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Tibetan Astrology

Tibetan Astrology

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Published by Michael Erlewine
Tibetan Astrology
by Michael Erlewine

827 pages, 579 color illustrations

Tibet, often called the spiritual and physical "roof of the world" has been the source of great inspiration to Westerners for over two centuries. Is Tibetan astrology as profound as its spiritual teachings? Well-known astrologer Michael Erlewine has spent the last 30 years finding out, including two trips to Tibet and China, learning to read Tibetan along the way. In this 827-page you will find 579 full-color diagrams and scores of tables. The book also includes tarot-card-like images for many Tibetan indicators plus traditional interpretations translated directly from the Tibetan into English.

Erlewine introduces readers to the basic fundamentals of Tibetan astrology. Of course topics like the Five Elements, Twelve Animals Signs, the 60-year Element-Animal Cycle, the Nine-numbered Magic Square, and the Eight Trigrams of the I-Ching are covered. But there are dozens of other topics, including the Tibetan Calendar (and how to use it), Lunar Months, the 30 Lunar Days, Dharma Practice Days, 11 Karanas, 27 Lunar Mansions, Papme Mewa, Descending Mewa, Annual and Daily Mewa and Par-Kha, Descending Par-Kha, Solar Data, 8 Directions, 8 Portents, 27 Yogas, Weekday Combinations, Travel Days, Bad Years, Log-Men, Lo-Khak, Shi-Shey, Thus-Sun, Tomb Signs, 24 Seasonal Sectors, 28 Great Conjunctions, 15 Conjunctures, Ten Element Combinations, Vital Forces, Deu Kha-Mar, Cosmic Tortoise, 12 Nidanas, Geomancy, and a special section on the 105 Major Earth Lords. More.

Includes the book Tibetan Earth Lords: Tibetan Astrology and Geomancy.
Tibetan Astrology
by Michael Erlewine

827 pages, 579 color illustrations

Tibet, often called the spiritual and physical "roof of the world" has been the source of great inspiration to Westerners for over two centuries. Is Tibetan astrology as profound as its spiritual teachings? Well-known astrologer Michael Erlewine has spent the last 30 years finding out, including two trips to Tibet and China, learning to read Tibetan along the way. In this 827-page you will find 579 full-color diagrams and scores of tables. The book also includes tarot-card-like images for many Tibetan indicators plus traditional interpretations translated directly from the Tibetan into English.

Erlewine introduces readers to the basic fundamentals of Tibetan astrology. Of course topics like the Five Elements, Twelve Animals Signs, the 60-year Element-Animal Cycle, the Nine-numbered Magic Square, and the Eight Trigrams of the I-Ching are covered. But there are dozens of other topics, including the Tibetan Calendar (and how to use it), Lunar Months, the 30 Lunar Days, Dharma Practice Days, 11 Karanas, 27 Lunar Mansions, Papme Mewa, Descending Mewa, Annual and Daily Mewa and Par-Kha, Descending Par-Kha, Solar Data, 8 Directions, 8 Portents, 27 Yogas, Weekday Combinations, Travel Days, Bad Years, Log-Men, Lo-Khak, Shi-Shey, Thus-Sun, Tomb Signs, 24 Seasonal Sectors, 28 Great Conjunctions, 15 Conjunctures, Ten Element Combinations, Vital Forces, Deu Kha-Mar, Cosmic Tortoise, 12 Nidanas, Geomancy, and a special section on the 105 Major Earth Lords. More.

Includes the book Tibetan Earth Lords: Tibetan Astrology and Geomancy.

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Published by: Michael Erlewine on Sep 10, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/09/2014

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The reverse process is also true. Sometimes what is
needed is to strengthen an element that is weakened,
one that needs a boost. There are several ways to do
that, as well.

You can increase the strength of its parent, so that it
receives more nourishment and protection. You can
decrease the strength of its child, so it does not pull so
much strength from its mother, the element you are
considering. By the same token, you can decrease the
strength of its destroying element, so that it does not
impinge on your chosen element, and lastly, you can
decrease the strength of the grandchild element, so that
it takes less strength to attach. You get the idea.

The Chinese concept of the Five Elements and feng-
shui for that matter is all about balance and harmony.
To show what I would consider a perfect example of the
difference between Eastern and Western philosophy:

Tibetan Astrology

533

Looking at the elemental balance from a Western
perspective, if you are missing an element, you are said
to lack that quality. However, in the Easter view of the
five elements, when you are missing an element, this
element is termed your "Luck Element," because only
when you add it or come across it can you ever be
balanced. In other words, it is through what you want or
lack that you will become whole, so that missing
element is lucky.

The difference between the two views may be subtle,
but very revealing in how the Chinese approach works.

Tibetan Astrology

534

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