Workplace, Values, Ethics, and Emotions

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Values and Ethics at The Warehouse
The Warehouse in New Zealand is one of the world¶s top discount retailers because of its social responsibility practices and ³people first´ values. ³We have discovered that our policies of putting team members first « enables [them] to put the customers first and to provide exceptional service,´ explains founder Stephen Tindall.

Courtesy of The Warehouse

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Values Defined
Stable, long-lasting beliefs about what is important Define right or wrong, good or bad Include cross-cultural, ethical, and organizational culture values
Courtesy of The Warehouse

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Forms of Workplace Values
Terminal vs. Instrumental 
Terminal are desired states of
existence  Instrumental are desirable modes of behavior

Espoused vs.Enacted 
Espoused are values we want
others to believe we hold  Enacted are values-in-use, what we actually practice
Courtesy of The Warehouse

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Importance of Values at Work
Globalization  Increasing awareness of and
sensitivity to different values across cultures

Replacing Direct Supervision  Potentially aligns employees¶
decisions and actions with corporate goals

Demand for Ethical Practices  increasing pressure to engage
in ethical practices
Courtesy of The Warehouse

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

IndividualismIndividualism- Collectivism
Individualism
United States
Collectivists tend to:

Germany

Japan

1. Identify themselves by group membership 2. Give priority of group goals 3. Put more emphasis on harmonious relationships 4. Have more socially-based emotions (indebtedness)

China

Collectivism
McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Power Distance
High Power Distance
Malaysia

France Japan United States Germany

The degree that people accept an unequal distribution of power in society

Low Power Distance
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Uncertainty Avoidance
High U. A.
Japan Germany United States Singapore

The degree that people tolerate ambiguity (low U.A.) or feel threatened by ambiguity and uncertainty (high U.A.).

Low U. A.
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AchievementAchievement-Nurturing
Achievement
Japan

United States South Korea

The degree that people value assertiveness, competitiveness, and materialism (achievement) versus relationships and well-being of others (nurturing)

Sweden

Nurturing
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Long/ShortLong/Short-Term Orientation
Long-Term Orientation
China Japan

Netherlands United States Russia

The degree that people value thrift, savings, and persistence (long-term) versus past and present issues (short-term).

Short-Term Orientation
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Three Ethical Principles
Utilitarianism  Greatest good for greatest number Individual Rights  Fundamental entitlements in society Distributive Justice  Inequality must have equal access  Inequality must benefit the least well off

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Influences on Ethical Conduct
Moral intensity  Degree that issue demands ethical principles Ethical sensitivity  Ability to recognize the presence and determine
the relative importance of an ethical issue

Situational influences  Competitive pressures and other conditions
affect ethical behavior

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Emotions Defined
Feelings experienced toward an object, person, or event that create a state of readiness  Emotions demand attention and interrupt
our train of thought  Emotions are directed toward something

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Model of Attitudes and Behavior
Beliefs

Attitude

Feelings Behavioral Intentions

Emotional Episodes

Behavior
McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Emotional Labor Defined

The effort, planning and control needed to express organizationally desired emotions during interpersonal transactions

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

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Emotional Labor Issues
True emotions leak out -especially with low emotional adaptability Emotional dissonance causes stress Display norms vary across cultures

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Emotional Intelligence at VA Medical
Medical professionals at Jerry L. Pettis Memorial VA Medical Center in Loma Linda, California attend special classes where they receive their personal emotional intelligence profile and learn to improve their EQ.
Courtesy of Jerry L. Pettis Memorial VA Medical Center

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Emotional Intelligence Dimensions
SelfSelfAwareness Social Skill Emotional Intelligence SelfSelfRegulation

Empathy

SelfSelfMotivation

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Job Satisfaction and Behavior
Job satisfaction reduces turnover, absenteeism, theft Weak association with job performance because:
1. General attitude is a poor predictor of specific behaviors 2. Performance affects satisfaction through rewards

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Job Satisfaction and Customers
Ipswitch founder and CEO Roger Greene (center) has taken all 130 employees on a four-day cruise in the Bahamas. He believes that keeping employees happy will keep customers happy.
J. Wilcox, Boston Globe

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Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Employee-CustomerEmployee-Customer-Profit Chain
Org. Practices

Satisfied Employees

‡ Less turnover ‡ Consistent service

Customer¶s Perceived Value

‡ Satisfied customers ‡ Customer referrals

Higher Revenue Growth and Profits

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Organizational Commitment
Affective commitment  Emotional attachment to, identification
with, and involvement in an organization

Continuance commitment  Belief that staying with the organization
serves your personal interests

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Building Organizational Commitment
Maintain fairness and satisfaction Provide some job security Support organizational comprehension Involve employees in decisions Build trust

McShane/ Von Glinow 2/e

Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

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