techniques. This fact helps a lot, because it

325

means we can be pretty confident of getting the kind
of mind training we need from a variety of readily
available sources. There are two basic techniques
that almost every meditation student is taught, and

the Sanskrit (oldest) terms for these are ―Shamata‖
and ―Vipassana,‖ and they are usually taught in that

order. These can greatly accelerate our work, as well.

Shamata, the place to begin, is simply a technique for
calming our otherwise unruly mind. It translates to

something like ―abiding in the calm‖ or ―calming the
mind.‖ Without quieting the mind, no other kind of

meditation technique can be learned, because our
mind is too busy. I am not going to try and present the
Shamata technique here, because it is best for you to
get it from someone, in person, so that whatever
questions you might have can be answered. Shamata
is a method to look at the mind, and by looking at it, to
gradually recognize its busy or hectic character, thus
allowing the mind to calm down and come to rest. In
Shamata, we learn to let the mind rest. It may sound
easy, but for most of us, it is not easy to just let the
mind rest.

Once we have learned to let the mind rest, we can
begin the practice of Vipassana or insight meditation,
which involves actually looking for and directly at the
nature of the mind. It is through Vipassana that we
begin to pick through the ego or Self, piece by piece,
and to develop an increased awareness of the true
nature of the mind. By learning to look at who is
looking at the mind, the looker, we can set to rest
more and more of what we have always been
focusing on, which is the content of the mind (the
subject matter), and begin to see beyond that subject
matter to the ground or true nature of the mind itself.
This will not be presented here, as it should be

326

explained by a teacher of this kind of meditation. In
general, though, the point is to stop just looking at the
content of our thoughts (what the thought is about),
and, instead, learn to look at the true nature of all
thoughts, regardless of their content.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->