You are on page 1of 135

 

 
PAKISTAN NAVY  E
ENGINEERING COLLEGE  
NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCES & 
 
TECHNOLOGY 

 
 

 
DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE
 

 
PROJECT ADJUDICATION REPORT 
 

 
Project Advisor: 
  Dr. Waqar A Khan 
Group Members: 
Rehan Azhar (ME‐722‐06) 
  Project Examiners: 
Shahzad Ahmad (ME‐723‐06)   
M.Sajjad Ashraf (ME‐710‐06))  Mr. Aijaz Ahmad 
 
Dr. Noman Danish 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
Table of Contents 

PREFACE……………… ................................................................................................................................ 8 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS .......................................................................................................................... 9 
PROJECT APPROVAL............................................................................................................................. 10 
NOMENCLATURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………………………..1

CHAPTER 1  LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................................... 13 

CHAPTER 2  INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................... 16 
2.1  AIM OF PROJECT ............................................................................................................................... 16 
2.2  SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................ 16 
2.3  PROJECT DESCRIPTION ....................................................................................................................... 16 
2.3.1  Stirling Engine .......................................................................................................................... 16 
2.3.2  History ..................................................................................................................................... 16 
2.4  TERMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE STIRLING ENGINE ...................................................................................... 17 
2.4.1  Heat engine ............................................................................................................................. 17 
2.4.2  Sink .......................................................................................................................................... 17 
2.4.3  Source ...................................................................................................................................... 17 
2.4.4  Internal Combustion Engine .................................................................................................... 17 
2.5  MAJOR COMPONENTS OF THE STIRLING ENGINE .................................................................................... 17 
2.5.1  Displacer .................................................................................................................................. 17 
2.5.2  Power piston ............................................................................................................................ 18 
2.5.3  Crank shaft .............................................................................................................................. 18 
2.5.4  Connecting rod ........................................................................................................................ 18 
2.5.5  Regenerator (optional) ............................................................................................................ 18 
2.6  STIRLING ENGINE‐EXTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE ................................................................................. 18 
2.7  BASICS OF STIRLING ENGINE ............................................................................................................... 19 
2.8  THE STIRLING ENGINE CYCLE ............................................................................................................... 19 
2.8.1  2‐3 Isothermal Expansion ........................................................................................................ 20 
2.8.2  3‐4 Constant Volume Heat Rejection ....................................................................................... 20 
2.8.3  4‐1 Isothermal Compression .................................................................................................... 20 
2.8.4  1‐2 Constant Volume Heat Addition ........................................................................................ 20 
2.9  OPERATION OF STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE ................................................................................................ 20 
2.10  HOW TO INCREASE THE POWER OUTPUT OF A STIRLING ENGINE .............................................................. 21 
2.10.1  Pressurization .......................................................................................................................... 24 
2.10.2  Lubricants and friction ............................................................................................................. 24 
2.11  COMPARISON OF STIRLING ENGINE WITH AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE ............................................ 24 
2.11.1  Advantages .............................................................................................................................. 24 
2.11.2  Disadvantages ......................................................................................................................... 25 
2.12  APPLICATIONS OF STIRLING ENGINE ..................................................................................................... 25 
CHAPTER 3  DESIGN SELECTION .................................................................................................. 28 
3.1  CONFIGURATIONS OF STIRLING ENGINE ................................................................................................. 28 
3.2  ALPHA STIRLING ENGINE ..................................................................................................................... 28 
3.2.1  Advantages .............................................................................................................................. 28 
3.2.2  Disadvantages ......................................................................................................................... 29 
3.2.3  Action of an alpha type Stirling engine .................................................................................... 29 

  Page 2 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
3.3  BETA STIRLING ENGINE ....................................................................................................................... 29 
3.3.1  Advantages .............................................................................................................................. 30 
3.3.2  Disadvantages ......................................................................................................................... 30 
3.3.3  Action of a Beta Type Stirling Engine ....................................................................................... 30 
3.4  GAMMA STIRLING ENGINE .................................................................................................................. 30 
3.4.1  Advantages .............................................................................................................................. 30 
3.4.2  Disadvantages ......................................................................................................................... 31 
3.5  WEIGHTING MATRIX FOR STIRLING ENGINE TYPES................................................................................... 31 
3.6  RATING MATRIX FOR STIRLING ENGINE TYPES ........................................................................................ 31 
3.6.1  Pie Charts (Based on the data from the rating matrix) ........................................................... 32 
3.6.2  Final analysis for the choice of configuration of Stirling Engine .............................................. 33 
3.7  CHOICE OF GAS (WORKING FLUID) ...................................................................................................... 33 
3.7.1  Hydrogen ................................................................................................................................. 33 
3.7.2  Helium ..................................................................................................................................... 34 
3.7.3  Air (primarily nitrogen) ............................................................................................................ 34 
3.8  WEIGHTING MATRIX FOR WORKING FLUID ............................................................................................ 36 
3.9  RATING MATRIX FOR WORKING FLUID .................................................................................................. 36 
3.9.1  Pie Charts (Based on the data from the rating matrix of working fluid) ................................. 37 
3.9.2  Final analysis for the choice of gas .......................................................................................... 38 

CHAPTER 4  THERMAL ANALYSIS ................................................................................................ 39 

4.1  CALCULATION OF THE ADIABATIC FLAME TEMPERATURE| ......................................................................... 39 
4.1.1  Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 39 
4.1.2  Assumptions ............................................................................................................................ 39 
4.1.3  Calculations for liquid kerosene (C12H26) .................................................................................. 39 
4.1.4  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................ 41 
4.2  CALCULATIONS FOR METHANE (CH4) .................................................................................................... 41 
4.2.1  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................ 42 
4.2.2  Final conclusion with respect to the choice of fuel .................................................................. 42 
4.3  HEAT TRANSFER CALCULATION ............................................................................................................ 42 
4.3.1  Formulas to be used ................................................................................................................ 42 
4.3.2  Data ......................................................................................................................................... 43 
4.3.3  Calculations for thermal resistance network ........................................................................... 46 
4.3.4  Calculations for the flame temperature .................................................................................. 47 
4.3.5  Calculations for thermal efficiency: ......................................................................................... 49 

CHAPTER 5  SELECTION OF SWEPT VOLUME ............................................................................... 50 
5.1  ANALYSIS OF STIRLING ENGINE ............................................................................................................ 50 
5.1.1  1st‐order method ..................................................................................................................... 50 
5.1.2  2nd‐order method ................................................................................................................... 50 
5.1.3  3rd‐order methods ................................................................................................................... 50 
5.2  THE SCHMIDT ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................... 50 
5.2.1  Assumptions of Schmidt Model for Gamma Stirling Analysis .................................................. 51 
5.2.2  Indicated Work ........................................................................................................................ 51 
5.2.3  Root Mean Cycle Pressure ....................................................................................................... 52 
5.2.4  Forced Work ............................................................................................................................ 52 
5.2.5  Shaft Work ............................................................................................................................... 53 
5.3  1ST‐ORDER ANALYSIS METHOD ........................................................................................................... 54 
5.3.1  Effectiveness & Mechanical Efficiency ..................................................................................... 54 
5.3.2  Compression Ratio ................................................................................................................... 54 

  Page 3 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
5.3.3  Workspace Charging Effect ..................................................................................................... 55 
5.3.4  Dead Space Effects .................................................................................................................. 57 
5.3.5  Conclusion ................................................................................................................................ 58 
5.4  DESIGN APPROACH ........................................................................................................................... 58 
5.5  ACTUAL TREND OF GRAPH .................................................................................................................. 64 
5.6  SELECTION OF COMPRESSION RATIO ..................................................................................................... 65 
5.7  CALCULATIONS (AT OPTIMUM VALUES) ................................................................................................. 67 
5.7.1  Values of Designed Parameters ............................................................................................... 67 
5.7.2  Total Volume   .................................................................................................................. 67 
5.7.3  Mass of Working Fluid (m) ...................................................................................................... 67 
5.7.4  Root Mean Cycle Pressure ( ) ................................................................................................. 68 
5.7.5  Indicated Work (W) ................................................................................................................. 68 
5.7.6  Forced Work ............................................................................................................................ 68 
5.7.7  Shaft Work ............................................................................................................................... 68 
5.7.8  Mechanical Efficiency .............................................................................................................. 68 
CHAPTER 6  KINETICS & TURNING MOMENT .............................................................................. 69 
6.1  KINETICS AND TURNING MOMENT ....................................................................................................... 69 
6.1.1  Assumptions ............................................................................................................................ 70 
6.1.2  Calculations ............................................................................................................................. 70 

CHAPTER 7  SIMULATION OF STATIC TEMPERATURE ................................................................... 76 

7.1  MODELING ...................................................................................................................................... 76 
7.2  MESHING ........................................................................................................................................ 77 
7.3  GRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION .................................................................................................................. 77 
7.4  TEMPERATURE PROFILE ...................................................................................................................... 78 

CHAPTER 8  CAD DRAFTS ............................................................................................................ 79 

CHAPTER 9  INSTRUMENTATION ................................................................................................ 90 

9.1  PROXIMITY SENSOR ........................................................................................................................... 90 
9.2  MODEL EXPLANATION OF PROXIMITY SWITCH ......................................................................................... 91 
9.3  MAIN FEATURES: .............................................................................................................................. 91 
9.4  THERMOCOUPLE ............................................................................................................................... 92 
9.5  TYPES OF THERMOCOUPLES: ............................................................................................................... 93 
9.6  K‐TYPE ........................................................................................................................................... 93 
9.7  TABLE FOR TYPE K THERMOCOUPLE (REF JUNCTION 0 ◦C) ........................................................................ 94 
CHAPTER 10  EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ......................................................................................... 95 

10.1  FLAME CHARACTERISTICS .................................................................................................................... 95 
10.2  EXPERIMENTAL FINDINGS .................................................................................................................... 95 

CHAPTER 11  POST DESIGNING ..................................................................................................... 98 


11.1  COST ESTIMATES .............................................................................................................................. 98 
11.2  RISK ASSESSMENT ............................................................................................................................. 99 
11.3  SAFETY ASSESSMENT: ...................................................................................................................... 102 
11.3.1  Introduction: .......................................................................................................................... 102 
11.3.2  System Operation: ................................................................................................................. 102 
11.3.3  Safety Engineering: ................................................................................................................ 103 
11.3.4  Objectives Assessment:.......................................................................................................... 105 

  Page 4 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
GALLERY………………………… .................................................................................................................. 110 
APPENDIX A “GANTT CHART” ............................................................................................................. 114 
APPENDIX B “SOR” ............................................................................................................................ 116 

APPENDIX C “TERMS & DEFINITIONS” ................................................................................................ 127 
APPENDIX D “REFERENCES” ............................................................................................................... 133 

  Page 5 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
List of Figures 

Figure 2‐1 Ideal Stirling Cycle ........................................................................................................................ 19 
Figure 2‐2 Operation of Ideal Stirling Cycle Engine (Displacer at the Lower‐Dead Center) .......................... 21 
Figure 2‐3 Operation of Ideal Stirling Cycle Engine (Displacer at the Upper‐Dead Center) .......................... 21 
Figure 2‐4 Expansion (Driving the Power Piston Upward) ............................................................................ 22 
Figure 2‐5 Transfer of Warm Gas to the Upper Cool end.............................................................................. 22 
Figure 2‐6 Contraction (Driving the Power Piston Downward) ..................................................................... 23 
Figure 2‐7 Transfer of Cooled Gas to the Lower Hot End .............................................................................. 23 
Figure 3‐1 Alpha Engine Configuration .......................................................................................................... 28 
Figure 3‐2 Beta Engine Configuration ........................................................................................................... 29 
Figure 3‐3 Gamma Engine Configuration ...................................................................................................... 30 
Figure 3‐4 Ease of Sealing .............................................................................................................................. 32 
Figure 3‐5 Design Simplicity .......................................................................................................................... 32 
Figure 3‐6 Problem of Hot Moving Seals ....................................................................................................... 32 
Figure 3‐7  Compression Ratio ...................................................................................................................... 32 
Figure 3‐8 Availability .................................................................................................................................... 37 
Figure 3‐9 Cost (cheap) ................................................................................................................................. 37 
Figure 3‐10 Non‐Flammable .......................................................................................................................... 37 
Figure 3‐11 Low Diffusivity ............................................................................................................................ 37 
Figure 3‐12 Low Viscosity .............................................................................................................................. 37 
Figure 3‐13 High Thermal Conductivity ......................................................................................................... 37 
Figure 4‐1 1D Heat Transfer Across the Displacer Cylinder ........................................................................... 46 
Figure 4‐2 Thermal Resistive Network Schematic ......................................................................................... 46 
Figure 4‐3 Thermal Resistances ..................................................................................................................... 48 
Figure 5‐1 Effect of Increasing Swept Volume Ratio ..................................................................................... 52 
Figure 5‐2 Effect of Increasing Size on Forced Work ..................................................................................... 53 
Figure 5‐3 Graph of Maximum Mechanical Efficiency versus Compression Ratio ........................................ 55 
Figure 5‐4 PV Diagram of Charged Stirling Engine ........................................................................................ 56 
Figure 5‐5 Variation of maximum specific shaft work Ws versus dead space ratio χ ................................... 57 
Figure 5‐6 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.2 ......................... 61 
Figure 5‐7 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.3 ......................... 62 
Figure 5‐8 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.4 ......................... 63 
Figure 5‐9 Actual Graphical Representation from Experimental Data .......................................................... 64 
Figure 5‐10 Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Compression Ratio at T=0.3 ......................................... 66 
Figure 6‐1 Crank‐angle Mechanism ............................................................................................................... 69 
Figure 6‐2 Kinetics of Flywheel ...................................................................................................................... 70 
Figure 6‐3 Turning Moment Diagram ............................................................................................................ 75 
Figure 7‐1 Modeling of 2D Cylinder in ANSYS ............................................................................................... 76 
Figure 7‐2 Meshing of 2D Cylinder in ANSYS ................................................................................................. 77 
Figure 7‐3 Contours of Temperature Distribution ......................................................................................... 77 
Figure 7‐4 Graph of Temperature Variation Along Cylinder Height .............................................................. 78 
Figure 9‐1 Proximity Sensor (RPM Measuring Device) .................................................................................. 91 
Figure 9‐2 Dimensions of Proximity Sensor ................................................................................................... 92 
Figure 9‐3 Construction of Thermocouple .................................................................................................... 92 
Figure 9‐4 K Type Thermocouple .................................................................................................................. 93 
Figure 10‐1 Temperature vs. Height .............................................................................................................. 96 
Figure 10‐2 RPM vs. Flame Temperature ...................................................................................................... 97 
 

  Page 6 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
List of Tables 

Table 3‐1 Weighting Matrix for Stirling Engine Types ................................................................................... 31 
Table 3‐2 Rating Matrix for Stirling Engine Types ......................................................................................... 31 
Table 3‐3 Weighting Matrix for Working Fluid .............................................................................................. 36 
Table 3‐4 Rating Matrix for Working Fluid .................................................................................................... 36 
Table 4‐1 Data Input ...................................................................................................................................... 43 
Table 4‐2 For Horizontal Plate with Hot Side Facing Down ........................................................................... 43 
Table 4‐3 Assumed Ts .................................................................................................................................... 44 
Table 4‐4 Film Temperature at Ts ................................................................................................................. 44 
Table 4‐5 Air Properties at Various Tf ........................................................................................................... 44 
Table 4‐6 Air Properties at Film Temperatures for Various Ts Values........................................................... 46 
Table 4‐7 Thermal Resistances ...................................................................................................................... 47 
Table 4‐8 Various Temperatures Calculated via Thermal Resistance Network ............................................. 48 
Table 5‐1 Engine Operating Parameter as a Function of Volume Ratio ........................................................ 60 
Table 5‐2 Engine Operating Parameters as a Function of Compression Ratio .............................................. 65 
Table 6‐1 Parameters at Different Crank Positions ....................................................................................... 74 
Table 9‐1 Types of Thermocouple ................................................................................................................. 93 
 

  Page 7 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Preface 

The final year project plays a significant role in BE degree classes in order to furbish the 
students with practical skills along with the theoretical knowledge. It also provides the 
opportunity to the members to work as a team which is the basic requirement of any 
reputable organization.  It also creates managerial skills in an individual’s personality as 
no project can be accomplished without proper management. In order to manage and 
plan the project, it is necessary that the progress of the project should be documented 
as  it  serves  as  a  good  tool  for  having  a  good  and  unanimous  consensus  amongst  the 
project members. 

We  being  final  year  students  are  going  through  the  same  phase  of  our  degree.  The 
purpose of writing this report is to present our progress and work on this initial phase of 
our  project  titled  “Design  and  Fabrication  of  a  Stirling  Cycle  Engine”  in  a  presentable 
form as it is the requirement of the Design Evaluation Board and in addition it will also 
be helpful for future reference as it would be needed for our final report. 

The  report  is  divided  into  four  sections.  The  first  section  mainly  consists  of  the 
introduction  and  how  a  stirling  engine  works.  The  second  section  comprises  of  the 
design criteria and our proposed selection. The third section is on risk assessment and 
the fourth section is on cost evaluation.  

Readers are requested to kindly compromise with any deficiency that they might find in 
this report as this was our first attempt in its compilation and thus might be subjected to 
some un‐intentional oversight. In light of the above mentioned we would like to request 
you to kindly consider this as our first step and we assure you that the future editions of 
this report will be comprehensibly better and complete. 

  Page 8 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 

Acknowledgements 

This report is the product of sheer hard work and pure dedication. We would like to take 
this  opportunity  to  first  of  all  thank  Allah  the  Almighty  for  giving  us  the  mental  and 
physical  strength  to  manage  our  project  work  simultaneously  with  our  academic 
routine,  deal  with  the  various  problems  involved,  overcome  the  various  obstacles 
encountered and accomplish it on time.  

Furthermore  we  would  also  like  to  thank  our  families  for  their  continued  support  and 
bearing with our hectic schedule. This project would not have culminated without their 
cooperation. 

Last  but  by  no  means  the  least,  we  would  like  to  acknowledge  with  gratitude  the 
following  individuals  whose  valued  suggestions,  guidance  and  constructive  criticism 
helped  in  shaping  our  project  and  above  all  our  professional  lives  and  personalities, 
which will be very beneficial for our future career: 

       Project Advisor         Project Examiner 
• Dr.  Waqar A. Khan  •   Mr. Aijaz Ahmed 
(Professor)              (Lecturer) 
   
                                                                           Project Co Examiner                    
                    • Dr. Nouman Danish 
(Associate Professor) 
 

Though  the  following  were  not  actively  involved  in  the  project,  nonetheless  they  do 
deserve special mention for their continued support and advice: 
 
• Gp. Capt. Shoaib Ahmed 
(Associate Professor)         
• Mr. Khurram Jammal Hashmi 
 (Assistant Professor)                       
• Mr. Mirza Ahmed Ali 
 (Lecturer) 
• Mr. Atif 
 (Lab Supervisor) 

 
  Page 9 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Project Approval 

It  is  certified  that  the  contents  and  form  of  the  thesis  entitled  “The  Design  and 
Fabrication  of  a  Stirling  Cycle  Engine”  submitted  by  Mr.  Rehan  Azhar,  Mr.  Shahzad 
Ahmad and Mr. M. Sajjad Ashraf have been found to be satisfactory for the requirement 
of B.E degree. 

Project Advisor: _____________________________ 
Name: Dr. Waqar Ahmed Khan 
             (Professor) 

 
Project Examiner 1: __________________________ 
Name: Mr. Aijaz Ahmad 
             (Lecturer) 
 
Project Examiner 2: __________________________ 
Name: Dr. Noman Danish 
             (Associate Professor) 

 
Project Coordinator: _________________________ 
Name: Cdr. (R) Muhammad Shakeel 
             (Associate Professor) 

HOD (Mechanical): __________________________ 
Name: Gp. Capt. (R) Shoib Ahmed 
             (Associate Professor) 
 

Dean ES: __________________________________ 
Name: Cdr Dr. Nadeem Ahmed 
 

  Page 10 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Nomenclature 
 = displacer swept volume   = piston swept volume 
 = dead volume   = hot space temperature  
 = cold space temperature   = dead space temperature =  ⁄2 
 = external buffer pressure   ω = angular velocity of  crankshaft 
   =  root mean cycle pressure  or mean  = angle by which displacer crank leads 
pressure  piston crank 

τ   =   = ratio of temperatures of cold to hot  κ   =    = ratio of piston swept volume to 

space  displacer swept volume 
r    = uncompressed volume / compressed  χ =   = dead volume ratio 
volume 
ωt = instantaneous angular position of piston 
crank 
  = instantaneous total engine volume    = instantaneous pressure throughout 
        engine spaces 
l= Length of the connecting rod  c= Crank radius 
A1= Cross‐sectional area on the back end side  A2= Cross‐sectional area on the crank end side 
       of the piston         of the piston 
a= Cross‐sectional area of the connecting rod  p1= Pressure on the back end side of the 
       piston 
p2= Pressure on the crank end side of the    d= Outer diameter of power piston 
       piston=Buffer pressure=pb 
B= Bore of the power cylinder  L= Stroke of the piston 
mR= Mass of the reciprocating parts  Vd= Displaced Volume of the power cylinder 
T= Torque or Turning moment of the crank  N = Crankshaft speed in revolutions per 
minute   (rpm) 
P= Desired power in Watts  Fp= Piston Effort 
FL= Net load on piston  FI= Inertia Force 
W R= Weight of reciprocating parts  T = Torque or Turning moment on the  
       crankshaft at any instant 
Tmean = Mean Resisting Torque  P = Desired power in Watts 
N = Crankshaft speed in revolutions per   CE = Co‐efficient of fluctuation of Energy 

  Page 11 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
       minute (rpm) 
CS = Co‐efficient of fluctuation of Speed  mf = Mass of the flywheel 
k = Radius of Gyration of the flywheel  I = Mass moment of Inertia of flywheel 
h = convective heat transfer coefficient  k = thermal conductivity 
ε = emissivity  σ = Stefan Boltzmann constant 
Ts = External surface temperature at the top of  Tli = Internal surface temperature at the top of 
        the displacer          the displacer 
To = Ambient temperature  Tflame = Temperature of the applied flame 
Th = External surface temperature at the base   Tu = Internal surface temperature at the base  
        of the displacer          of the displacer 
Tf = Film temperature  Pr = Prandtl number 
Ra = Rayleigh number  Nu = Nusselt number 
β = Volume expansion coefficient  υ = Kinematic viscosity 
τ = Temperature ratio of sink to source  D = Diameter 
A = Area  R = Thermal resistances 
 

  Page 12 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 1  
LITERATURE REVIEW 
 
[1]   
Iskander  Tlili,  Youssef  Timoumi  and  Sassi  Ben  Nasrallah  presented  the  study  and 
design  of  a  mean  temperature  differential  Stirling  engine  for  solar  application.  The 
system uses hydrogen as working fluid and is designed for a temperature difference of 
300◦C,  with  the  source  at  320◦C  and  the  sink  at  20◦C.  They  also  discuss  design 
considerations  which  may  be  taken  to  develop  a  solar  Stirling  engine  with  average 
concentration  operating  on  mean  temperature  difference  of  300◦C.  Detailed  design 
considerations  pertaining  to  the  output  power,  energy  losses  as  well  as  the 
effectiveness  of  the  regenerator  used  are  presented.  Then  the  relationship  between 
different operating parameters is discussed. 
 
[2] 
Bancha Kongtragool and Somchai Wongwises gave different approaches to determine 
the  designed  power  output,  discussing  their  relative  significance.  In  the  preliminary 
design  phase,  some  design  parameters  are  unknown.  The  Schmidt  formula  and  West 
formula are more difficult to use when compared with the Beale formula and the mean 
pressure formula. In principle, the Beale formula is simpler, however, an accurate value 
of  the  Beale  number  is  critical  and  the  existing  data  on  the  Beale  number  are  not 
available for Low Temperature Differential (LTD) Stirling engines. 
 
For  design  purposes,  the  mean  pressure  power  formula  can  be  used  to  calculate  the 
engine rated output, or inversely, to evaluate the approximate operating parameters of 
the  Stirling  engine  for  a  required  or  given  power  output.  The  mean  pressure  power 
formula  allows  us  to  initiate  an  initial  design  process  rapidly.  For  LTD  Stirling  engines 
operated  by  a  low  temperature  source,  results  from  this  study  indicate  that  the  rated 
power output of a LTD Stirling engine can be directly calculated from the mean pressure 
power formula. 
 

  Page 13 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
[3] 
Can Cinar and Halit Karabulut presented study of a gamma type Stirling engine with 
276 cc swept volume that was designed and manufactured. The engine was tested with 
air and helium by using an electrical furnace as heat source. Working characteristics of 
the engine were obtained within the range of heat source temperature 700–1000 ₀C and 
range of charge pressure 1–4.5 bar. Maximum power output was obtained with helium 
at  1000  ₀C  heat  source  temperature  and  4  bar  charge  pressure  as  128.3  W.  The 
maximum torque was obtained as 2 Nm at 1000  ₀C heat source temperature and 4 bar 
helium  charge  pressure.  Results  were  found  to  be  encouraging  to  initiate  a  Stirling 
engine project for 1 kW power output. 
 
[4] 
Bancha  Kongtragool,  Somchai  Wongwises  presented  results  from  their  study  which 
indicated  that  stirling  engines  working  with  relatively  low  temperature  air  are 
potentially  attractive  engines  of  the  future,  especially  solar‐powered  low  temperature 
differential  stirling  engines  with  vertical,  double‐acting,  gamma‐configuration.  New 
materials and good heat transfer to working fluid are the keys to the success of a stirling 
engine. Good heat transfer needs high mass flows, then a lower viscosity working fluid is 
used to reduce pumping losses, or higher pressure is used to reduce the required flow 
or the combination of both. Simplicity and reliability is the key to a cost effective Stirling 
solar  generator.  Since,  during  two‐thirds  of  the  day,  solar  energy  is  not  available, 
solar/fuel  hybrids  are  needed.  For  solar  operation,  the  cover  plate  acts  as  the  solar 
absorber and also the displacer cylinder head, it must therefore be able to tolerate the 
effects of high maximum internal pressures and temperatures. 
 
[5] 
D.G.  Thombarea  and  S.K.  Vermab  stated  that  the  performance  of  stirling  engines 
meets the demands of the efficient use of energy and environmental security; hence the 
development  and  investigation  of  stirling  engine  have  come  to  the  attention  of  many 
scientific institutes. The stirling engine is simple, reliable and safe. Today stirling cycle‐
based  systems  are  in  commercial  use  as  a  heat  pump,  cryogenic  refrigeration  and  air 
liquefaction.  It  is  seen  that  for  successful  operation  of  engine  system  with  good 
efficiency a careful design of heat exchangers, proper selection of drive mechanism and 
engine  configuration  is  essential.  The  reliable  and  efficient  operation  of  the  engine 
depends upon the dynamic behavior of engine mechanism and performance of all heat 
  Page 14 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
exchangers,  which  are  interdependent.  This  difficult  task  to  design  a  system  where 
thermal,  fluid  and  mechanical  design  considerations  are  required  to  be  taken  into 
account  jointly  with  system  optimization.  An  additional  development  is  needed  to 
produce  a  practical  engine  by  selection  of  suitable  configuration;  adoption  of  good 
working fluid and development of better seal may make stirling engine a real practical 
alternative for power generation. 
 
[6] 
Leonardo  Scollo,  Pablo  Valdez  and  Jorge  Baro´n  focused  on  the  local  design, 
construction and testing of Stirling engine. They presented the research work carried on 
an  external  combustion  engine  which  makes  it  a  versatile  machine  along  with  the 
advantage of using any external heat source like concentrated solar energy, hydrogen, 
biomass and fossil fuels. Moreover, it explains the working of cycles quite elaborately on 
a  PV  diagram  which  serves  a  good  source  of  understanding  the  ideal  stirling  cycle 
scheme. The formulated power for this project is in the range of 0.5‐1kW. The engine is 
designed  from  a  previously  designed  prototype  engine  of  known  parameters  and 
characteristics  through  scaling.  The  results  of  this  research  were  marked  encouraging 
and it was foreseen to redesign each part of the engine. 

  Page 15 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 2  
INTRODUCTION 
 

2.1 Aim of Project 

To obtain useful mechanical work output from a given heat input by employing a stirling 
cycle engine mechanism. 

2.2 Scope 

The  design,  analysis  and  fabrication  of  a  stirling  engine  by  systematic  study  of  basic 
operating  principles,  design  parameters  and  the  study  of  a  home‐made  scaled  down 
version  of  the  engine  (as  per  the  PCSIR  project  competition  requirement)  in  order  to 
identify the engineering complications associated with it. 

2.3 Project Description 
 
2.3.1 Stirling Engine 

It is a heat engine that operates by cyclic compression and expansion of air or another 
gas, the working fluid, at different temperature levels such that there is a net conversion 
of heat energy to mechanical work. 

2.3.2  History 

The  Stirling  was  invented  and  patented  by  Robert  Stirling  in  1816.  Subsequent 
development by Robert Stirling and his brother James, an engineer, resulted in patents 
for various improved configurations of the original engine including pressurization which 
had by 1843 sufficiently increased power output to drive all the machinery at a Dundee 
iron foundry.  

  Page 16 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Though  it  has  been  disputed  it  is  widely  supposed  that  as  well  as  saving  fuel,  the 
inventors were motivated to create a safer alternative to the steam engines of the time, 
whose  boilers  frequently  exploded,  causing  many  injuries  and  fatalities.  The  need  for 
Stirling  engines  to  run  at  very  high  temperatures  to  maximize  power  and  efficiency 
exposed limitations in the materials of the day and the few engines that were built in 
those early years suffered unacceptably frequent failures. 

2.4 Terms associated with the Stirling engine 
 
2.4.1 Heat engine 

A heat engine is a device that converts thermal energy into mechanical work output. 

2.4.2 Sink 

The heat sink is typically the environment at ambient temperature to where heat is lost 
and the temperature is lowered. 

2.4.3 Source 

Source is the venue from where heat energy is obtained. 

2.4.4 Internal Combustion Engine 

An engine, where combustion takes place inside the power cylinder. 

2.5 Major Components Of The Stirling Engine 
2.5.1 Displacer 

The  displacer  resembles  a  large  piston,  except that  it  has  a  smaller  diameter  than  the 
cylinder, thus its motion does not change the volume of gas in the cylinder—it merely 
transfers the gas around within the cylinder. 

  Page 17 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
2.5.2 Power piston 

Power piston is the piston located in the expansion chamber. The expanding gases in the 
cylinder  exert  a  pressure  on  the  power  piston  which  in  turn  rotates  the  crank  and 
provides the system with the power stroke. 

2.5.3 Crank shaft 

The crankshaft, sometimes casually abbreviated to crank, is the part of an engine which 
translates reciprocating linear piston motion into rotation. 

2.5.4 Connecting rod 

Transfers power from the power piston to the crankshaft. 

2.5.5 Regenerator (optional) 

The  regenerator  is  an  internal  heat  exchanger  and  temporary  heat  storage  element 
placed between the hot and cold spaces such that the working fluid passes through it 
first in one direction then the other. Its function is to retain within the system that heat 
which  would  otherwise  be  exchanged  with  the  environment  at  temperatures 
intermediate  to  the  maximum  and  minimum  cycle  temperatures,  thus  enabling  the 
thermal efficiency of the cycle to approach the limiting Carnot efficiency. 

2.6 Stirling Engine­External Combustion Engine 

Stirling  engine  uses  an  external  heat  source  that  could  be  concentrated  solar  energy 
through  the  use  of  parabolic  troughs,  flame,  combustion  of  fuel  etc,  this  heat  energy 
flows  in  and  out  through  the  walls  and  creates  a  temperature  difference  which  is  the 
key in the operation of the Stirling engine. Due to the external heat source it is known as 
external combustion  engine  in  contrast  to  internal combustion  engine  where  the  heat 
source  is  the  combustion  of  fuel  inside  the  working  fluid.  Stirling  engine  uses  a 
permanently  sealed  gaseous  working  fluid  (air,  helium  or  hydrogen)  much  like  a 
refrigerant or air‐conditioner.  

  Page 18 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
2.7 Basics Of Stirling Engine 

In a Stirling engine, a fixed amount of a gas is sealed inside the engine. The Stirling cycle 
involves a series of events that change the pressure of the gas inside the engine, causing 
it to do work. There are several properties of gases that are critical to the operation of 
Stirling engines:  

If  you  have  a  fixed  amount  of  gas  in  a  fixed  volume  of  space  and  you  raise  the 
temperature of that gas, the pressure will increase.  

If  you  have  a  fixed  amount  of  gas  and  you  compress  it  (decrease  the  volume  of  its 
space), the temperature of that gas will increase. 

2.8 The Stirling Engine Cycle 

The Stirling cycle engine consists of four thermodynamic process cycles as show in 
Figure 2‐1. 

1‐2     Constant Volume Heat Addition  
2‐3     Isothermal Expansion  
3‐4     Constant Volume Heat Rejection  
4‐1     Isothermal Compression 

Figure 2‐1 Ideal Stirling Cycle     

  Page 19 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
2.8.1 2­3 Isothermal Expansion 

The expansion‐space and associated heat exchanger are maintained at a constant high 
temperature, and the gas undergoes isothermal expansion absorbing heat from the hot 
source. 

2.8.2 3­4 Constant Volume Heat Rejection 

Constant‐volume (known as iso‐volumetric or isochoric) heat‐removal. The gas is passed 
through the regenerator, where it cools transferring heat to the regenerator for use in 
the next cycle. 

2.8.3 4­1 Isothermal Compression 

The compression space and associated heat exchanger are maintained at a constant low 
temperature  so  the  gas  undergoes  isothermal  compression  rejecting  heat  to  the  cold 
sink. 

2.8.4 1­2 Constant Volume Heat Addition 

Constant‐Volume  (known  as  iso‐volumetric  or  isochoric)  heat‐addition.  The  gas  passes 
back through the regenerator where it recovers much of the heat transferred in 2 to 3, 
heating up on its way to the expansion space. 

2.9 Operation of Stirling Cycle Engine 

A simple stirling engine uses two cylinders and two pistons: power piston and displacer 
piston. The vertical cylinder (see Figure 2‐2) is constantly heated up on the top while it is 
cooled at the lower part. The displacer piston does not seal with the walls of cylinder, 
and lets air pass through. If the displacer piston is now in the lower dead‐center, air is 
strongly heated up and the pressure pushes on the working piston on the right, which 
slides to the right now. The left piston (see Figure 2‐3) now gets pulled upward by the 
coupling of the two pistons. Air is strongly cooled, and together with compression work 
from  the  flywheel  the working  piston  is  brought  again  to  the  left,  the  displacer  piston 
slides down and the air is heated up again. 

  Page 20 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 

   
Figure 2‐2 Operation of Ideal Stirling Cycle Engine  Figure 2‐3 Operation of Ideal Stirling Cycle Engine 
(Displacer at the Lower‐Dead Center)  (Displacer at the Upper‐Dead Center) 

2.10 How To Increase The Power Output Of A Stirling Engine

The  stirling  engine  only  makes  power  during  the  first  part  of  the  cycle.  There  are  two 
main ways to increase the power output of a stirling cycle: 

Increase  power  output  in  stage  one  ‐  In  part  one  of  the  cycle,  the  pressure  of  the   
heated  gas  pushing  against  the  piston  performs  work.  Increasing  the  pressure  during 
this  part  of  the  cycle  will  increase  the  power  output  of  the  engine.  One  way  of 
increasing  the  pressure  is  by  increasing  the  temperature  of  the  gas.  A  look  at  a  two‐
piston Stirling engine later in this article, shows how a device called a regenerator can 
improve the power output of the engine by temporarily storing heat. 

Decrease power usage in stage three ‐ In part three of the cycle, the pistons perform 
work on the gas, using some of the power produced in part one. Lowering the pressure 
during this part of the cycle can decrease the power used during this stage of the cycle 
(effectively  increasing  the  power  output  of  the  engine).  One  way  to  decrease  the 
pressure is to cool the gas to a lower temperature. 

The four phases of the cycle are explained in a clear manner as follows: 

  Page 21 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 2‐4 Expansion (Driving the Power Piston Upward) 

Expansion 

The majority of the gas is in contact with the warmer plate. The gas heats and expands, 
driving the power piston upward (see Figure 2‐4) 

Figure 2‐5 Transfer of Warm Gas to the Upper Cool end 

  Page 22 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Transfer 

Flywheel momentum carries the displacer downward, transferring the warm gas to the 
upper, cool end of the cylinder (see Figure 2‐5). 

Figure 2‐6 Contraction (Driving the Power Piston Downward) 

Contraction 

Now  the  majority  of  the  gas  is  in  contact  with  the  cool  plate.  The  gas  cools  and 
contracts, drawing the power piston downward (see Figure 2‐6) 

Figure 2‐7 Transfer of Cooled Gas to the Lower Hot End 

  Page 23 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Transfer 

Flywheel  momentum  carries  the  displacer  up,  transferring  the  cooled  gas  back  to  the 
lower, hot end of the cylinder(see Figure 2‐7). 

2.10.1 Pressurization 

In most high power Stirling engines, both the minimum pressure and mean pressure of 
the working fluid are above atmospheric pressure. This initial engine pressurization can 
be realized by a pump, or by filling the engine from a compressed gas tank, or even just 
by  sealing  the  engine  when  the  mean  temperature  is  lower  than  the  mean  operating 
temperature.  All  of  these  methods  increase  the  mass  of  working  fluid  in  the 
thermodynamic cycle.  

2.10.2 Lubricants and friction 

At high temperatures and pressures, the oxygen in air‐pressurized crankcases, or in the 
working  gas  of  hot  air  engines,  can  combine  with  the  engine’s  lubricating  oil  and 
explode. 

Thus,  non‐lubricated,  low‐coefficient  of  friction  materials  (such  as  graphite),  with  low 
normal forces on the moving parts, are preferred, especially for sliding seals. At times 
sliding  surfaces  are  avoided  altogether  by  using  diaphragms  for  sealed  pistons.  These 
are  some  of  the  factors  that  allow  Stirling  engines  to  have  lower  maintenance 
requirements and a longer life than internal‐combustion engines. 

2.11 Comparison Of Stirling Engine With An Internal Combustion Engine 
 
2.11.1 Advantages 

• In contrast to internal combustion engines, they can use renewable heat sources 
more easily. 
• Are quieter than internal combustion engines.  
• More reliable with lower maintenance dues to lesser moving components. 
• More efficient and cleaner (creation of pollutants such as NOx can be avoided). 

  Page 24 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
• Since the fuel is burned slowly and constantly outside the engine, there are no 
explosions to muffle. Thus there are no violent vibrations. 
• A Stirling cycle is truly reversible (this means that if you heat and cool the heat 
exchangers of the engine you get power out or if you power the engine you get 
heating or cooling out). 
• Most Stirling engines have the bearing and seals on the cool side of the engine, 
and  they  require  less  lubricant  and  last  longer  than  other  reciprocating  engine 
types. 
• No valves are needed. 
• A  Stirling  engine  uses  a  single‐phase  working  fluid  which  maintains  an  internal 
pressure close to the design pressure, and thus for a properly designed system 
the  risk  of  explosion  is  low.  In  comparison,  a  steam  engine  uses  a  two‐phase 
gas/liquid working fluid, so a faulty relief valve can cause an explosion.  
• Since  they  run  without  an  air  supply,  they  can  be  used  for  air‐independent 
propulsion in submarines. 
• Easy to start, though slowly after warming up. 

2.11.2 Disadvantages 

• Lower power output as compared to an internal combustion engine of the same 
size. 
• Gas leakage may pose design problems. 
• The Stirling engine must successfully contain the pressure of the working fluid, 
where the pressure is proportional to the engine power output/temperature. In 
addition, the expansion‐side heat exchanger is often at very high temperature, 
so the materials must resist the corrosive effects of the heat source, and have 
low creep. 

2.12 Applications Of Stirling Engine 

Since  stirling  engines  employ  external  combustion  and  are  quieter,  cleaner  and  more 
efficient  than  internal  combustion  engines,  thus  they  are  used  where  use  of  internal 

  Page 25 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
combustion  engines  is  either  impractical  or  unfeasible.  From  cooling  microchips  to 
powering submarines, there uses are various. 

The following are a few practical applications of stirling engines: 

As a heat pump 

Since the stirling cycle is reversible, therefore if the crankshaft of the stirling engine is 
supplied with mechanical power, then it can act as a heat pump with the result that the 
sink of the engine will experience a drop in temperature and the source will experience 
an increase in temperature. This process may be employed for domestic air‐conditioning 
and heating. 

Power generation via utilization of waste heat in domestic water heaters 

 It  is  possible  to  generate  electricity  by  employing  a  stirling  engine  that  utilizes  waste 
heat from a domestic water heater. However, this is not practical since stirling engines 
run on very high temperatures whereas the waste generated by such heaters is mostly 
warm and not hot.  

Generation of electricity via solar energy  

A stirling engine, with its source end placed at the focal point of a parabolic trough, can 
use the focused rays of the sun to drive the engine mechanism and generate electrical 
power. Care must be taken to ensure that the material used at the source can withstand 
the extreme temperatures generated. 

Power generation in submarines  

Stirling engines are a better alternative to diesel engines for submarines since they are 
quieter and do not experience heavy vibrations. They carry compressed oxygen to allow 
fuel combustion. 

Nuclear power generation  

The steam turbines of nuclear power plants may be replaced with stirling engines since 
they are more efficient and require less maintenance. It is also theorized that spacecraft 

  Page 26 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
on  lengthy  space  missions  may  generate  electricity  for  themselves  by  using  a  stirling 
engine with a nuclear fuel rod as the heat source and space itself as the sink. 

Aircraft and automobile engines  

Due to their low power‐to‐weight ratios and long start‐up time, stirling engines are not 
yet  feasible  for  automobiles.  However  they  do  hold  some  promise  for  aircraft 
propulsion  if  high  power  density  and  low  cost  can  be  achieved.  They  are  quieter,  less 
polluting,  gain  efficiency  with  altitude  due  to  lower  ambient  temperatures,  are  more 
reliable due to fewer parts and the absence of an ignition system, produces much less 
vibration (meaning airframes last longer). 

Microchip cooling  

Miniature  Stirling  engine  cooling  systems  for  personal  computer  chips  have  been 
developed that use the waste heat from the chip to drive a fan in order to cool it. 

  Page 27 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 3  
DESIGN SELECTION 
 

3.1 Configurations of Stirling Engine 

Stirling  engines  are  distinguished  according  to  the  motion  of  air  between  the  hot  and 
cold sides of the cylinder. Two types of configurations are used: 

• Alpha‐type stirling engines 
• Displacer‐type stirling engines (Beta and Gamma). 

3.2 Alpha Stirling engine 

An alpha Stirling engine contains two power pistons in separate cylinders, one hot and 
one cold. The hot cylinder is situated inside the high temperature heat exchanger and 
the  cold  cylinder  is  situated  inside  the  low  temperature  heat  exchanger  as  shown  in 
Figure  3‐1.  This  type  of  engine  has  a  high  power‐to‐volume  ratio  but  has  technical 
problems due to the usually high temperature of the hot piston and the durability of its 
seals. 

Figure 3‐1 Alpha Engine Configuration 

3.2.1  Advantages 

• High power‐to‐volume ratio  
• Relatively simple design as compared to the beta type stirling engine. 
 

  Page 28 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
3.2.2 Disadvantages 

• Causes technical problems due to the high temperature of the hot piston 
• Sealing of the hot and cold pistons is a primary problem due to dual pistons 

3.2.3 Action of an alpha type Stirling engine 

The  following  diagrams  do  not  show  internal  heat  exchangers  in  the  compression  and 
expansion spaces, which are needed to produce power. A regenerator would be placed 
in the pipe connecting the two cylinders. The crankshaft has also been omitted. 

3.3 Beta Stirling engine 

A  beta Stirling  engine  has  a  single power  piston  arranged within  the  same cylinder  on 


the  same  shaft  as  a  displacer  piston  as  shown  in  Figure  3‐2.  The  displacer  piston  is  a 
loose  fit  and  does  not  extract  any  power  from  the  expanding  gas  but  only  serves  to 
shuttle the working gas from the hot heat exchanger to the cold heat exchanger. When 
the  working  gas  is  pushed  to  the  hot  end  of  the  cylinder  it  expands  and  pushes  the 
power  piston.  When  it  is  pushed  to  the  cold  end  of  the  cylinder  it  contracts  and  the 
momentum of the machine, usually enhanced by a flywheel, pushes the power piston 
the other way to compress the gas. 

Figure 3‐2 Beta Engine Configuration 

  Page 29 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
3.3.1 Advantages 

• Just one cylinder needs to be sealed. 
• Beta type avoids the technical problems of hot moving seals. 

3.3.2 Disadvantages 

• Containing the moving power and displacer pistons in one cylinder poses design 
problems. 

3.3.3 Action of a Beta Type Stirling Engine 

Again, the following diagrams do not show internal heat exchangers or a regenerator, 
which would be placed in the gas path around the displacer. 

3.4  Gamma Stirling Engine 

A gamma stirling engine is simply a beta Stirling in which the power piston is mounted in 
a separate cylinder alongside the displacer piston cylinder, but is still connected to the 
same  flywheel  as  shown  in  Figure  3‐3.  The  gas  in  the  two  cylinders  can  flow  freely 
between them and remains a single body. 

Figure 3‐3 Gamma Engine Configuration 

3.4.1 Advantages 

• Mechanically simpler in design when compared with a beta type engine due to 
the power piston and displacer being in separate cylinders. 
• Sealing is relatively easier. 
  Page 30 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
• Avoids the technical problems of hot moving seals. 

3.4.2 Disadvantages 

• Produces a lower compression ratio. 

3.5 Weighting Matrix for Stirling Engine Types 

I WEIGHTAG
CRITERIA  A  B  C  D  E  TOTAL 
D  E 

A  EASE OF SEALING  1 1 1 1 4 0.4 
B  DESIGN SIMPLICITY  0 1 1 1 3 0.3 
C  HOT MOVING SEALS 0 0 1 1 2 0.2 
D  COMPRESSION RATIO 0 0 0 1 1 0.1 
E  POWER TO VOLUME RATIO 0 0 0 0 0 0 
      10  1 
Table 3‐1 Weighting Matrix for Stirling Engine Types 

3.6 Rating Matrix for Stirling Engine Types 

CRITERIA  WEIGHTA CONCEP RATING 


GE T
a b c a  b  c
EASE OF SEALING  0.4 1 3 3 0.4  1. 1.2
DESIGN SIMPLICITY  0.3 2 1 3 0.6  0. 0.9
PROBLEM OF HOT MOVING  0.2 3 1 1 0.6  0. 0.2
COMPRESSION RATIO  0.1 3 2 1 0.3  0. 0.1
POWER TO VOLUME RATIO 0 3 2 1 0 0  0 
   ∑ 1.9  1. 2.4
Table 3‐2 Rating Matrix for Stirling Engine Types 

LEGEND 

a Alpha                                    1 Low 
       b Beta                                      2 Medium 
 c Gamma                                 3 High 

  Page 31 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
3.6.1 Pie Charts (Based on the data from the rating matrix) 

 
 
 

EASE OF SEALING DESIGN SIMPLICITY
Alpha
14% Alpha
33%
Gamma
43% Gamma
50%
Beta
Beta
43%
17%

Figure 3‐4 Ease of Sealing  Figure 3‐5 Design Simplicity 

 
 
 
   
   

PROBLEM OF HOT MOVING  COMPRESSION RATIO
SEALS Gamma
17%
Gamma
20%
Alpha
50%
Beta
Alpha 33%
Beta 60%
20%

Figure 3‐6 Problem of Hot Moving Seals  Figure 3‐7  Compression Ratio 

 
 
 
 
 

  Page 32 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
3.6.2 Final analysis for the choice of configuration of Stirling Engine 

After going through the analysis of the rating matrix (refer to Table 3‐1 and Table 3‐2) 
and  pie  charts  shown  in  (Figure  3‐4  to  Figure  3‐7)  it  can  be  seen  that  the  rating  of 
gamma stirling engine is quite higher (i.e. 2.4) as compared to the other configuration 
namely alpha and beta which have a rating of 1.9 each. So depending on these rating, 
the  final  choice  for  configuration  of  stirling  engine  is  Gamma  stirling  engine.  It  is 
noteworthy to mention here that while creating these matrices priorities were given to 
the ease of sealing and design simplicity. 

3.7 Choice Of Gas (Working Fluid) 

Though just about any gas can be used as the working fluid in a stirling engine, however 
the most popular choices are hydrogen, helium or air (primarily nitrogen). The choice of 
the  working  fluid  is  very  essential  to  the  overall  efficiency,  power  output,  safety  and 
performance of the stirling engine. 

The used gas should have the following characteristics: 

• A low heat capacity, so that a given amount of transferred heat leads to a large 
increase in pressure. 
• Low viscosity and high thermal conductivity. 
• Low rate of diffusivity diffusion rate. 
• Should not be a flammable gas, which is a major safety concern. 
• Should be cheap. 
• Should be easy available. 
• Should not condense at the sink temperature like CFCs. 

Let us analyze the three gases that are available to us for selection: 

3.7.1 Hydrogen 

Advantages 

  Page 33 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
• Its low viscosity and high thermal conductivity make it the most powerful 
working gas, primarily because the engine can run faster than with other gases. 
• Relatively cheaper than helium. 
• Can be generated by electrolysis of water, the action of steam on red hot 
carbon‐based fuel or by the reaction of acid on metal. 
• Has a low heat capacity, meaning a given amount of transferred heat leads to a 
large increase in pressure. 

Disadvantages 

• Hydrogen’s high diffusion rate associated with its low molecular weight causes it 
to diffuse through the walls of the cylinder particularly at high temperatures, 
thus reducing its pressure and mass. 
• Hydrogen also causes metals to become brittle. 
• Hydrogen is a flammable gas, which is a safety concern, although the quantity 
used is very small, and it is arguably safer than other commonly used flammable 
gases. 

3.7.2 Helium 

Advantages 

• Best gas because of its very low heat capacity. 
• Non‐flammable as it’s an inert gas. 
• Low viscosity and high thermal conductivity. 

Disadvantages 

• High diffusivity but not as high as hydrogen’s. 
• Not available easily. 
• Very expensive. 

3.7.3 Air (primarily nitrogen) 

Advantages 

  Page 34 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
• Low diffusivity. 
• Easily available. 
• Very cheap. 
• Is not a flammable gas (though the oxygen in the air supports combustion). 

Disadvantages 

• The oxygen in a highly pressurized air engine can cause fatal accidents caused by 
lubricating oil explosions. 
• Relatively higher viscosity and lower thermal conductivity. 
• Highest heat capacity of the three available gases. 

  Page 35 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

3.8 Weighting Matrix For Working Fluid 

I TOTA
CRITERIA  A B C D E F G  WEIGHTAGE 
D  L 

A  AVAILABILITY  1 1 1 1 1 1 6  0.2857143
B  COST (CHEAP)  0 1 1 1 1 1 5  0.2380952
C  NON‐FLAMMABLE  0 0 1 1 1 1 4  0.1904762
D  LOW DIFFUSIVITY  0 0 0 1 1 1 3  0.1428571
E  LOW VISCOSITY  0 0 0 0 1 1 2  0.0952381
F  HIGH THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY 0 0 0 0 0 1 1  0.047619
G  LOW HEAT CAPACITY  0 0 0 0 0 0 0  0 
      ∑  21  1 
Table 3‐3 Weighting Matrix for Working Fluid 

3.9  Rating Matrix For Working Fluid 

WEIGHTAG
CRITERIA  CONCEPT RATING 

a b c a b  c
AVAILABILITY  0.28571428 3 2 1 0.85714285 0.571428571  0.28571428
COST (CHEAP)  0.23809523 3 2 1 0.71428571 0.476190476  0.23809523
NON‐ 0.19047619 3 1 3 0.57142857 0.19047619  0.57142857
LOW  0.14285714 3 1 2 0.42857142 0.142857143  0.28571428
LOW VISCOSITY  0.09523809 1 3 3 0.09523809 0.285714286  0.28571428
HIGH THERMAL  0.04761904 1 3 3 0.04761904 0.142857143  0.14285714
LOW HEAT  0  1 3 3 0 0 0 
      ∑ 2.71428571 1.80952381  1.80952381
Table 3‐4 Rating Matrix for Working Fluid 

LEGEND 

a Air                                         1 Low 
      b Hydrogen                              2 Medium 
c Helium                                  3 High 

  Page 36 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
3.9.1 Pie Charts (Based on the data from the rating matrix of working fluid) 

AVAILABILITY COST(CHEAP)
Helium Helium
17% 17%
Air
Air 50%
50%
Hydrogen Hydrogen
33% 33%

Figure 3‐8 Availability  Figure 3‐9 Cost (cheap) 

NON‐FLAMMABLE LOW DIFFUSIVITY

Air Helium Air


Helium
43% 33% 50%
43%

Hydrogen Hydrogen
14% 17%

Figure 3‐10 Non‐Flammable  Figure 3‐11 Low Diffusivity 

     

LOW VISCOSITY Air
HIGH THERMAL 
14% CONDUCTIVITY Air
14%
Helium
43% Helium
43%
Hydrogen
Hydrogen
43%
43%

Figure 3‐12 Low Viscosity  Figure 3‐13 High Thermal Conductivity 

  Page 37 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
3.9.2  Final analysis for the choice of gas 

The utmost priority in the selection of the working fluid after going through the rating 
matrix (refer to Table 3‐3 and Table 3‐4 and also the pie charts as shown in Figure 3‐8 to 
Figure 3‐13) is to ensure that it is not flammable and has a low rate of diffusivity since 
safety and containment of the gas are to two vital aspects of this project. Also it must be 
cheap  (due  to  financial  constraints)  and  be  easily  available.  Since  it  is  not  desired  to 
achieve  a  high  power  output  thus  low  heat‐capacity,  low  viscosity  and  high  thermal 
conductivity do not fall within the primary criteria. Keeping all these factors in mind, the 
working fluid that suits is Air. 

  Page 38 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 4  
THERMAL ANALYSIS 
 

4.1 Calculation of the Adiabatic Flame Temperature| 
 
4.1.1 Introduction 

The determination of the adiabatic flame temperature is important because it indicates 
the  maximum  temperature  that  can  be  used  at  the  source.  Also,  it  is  useful  in 
determining what the choice of fuel should be. For example, if the required temperature 
of the source is to be 1000  oC and the adiabatic flame temperature of Fuel A is 900  oC 
and that of Fuel B is 1200  oC, then Fuel B is to be used as the maximum temperature as 
compared to Fuel A that is less than the required temperature at the source. If Fuel B is 
employed, then after convective heat transfer losses, the temperature of the flame will 
drop down to the required source of temperature of 1000 oC. 

4.1.2 Assumptions 

1. Steady flow combustion process 
2. Combustion chamber is adiabatic (Q=0) 
3. There are no work interactions 
4. Air and the combustion gases are ideal gases 
5. Changes in kinetic and potential energies are negligible 
6. Combustion reaction is stoichiometric (i.e. 100% theoretical air) 
7. Standard conditions of 1 atm and 25 oC apply 

4.1.3 Calculations for liquid kerosene (C12H26) 

Combustion equation:  C12H26(l) + 18.5(O2+3.76N2) Æ 12CO2 + 13H2O + 69.56N2 

Enthalpy of products = Enthalpy of reactants (Hprod = Hreact) 

  Page 39 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Note:  

All  values  of  hf  and  ho  have  been  taken  from  enthalpy  tables.  The  values  of  hf  for 
elements are taken to be zero. 

∑ Np (hf + h ‐ ho) = ∑ Nr (hf + h ‐ ho) 

12(‐393,520 + hCO2 – 9364) + 13(‐241,820 + hH20 – 9904) + 69.56(0 + hN2 – 8669) 

= 1(‐24,149 + h298 – h0298) + 18.5(0 + h298 – h0298) + 69.56(0 + h298 – h0298) 

12hCO2 + 13hH2O + 69.56hN2 = 8685886.64 kJ 

Divide by total number of moles to get Æ 91855.82 kJ/kmol 

For N2 this value corresponds to T = 2741.4K 

For H2O this value corresponds to T = 2179.23K 

For CO2 this value corresponds to T = 1851K 

Since majority of the moles are of N2,  the temperature should be close to 2741.4K but 
somewhat  under  it.  After  trying  different  values  of  temperature  under  2741.4K  it  is 
determined between which two temperatures the value of sum of the enthalpies of the 
products fluctuates about the value of the sum of the enthalpies of the reactants. 

For T = 2700K 

∑Hprod = 9562976.68 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 8685886.64 kJ 

For T = 2650K 

∑Hprod = 9362504.28 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 8685886.64 kJ 

For T = 2450K 

∑Hprod = 8563731.44 kJ which is less than ∑Hreact = 8685886.64 kJ 

For T = 2500K 

∑Hprod = 8762922.36 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 8685886.64 kJ 

  Page 40 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
4.1.4 Conclusion 

 It  is  clear  that  the  value  of  the  adiabatic  flame  temperature  lies  between  2450K  and 
2500K. After interpolation, it is found to be 2480.66K 

4.2 Calculations for methane (CH4) 

Combustion equation:  CH4 (g) + 2(O2+3.76N2) Æ CO2 + 2H2O + 7.52N2 

Enthalpy of products = Enthalpy of reactants (Hprod = Hreact) 

Note: All values of hf and ho  have been taken from enthalpy tables. The values of hf for 
elements are taken to be zero. 

∑ Np (hf + h ‐ ho) = ∑ Nr (hf + h ‐ ho) 

(‐393,520 + hCO2 – 9364) + 2(‐241,820 + hH20 – 9904) + 7.52(0 + hN2 – 8669) 

= 1(‐74,850 + h298 – h0298) + 2(0 + h298 – h0298) + 7.52(0 + h298 – h0298) 

hCO2 + 2hH2O + 7.52hN2 = 896672.88 kJ 

Divide by total number of moles to get Æ 85235 kJ/kmol 

For N2 this value corresponds to T = 2561.5K 

For H2O this value corresponds to T = 2051.5K 

For CO2 this value corresponds to T = 1741K 

Since majority of the moles are of N2,  the temperature should be close to 2561.5K but 
somewhat  under  it.  After  trying  different  values  of  temperature  under  2561.5K  it  is 
determined between which two temperatures the value of sum of the enthalpies of the 
products fluctuates about the value of the sum of the enthalpies of the reactants. 

For T = 2500K 

∑Hprod = 973043.12 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 896672.88 kJ 

For T = 2450K 

  Page 41 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
∑Hprod = 950825.48 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 896672.88 kJ 

For T = 2300K 

∑Hprod = 884516.52 kJ which is less than ∑Hreact = 896672.88 kJ 

For T = 2350K 

∑Hprod = 906552.92 kJ which is greater than ∑Hreact = 896672.88 kJ 

4.2.1 Conclusion   

It  is  clear  that  the  value  of  the  adiabatic  flame  temperature  lies  between  2300K  and 
2350K. After interpolation, it is found to be 2327.6K 

4.2.2 Final conclusion with respect to the choice of fuel 

Since there is very little difference in the values of the adiabatic flame temperatures of 
the  two  fuels  and  since  both  temperatures  are  sufficiently  higher  than  the  required 
source  temperature  of  720  oC,  methane  is  employed  as  the  fuel  for  the  following 
reasons: 

1. It is easily available 
2. Its flow can be regulated easily using a valve 
3. It burns more cleanly than kerosene 

4.3 Heat Transfer Calculation 
 
4.3.1  Formulas to be used 

Thermal conductive resistance,   (oC/W) 

Thermal convective resistance,     (oC/W) 

β
Rayleigh number,     
υ

Convective heat transfer coefficient,     (W/m2.oC) 

  Page 42 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

For horizontal plate with hot side facing down: 

.
Nusselt number,  0.27  

For horizontal plate with hot side facing up: 

.
Nusselt number,  0.54  (For Ra 104 ‐ 107) 

For internal side of the cylinder at the base: 

.
Nusselt number,  0.4  

Volume expansion coefficient, β      (K‐1) 

      (W) 

 Indicated power,              

4.3.2  Data 
External Diameter (m) 0.05506
  Internal Diameter (m) 0.05056
Height (m)  0.0872
  Thickness (m) 0.00225
Tc (K) and (oC) 298 25
 
Temp Ratio (Tc/Th) 0.3
Th (K) and (oC) 993.3333333 720.3333333 
  Tf (K) and (oC) 645.6666667 372.6666667 

Table 4‐1 Data Input 

For horizontal plate with hot side facing down: 

Properties of air at Tf = 372.5 oC and 1 atm (Table A‐15)   
k (W/m2.oC)  0.048533 Pr  0.694195
k of steel @ 993K  25   
v (m2/s)  0.0000580980  B (K‐1)  0.001548787
Ra  362678.18090 
Nu = 0.27Ra1/4  6.62588847  h=(k/Dext)(Nu) 5.840433075
Table 4‐2 For Horizontal Plate with Hot Side Facing Down 

  Page 43 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

For horizontal plate with hot side facing up: 

Assume external surface temperatures at the top of the displacer (oC) and (K) Ts 

Ts (oC) Ts (K)
600 873
500 773
300 573
250 523
200 473
150 423
100 373
75 348
55 328
30 303
Table 4‐3 Assumed Ts 

The corresponding film temperatures in K and oC are: 

o
K C
585.5 312.5
535.5 262.5
435.5 162.5
410.5 137.5
385.5 112.5
360.5 87.5
335.5 62.5
323 50
313 40
300.5 27.5
Table 4‐4 Film Temperature at Ts 

Corresponding air properties at the respective film temperatures: 

k air @ 27.5 oC  0.025695 k air @ 40 oC 0.02662 


Pr air at 27.5 oC  0.7289 Pr air at 40 oC 0.7255 
V air @ 27.5 oC  0.00001585 V air @ 40 oC 0.00001702 
B air @ 27.5 oC  0.003327787 B air @ 40 oC 0.003194888 
k steel @ 303 K  14.86 k steel @ 328 K 15.34 
Ra  79051.94752 Ra 393072.67204 
Nu  9.054654911 Nu 13.52109837 
h  4.225560442 h 6.537080253 

Table 4‐5 Air Properties at Various Tf 

  Page 44 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
k air @ 50 oC  0.02735 k air @ 62.5 oC 0.0282625 
Pr air at 50 oC  0.7228 Pr air at 62.5 oC 0.7195375 
V air @ 50 oC  0.00001798 V air @ 62.5 oC 0.0000192075
B air @ 50 oC  0.003095975 B air @ 62.5 oC 0.002980626 
k steel @ 348 K  15.705 k steel @ 373 K 16.145 
Ra  566740.01803 Ra 713934.08478
Nu  14.81629886 Nu 15.69669751 
h  7.359712567 h 8.057172417 
k air @ 87.5 oC  0.0300625 k air @ 112.5 oC 0.031825 
Pr air at 87.5 oC  0.71375 Pr air at 112.5  0.708725 
V air @ 87.5 oC  0.00002175 V air @ 112.5 oC 0.00002441 
B air @ 87.5 oC  0.002773925 B air @ 112.5 oC 0.002594034 
k steel @ 423 K  13.09 k steel @473 K 17.745 
Ra  856662.92389 Ra 884165.34491
Nu  16.42843723 Nu 16.55873409 
h  8.969849148 h 9.571044539 
 

k air @ 137.5 oC  0.03356625 k air @ 162.5 oC 0.03528125 


Pr air at 137.5  0.7048 Pr air at 162.5  0.701075 
V air @ 137.5  0.0000273 V air @ 162.5  0.0000300375
B air @ 137.5 oC  0.002436054 B air @ 162.5  0.002296211 
k steel @ 523 K  18.65 k steel @573 K 19.4 
Ra  848765.24234 Ra 803450.40882
Nu  16.39044167 Nu 16.16715227 
h  9.992111561 h 10.35955941 
 

  k air @ 262.5 oC  0.0420475 k air @ 312.5 oC 0.0449375 


Pr air at 262.5  0.6939 Pr air at 312.5  0.69355 
  V air @ 262.5 oC  0.0000425 V air @ 312.5  0.000049425 
B air @ 262.5 oC  0.001867414 B air @ 312.5  0.001707942 
k steel @ 773 K  22.25 k steel @ 873 K 23.53 
 
Ra  557995.62058 Ra 456565.39765 
Nu  14.75881393 Nu 14.03684513 
  h  11.27081781 h 11.45624279 

  Page 45 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE 
 
 

For internal side of the cylinder at the base: 

Assumed base temperature Tu of 718 oC (991K): 

Table 4‐6 Air Properties at Film Temperatures for Various Ts Values 

4.3.3 Calculations for thermal resistance network 

Figure 4‐1 1D Heat Transfer Across the Displacer Cylinder 

 
Tflame Rconv1 Th Rcond1 Tu Rpar Tli Rcond2 Ts Rconv2 To

  Figure 4‐2 Thermal Resistive Network Schematic 

  Page 46 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

Area External m2 0.002381014

Area Internal m2 0.002007722

4.3.4 Calculations for the flame temperature 

Power = h1(Tflame‐Tu)‐h2(Tli‐
Power (W) = 11.248

Table 4‐7 Thermal Resistances 

  Page 47 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
 

Intersection of Ts assumed with Ts resistance 

Figure 4‐3 Thermal Resistances 

Conclusion:  

From the graph it can be clearly observed that Ts assumed and Ts calculated via the 
thermal resistance network, have a common value at approximately 600 oC. Thus the 
operating point and its associated values are as follows: 

Table 4‐8 Various Temperatures Calculated via Thermal Resistance Network 

 
  Page 48 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
For internal side of the cylinder at the base:

Base temp oC and K 718 991 

For cold side of the cylinder with hot side facing up:

k air @ 312.5 oC 0.0449375
Pr air at 312.5 oC 0.69355
V air @ 312.5 oC 0.000049425
B air @ 312.5 oC 0.001707942
k steel @ 873 K 23.53
Ra  456565.39765
Nu  14.03684513
h  11.45624279
 

4.3.5 Calculations for thermal efficiency: 

Carnot Efficiency (Maximum theoretical thermal efficiency): 

1      ; (where To and Th are in Kelvin) 

298
1   0.7  70%  
993

Thermal Efficiency (Actual Efficiency) 

    8.43375
      0.5479938 54.79%  
    15.39022973

  Page 49 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 5  
SELECTION OF SWEPT VOLUME 
 

5.1 Analysis of Stirling Engine 

The analysis of Stirling engines are parted on three methods. 

5.1.1 1st­order method 

The  analysis  is  based  on  the  use  of  experimental  value  and  engine  size,  or  the  ideal 
analysis models. For example Schmidt model. 

5.1.2 2nd­order method 

The analysis takes into consideration losses of various kind. It uses the results of ideal 
analysis and the losses of various kind.  

5.1.3 3rd­order methods 

This  type  of  analysis  solves  homogeneous  equations  of  flow  and  equations  of  various 
kinds of losses.  

5.2 The Schmidt Analysis 

It  is  an  idealized  model  which  captures  the  basic  and  essential  features  of  a  stirling 
engine basically the interconnection between the mechanically constraint motion of the 
parts and the interconnected or resulting thermodynamically cycle. 

The  work  here  is  basically  focused  to  on  finding  the  maximum  indicated  cycle  work 
relative  to  the  cycle  pressure,  relative  to  the  mass  to  the working  fluid  or  to  the total 
swept volume. 

  Page 50 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE 
 
The fore coming calculations and  analysis is to select that what should be the ratio of 
the swept volume of the piston to that of the displacer. 

5.2.1  Assumptions of Schmidt Model for Gamma Stirling Analysis 

• The motion of piston and displacer is pure sinusoidal motion. 
• Working fluid in work space is an ideal gas 
• Isothermal hot, cold and dead spaces 
• Uniform instantaneous pressure throughout all the engine spaces 
• No leaking of working gas into or out of the engine. 
• All dead space is treated as being at the arithmetic average of the extreme cycle 
temperatures. 
• Temperature ratio represents the temperature extremes of the working gas. 
• The mechanism effectiveness is assumed constant throughout the cycle. 
• Limitations in the heat transfer are ignored. 

5.2.2  Indicated Work 

The  closed  form  of  indicated  work  of  Schmidt’s  gamma  Stirling  can  be  written  as 
follows: 

6
           W=    
κ √

Where:                                      1 κ  

κ 2κ 1 cos 1  

It can be seen that the only factors having dimensions is the total swept volume   and 
root mean cycle pressure. 

  Page 51 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐1 Effect of Increasing Swept Volume Ratio 

The Figure 5‐1 shows that increasing the swept volume ratio correspondingly increases 
indicated work. It can be seen that the indicated work of the largest cycle is relatively 
higher than the smallest one. 

5.2.3  Root Mean Cycle Pressure 

The root mean cycle pressure  =   can be written as: 

2
 

5.2.4  Forced Work 

The definition of the forced work of a cycle requires integrating the product of p− pb and 
dV over those portions of the cycle where they differ in sign. It can be written as follows: 

After employing necessary numerical integration techniques and simplification, the 
following is obtained, 

1 ln 1 ln  1

  Page 52 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐2 Effect of Increasing Size on Forced Work

Forced work depends upon the shape of the cycle and upon the buffer pressure level. It 
is the work that the mechanism must deliver to the piston to make it move in opposition 
to  the  pressure  difference  across  it.  Because  of  losses  in  transmission  through  the 
mechanism, more work, namely Wi (work input) , must be taken from the flywheel to 
supply W−.

As  can  be  seen  from  Figure  5‐2  that  as  the  indicated  work  increases  with  increasing 
swept volume ratio, so does the forced work, represented as the shaded area. Therefore 
a  careful  compromise  has  to  be  made  regarding  the  selection  of  the  optimum  swept 
volume ratio. 

5.2.5 Shaft Work 

The shaft work of Schmidt’s gamma stirling engine is given by: 

1
 

It is worth mentioning here that the maximum indicated output does not ensure getting 
the  maximum  shaft  or  brake  output.  Since  shaft  work  is  not  a  simple  multiple  of 
indicated work but depends upon the shape of the engine cycle and the relative buffer 
pressure, as well as on the effectiveness of the engine mechanism. 

  Page 53 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
5.3 1st­Order Analysis Method 
 
5.3.1  Effectiveness & Mechanical Efficiency 

Mechanism  effectiveness  in  principle  depends  in  a  complex  way  upon  a  number  of 
variables.  It  obviously  depends  upon  the  instantaneous  position  of  the  parts  of  the 
mechanism,  which  determines  the  loading  on  the  various  joints  and  hence  the  acting 
Coulomb  friction  forces.  Inertial  effects  due  to  the  velocity  and  acceleration  of  parts 
with appreciable mass also affect the joint loads and friction. Mechanism effectiveness 
may also depend significantly upon the magnitude of the force applied to the piston as 
when a friction type other than Coulomb is present in some joints. 

Clearly,  mechanism  effectiveness  is  a  non‐negative  quantity  and  cannot  exceed  unity. 
There may in fact be portions of an engine cycle where the effectiveness is actually zero. 
This  is  the  case  in  the  situation  where  both  piston  and  flywheel  put  work  into  the 
mechanism in certain parts of the cycle. 

During work input by the piston to the mechanism for transmittal to the flywheel shaft, 
some work is lost to friction and the reduced amount is actually delivered. This loss is 
due to the mechanism’s mechanical efficiency. The presence of any forced work always 
reduces  mechanical  efficiency  to  a  value  below  that  of  the  effectiveness  of  the 
mechanism. 

5.3.2  Compression Ratio 

Maximal mechanical efficiency ηms is simply equal to the Effectiveness as long as r ≤ 1/τ. 
As  no  engine  can  have  a  better  mechanical  efficiency  than  ηms,  so  no  engine  can  run 
with a compression ratio beyond the r value where ηms becomes zero.  

Figure  5‐3  shows  graphs  of  maximal  mechanical  efficiency  ηms  with  respect  to  r  for 
specific values of E and τ .The smaller E2 is relative to τ, the faster ηms becomes zero. This 
means  that  for  engines  operating  from  relatively  low  temperature  heat  sources,  the 
range  of  usable  compression  ratio  is  definitely  limited.  The  closer  τ  is  to  1,  the  more 

  Page 54 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
limited  the  compression  ratio  range  becomes.  This  is  precisely  why  low  temperature 
differential engines require low compression ratios. 

Figure 5‐3 Graph of Maximum Mechanical Efficiency versus Compression Ratio 

On the other hand, if an engine is to operate from a very high temperature source, then 
τ = TC/TH will be small enough so that E2 > τ for all practical values of E. In this case, there 
is  no  intrinsic  restriction  on  compression  ratio,  and  it  can  be  chosen  to  suit  any  other 
requirements or desires. 

5.3.3 Workspace Charging Effect 

In any monomorphic engine with constant mechanism effectiveness, if the charge of its 
workspace and its buffer pressure are increased by the same factor, then its shaft work 
also will increase by the same factor, and mechanical efficiency is preserved. An engine 
in which the buffer pressure never exceeds the workspace pressure will be referred to 
as being charged above buffer pressure or as buffered from below.  

There are a number of practical advantages to buffering from below. These advantages 
include  preventing  lubricant  migration  into  the  workspace,  preventing  or  minimizing 
bearing  load  reversals,  and  perhaps  most  important,  increasing  output,  albeit  at  the 
expense  of  mechanical  efficiency.  It  often  is  the  case  in  practice  that  buffer  pressure 

  Page 55 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
cannot  be  modified.  Charging  the  workspace  alone  is  the  only  option  to  increase  the 
output of such engines. Even when a crankcase is totally enclosed and pressure‐worthy, 
the other advantages may make charging above buffer pressure desirable. 

For engines buffered from below, there is no forced work arising during expansion. The 
forced  work  occurs  over  the  whole  compression  process  and  is  simply  the  absolute 
compression work minus the area below the buffer pressure line. 

Figure 5‐4 PV Diagram of Charged Stirling Engine 

The  mechanical  efficiency  (ηm)  is  a  decreasing  function  of  the  mass  (m)  inside  the 
workspace. Therefore the output of the stirling engine can be increased by charging, but 
it can be done only at the expense of diminished mechanical efficiency. 

For an Ideal Stirling engine, the absolute work ratio equals the temperature ratio: 

Wc/We = TC/TH = τ . 

Thus,  if  E2  >  τ,  cyclic  shaft  work  output  will  increase  indefinitely  as  the  workspace  is 
charged  higher  and  higher  above  a  fixed  buffer  pressure.  Of  course,  mechanical 
efficiency  will  certainly  decrease  after  the  engine  becomes  buffered  entirely  from 
below.  If,  on  the  other  hand,  E2  <  τ,  then  shaft  output  decreases  as  the  workspace  is 
charged  above  buffer  pressure,  and  eventually  the  engine  will  even  be  unable  to  run 
itself. 

  Page 56 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
5.3.4  Dead Space Effects 

The amount of dead space reduces the output potential of the stirling engine. The dead 
volume effect is greater for engines operating at a smaller temperature difference. 

Figure 5‐5 shows the variation of specific shaft work with increasing dead space over the 
range  from  χ  =  0  to  10  for  a  particular  engine  with  τ  =  0.5  and  E  =  0.7.  Note  that 
performance  drops  off  at  a  high  rate  over  the  entire  usual  range  of  relative  dead 
volume, becoming what one might call gradual only for dead volume ratios much higher 
than ever necessary in practice. 

 
Figure 5‐5 Variation of maximum specific shaft work Ws versus dead space ratio χ 
 

Dead volume effects on brake output are not neutralized by increasing compression 
ratio, as one might have guessed prior to the analysis. 

  Page 57 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
5.3.5  Conclusion 

Some of the findings important for 1st order stirling engine design are summarized as 
follows: 

• Maximum shaft output occurs at smaller swept volume ratios than does 
maximum indicated work. 
• Less effective mechanisms favor smaller swept volume ratios. 
• Smaller swept volume ratios yield better mechanical efficiency. 
• Low temperature differential engines require small swept volume ratios. 
• Dead volume incurs a high penalty in brake output. 
• Higher engine speeds favor lower swept volume ratios. 
• Dead volume effects cannot be offset by increasing compression ratio. 

5.4  Design Approach 

Before going in to the details of the design, there are few things that must be kept in 
mind  in  order  to  clearly  understand  the  design  method  presented  here.  The 
conventional  approach  of  design,  which  is  referred  to  as  the  “bottom‐up”  method  in 
which the design is focused towards obtaining the desired output from the device and 
thus  setting  other  parameters  accordingly,  is  not  generally  recommended  for  low‐
power, low temperature differential stirling engines. 

Therefore  the  design  of  Stirling  Engine  involves  a  significant  question,  that  is  what 
should be the ratio of swept volume of the power piston to that of the displacer, and 
what  should  be  the  phase  angle  between  them.  Thus  a  need  arises  for  choosing 
optimum design parameters that would give a handful of power at suitable temperature 
ratio and good mechanical efficiency. 

The optimum phase angle is usually easy to adjust or reset and so the best phase angle 
can  be  experimentally  determined  to  the  engine  operator’s  satisfaction,  and  also  the 
engine’s performance is not extremely sensitive to phase angle.  

But  the  swept  volume  ratio  cannot  be  easily  changed  without  affecting  other  engine 
features  that  might  themselves  affect  output  such  as  overall  size  and  dead  volume. 

  Page 58 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Therefore  an  optimum  swept  volume  ratio  must  be  chosen  to  maximize  the  work  per 
cycle. 

Design  of  the  Stirling  Engine  is  based  on  1st  order  analysis method.  Using  this  method 
different designing parameters which are stated above are being analyzed through the 
aid  of  experimental  data  and  then  plotted  to  study  their  behavior.  The  following  data 
and graph shows the effect of swept volume ratio on the indicated power, shaft work, 
forced work and then connectively to the mechanical efficiency. 

Since  the  required  temperature  ratio  was  determined  through  the  heat  transfer 
analysis. Also setting the other parameters which are quite independent of each other 
as, 

τ= 0.3 
α= 90 
E= 0.75 
 χ=0.2 
 

  Page 59 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
For τ=0.3 

Table 5‐1 Engine Operating Parameter as a Function of Volume Ratio 

  Page 60 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐6 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.2 

 
 

  Page 61 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐7 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.3 

  Page 62 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐8 Work and Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Swept Volume Ratio at τ=0.4 

     

  Page 63 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
5.5 Actual Trend of Graph 

Figure 5‐9 Actual Graphical Representation from Experimental Data 

The  graphs  presented  in  (Figure  5‐6  to  Figure  5‐8)  above  exhibit  a  similar  trend  as 
indicated by the actual curves of Figure 5‐9. Since the heat transfer analysis yielded the 
temperature ratio to be τ= 0.3, so looking in the graph for the stated temperature ratio, 
two swept volume ratios namely κ= 0.7 and κ= 2.1 yield good mechanical efficiency and 
allow lesser forced work. But κ= 0.7 is selected to be the optimum swept volume since 
limited heat transfer rates strongly favor choosing a small κ and also  a smaller κ would 
allow  the  engine  to  start  at  a  lower  hot  end  temperature.  Moreover,  the  ease  of 
availability of the cylinder sleeves with swept volumes of 70 and 100cc. 

  Page 64 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
5.6  Selection of Compression Ratio 

Table 5‐2 Engine Operating Parameters as a Function of Compression Ratio 

  Page 65 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 5‐10 Mechanical Efficiency as a Function of Compression Ratio at T=0.3 

Now an optimum compression ratio is to be set, that would give the best mechanical 
efficiency. Keeping the already determined parameters fixed, and varying the 
compression ratio, gives the optimum value to be 3.3, as indicated in the table. 

  Page 66 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
5.7  Calculations (At optimum values) 

After getting the swept volume ratio and compression selected, calculations of root 
mean cycle pressure, indicated work, shaft work, forced work and mechanical efficiency 
can be shown.  

5.7.1 Values of Designed Parameters 

Displacer Volume  =100cc=0.0001    
Temperature ratio τ=0.3  
Swept Volume Ratio 6=0.7 
Compression ratio r=3.3 
Phase Angle α=90° 
Dead Volume Ratio χ = 0.2
Effectiveness E=0.75 
Cold side Temperature = 300K 

Hot side Temperature =  = 1000  
.

5.7.2 Total Volume   

Since   
1 6  
                 1 0.7 0.0001  
 1.7e‐4   

5.7.3 Mass of Working Fluid (m) 

       
      =  
 

 x   

                                                                             1.205 (1.7e‐4)              ρ=1.205   

               0.00020485 kg 
 
 
 
  Page 67 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
5.7.4 Root Mean Cycle Pressure ( ) 

Where:  1 κ            &         κ 2κ 1 cos 1  

. .
    1 0.3 0.7      
.

0.7 2 0.7 1 0.3 cos 90° 1 0.3  

               2.184615385            0.9899494937 

. .
Now:   =   =181.1355857   
√ . √ . .

5.7.5 Indicated Work (W) 

6
W    
6 √

. . . . °
.  kilo‐ 
. √ . . .

joule 

5.7.6  Forced Work 

1 ln 1 ln 1  
  0.00020485)( 0.287 1000 0.3 ln 0.3 1 0.3 ln 1 0.3
ln 1 3.3 ln 0.3  
  6.864507e‐7 kilo‐joule 

5.7.7 Shaft Work 

0.75 6.748123e‐3) 0.75 6.864507e‐7 


.

. e‐3 kilo‐joule 

5.7.8 Mechanical Efficiency 

.
0.74994 
.

  Page 68 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 6  
KINETICS & TURNING MOMENT 
 

6.1 Kinetics and Turning Moment 

Reciprocating  engines  employ  a  very  popular  mechanism  known  as  slider  crank 
mechanism.  Kinematic  analysis  of  the  slider‐crank  mechanism  helps  to  answer  many 
questions pertaining to the motion of various links of the mechanism viz. displacement, 
velocity  and  accelerations  of  driven  members  like  connecting  rod  and  piston,  while 
kinetics involves the study of various forces acting on the mechanism. Figure 6‐1 shows 
arrangement of crank‐angle mechanism. 

Figure 6‐1 Crank‐angle Mechanism 

 
  Page 69 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
The  Figure 6‐2 indicates various forces acting on the slider‐crank mechanism: 

Figure 6‐2 Kinetics of Flywheel 

6.1.1 Assumptions 

Following  are  some  assumptions  used  in  the  analysis  of  the  forces  in  the  slider‐crank 
mechanism: 

• The weight of the connecting rod is neglected in the analysis. 
• The unbalance of rotating masses is balanced using counterweight. 
• Frictional effects of link joints and gravitational effects are ignored. 

6.1.2 Calculations 

Earlier  the  following  parameters  had  been  developed,  related  to  the  operation  of  the 
stirling engine: 

Tc=300K 
τ=0.3 
κ=0.7 
X=0.989926563 
Y=2.184615385 

  Page 70 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
χ=0.2 
E=0.75 
r=3.3 
Pb=100 Kpa 
m=0.00020485 kg 
 
Now the design of the stirling engine focuses on obtaining a shaft power output of at a 
crankshaft speed of, having following parameters. 

l= 93mm 
Vd= 0.00007 m3 
V1= 0.0001 m3= Displacer swept volume 
B= 47.5mm 
α=90° 
The displaced volume Vd is given by, 

π
 
4

Thus, 
π
0.0007 0.0475  
4

or, 
39.50217  

It is known that in a reciprocating engine the stroke “L” and crank radius “c” are related 
as, 

2  

or, 
19.75108  

Similarly, 
π π
0.0469  
4 4

  Page 71 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
0.00172757   

And,             

            0.00172757  0.00000675 

 
0.00172082 m

Also, 

  1.20247 

4.7086 

The instantaneous pressure “p” inside the cylinder at any crank position is given by, 

2
 
θ φ

where, 

 φ  

 
  κ 1 τ α 

 
  0.7 1 0.3 90° 0.7 

 
  1 τ α 1 0.3 90° 0.7 

Using values of A and B the following is obtained, 
0.7
 φ 45° 0.785398   
√0.7 0.7

Now  putting  all  the  values  of  the  required  constants  determined  above,  into  the 
equation for the instantaneous pressure for various crank angle position. 

Net load on the piston is given by, 

  Page 72 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

p1 is taken to be the instantaneous pressure at a certain crank angle, while p2 is taken to 
be equal to the buffer pressure, which is atmospheric in the design. 

Inertia force is given by, 

2
 
900

Weight of reciprocating parts is given by, 

Then piston effort is determined as, 

Finally Turning moment or Torque can be obtained as, 

2
 
2√

These parameters can now be obtained at different crank positions as shown in Table 
6‐1 and then the turning moment diagram for the stirling engine is obtained. 

The mean resisting torque (Tmean) can be found as: 

     
 
     

5.061
0.805  .  

  Page 73 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 

Table 6‐1 Parameters at Different Crank Positions 

  Page 74 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 6‐3 Turning Moment Diagram 

       

  Page 75 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 7  
SIMULATION OF STATIC TEMPERATURE 
 

7.1  Modeling 

In  order  to  verify  the  static  temperature  distribution  within  the  displacer  cylinder,  a 
simplified 2D‐model of the cylinder was analyzed using Finite Element software ANSYS. 
It  should  be  kept  in  mind  that  the  displacer  is  assumed  to  be  absent  in  the  analytical 
solution,  in  order  to  make  the  laborious  task  easy.  Accompanying  Figure  7‐1  shows 
modeling  of  2D  Cylinder  in  Ansys  where  the  green  region  depicts  the  modeling  of  air 
whereas the thin purple region depicts the modeling of Cylinder. 

Figure 7‐1 Modeling of 2D Cylinder in ANSYS 

  Page 76 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
7.2  Meshing 

The two areas highlighted in separate colors in the figure 6‐2 are uniformly meshed in 
order to achieve accuracy of results. 

Figure 7‐2 Meshing of 2D Cylinder in ANSYS 

7.3 Graphical Distribution 

Temperature distribution profile can finally be obtained and the results can be readily 
compared  against  those  obtained  from  calculations.  Figure  7‐3  shows  contours  of 
Temperature variation along the cylinder height. 

Figure 7‐3 Contours of Temperature Distribution 

  Page 77 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
7.4 Temperature Profile 

The  solver  enables  a  graph  to  be  plotted  between  the  temperature  and  the  distance 
along  the  center  line  from  the  base  of  the  cylinder.  Figure  7‐4  shows  the  graph  of 
temperature variation along cylinder height. 

Figure 7‐4 Graph of Temperature Variation Along Cylinder Height 

  Page 78 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 8  
CAD DRAFTS 
 

  Page 79 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 80 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 81 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 82 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 83 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 84 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 85 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 86 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 87 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 88 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 89 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 9  
INSTRUMENTATION  
 

9.1 Proximity Sensor 

A proximity sensor is a sensor able to detect the presence of nearby objects without any 
physical contact. A proximity sensor often emits an electromagnetic field or a beam of 
electromagnetic radiation (infrared, for instance), and looks for changes in the field or 
the return signal. 

The maximum distance that this sensor can detect is defined "nominal range". 

Proximity  switches  open  or  close  an  electrical  circuit  when  they  make  contact  with  or 
come  within  a  certain  distance  of  an  object.  Proximity  switches  are  most  commonly 
used in manufacturing equipment, robotics, and security systems. There are four basic 
types of proximity switches: 

1. Infrared: Emits infra‐red radiation. 
2. Acoustic: Emits inaudible sound waves 
3. Capacitive: Measures changes in capacitance around it 
4. Inductive: Emits magnetic field  

Inductive  proximity  switches  sense  distance  to  objects  by  generating  magnetic  fields. 
They are similar in principle to metal detectors. A coil of wire is charged with electrical 
current,  and  an  electronic  circuit  measures  this  current.  If  a  metallic  part  gets  close 
enough to the coil, the current will increase and the proximity switch will open or close 
accordingly. The chief disadvantage of inductive proximity switches is that they can only 
detect metallic objects.  

  Page 90 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

Figure 9‐1 Proximity Sensor (RPM Measuring Device) 

9.2 Model explanation of proximity switch 

LM 18 – 30 08 N A
 
1. LM signifies the switch category (LM: inductance type; CM: capacitance type
etc.) 
2. 30 signifies the operating voltage (30: 6‐36VDC; 310: 5‐24VDC; 320: 12‐
60VDC; 20:90‐250VAC; 210: 24‐250VAC;220: 380VAC; 40: 12‐240VDC/24‐
240AC; 50: Special voltage)
3. 08 signifies the detection distance (01: 1mm; 05: 5mm; 10: 10mm)
 

9.3 Main features:  

• Compact volume 
• Wide voltage range  
• Dust proof, vibration proof, water proof and oil proof.  
• Long service life  

 
  Page 91 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Figure 9‐2 Dimensions of Proximity Sensor 

9.4 Thermocouple 

A  thermocouple  is  a  junction  between  two  different  metals  that  produces  a  voltage 
related  to  a  temperature  difference.  Thermocouples  are  a  widely  used  type  of 
temperature sensor for measurement and control and can also be used to convert heat 
into electric power. They are inexpensive and interchangeable, are supplied fitted with 
standard connectors and can measure a wide range of temperatures. 

Figure 9‐3 Construction of Thermocouple 

  Page 92 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
9.5 Types of Thermocouples: 

Certain combinations of alloys have become popular as industry standards. Selection of 
the  combination  is  driven  by  cost,  availability,  convenience,  melting  point,  chemical 
properties,  stability,  and  output.  Different  types  are  best  suited  for  different 
applications. They are usually selected based on the temperature range and sensitivity 
needed. Thermocouples with low sensitivities (B, R, and S types) have correspondingly 
lower  resolutions.  Other  selection  criteria  include  the  inertness  of  the  thermocouple 
material and whether it is magnetic or not. 

Thermocouple Type Overall Range (°C) 0.1°C Resolution 0.025°C Resolution

B 100..1800 1030..1800 -

E -270..790 -240..790 -140..790

J -210..1050 -210..1050 -120..1050

K -270..1370 -220..1370 -20..1150

N -260..1300 -210..1300 340..1260

R -50..1760 330..1760 -

S -50..1760 250..1760 -

T -270..400 -230..400 -20..400

Table 9‐1 Types of Thermocouple 

9.6 K­Type 

Type  K  (chromel–alumel)  is  the  most  common  general  purpose  thermocouple  with  a 
sensitivity  of  approximately  41 µV/°C  chromel  positive  relative  to  alumel.  It  is 
inexpensive and a wide variety of probes are available in its −200 °C to +1350 °C range. 

Figure 9‐4 K Type Thermocouple 

  Page 93 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 
9.7 Table for Type K Thermocouple (Ref Junction 0 ◦C) 

 
  Page 94 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 10  
EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS 
 

10.1 Flame characteristics 

Natural gas consumption  Heat dissipated 
Type of Consumer  3
10‐6 
ft /hr  liters/s Btu/hr  kW 
m3/s 
Bunsen burner 
3  20  0.02  3500  1 
small 
Bunsen burner 
10  80  0.08  10000  3 
large 
 

10.2 Experimental findings 

For Tamb= 33◦C 

Flame  Displacer Base  Displacer Top 


  
Maximum Temperature 
800  225  75 
(oC) 
Minimum Temperature 
423  73  52 
(oC) 
 
Maximum Temperature 
800  440 
  (oC)  Maximum RPM 
Minimum Temperature 
  423  260 
(oC)  Minimum RPM 

 
  Page 95 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 
      Flame  Flame 
RPM  Height 
Temperature    Temperature

423  260  0  225 


  1  205 
450  277 
500  303  2  197 
 
550  325  3  170 

600  339    4  150 

650  370  5  133 

700  388    6  118 

750  420  7  107 


  8  90 
800  440 
8.72  75 
 

Figure 10‐1 Temperature vs. Height 

  Page 96 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE 
 

Figure 10‐2 RPM vs. Flame Temperature 

  Page 97 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

CHAPTER 11  
POST DESIGNING 
11.1  Cost Estimates 

S No.  Component Cost (in Rupees)

1.  Crankshaft 700 

2.  Flywheel 750 

3.  Power piston 900 

4.  Displacer cylinder 1000 

5.  Expansion cylinder 1000 

6.  Two Connecting rods 800 

7.  Displacer 500 

8.  Bearings 500 

9.  Nuts, bolts and brackets 500 

11.  Transportation 5000 

12.  Miscellaneous 2,100 

13.  Proximity Sensor 400 

14.  Thermocouple 300 

15.  RPM Display Meter 1200 

16.  Temperature Display Meter 950 

  TOTAL Rs 16,600 

  Page 98 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE 
 
11.2  Risk Assessment 

Probability  Estimated 
Mitigation  Contingency 
Risk Event  Description  of  Project 
Strategy  Plan 
Occurrence Impact 

Leakage of 
Use of 
working  70%‐80%  Control 
High  secure 
Sealing  fluid due to  (Very  (Minimize 
(Catastrophic)  sealings/pist
improper  likely)  the effect) 
on rings 
seals 

Dimensional 
non‐
compliance  Retention  Re‐designing 
Dimensional  between  30%‐40%  Low  (Accept the  of the 
inaccuracy  the stroke  (Unlikely)  (Marginal)  consequen concerned 
and the  ces)  parts 
cylinder 
length 

Resistance 
Use of 
to smooth  70%‐90%  Control 
Mechanical  High  lubricants 
movement  (Very  (Minimize 
friction  (Catastrophic)  such as oil or 
of dynamic  likely)  the effect) 
grease 
components

Leakage of  Coating of 
working  Control  cylinder 
fluid  20%‐30%  Low  walls with 
Diffusivity  (Minimize 
through the  (Unlikely)  (Marginal) 
the effect)  thick heat‐
walls of the  resistant 
cylinder due  paint to 

  Page 99 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
to low  reduce 
molecular  diffusion 
weight of  through 
the fluid  them 
with respect 
to the 
molecular 
spacing of 
the wall 
material 

Rise in 
Use of 
temperatur
effective 
e of the 
cooling 
material  Control 
50%‐60%  Medium  mechanism 
Overheating  due to non‐ (Minimize 
(Probable)  (Critical)  by reducing 
uniform  the effect) 
the 
heating and 
temperature 
ineffective 
at the sink 
cooling 

  Page 100 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
  Impact Guidelines for 
Scope,  
Probability Guidelines  Mitigation Strategy 
Cost, Schedule, or 
  Quality 

Transfer the risk to 
Very Likely  70‐100%  High (Catastrophic)  Deflection 
another party. 

Probable  40‐70%  Medium (Critical) Control Minimize the effect.

Accept the 
Unlikely  0‐40%  Low (Marginal)  Retention 
consequences. 

Reject the risk; do 
      Avoidance 
nothing. 

  Page 101 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
11.3 Safety Assessment: 
 
11.3.1 Introduction: 

There  is  always  considerable  amount  of  risk  and  danger  while  working  with  power 
producing  or  energy  conversion  devices.  Stirling  Engine  is  one  such  device,  and  as 
compared  to  conventional  internal  combustion  engine,  it  has  increased  amount  of 
danger due to its external source of heat or combustion. This chapter aims to provide a 
complete in‐depth analysis of the safety concerns associated with the project, and the 
necessary remedial measures taken in this regard. It identifies all safety features of the 
system,  design,  and  procedural  hazards  that  may  be  present  and  specific  procedural 
controls  and  precautions  that  should  be  followed.  This  study  is  based  on  the  factors 
which were highlighted earlier during the risk assessment in the concept design phase. 

11.3.2 System Operation: 

Stirling engine is a heat engine that operates by cyclic compression and expansion of air 
or another gas, the working fluid, at different temperature levels such that there is a net 
conversion of heat energy to mechanical work. The key components within the system 
are  the  power  piston,  displacer,  the  connecting  rod,  crankshaft  and  the  heat  source 
(flame).  The  synchronous  operation  of  each  of  these  components  is  necessary  for  the 
smooth operation of the engine. Otherwise, these components might induce unwanted 
vibrations,  resulting  in  the  complete  malfunction  of  the  engine  or  break‐up  of  these 
components, causing both material and human damage. 

The engine is operated after being provided a sufficient amount of heat with any of the 
available  heat  source  such  as  flame,  steam  etc.  It  is  important  to  contain  the  flame 
within a specified area so as to ensure uniform or continuous heating and therefore it 
must  be  prevented  from  gust  of  winds.  Also  the  uncontrolled  flame  may  go  on  to 
damage  the  instrumentation  devices  such  as  the  thermocouple  wire  or  the  proximity 
sensor. 

The output shaft is coupled with a fan, so as to indicate the engine output and also to 
provide the engine with the initial push to get it started. This fan remains bare on the 

  Page 102 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
output  shaft  and  a  little  carelessness  from  the  operator  may  cause  the  hands  of  the 
operator to stick into the sharp blades of the fan, causing serious injuries. 

The  reciprocating  parts  must  be  lubricated  from  time  to  time  to  ensure  their  smooth 
operation. Also the seals must be checked regularly to make sure that they are in order 
and  functioning  properly.  The  engine  must  be  inspected  periodically  to  assess  the 
wearing of moving parts and to replace them if necessary. The gas pipe leading to the 
burner must be checked for any sort of blockage.  

11.3.3 Safety Engineering: 

Estimated 
Probability of  Safety 
Event  Description/Issue Project 
Occurrence  Feature 
Impact 
Use of secure 
Leakage of working  High  sealings and 
70%‐80% (Very 
Sealing  fluid due to  (Catastrophi strong 
likely) 
improper seals  c)  gasketting 
fixtures 
Use of flame 
Due to sudden 
enclosures 
increase in the mass 
around the 
Dispersed/  flow of gas the flame 
30%‐40%  Medium  base of the 
Uncontroll may come up in 
(Unlikely)  (Critical)  burner and 
ed flame  contact with sensors 
upto the 
or measuring 
base of 
instruments 
cylinders 
Resistance to  Use of 
High 
Mechanica smooth movement  70%‐90% (Very  lubricants 
(Catastrophi
l friction  of dynamic  likely)  such as oil or 
c) 
components  grease 

  Page 103 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Coating of 
Leakage of working 
cylinder walls 
fluid through the 
with thick 
walls of the cylinder 
heat‐
due to low 
20%‐30%  Low  resistant 
Diffusivity  molecular weight of 
(Unlikely)  (Marginal)  paint to 
the fluid with 
reduce 
respect to the 
diffusion 
molecular spacing of 
through 
the wall material 
them 
Rise in temperature 
of the material due 
Overheati 50%‐60%  Medium  Heat sink or 
to non‐uniform 
ng  (Probable)  (Critical)  fins are used 
heating and 
ineffective cooling 
The rotating fan 
Protective 
blades may get 
Blade  30%‐40%  Low  cage is used 
damaged or may 
Damage  (Unlikely)  (Marginal)  to enclose 
hurt someone 
the fan 
during operation 
 

  Page 104 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
11.3.4 Objectives Assessment: 

This is to assess the percentage of success the project had as when compared with the 
SOR originally given. 

Proposed 
Ref  Task  Result Description 
status 

1.5  Fabrication of a  Manufactured a can‐type 


scaled down home‐ stirling engine with a 
made stirling engine  manufacturing duration of 
W(L)  A 
for PCSIR project  four weeks, in order to study 
competition  and analyze the design 
requirement.  problems associated. 

1.5  Design, analysis and  Successfully manufactured a 


fabrication of stirling  gamma type stirling engine. 
engine.  D  A  Initial problems associated 
with the manufactured engine 
were duly resolved. 
1.5  3D geometrical 
D  Completed a 3D geometric 
modeling on Solid  A 
Edge.  animated model on Solid Edge.

1.5  Optimization of 
components of 
Did not manage to optimize 
stirling engine using 
W(L)  NA  the design due to time 
commercially 
constraints. 
available FEA package 
software. 

1.5  Final presentation,  Successfully achieved all three 


project report and  D  A  targets associated with the 
final year project. 

  Page 105 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
fabrication of model.

1.5  Submission of project 
in the form of a 
Did not manage to compile a 
research paper to be 
submitted in a  W(L)  research paper due to time 
NA 
constraints. 
reputable 
 
international 
journal/conference. 

Final design 
calculations of our 
Conducted one dimensional 
fabricated engine 
steady state heat transfer, 
model based on the 
2.1.6  D  A  geometric and mechanical 
studies conducted on 
calculations for a gamma type 
the hand‐made (tin‐
can) stirling engine  stirling engine. 

model. 

Simulation of our 
design on FEA 
Successfully managed to 
software package. 
This will include  simulate the thermal and 
dynamic performance of the 
optimization of the 
2.1.7  design and  W(L)  design on ANSYS simulation 

software. The results were 
performance 
parameters, the  almost in agreement with the 

structural, dynamic,  analytical calculations 

thermal and flow  performed. 

analysis. 

Final fabrication of  Fabricated engine with minor 
2.1.8  D  A 
the engine based on  changes in original design that 

  Page 106 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
our analysis.  were essential to overcome 
the problems encountered in 
the fabrication phase. 
Comparison of our 
Did not manage to draw 
design with an 
2.1.9  equivalent power  W(L)  comparisons with an internal 
NA 
combustion engine due to 
internal combustion 
engine.  time and financial constraints. 

2.2  Should be capable of 
producing useful 
electrical output for  Did not manage to couple the 
W(H)  NA  engine with a generator due to 
charging an electronic 
time and financial constraints. 
device such as laptop 
or cell phone. 

2.2.1  Combustion by‐ Engine did produce some 


products produced by  noise initially due to 
ICE such as NOx are  manufacturing faults. However 
eliminated and must  D  A  these were duly rectified and it 
generate less noise as  was found to be virtually 
compared to an ICE.  noiseless and burned with a 
clean flame. 
2.2.2  The temperature of 
the heat source shall  The maximum temperature 
not exceed the  measured was found to be 
D  A 
melting point  within the metallurgical limit 
temperature of the  of the chosen material. 
expansion cylinder. 

2.2.2  Pressure attained  The maximum pressure inside 


inside the expansion  D  A  the cylinder was found to be 
chamber should be  within the permissible design 

  Page 107 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
within permissible  limits. 
design limits. 

2.2.2  The stirling engine 
should produce a  This objective was achieved 
smooth and  W(H)  A  after an initial round of trouble 
continuous power  shooting. 
output. 

2.3.1  Heat source must be 
The heat source in shielded 
properly concealed to 
D  A  from direct human contact by 
prevent direct human 
contact.  an aluminum sheet. 

2.3.1  The engine placement 
The engine rig is stably 
rig must be stable to 
D  supported on three legs with 
prevent any mishap  A 
soft rubber pegs for a firm 
due to engine 
dynamics.  grip. 

2.3.3  Expansion chamber 
and displacer 
W(H)  The working fluid is sealed 
chamber must be air  A 
shut inside the two cylinders. 
tight to prevent 
leakage. 

2.4  It shall be ensured 
All engine components are 
that the components 
D  easily available in the market 
of the engine are  A 
or can be easily manufactured 
easily available in the 
local market.  at minimal cost and time. 

2.4  The engine shall be in  All moving and hot engine 


D  A 
compliance with the  parts are shielded from direct 

  Page 108 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
environmental safety  human contact. No toxic 
standards.  pollutants are emitted and the 
engine also does not create a 
lot of noise. 
2.4  The engine shall not  The design is completely 
be plagiarized from  indigenous though it may bear 
an existing design.  D  A  some similarities to other 
designs due to its conventional 
nature. 
2.5  The engine shall  Engine operates at standard 
operate at STP.  D  conditions of 25 oC ambient 

temperature and 1 atm 
pressure. 
2.6  Engine components 
All engine components are 
shall be replaceable in 
D  A  easily replaceable at a very low 
case of 
damage/malfunction.  cost. 

2.7  Safe handling of parts  None of the exposed parts 


during fabrication.  contain sharp edges or 
D  A 
anything that may pose an 
injury risk. 
2.7  Project details shall  All project details from initial 
be documented.  concept design to design 
D  A  calculations and final 
fabrication have been 
documented. 
 

 
  Page 109 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

GALLERY 

This  gallery  is  dedicated  to  the  pictures  of  the  final  and 
successfully fabricated Stirling engine prototype. 

The  various  engine  components  such  as  the  displacer  cylinder, 


power cylinder, connecting rod, displacer rod, crankshaft etc can 
be seen clearly. 

Also  in  the  pictures  can  be  seen  the  inductive  proximity  sensor 
and its associated wiring which was used to measure the RPM of 
the engine. 
 

  Page 110 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
   
   
   
   
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   

  Page 111 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE  
 

   

  Page 112 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

  Page 113 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

APPENDIX A 
“GANTT CHART” 

  Page 114 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

  Page 115 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

APPENDIX B 
“SOR” 

  Page 116 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Statement Of Requirement 

Title: Design and fabrication of  Issue: 01 Date: 7th November, 


a Stirling Cycle Engine  2009 

CHANGES  D/W  REF REQUIREMENTS

    1  Introduction

    1.1  Preamble

      Stirling  engine  is  an  external  source  heat  engine 


that  meets  the  demand  for  efficient  energy 
utilization  and  that  is  why  the  study  and 
investigation  of  stirling  engine  is  a  topic  of  great 
interest for many institutes including universities. 
In  contrast  to  internal  combustion  engine,  they 
are  more  reliable,  simple  in  design,  highly 
efficient,  cheap,  can  utilize  any  heat  source  and 
above  all  they  are  environment  friendly 
depending  upon  the  source  of  heat.  Especially 
due  to  the  technological  advances  in  material 
sciences  and  manufacturing  techniques  in  the 
twentieth  century,  the  interest  in  stirling  engine 
has re‐kindled. 

     1.2  Objective

      To  obtain  useful  mechanical  work  output  from  a 


given  heat  input  by  employing  a  stirling  cycle 
engine mechanism. 

    1.3  Scope

      The  design,  analysis  and  fabrication  of  a  stirling 


engine  by  systematic  study  of  basic  operating 

  Page 117 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
principles,  design  parameters  and  the  study  of  a 
home‐made scaled down version of the engine (as 
per the PCSIR project competition requirement) in 
order  to  identify  the  engineering  complications 
associated with it. 

    1.4  Related Documents

      Bancha  Kongtragool,  Somchai  Wongwises, 


Investigation  on  power  output  of  the  gamma‐
configuration low temperature differential Stirling 
engines, Renewable energy,30,pg. 465‐476,2005 

Can  Cinar,  Halit  Karabulut,  Manufacturing  and 


testing  of  a  gamma  type  Stirling  engine, 
Renewable Energy,30, pg. 57‐66,2005 

Leonardo  Scollo,  Pablo  Valdez,  Jorge  Baron 


,Design  and  construction  of  a  Stirling  engine 
prototype,  International  journal  of  hydrogen 
energy, 33, pg.3506‐3510, 2008 

    1.4.1 Books

      Yunus  A.  Cengel  and  Michael  A  Boles, 


Thermodynamics:  An  engineering  approach, 
McGraw Hill International 

Yunus A. Cengel, Heat Transfer, Tata‐McGraw Hill, 
New‐Delhi 

F.P.  Beer,  E.R.  Johnston  Jr.,  John  T.  Dewolf 


Mechanics of Materials, McGraw Hill International

William  D.  Callister  Jr,  Material  Science  and 


Engineering: An Introduction, John Wiley & Sons, 

  Page 118 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
2003

      R. S. Khurmi and J. K. Gupta, Theory of Machines 
and  Mechanisms,  Eurasia  Publishing  House,  New 
Delhi, 1998 

R.C.  Hibbler,  Engineering  Mechanics  –Statics  and 


Dynamics, Prentice Hall International, New Jersey 

    1.4.2 Software

  D    Solid Edge V20 or Solid Edge ST 

W(L)  Ansys V11 FEA package software 

    1.5  Deliverables

    Fabrication of a scaled down home‐made stirling 
W(L)  engine for PCSIR project competition 
requirement. 

D  Design, analysis and fabrication of stirling engine.

D  3D geometrical modeling on Solid Edge. 

Optimization of components of stirling engine 
W(L)  using commercially available FEA package 
software. 

Final presentation, project report and fabrication 

of model. 

Submission of project in the form of research 
W(L)  paper to be submitted in a reputable international 
journal/conference. 

    1.6  Definitions, Abbreviations and Symbols 

  Page 119 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
    1.6.1 Definitions

      Displacer:

The displacer resembles a large piston, except 
that it has a smaller diameter than the cylinder, 
thus its motion does not change the volume of 
gas in the cylinder—it merely transfers the gas 
around within the cylinder. 

      Power piston:

      Power piston is the piston located in the 
expansion chamber. The expanding gases in the 
cylinder exert a pressure on the power piston 
which in turn rotates the crank and provides the 
system with the power stroke. 

      Crank shaft:

      The crankshaft, sometimes casually abbreviated 
to crank, is the part of an engine which translates 
reciprocating linear piston motion into rotation. 

      Connecting rods:

      The connecting rod connects the piston to the 
crank or crankshaft. 

      Piston rings:

      A piston ring is an open‐ended ring that fits into a 
groove on the outer diameter of a piston with the 
primary aim to seal the expansion chamber. 

      Flywheel:

  Page 120 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
      A flywheel is a mechanical device with a 
significant moment of inertia used as a storage 
device for rotational energy. 

      Heat engine:

      A heat engine is a device that converts thermal 
energy to mechanical work output. 

      Sink:

      The heat sink is typically the environment at 
ambient temperature to where heat is lost and 
the temperature is lowered. 

      Source:

    Source is the venue from where heat energy is 
 
obtained, in this design via combustion. 

      Internal Combustion Engine: 

    An engine where combustion takes place inside 
 
the power cylinder. 

      Heat Transfer Coefficient:

    A coefficient used in calculating the convective 
 
heat transfer between a fluid and a solid body. 

      Fins:

    They are used to enhance convective heat 
  transfer by increasing the area exposed to 
convection. 

  Page 121 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
    1.6.2 Abbreviations

    ICE:

Internal Combustion Engine

NASA:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

PCSIR:

  Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial 
Research 

FEA:

Finite Element Analysis

STP:

Standard Temperature & Pressure (250C, 1atm)

      NOX:

      Nitrous Oxide

    1.6.3 Symbols

    D

Demand: A mandatory requirement. 

W(H)
 
Wish high: A highly desirable attribute. 

W(L)

Wish low: A less desirable attribute. 

  Page 122 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
    2  Technical Requirements

    Conceptual knowledge of thermodynamics, heat 
transfer, mechanics of machines, engineering 
D  dynamics, mechanics of solids and material 
sciences along with modeling and FEA software 
packages. 

    2.1  Description and Purpose

  Study of the basic concept and three categories of 
D  2.1.1 
stirling engine namely alpha, beta and gamma. 

  Collecting the latest research literature and 
W(H)  2.1.2 
general subject matter on stirling engines. 

  Narrowing down the selection to the right type 
D  2.1.3  (alpha, beta and gamma) of stirling engine on 
which to base the design. 

  Solid modeling of the selected stirling engine 
W(H)  2.1.4  category on modeling software, for the home‐
made (tin‐can) stirling engine. 

  Construction of the hand‐made (tin‐can) stirling 
engine in order to gain a better understanding of 
its working principles and identification of the 
W(L)  2.1.5 
associated mechanical problems coupled with 
their solutions (as per the PCSIR competition 
requirement). 

  Final design calculations of the fabricated engine 
D  2.1.6  model based on the studies conducted on the 
hand‐made (tin‐can) stirling engine model. 

  Page 123 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
  Simulation of the design on FEA software 
package. This will include optimization of the 
W(L)  2.1.7 
design and performance parameters, the 
structural, dynamic, thermal and flow analysis. 

  Final fabrication of the engine based on the 
D  2.1.8 
analysis. 

  Comparison of the design with an equivalent 
W(L)  2.1.9 
power internal combustion engine. 

    2.2  Functional Characteristics

  Should be capable of producing useful electrical 
W(H)    output for charging an electronic device such as 
laptop or cell phone. 

    2.2.1 Qualitative issues

  Combustion by‐products produced by ICE such as 

D    NOx are eliminated. 

Should generate less noise as compared to an ICE.

    2.2.2 Quantitative issues

  The temperature of the heat source shall not 
D    exceed the melting point temperature of the 
expansion cylinder. 

  Pressure attained inside the expansion chamber 
D   
should be within permissible design limits. 

  The stirling engine should produce a smooth and 
W(H)   
continuous power output. 

    2.3  Physical and other characteristics 

  Page 124 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
    2.3.1 Health and safety criteria

  Heat source must be properly concealed to 
prevent direct human contact. 
D   
The engine placement rig must be stable to 
prevent any mishap due to engine dynamics. 

    2.3.2 Protective finish and coatings 

      Use of lubricants where desired. 

    2.3.3 Equipment sealing requirements 

  Expansion chamber and displacer chamber must 
W(H)   
be air tight to prevent leakage. 

    2.4  Design & Construction

  It shall be ensured that the components of the 
engine are easily available in the local market. 

The engine shall be in compliance with the 
D   
environmental safety standards. 

The engine shall not be plagiarized from an 
existing design. 

    2.5  Environmental conditions

  D    The engine shall operate at STP. 

    2.6  Interchangeability

  Engine components shall be replaceable in case of 
D   
damage/malfunction. 

    2.7  Production

  D    Engine is to be developed by the students under 

  Page 125 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
the guidance of project advisor and with the aid 
of reference books and online subject matter. 

Students may employ the use of modeling and 
FEA software to aid in the engine design. 

    2.8  Miscellaneous

  Safe handling of parts during fabrication. 

Project details shall be documented. 

D    Project content shall be monitored by project 
advisor Dr. Waqar Ahmed Khan and overlooked 
by project examiner and co‐examiner, Mr. Aijaz 
Ahmed and Dr. Noman Danish respectively. 

    3  Cost

  The estimated cost of the project is Rs. 60,000 
(10% contingencies). However the actual cost of 
    the project may vary according to the 
circumstances and will be ascertained by the 
group members. 

 
  Page 126 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

APPENDIX C 
“TERMS & DEFINITIONS” 

  Page 127 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Adiabatic Flame Temperature: 

In the absence of any work interactions or changes in the kinetic or potential energies, 
the  chemical  energy  released  during  combustion  is  either  lost  as  heat  to  the 
surroundings or is used to raise the temperature of the products. The smaller the heat 
loss,  larger  the  temperature  rise.  When  there  is  no  heat  loss,  the  temperature  of  the 
products  will  reach  a  maximum.  This  maximum  is  called  the  ‘adiabatic  flame 
temperature’ of the reaction. 

Buffer Pressure: 

Pressure  acting  on  the  non‐workspace  side  of  the  piston  is  known  as  buffer  pressure. 
The buffer gas like the fly wheel absorbs stores and returns energy during the cycle. 

Coefficient of Fluctuation of Energy: 

It  is  defined  as  the  ratio  of  the  maximum  fluctuation  of  energy  to  the  work  done  per 
cycle. 

Coefficient of Fluctuation of Speed: 

The difference between the maximum and minimum speeds during a cycle is called the 
maximum  fluctuation  of  speed.  The  ratio  of  the  maximum  fluctuation  of  speed  to  the 
mean speed is called the coefficient of fluctuation of speed. 

Compression Ratio: 

It is the ratio of uncompressed volume upon compressed volume. It is denoted by r. 

Convection heat transfer coefficient (h): 

Defined  as  the  rate  of  heat  transfer  per  unit  area,  per  unit  temperature  difference  of 
fluid flow. The convective heat transfer coefficient is not a property of the fluid. It is an 
experimentally determined parameter whose value depends on the surface geometry, 
the nature of fluid motion, the properties of the fluid and the bulk fluid velocity. 

  Page 128 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Dead Volume: 

Dead  volume  is  a  function  of  volume  of  heaters,  coolers,  piston  clearances,  ducts,  etc 
and any other volumes in the gas circuit that is not swept by either piston, denoted by 
VD. 

Effectiveness: 

The ratio of actual torque to ideal torque is called the effectiveness denoted by E. 

Efficacious Cycle: 

If  τr  ≤  1,  the  Stirling  cycle  has  the  property  that  the  minimum  expansion  process 
pressure  is  greater  than  or  equal  to  the  maximum  compression  process  pressure. 
Efficacious  engines  are  the  most  efficient  mechanically,  but  they  are  not  always  the 
most practical. 

Enthalpy of Reaction (hr): 

This is the difference between the enthalpy of the products at a specified state and the 
enthalpy of the reactants at the same state for a complete reaction. 

Enthalpy of Formation (hf): 

This is the enthalpy of a substance at a specified state due to its chemical composition. 

Forced Work: 

The forced work is the work that the mechanism must deliver to make the piston move 
in opposition to the pressure difference across it. It is denoted by  . 

Film Temperature (Tf): 

To account for the temperature variation of the fluid in the thermal boundary layer (i.e. 
from  the  surface  to  the  outer  edge  of  the  boundary  layer),  the  fluid  properties  are 
usually  evaluated  at  the  ‘film  temperature’  which  is  the  arithmetic  average  of  the 
surface and the free‐stream temperature. 

  Page 129 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Grashof number (Gr): 

It  is  a  dimensionless  number  which  represents  the  ratio  of  the  buoyancy  force  to  the 
viscous  force  acting  on  the  fluid.  The  role  played  by  Reynolds  number  in  forced 
convection is played by the Grashof number in natural convection. 

Inertia Force: (FI) 

It is an imaginary force, which when acts upon a rigid body, brings it in an equilibrium 
position. It is numerically equal to the accelerating force in magnitude, but opposite in 
direction. 

Indicated Work: 

It is the difference between the work done by the fluid during expansion and the work 
done during compression. It is denoted by Wi. It is also defined as the area enclosed by 
the P‐v diagram of the cycle. 

Maximum Fluctuation of Energy: 

The  variation  of  energy  above  and  below  the  mean  resisting  torque  line  is  called  the 
fluctuation  of  energy,  while  the  difference  between  the  maximum  and  minimum 
energies is known as the maximum fluctuation of energy. 

Mean Resisting Torque: (Tmean) 

The product of the crank‐pin effort and the crank‐pin radius is known as crank effort or 
turning moment or torque on the crankshaft 

Mechanical Efficiency: 

It  is  the  measure  of  how  much  the  work  produced  by  the  thermodynamic  cycle  can 
actually be taken out to the shaft, outside the engine. 

Monomorphic Engine: 

A monomorphic engine is one in which its pressure–volume function is proportional to 
the gas mass content of its workspace. 

  Page 130 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Net Load on Piston: (FL) 

It is the force acting on the piston due to the difference of pressures in the cylinder on 
the two sides of the piston. 

Non‐ Efficacious Cycle: 

Non‐Efficacious Stirling Cycle is the one, for which τr > 1. Non‐efficacious engines 
potentially 
have a higher power density. 
 
Nusselt number (Nu): 

It represents the enhancement of the heat transfer through a fluid layer as a result of 
convection relative to conduction across the same fluid layer. 

Piston Effort: (Fp) 

It is the net force acting on the piston or crosshead pin, along the line of stroke. 

Prandtl number (Pr): 

It is a dimensionless number that describes the relative thickness of the velocity and the 
thermal boundary layers. 

Radius of Gyration: 

A body when it rotates behaves as if all of its mass were concentrated in a ring at some 
distance from the axis of rotation. This distance is known as the Radius of Gyration of 
the body.  

Rayleigh number (Ra): 

It is simply the product of the Grashof number and the Prandtl number. 

Shaft Work: 

It  is  the  difference  between  the  cyclic  work  Wo  received  by  the  flywheel/output  shaft 
and indicated work Wi.  

  Page 131 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Ws = Wo − Wi 

Stoichiometric Air: 

The  minimum  amount  of  air  needed  for  the  complete  combustion  of  a  fuel  is  called 
stoichiometric or theoretical air. 

Swept Volume: 

The volume displaced during the reciprocating motion of the piston is called the swept 
volume. 

Temperature Ratio: 

Ratio  of  cold  space  temperature  to  hot  space  temperature  is  known  as  temperature 
ratio. It is denoted by τ. 

Thermal conductivity (k): 

The rate of heat transfer through a unit thickness of the material per unit area, per unit 
temperature difference. 

Turning Moment or Torque on Crankshaft: (T) 

The product of the crank‐pin effort and the crank‐pin radius is known as crank effort or 
turning moment or torque on the crankshaft. 

Workspace: 

The  working  substance,  typically  a  gas  confined  in  an  expansion  chamber  is  known  as 
working space. 

  Page 132 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

APPENDIX D 
“REFERENCES” 

  Page 133 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
 

[1]  Iskander  Tlili,  Youssef  Timoumi  and  Sassi  Ben  Nasrallah  (2007),  “Analysis  and 
design  consideration  of  mean  temperature  differential  Stirling  engine  for  solar 
application”,   Renewable Energy, Vol. 33 (2008), pg 1911–1921. 
 
[2]   Bancha  Kongtragool  and  Somchai  Wongwises  (2004),  “Investigation  on  power 
output of   the  gamma‐configuration  low  temperature  differential  Stirling  engines”, 
Renewable   Energy, Vol. 30 (2005), pg 465–476.   
 
[3]   Can  Cinar  and  Halit  Karabulut  (2004),  “Manufacturing  and  testing  of  a  gamma 
type   Stirling engine”, Renewable Energy, Vol. 30 (2005), pg 57–66.   
 

[4]   Bancha  Kongtragool,  Somchai  Wongwises  (2002),  “A  review  of  solar  powered 
stirling  engines  and  low  temperature  differential  stirling  engines”,  Renewable  and 
Sustainable   Energy Reviews, Vol. 7 (2003), pg 131–154.   
 

[5]   D.G.  Thombarea  and  S.K.  Vermab  (2006),  “Technological  development  in  the 
stirling  cycle engines”, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol. 12 (2008), pg 1‐
38.   
 

[6]   Leonardo Scollo, Pablo Valdez and Jorge Baro´n (2007), “Design and construction 
of a   Stirling engine prototype”, International Association for Hydrogen Energy (2008). 

  Page 134 
 
 
FINAL YEAR PROJECT REPORT                                           DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF A STIRLING CYCLE ENGINE

 
Books: 

James R. Senft 
“Mechanical Efficiency of Heat Engines”, Cambridge University Press, ISBN‐13 978‐0‐
511‐33538‐9. 
 
Theodor Finkelstein & Allan J. Organ 
“Air Engines”, Professional Engineering Publishing Limited, ISBN 1 86058 338 5 
 
Allan J. Organ 
“The Air Engine‐ Stirling Cycle Power for a sustainable future”, Woodhead Publishing 
Limited, ISBN 978‐1‐84569‐360‐2 
 

Research Articles: 

Bancha Kongtragool, Somchai Wongwises 
“Investigation on power output of the gamma‐configuration low temperature 
differential Stirling engines”, ELSEVIER (www.sciencedirect.com) 
 
Can Cinar , Halit Karabulut 
“Manufacturing and testing of a gamma type Stirling engine”, ELSEVIER 
(www.sciencedirect.com) 
 
Leonardo Scollo, Pablo Valdez, Jorge Baron 
“Design and construction of a Stirling engine prototype”, ELSEVIER 
(www.sciencedirect.com) 
 
Iskander Tlili, Youssef Timoumi, Sassi Ben Nasrallah 
“Analysis and design consideration of mean temperature differential Stirling engine for 
solar application”, ELSEVIER (www.sciencedirect.com) 
 

Web References: 

http://www.stirlingengine.fr/principles.php 
http://www.animatedengines.com/ltdstirling.shtml 
http://www.sesusa.org/ 
http://www.stirlingengine.com/ 
http://www.solarheatengines.com/ 
 

  Page 135