FB/EK HOLDEN NASCO WARMARIDE HEATERS ENTHUSIASTS GUIDE

REVISION 0

DATE August 2010

UPDATE Initial draft for review.

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Table of Contents
Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................................2 1 Background ..................................................................................................................................3 2 Identifying the “Correct” Heater .................................................................................................5 3 Manuals, Documents and Records ........................................................................................... 11 3.1 Holden “FB” Parts Catalogue .......................................................................................................11 3.2 FB Holden NASCO Car Accessories brochure ............................................................................11 3.3 EK Holden NASCO Car Accessories brochure ............................................................................12 3.4 Holden Shop Manual “FB” Series ................................................................................................ 12 3.5 Holden Shop Manual “EK” Series ................................................................................................ 12 3.6 EK Holden Owners Manual ..........................................................................................................12 3.7 GMH Service Bulletin August 1960 .............................................................................................. 14 3.8 GMH Master Parts Catalogue ......................................................................................................15 3.9 Accelerator Magazines ................................................................................................................15 4 Heater Water Connections.........................................................................................................21 4.1 Grey Motor ...................................................................................................................................21 4.2 Red Motor ....................................................................................................................................23 4.3 Chevrolet V8 Motor ...................................................................................................................... 23 4.4 Thermostat ...................................................................................................................................23 5 Heater Hoses .............................................................................................................................. 25 6 Heater Cores ............................................................................................................................... 27 7 Heater Valves .............................................................................................................................. 28 7.1 Recirculatory Heater Valve ..........................................................................................................29 7.2 Fresh-Air Heater Valve ................................................................................................................29 7.3 Overhauling the Recirculatory Heater Valve ................................................................................30 7.4 Overhauling the Fresh-Air Heater Valve ...................................................................................... 34 7.5 Replacing the Heater Valve .........................................................................................................38 8 Demisters ....................................................................................................................................39 8.1 Demister Ducting Tube ................................................................................................................39 8.2 Demister Steel Nozzles ................................................................................................................40 8.3 Rubber Demister Duct Outlets .....................................................................................................41 9 Electrical Connection .................................................................................................................43 9.1 Wiring...........................................................................................................................................43 9.2 Fan Motor ....................................................................................................................................44 10 Heater Air Control ...................................................................................................................... 45 10.1 Recirculatory Heater .................................................................................................................... 45 10.2 Early Fresh-Air Heater .................................................................................................................46 10.3 Late Fresh-Air Heater ..................................................................................................................47 11 Removal, Disassembly and Reassembly ................................................................................48 11.1 Removing the Heater from the Vehicle ........................................................................................ 48 11.2 Removing the Recirculatory Heater Valve ................................................................................... 49 11.3 Removing the Fresh-Air Heater Valve ......................................................................................... 50 11.4 Disassembling the Heater Assembly ........................................................................................... 50 11.5 Reassembly and Installation ........................................................................................................53 12 Other Warmaride Heaters ..........................................................................................................54 12.1 FC Holden ....................................................................................................................................54 12.2 EJ Holden ....................................................................................................................................55 12.3 EH Holden ...................................................................................................................................56 12.4 HD Holden ...................................................................................................................................57 12.5 HR Holden ...................................................................................................................................58 12.6 Smiths Beehive ............................................................................................................................ 58 12.7 Hhhhhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmm....... ......................................................................................... 59 13 Part Numbers .............................................................................................................................. 60 13.1 FE/FC Holden .............................................................................................................................. 60 13.2 FB/EK Holden .............................................................................................................................. 60 13.3 EJ/EH Holden .............................................................................................................................. 61 13.4 HD/HR Holden ............................................................................................................................. 63

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1 Background This document aims to provide some information regarding the NASCO Warmaride heaters fitted to FB and EK Holdens. It contains  historical information, such as which heaters were advertised for different model Holdens,  practical information on identification, disassembly and reassembly of FB and EK Warmarides, and  guidance on replacement parts and overhaul techniques. It contains answers to many of the questions that seem to come up every winter on most of the early Holden forums: “Where do I connect the heater hoses to?” “Where can I get demister ducting from?” “Is anyone making aftermarket demister nozzles?” “My heater tap is dribbling hot water… can I replace it?” The FB and EK Holden Nasco Warmaride heaters that are the subject of this document are:  Either Recirculatory or Fresh-Air heaters. I will not deal with the FB/EK Motorless heater here... maybe if this document gets an update,  Are either black or very dark grey, though not as dark as the top of the dash was painted,  Have a matt finish that is rough to touch (like medium grit sandpaper),  Have a multiple-piece casing, with a 12-volt electric fan motor mounted in the lower casing, ventilation assemblies in the middle casing and the heater core located in the top casing. An additional flue assembly was fitted to the FreshAir heaters, and  Are fitted with a heater valve (of varying design) on the passenger‟s side of the heater core casing, controlled by the dash controls. Whilst this document is primarily related to the FB and EK Holden Warmaride heaters, much of the information is similar or identical to other early Holden heaters. Please bear in mind that the Warmaride heater is more than half a century old, and that very little documentation is known to exist other than references in parts manuals and Accelerator magazines (despite much hunting by enthusiasts, and both FE/FC and FB/EK Clubs). Much of the information below is drawn from internet forums, discussion with enthusiasts and common sense. I have used photos and other information from a wide variety of sources, particularly from the forums – if anyone is offended by my use of the material, feels I have breached copyright or needs recognition, please let me know and I will correct the issue immediately.

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I would however like to thank the following for their patience and willingness to help me learn:  Smooth (whose knowledge of most things NASCO, and incredible document collection has few rivals),  Tim Gall (who has pulled apart, put together, broken and fixed more FB/EK gear than most),  John McBride (an impressive machinist who could readily be the national Early Holden heater tap repair authority), and  Ken Mclean (whose knowledge of FE/FC Holdens is formidable). Equally, I have made opinions and drawn conclusions on some of the information I have found and equipment I have owned - if anyone believes that I have made an error (or knows a better way to do something), please let me know and I will update the document... after all, the main purpose here is to help other early Holden enthusiasts. I have marked some text in red in this document where I am missing information – any help in closing these gaps is appreciated. Like all things automotive, installing, operating and maintaining a Warmaride heater comes with a risk. Hot radiator water can scald, shoddy wiring can burn down a car, and poor firewall connections can let in exhaust fumes (amongst other hazards). Any advice contained in this document is to be taken at the reader‟s risk – qualified mechanics should be consulted where appropriate.

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2 Identifying the “Correct” Heater Early Holden heaters made by NASCO are generally of one of three types:  “Motorless”, which consisted of a bare radiator-type heater core which bolted in under the plenum control door. These heaters had no fan, and relied on Fresh-Air blowing in through the plenum vent whilst the car was moving. They are often referred to as the “poor man‟s heater” or “poverty pack” heater.  “Recirculatory”, which bolted to the firewall at about the level of the bottom of the dash. These heaters had a fan, but no connection to the plenum i.e. they “recirculated” warm air through the car, rather than heating the Fresh-Air coming in through the plenum vent.  “Fresh-Air”, which had a flue connecting the heater to the plenum vent (or in the case of the FC Holden, to the engine bay). These heaters had a fan, and could work in either “recirculatory” mode (plenum vent shut) or in “fresh air” mode heating the air coming in the plenum vent (similarly to a “Motorless” heater. Most, if not all these heaters were available with demister tubes and vents, sometimes as part of the original supply package, and sometimes as an optional extra. The following bullet points outline the heaters available for various early Holdens. I will include photographs of the FB/EK Holden heaters, with photographs of other model heaters attached in Section 12 below.  A 6-volt recirculatory heater was supplied by NASCO for the 48-215 and FJ Holden (48-50-„FJ‟ Universal part number M32083), which was advertised in the Accelerator magazine in the winter of 1957 as a NASCO Autoheat heater. By 1958 "Warmaride" began replacing the Autoheat naming, with the June 1960 Accelerator magazine listing the M32083 heater as a Warmaride Recirculatory heater. 1956 FE Holdens used the 12-volt round Bosch twin-door heater (part number M31601). It appears that the SMITHS heater was only ever offered at the same time as the Bosch heater in 1956 until the Nasco unit was released.  In the winter of 1957 (still the FE Holden), the Bosch twin-door heater unit was replaced with the round NASCO – Autoheat twin door heater (part number M32051). These units were made by Preslite for NASCO. Note that with some Autoheat twin door heaters were installed with the Preslite badging instead of NASCO badging. It is probable that the Preslite-badged heaters were never offered as a NASCO fitted heater on FE or FC. They were sold through aftermarket houses and are very common because they were cheaper than genuine heaters. By 1958 "Warmaride" began replacing the “Autoheat” naming, with the June 1960 Accelerator magazine listing the M32051 heater as a Warmaride Recirculatory heater for both FE and FC Holdens. A demister package was also offered for the FE (and FC) Holden heaters (part number 7406264, sometimes listed as M32843). A history of the naming changes described in Accelerator Magazines is appended in Section 3.9 below.

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FC Holdens were offered with two heaters: a) A Warmaride Recirculatory type, listed as the “FE-FC Universal Heater”, part number 7406627 (sometimes listed as M32841, such as in the June 1960 Accelerator magazine). Combining the FC Holden Warmaride heater with the demister package 7406264 gives the NASCO Recirculatory Heater and Demister, part number M33017. b) A further Smiths heater was also available (from NASCO?), part number 7406185. This info is listed on the national FE/FC club site, though I‟m not sure if this was just for FC‟s though. c) In the May 1960 Accelerator magazine, an FE-FC fresh-air heater was listed as M32480. This heater has a control panel tailored for „FE‟ „FC‟ which fits immediately underneath the Radio Grille. Separate lever type controls adjust the temperature and Fresh-Air intake and a rheostat switch controls the speed of the fan. This was the first Holden heater valve to be adjusted by dash controls. The heater looks very similar to (if not identical to) the Smiths Beehive heater with the inlet & outlet at opposite corners, though has ducting which runs from the heater through the engine bay across the motor to the off side radiator support panel, into which a hole was cut to supply "fresh air" via the ducting to the back of the heater using one of the controls. Early FB Holdens (1960 models and less so 1961 models) could also have been fitted with a round Warmaride heater of similar design to the FE-FC Universal Heater. The heaters were not common, being dealer-fitted from stock on hand. Later FB Holdens were offered with a Recirculatory Warmaride heater (part number 7414673). These were a square-case heater with no flue above the core casing. The core casing is topped by a “Cover Plate & Stud Assembly FB, EK”, part number 74231331 and a bracket (which bridges between the Stud Assembly and the plenum control door). These had a heater water valve, listed as Valve Water FB, EK”, part number 74231311, located on the passenger‟s side of the heater casing. The heater water valve is be adjusted by the dash controls (using a second lever on the standard control mechanism, listed as “Lever - Hot Water Control FB, EK”, part number 74146801). The second lever is mounted alongside the “first” lever, which all FB/EKs were fitted with from the factory (the “first” lever opens and closes the plenum control door). The Recirculatory heater was also fitted to EKs.

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EK Holdens were offered with a Fresh-air Warmaride, listed as the “Heater - Fresh-Air and Demister FB, EK Right Hand Drive”, part number 7414672. The EK Fresh-air Warmaride has a flue that bolts between the core casing and plenum control door. It has a hinged flap on the driver‟s side to allow air to recirculate (if the plenum control door is shut), but no other air doors. The “Cover Plate & Stud Assembly FB, EK”, part number 74231331 and bracket (which bridges between the Stud Assembly and the plenum control door) is not used with the Fresh-Air heaters as the flue replaces it. The Fresh-Air heater has no connection to the dashmounted controls other than the water valve control. The water valve on Fresh-air heaters was changed to the Ranco thermostatic-type, listed as Valve Assembly - Control FB, EK, part number 74146291. Ranco valves were offered in all subsequent Warmaride heaters (for EJ, EH, HD and HR Holdens). A conversion package was offered to turn FB Holden Recirculating Warmaride heaters into EK Holden Fresh-air Warmaride heaters (Conversion Package - Recirculating to Fresh-Air FB Right Hand Drive, part number 7425042). Some EK Holdens were also fitted with a Fresh-air Warmaride with separate air controls. The flue has doors on the passenger and drivers side with a connection to the dash-mounted control. Levers on the front of the casing move internal flaps (they either cover the core, or close the side doors). The levers were connected to the dash controls. I am not certain how the lever controls are connected to the dash… would dearly love a photo of the air control connections. Late in the EK model run (July 1962), a Motorless heater was offered for the EK Holden, listed in the Accelerator magazine as “Heater Package – Motorless FB, EK”, part number 7422438. A separate “Demister Package FB, EK”, part number M35155 was also offered. There is a good chance that some of these Motorless heaters were fitted by dealers into FB Holdens, even though they were not the "new model" EJ Holden or the "outgoing model" EK Holden. Motorless heaters were of the type seen in the image to the right, which has been fitted with an optional demister package.

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Some FB/EK heaters (fitted to mainly commercial vehicles and utilities) utilise the Fresh-air casing, core, flue and mounting points, but have blank off plates fitted to the fan motor and fan switch apertures. These heaters would have operated exactly like a Motorless heater (i.e. were not able to operate in a recirculation mode). I am not aware of any separate part numbers, dealer or NASCO documentation which describes these heaters. It is possible that dealers cobbled them together from parts at hand, although: a) the platform bracket for the heater tap, normally welded to the passenger‟s side rear of the casing is absent, and b) enough heaters have been found installed in vehicles to suggest that they were offered as an option rather than a “backyard special”.

EJ Holdens were offered with their own Motorless heater, listed as “Heater and Demister Package - Motorless EJ exc. EJ/235”, part number 7420704. The heater and demisters could also be purchased separately as the “Heater Package - Motorless EJ exc. EJ/235”, part number 7420461 and “Demister Package - Motorless Heater EJ exc. EJ/235”, part number 7420460.

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EJ Holdens were also offered with a Deluxe (sometimes spelt De luxe) FreshAir heater, listed as “Heater - Fresh-Air and Demister EJ exc. EJ/235”, part number 7419286. This was similar in design to the EK fresh-air heater, but had a different fan location (no lower louvered casing) and different mounting. The EJ Holden Ranco heater valve (“Valve Assembly - Heater Control EJ, EH”, part number 74186961) is on the driver‟s side (different from the FB/EK Holden Warmaride heater). The EJ/EH Holden heater valves are different to EK Holden valves. EK Holden valves had a cap soldered on the heater tap body end to allow the valve spindle to come out for overhaul, EJ/EH valves have a bottom outlet pipe that allows the spindle to come out without desoldering. Some EJ Holdens may have been fitted with the Universal round FC style Warmaride (as the recirculatory heater was listed in the NASCO brochure, and in the August 1962 Accelerator magazine), though this was not common. All adverts after August 1962 referred to two types only - Fresh-Air and Motorless, suggesting even further the round FC Holden-style heater had been put to rest and extremely unlikely to ever been fitted to EJ Holdens (dealer clearance stock excluded). EH Holdens were offered with their own Motorless heater, listed as “Heater and Demister Package Motorless EH exc. EH/235, EH/239”, part number 7420709. The heater and demisters could also be purchased separately as “Heater Package Motorless EH exc. EH/235, EH/239”, part number 7420458 and “Demister Package Motorless Heater EH exc. EH/235, EH/239”, part number 7420460. EH Holdens were also offered with their own Fresh-air heater, listed as “Heater Fresh-Air and Demister EH exc. EH/235, EH/239, part number 7422768”. On the EH Holden heater, the Ranco heater valve (“Valve Assembly - Heater Control EJ, EH”, part number 74186961) is also on the driver‟s side (similar to EJ). EH Holdens had two sets of outlets – a round set for the demisters and a square set for warming your feet/the rest of the car. HD Holdens offered their own Motorless heater, listed as “Heater Package Motorless HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive”, part number 7427704. This heater was not available with the X2 engine package. The Motorless heater also had demisters available, listed as “Demister Package - Motorless Heater HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive “, part number 7427670. The heater and demisters could also be purchased together as “Heater and Demister Package - Motorless HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive”, part number 7427668. For X2 engines, a separate Motorless heater was available, listed as Heater and Demister Package - Motorless HD X2 Eng. exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive”, part number 7429046.

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HD Holdens were also offered with a Fresh-Air heater, listed as “Heater Fresh-Air and Demister HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive”, part number 7427229. Two conversion packages were available, being “Conversion package - Fresh-Air Heater and Demister HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Left Hand Drive” (part number M35477” and “Conversion Package Fresh-Air Heater HD X2 Eng. exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive” (part number 7429047).

Notwithstanding the above, some heaters may have been fitted by dealers from old stock-on-hand, so it is possible that previous-model heaters were supplied to current-model cars. Additionally, some heaters were not available when a car was released, but were supplied retrospectively (and often a long time after the model vehicle had ceased production) by NASCO (for example the 48-215 Holden Warmaride heater being offered in mid-1960). Further, a number of other aftermarket heaters were available for early Holdens, including several variants of the Smiths‟ “beehive” heaters (see picture to the right). To make life even more difficult, early Holden enthusiasts have fitted many different heaters to different models over the years. The upshot of all this is that although the above information should act as a guide, it is not unusual (nor necessarily “unoriginal/non-genuine”) for different types of heaters to be fitted to a given model Holden.

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3 Manuals, Documents and Records The following provides some information on the documentation known to exist for FB/EK heaters. Of note, the “artwork” used in many Holden and NASCO publications is often incorrect – examples will be pointed out as they occur in the text below. 3.1 Holden “FB” Parts Catalogue The Holden “FB” Parts Catalogue indicates that two heaters were available from Holden: a) The “Fresh-Air and Demister Package”, part number 7414672, and b) The “Recirculating and Demister Package”, part number 7414673. The catalogue shows a line drawing of a round heater with doors marked “NASCO” and “Warmaride” similar to that offered on the FC Holden. While It is possible that FB Holdens were offered with either the round or square type Warmaride heaters, it is more likely that few FB Holdens were sold with the round FC type Warmaride heater shown in the Holden FB Parts Catalogue (the brochure artwork thus may be a hangover from the FC Holden sales process). 3.2 FB Holden NASCO Car Accessories brochure The FB Holden NASCO Car Accessories brochure indicates that a “Car Heater” was available, with the following text: “Even on the coldest winter day you drive snug and warmed with warm air flow throughout the car. Demisters supplied with the heater remove dangerous windshield fogging. Two types...Fresh-Air and Recirculating”. The accompanying drawing shows a square cased heater with a heater knob and winged escutcheon located under the centre of the dash. Note that the picture to the right merges two pages from the brochure.

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3.3 EK Holden NASCO Car Accessories brochure

The EK NASCO Car Accessories brochure is identical to the FB brochure with respect to the heater text and picture. Note that the picture to the left again merges two pages from the brochure.

3.4 Holden Shop Manual “FB” Series The Holden Shop Manual “FB” Series indicates the following with respect to heaters: “Note: If a car heater is fitted as an accessory, it is permissible to use an AC thermostat with a “Start to open” temperature of up to 173ºF. to improve the heater performance. However, should excessive detonation be detected or if hard driving is employed, it is advisable to replace with the standard thermostat.” “Note: Draining of the main radiator and the cylinder block will not drain the water out of the radiator of the accessory car heater; therefore, where a heater is fitted, it is essential that a suitable anti-freeze solution be used. If temperatures of 32ºF. or below are likely to be encountered, damage to the heater may occur. 3.5 Holden Shop Manual “EK” Series The Holden Shop Manual “EK” Series is identical to the FB manual with respect to the heater text. Note that I have not included a copy of the manual here as it is absolutely identical the FB manual picture above. 3.6 EK Holden Owners Manual The EK Holden Owners Manual offers the following advice:

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Heating (Accessory) Two types of heaters, designed to fit your Holden, are available as an accessory from your Holden dealer. Operating instructions are as follows:WARMARIDE FRESH-AIR HEATER OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS TO HEAT A. Initial Warm-Up Position of controls as follows:1. Heat Control Lever – ON 2. Air Control Lever – OFF (at bottom of slot) 3. Fan switch – FAST For maximum heater performance, all the windows should be closed. B. Fresh-Air Heating After the car has warmed up, more pleasant driving conditions should be obtained by utilizing Fresh-Air heating: i.e., with the controls positioned as follows:1. Heat Control Lever – ON 2. Air Control Lever – ON 3. Fan switch – OFF (Not normally required for Fresh-Air heating conditions). 4. One Window – Open at least 1 in. To 1½ in. to complete air (Preferably Rear) flow. During driving, the Fresh-Air heater output may be controlled by:1. Heat Control Lever. This may be adjusted to regulate the temperature of the heated air, so as to give the most comfortable driving conditions. 2. Air Control Lever. This may be adjusted between the OFF and ON positions to regulate the amount of heated air entering the car. Note: It is recommended that most of the regulating be done using the more sensitive heat control lever. TO DE-MIST When windows fog up during slow or city driving the condensation may be cleared up by using the controls as follows:1. Heat Control Lever – Leave these levers in the setting they are in at 2. Air Control Lever – the time of fogging up. 3. Fan – Minor Fogging – SLOW position - Extremely Bad FAST position Fogging

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SUMMER VENTILATION For Summer Ventilation, the controls should be positioned as follows:1. Heat Control Lever – OFF 2. Air Control Lever – ON 3. Fan Switch – Normal Conditions OFF Extreme Conditions The fan should be turned to FAST to enable additional air to be drawn into the car. WARMARIDE RECIRCULATING HEATER AIR CONTROL The Air-Control Lever has no effect whatever on this heater and should always be left in the OFF position when the heater is in use. WARMING UP: For Warming Up, the controls should be positioned as follows:1. Heat Control Lever – ON (Full) 2. Fan Switch – FAST 3. Windows – Closed – For maximum performance during warm-up period. NORMAL RUNNING After Warm-Up, the heater may be controlled by:1. Heat Control Lever This may be adjusted to regulate the temperature of the heated air, so as to vive the most comfortable driving conditions. 2. Fan Switch For drastic reduction of heat, the switch may be turned to slow. Windows should be closed for maximum performance, but may need to be opened slightly for individual comfort. TO DE-MIST The normal running setting of the heater should be adequate for de-misting, but in extreme conditions the fan switch should be turned to FAST to ensure satisfactory de-misting. 3.7 GMH Service Bulletin August 1960 The GMH Service Bulletin August 1960 offers the following advice: DEMISTER NOZZLE ALIGNMENT – “FB” Investigations into unsatisfactory demisting experienced on “FB” Model revealed misalignment of the demister nozzle due to minor discrepancies in the instrument panel demister slot. This causes the demister air stream to be partly blocked off by the instrument panel, or the air stream to be misdirected and hitting the windshield too high for

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satisfactory demisting. To check correct location of demister nozzle, make up a cardboard template to dimensions shown in Fig. 1, and insert centrally into nozzle. The outside corner of the template – Point A – should be within ¼in. of the windshield. If the gap is more than ½in., the position of the nozzle should be altered by setting the mounting lugs with pliers. Do not attempt to align nozzle by applying force to the hose. 3.8 GMH Master Parts Catalogue The GMH Master Parts catalogue (20 Years of Holden Production) lists the part numbers given in Section 13 below. It also contains two drawings, one of what appears to be a disassembled EH Holden heater, and one of the disassembled air control door/dash controls from an FB/EK Holden. 3.9 Accelerator Magazines The Bosch heater is first advertised in the August 1956 Accelerator Magazine as a NASCO heater. The article describes SMITHS 6- and 12-volt heaters as also being available "tailored for Holden". The Bosch heater is again advertised in the June 1957 Accelerator Magazine, though with no mention of SMITHS. The NASCO Autoheat heater is advertised in the same issue along with a demister package. The NASCO Autoheat heater is advertised again in the July 1957 Accelerator Magazine, and a 6-volt unit is added to the range. The NASCO Autoheat is advertised again in the August 1957 Accelerator Magazine. A 1957 Accelerator magazine (I‟m not sure which month) has an advertisement for NASCO heaters with the following notes: NASCO CAR HEATERS FOR SIX AND TWELVE VOLT SYSTEMS NASCO CAR HEATERS are tops in efficiency and appearance, and the price is just right too. It‟s the accessory your customers will be looking for now the bleak winter months are with us. There‟s no need to stress the comfort and warmth that comes with the NASCO HEATERS – that should be apparent. However, you should tell them how they are free from vibration, quiet in operation, powerful and trouble-free in service. The fawn hammer tone finish of the case and the attractively styled diecastings of the doors used to control the flow of warm air make this a tastefully designed accessory. Talk to your customers about NASCO CAR HEATERS, you‟ll find it will pay. Also sell the „FE‟ Holden Demister Unit which is designed to fir the slots provided in the cowl, and keeps the windscreen clear of internal fog. PART NO. M32051. (12 volt). List Price £20 10 0 plus TAX PART NO. M32083. (6 volt). List Price £20 10 0 plus TAX PART NO. 7406264. (Demister). List Price £4 0 0 plus TAX

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The NASCO Autoheat heater was advertised again in the May 1958 Accelerator magazine. This was a large two-page feature, with the demister featured. It is advertised as the "Warmaride" heater, though the picture shows an Autoheat heater. A 1958 Accelerator magazine (I‟m not certain which month but believe it to be June) has the first advertisement for Warmaride heaters with the following notes: NOW IS NASCO CAR HEATER TIME THE NASCO WARMARIDE CAR HEATER… has been manufactured in two types to fit all model Holdens. There is a 12 volt model tailored specifically for „FE‟ and „FC‟ Holden – and a 6 volt model tailored for all previous Holdens. These NASCO car heaters provide warm driving comfort in cold wintry conditions. Warm hands and feet are more active than those stiff with cold – it may be wintry outside but inside it‟s like a warm summer day. Both the 6 volt and 12 volt models are simple to modify for use as universal units. PART No. DESCRIPTION LIST PRICE M32051 NASCO Car Heater – 12 volt £20 10 0 M32083 NASCO Car heater – 6 volt £20 10 0 NASCO car heaters are… * Free from vibration * Powerful and trouble-free in action * Quiet * Easy ion the battery only draw 1-1½ amperes OPTIONAL WINDSCREEN PDEMISTER PACKAGE FOR „FE‟ HOLDEN A fogged-up windscreen is a real driving hazard, but the danger of restricted vision is eliminated when this Demister is used with the NASCO CAR HEATER. Dual streams of warm air are directed all over theinside of the windscreen from concealed jets mounted under the instrument panel. Mist is melted away in seconds – the screen is clear and remains clear even whent here are 4 of 5 passengers in the car.Sell driving safety. Sell your customers a Demister Package with their NASCO Car Heater. Part No.7406264 Demister Package List Price £3 7 6 plus tax. There was a further large two-page feature on the Warmaride heaters in the July 1958 Accelerator magazine. The Warmaride heater was again advertised in the August 1958 Accelerator magazine. A large two-page feature on the Warmaride heaters appeared in the April 1959 Accelerator magazine. The May 1959 Accelerator magazine heater advertisement indicates the release of the new fresh air heater for FE FC. The June 1959 Accelerator magazine again advertises both heaters. The July 1959 Accelerator magazine clearly shows the NASCO beehive heater as the unit in the fresh air package. The advertisement has good clear pictures of installation in the dash area and engine bay.

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The May 1960 Accelerator magazine, an FE-FC fresh-air heater was listed as M32480. This heater has a control panel tailored for „FE‟ „FC‟ which fits immediately underneath the Radio Grille. Separate lever type controls adjust the temperature and Fresh-Air intake and a rheostat switch controls the speed of the fan. The June 1960 Accelerator magazine has an advertisement for Warmaride heaters with the following notes: Your customers can enjoy all the comforts of home with NASCO WINTER ACCESSORIES in the cars Plan a winter selling campaign around these NASCO Winter Accessories. They are all “hot” Winter sellers, so stock up now and get set to enjoy bigger and more profitable Winter Accessory business in 1960. NASCO WARMARIDE CAR HEATERS NASCO car heaters are ideal for winter driving. They give spring temperatures all winter though – they ensure complete satisfaction. Tell your customers they have two types to choose from: NASCO WARMARIDE RECIRCULATORY HEATER This effective and reliable Heater takes the heat from hot water in the cooling system. A silent, low-drain electric fan distributes warm air throughout the vehicle. Part No. Voltage Model List Price M32083 6 volt 48-50-„FJ‟ Universal £20 10 0 M32841 12 volt „FE‟, „FC‟ Universal £22 10 0 M32843 Demister Package £3 10 0 7414673 12 volt „FB‟ Holden £26 2 6 NASCO WARMARIDE FRESH-AIR HEATER Year round comfort from this dual purpose heater. In winter it forces a controlled flow of warmed Fresh-Air throughout the vehicle and onto the windshield through the demister tubes. In summer it provides additional Fresh-Air ventilation.

Part No. M32603 7414672 6333360 6333362

Voltage Model List Price 12 volt Chevrolet and Pontiac £35 0 0 12 volt „FB‟ Holden £31 10 0 12 volt 1960 Vauxhall Victor £30 0 0 12 volt 1960 Vauxhall PA £30 0 0 SALES TAX TO BE ADDED TO PRICES SHOWN

The June 1962 Accelerator magazine has an advertisement for Warmaride heaters with the following notes: MAKE WINTER YOUR ALLY SELL NASCO WARMARIDE CAR HEATERS

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It‟s easy to sell NASCO Warmaride Car Heaters… and the profits are HIGH! Impress upon your customers the extra comfort and safety NASCO Car Heaters provide during the cold winter months. How do you do this? Fit a NASCO Heater to your own car and use it for demonstrations. Talk NASCO Warmaride Heaters to GMH vehicle owners at every opportunity. Display NASCO Car Heaters prominently in your showroom, using display cards to point out the extra benefits these “winter warmers” give. You‟ll find that sales come much easier than you ever expected. Order stocks of both types of NASCO Car Heaters from your NASCO Distributor today. Part number 7389297 Model Type List Price „59, ‟60, ‟61 Chevrolet, Pontiac 2 £38 0 0 7389297 also does 1962 Chevrolet but not Pontiac. 7414672 „FB‟, „EK‟, Holdens 2 £31 10 0 M33017 „FE‟, „FC‟ Holdens 1 £23 0 0 7414673 „FB‟, „EK‟, Holdens 1 £26 2 6 6333360 1960 „F‟ Vauxhall 2 £30 0 0 6343623 1961 „F‟ Vauxhall 2 £31 7 6 (Case parts kit 6353000) 6356677 1962 „FB‟ Vauxhall Victor 2 £35 7 6 6333362 1960-61 „PA‟ Vauxhall 2 £33 12 6 6369762 1962 „PA‟ Vauxhall 2 £35 0 0 All prices plus Sales Tax. TWO TYPES 1. NASCO WARMARIDE RECIRCUALTORY HEATER AND DEMISTER This effective and reliable heater takes heat from the hot water in the cooling system. A silent, low-drain fan distributes the warm air throughout the vehicle and on to the windshield through the demister tubes. 2. NASCO WARMARIDE FRESH-AIR HEATER In winter the NASCO Fresh-Air Heater forces a controlled flow of warmed FreshAir throughout the vehicle and on to the windshield. In summer it provides additional Fresh-Air ventilation. Separate lever controls adjust the temperature and Fresh-Air intake and a two speed switch controls the speed of the fan. The July 1962 Accelerator magazine has an advertisement for Warmaride heaters with the following notes: A TIMELY ADDITION TO THE NASCO RANGE NEW NASCO MOTORLESS CAR HEATER For FB and EK HOLDEN The cold weathers really with us now! People are beginning to feel that they need a car heater. So, just in time for the 1962 selling season, NASCO introduce this new, low priced, but most effective Motorless Car Heater for FB and EK Holden. Simple in operation, cold Fresh-Air forced through the plenum chamber by vehicle motion passes through special heater unit. Air vent lever on panel controls inward flow of warm, Fresh-Air which circulates around the car, giving

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driver passengers all-over warmth. The NASCO Motorless Car Heater is easy to fit, too… takes less than 45 minutes. Place an order for stocks of the new NASCO Motorless Car Heater with your NASCO Distributor today. Profit from your share of the extra business this economically priced heater will bring. Part No. 7422438 List Price: £8 plus tax. A WIDER CHOICE FOR HOLDEN OWNERS Now you can offer Holden owners a choice of three NASCO Car Heaters. There‟s the new Motorless Car Heater… the NASCO Warmaride Fresh-Air Heater and the NASCO Warmaride Recirculatory Heater. All are really “hot” sellers. Stock up now, and get set for bigger and more profitable winter accessory business. NASCO WARMARIDE FRESH-AIR HEATER In Winter, the NASCO Fresh-Air Heater forces a controlled flow of warmed Fresh-Air throughout the vehicle and onto the windshield through the demister tubes. In Summer it provides additional Fresh-Air ventilation. Use this table when ordering: PART No. 7414672 6333360 6333362 6343623 6353000 7389297 1962 Chevrolet 6269762 6356677 MODEL LIST PRICE FB, EK Holden £31 10 0 1960 Vauxhall Victor £30 0 0 1960, 61 Vauxhall PA £33 12 6 1961 Vauxhall Victa £31 7 6 Installation kit for 6343623 £2 5 6 1959-61 Chevrolet & Pontiac £38 0 0 1962 PA Vauxhall £35 0 0 FB Vauxhall Victor £35 17 6 (Add sales tax to all prices) NASCO WARMARIDE RECIRCUALTORY HEATER AND DEMISTER This effective and reliable heater takes the heat from the hot water in the cooling system. A silent, low-drain electric fan distributes warm air throughout the vehicle. Demisters stop windshield fogging. Traveling becomes more comfortable. Order as under: PART No. MODEL LIST PRICE M33017 FE, FC Holden £23.0.0 7414673 FB, EK Holden £26.2.6 (Add sales tax to all prices) TELL YOUR CUSTOMERS ABOUT THE BIG RANGE OF WARMARIDE CAR HEATERS AVAILABLE FROM NASCO DISTRIBUTORS The August 1962 Accelerator magazine has an advertisement for Warmaride heaters with the following notes:

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NOW… THERE ARE 3 TYPES OF NASCO WARMARIDE CAR HEATERS 1. NASCO WARMARIDE RECIRCUALTORY HEATER AND DEMISTER This effective and reliable heater takes heat from the hot water in the cooling system. A silent, low-drain fan distributes the warm air throughout the car, onto the windshield through the demister tubes. Tailored models available for „FE‟, „FC‟, „FB‟ and „EK‟ Holdens. Priced from £23 0 0 plus tax. 2. NASCO WARMARIDE FRESH-AIR HEATER In winter the NASCO Fresh-Air Heater forces a controlled flow of warmed FreshAir throughout the vehicle and on to the windshield. In summer it provides additional Fresh-Air ventilation. Separate lever controls adjust the temperature and Fresh-Air intake, and a two speed switch controls the force of the fan. Tailored models available for 1959-62 Chevrolet and Pontiac, „FB‟, „EK‟, „EJ‟ Holden, Vauxhall Victor and PA models. Priced from £31 10 0 plus tax. 3. NEW NASCO WAMRARIDE MOTORLESS CAR HEATER Simple in operation and very economically priced, this new Motorless heater uses the heat from the water in the radiator to warm the entire car. Fresh-Air forced through the plenum chamber by vehicular motion passes through a heated core element and into the car. Tailored models available for „EK‟ and „EJ‟ Holden models. Priced from £8 0 0 plus tax. You can offer your customers a wide range of NASCO Car Heaters. Every sale you make means really big profits, too. Order stocks from your NASCO Distributor today! Note that scanned copies of many of the above Accelerator magazines (and the Master Parts Catalogue) are available here http://earlyholdens.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=166 , though you will need to be a member of the forum to view them. Many thanks to both Smooth and Ken Mclean for digging through their collections of documentation.

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4 Heater Water Connections 4.1 Grey Motor The water connections to a grey motor varied with the model vehicle they were fitted to. Many early Holdens have had their motors changed over time… so your FB/EK Holden may well have an FJ motor, or an EJ one!. As a starting point, check the engine number. It is located on the driver‟s side of the motor, near the distributor, where there is a small flat surface with the numbers stamped into it. It may be painted over or covered with grease.        FX numbers started at 1001, FJ numbers started at 121694, FE numbers started at L283373, FC numbers at L439507, FB numbers started at B1001, EK numbers started at B175814, and EJ numbers started at J1001.

As well as changing engines, it‟s also possible that the cylinder head, thermostat housing and water pump may have been changed over time. The table below gives a guide to where the heater water connections are made in different model grey motors: Holden Model FE and FC

FX and FJ

Plug in lower thermostat housing?

Yes – 3/8” plug for heater return hose. Thermostat housing part number 7401195.

Number of holes in cylinder head

One (for temperature sender switch)

FB, EK and EJ No plug, but can be converted to suit by drilling and tapping. Thermostat housing number 7414666. Two (one for temperature sender switch and one for heater return hose).

Heater supply hose connection Heater return hose connection

To ½” hole in water pump housing. To hole in cylinder head (not temperature sender hole!).

To hole in thermostat housing.

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The FE/FC Holden type lower thermostat housing (with 3/8” threaded hole circled in red), is pictured to the right.

The picture to the right shows the heater hose locations for FB/EK/EJ Holdens really well – the heater hoses have been removed and replaced with bright green garden hose to block-off the nipples.

Note that FX, FJ, FC and FE Holden cylinder heads have only one hole, which is used for the temperature sender switch. It is not good practice to install a teepiece in this hole and connect both the temperature sender switch and heater hose. Doing so means that the temperature sender switch is placed a lot further away from the cylinder head, and if the heater is not turned on (e.g. in summer) the switch may have no or little water flowing past it. This means the switch is not really sensing the temperature very well… you could overheat the engine well before the warning light comes on! If your cylinder head has only one hole, then the lower thermostat housing is the only feasible place to connect the heater hose to. Note that FB, EK and EJ Holden lower thermostat housings have no holes drilled for heater hoses. If you have an FX/FJ/FE/FC Holden cylinder head (one hole) and an FB/EK/EJ Holden lower thermostat housing (no hole), then you will need to drill and tap the lower thermostat housing (tap 3/8”). Some lower thermostat housings have a boss on the driver‟s side of the housing which has some extra meat to give the threaded connection strength, others do not.

When making the connection, barbed nipples are required (one with a ½” thread, one with a 3/8” thread). These are readily available from most auto-parts stores. Try to get the barbed part of the fitting to suit 5/8” hose where possible (the nipples pictures to the right suit ½” hose).

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4.2 Red Motor Red motors are a common conversion for FB/EK Holdens. Water connections to the red motor are as follows: Heater supply To hole in water pump housing. hose connection Heater return Thermostat lower housing. hose connection 4.3 Chevrolet V8 Motor Chevrolet small-block engines are a popular conversion for early Holdens. Water connection to the Chevrolet small-block V8 (307, 327, 350 etc) is generally as follows: Heater supply To hole in water pump housing. hose connection Heater return To hole in front of inlet manifold. hose connection Note that some inlet manifolds may not have the hole for the heater hose, and may require drilling and tapping. A further option is to source a thermostat housing with a separate pipe cast into it for the heater hose.

4.4 Thermostat The thermostat is an engine coolant temperature control valve assembly that prevents circulation of coolant through the radiator until a predetermined engine temperature is achieved. This allows the engine to reach its operating temperature generally within the first ten minutes of operation. Upon reaching the predetermined temperature, the thermostat opens and allows coolant to flow through the radiator. This is especially important for stop/start type driving, short journeys, operation in cold weather or where the cooling system has excess capacity. In these cases the thermostat may not be fully open. As noted above (for grey motors), if a heater is fitted it is permissible to use an thermostat with a “Start to open” temperature of up to 173ºF (78.3ºC) to improve the heater performance. However, should excessive detonation (pinging) be detected or if hard driving is employed, it is advisable to use the standard thermostat with a “Start to open” temperature of 160ºF (71ºC). Bearing in mind that modern fuels are significantly higher in octane than the original FB/EK Holden fuel (current unleaded petrol is 91RON and premium petrol is 95RON versus the original FB/EK Holden fuel of 86RON), detonation is less of an issue.

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Grey motors use a non-bypass thermostat fitted with a jiggle pin that enables the system pressure to be stabilised so that the thermostat opens more easily. The jiggle pin also allows air pockets to move past the thermostat and the temperature to be regulated more efficiently. For motors where the cooling capacity is marginal, using a high flow thermostat may improve cooling system performance. They have a larger valve and allow approximately 30% more coolant flow than standard type thermostats. The following TRIDON thermostats are suitable for this advice, and are readily available from most auto-parts stores: Opening Part number Type Flange diameter temperature TT1-160 Conventional 54mm 71ºC (160ºF) TT2000-160 High flow 54mm 71ºC (160ºF) TT1-167 Conventional 54mm 75ºC (167ºF) TT1-170 Conventional 54mm 77ºC (171ºF) TT2000-170 High flow 54mm 77ºC (171ºF) Note that the corresponding TRIDON thermostat gasket is part number TTG29U.

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5 Heater Hoses The following advice relates to routing of the heater hoses:  The heater pipes for the FE Holden come straight out from the firewall with the hoses directing under the air cleaner, over the manifold and rocker to the inlet/outlet points on the water pump and thermostat housing. The heater tap was fitted to the thermostat housing.  The FC Holden heaters had a 90º bend in the pipes which directed the hoses up the firewall to a clip on the top of the firewall near the wiper motor then down along the left hand side of the rocker cover to the water pump and thermostat housing. The heater tap was fitted to the thermostat housing.  FB/EK Holden hoses pass from the firewall, with the return hose going directly to the cylinder head. The supply hose is clamped to the rocker cover (see pictures with red circles below) before passing along the driver‟s side of the rocker cover to the water pump.

On very early FB Holdens (1959 production) the heater outlet hole in the firewall was vertical, and was offset to the passenger‟s side just above the compliance plate, with some firewalls having no pressing ridges or even being cut open for the heater hose grommet. Later FB and EK Holden firewall holess are angled, and located between the wiper motor and the mechanical accelerator linkage mounting point. Heater hoses pass through a grommet located on the passenger‟s side of the firewall. The grommet may either be a blank, or have the holes “pushed out”. Replacement grommets are available from Rare Spares (“Grommet Firewall Heater Hose FE - HT Universal”, part number 7420721) and Scotts Old Auto Rubber (“Heater Hose Grommet”, part number 238.141). It makes no difference to the heater operation as to which hose (from the water pump or from the thermostat/cylinder head) is connected to which heater pipe (before or after the tap) on the heater.

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The copper heater pipes are 16mm (5/8”) outside diameter. ½” heater hose will fit, but is very difficult to get in place (and doesn‟t fill the firewall grommets very well). 5/8” heater hose is a much better option. To help ease the heater hoses on to the heater pipes and nipples, ensure the copper pipes and brass nipples are clean. Use a small smear of liquid dishwashing detergent to lubricate the copper pipes and brass nipples. Dip the heater hose ends into a coffee mug of hot water for half a minute to soften them up before sliding them on.

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6 Heater Cores The heater core pictured to the right is from an FB/EK Holden Warmaride heater. Warmaride heater cores are notorious for leaking, with many radiator repair shops not being prepared to repair them. This is especially true for the FC Holden Warmaride heater element - no aftermarket replacement is known to exist for them. Some alternatives for the FC Holden Warmaride core are:  Modifying the Warmaride base plate and fitting the core from a Bosch heater, which is much more robust. This involves finding a donor Bosch heater, which are becoming rare.  Making a replacement core from ½" copper tube, formed around a one litre paint tin and silver soldered pipe in various spots to hold together. A few words of caution around pressure testing the heater core for leaks:  FX-FE Holdens had a 4 psi radiator cap. Later model FE Holdens and all subsequent grey motors had a 7 psi cap. Red motors, and many transplanted engines run a 13 psi cap. The FB/EK Holden Warmaride heater was originally designed to operate on grey motors which have a 7 psi cooling system (i.e. the radiator cap will open up and dribble out water to ensure that the heater can only see 7 psi of pressure). 7 psi is not very much pressure!  Tap water pressure (in Sydney as an example) ranges from 21.3 psi (Sydney Water‟s minimum Operating Licence condition) to 142 psi, with an average of 70 psi. Bearing in mind that the grey motor‟s cooling system was designed to run at 7 psi, it is clear that you need to be careful in hooking up a garden hose to the heater to check for leaks. I‟d recommend not “deadheading” the hose, but instead use water flowing through the core to look for leaks (i.e. don‟t block the heater outlet).  Never ever use compressed air to test heater cores for leaks (often called pneumatic testing, or “bubble testing” as soapy water is applied to the joints to look for leaking air). Compressed air, even at low pressure, has a lot more energy stored up in it than water. When a piece of equipment being tested with air fails, the energy released can throw pieces of steel at high speed for long distances. Water, although a little messier, is much safer.

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7 Heater Valves The heater tap for FE/FC Holdens is the "tank tap" type. There are three types of heater valve fitted to the FB/EK Holden Warmaride heaters: a) A heater valve for the Motorless heater, listed as “Valve Assembly - Control FB, EK” (part number 74224441), b) A manual type valve for the Recirculatory heater, listed as “Valve - Water FB, EK” (part number 74231311), and c) A Ranco thermostatic-type (type H16) for the Fresh-Air heater, listed as “Valve Assembly - Control FB, EK” (part number 74146291). The Ranco thermostatic-type is very common, and was offered on a wide range of American vehicles (more than one hundred and seventy vehicles internationally) as well as many Holden Warmaride heaters. Whilst the Ranco valve body is different in each Holden Warmaride heater, the control mechanism is similar (if not identical) in the following Warmarides heaters:

FB/EK Holden

EJ/EH Holden

HD/HR Holden

All Warmaride heater valve types are prone to leaking, both internally (letting water past the valve seat and into the heater… making the car warm all the time) and externally (letting water past the spindle seal… dripping onto the passenger‟s feet). The valves can be replaced, or they can be overhauled. Guidance for both replacement and overhaul are given below. For those who do not want to overhaul the Fresh-air (Ranco) heater valve themselves, a valve overhaul service is offered by John from the Victorian EJ/EH Holden Club. John is based in Melbourne (telephone 0418444327, email jmb64@optusnet.com.au), and has overhauled over one hundred Ranco heater valves for early Holdens – many of the tap photos (and much of my understanding) is thanks to John.

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7.1 Recirculatory Heater Valve The manual-type heater valve fitted to FB/EK Holden Recirculatory heaters is controlled only by moving the HEAT lever on the ventilation control. The valve consists of a brass body with two copper elbows silver soldered on (the bottom copper elbow is additionally crimped AND silver soldered). A brass valve spindle emerges through a top steel washer that is crimped in place. The spindle has a steel pin which slides in a follower, which in turn runs on a cam on the heater valve control bracket. The control bracket is connected to the ventilation control assembly on the dash. Note that the control bracket is offset 1” from the HEAT lever (towards the driver‟s side), which makes use of a connecting rod infeasible (a short bowden cable is used to connect the heater valve control bracket and the dash controls). The heater valve is connected to the heater core by a 21/8” long length of heater hose, held in place with two Utilux H499 hose clamps (listed as “Clamp - Hose FB, EK”, part number SP15084). The valve controls the flow of water from the motor to/from the heater – pushing the HEAT lever upwards lifts the spindle increasing the water flow, pushing the HEAT lever down lowers the spindle and decreases the flow. For the Recirculatory heater valve, pulling the spindle out of the valve body (up) opens the valve, and pushing the valve spindle into the body (down) closes the valve. 7.2 Fresh-Air Heater Valve FB/EK Holden Fresh-Air heater Ranco thermostatic-type heater valves can be identified by the copper sensor tube which runs down the back of the heater core casing and enters to louvered casing through the wiring grommet. The sensor tube has a coiled end which sits in the air flow exiting the louvered casing. The Ranco thermostatic-type heater valve is controlled by moving the HEAT lever on the ventilation control, with the car temperature controlled by the sensor tube. The valve consists of a copper body with two copper elbows lead soldered on. An additional cap is lead soldered onto the bottom of the body. The valve spindle emerges through a

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rubber seal and the baseplate, with the valve body crimped on to the baseplate. The spindle is connected to the control mechanism by a hairpin clip. The control assembly has a series of two carriages (one for the dash control, one for the thermostatic control). The control assembly is connected by a metal control rod (pictured below) to the ventilation control assembly on the dash. Made from 1/8” Ø rod 5 7/16” The heater valve is connected to the heater core by a 2 1/8” long length of heater hose, held in place with two Utilux H499 hose clamps (listed as “Clamp - Hose FB, EK”, part number SP15084). The valve controls the flow of water from the motor to/from the heater – pushing the HEAT lever upwards lifts the spindle increasing the water flow, pushing the HEAT lever down lowers the spindle and decreases the flow. As the airflow warms up, the refrigerant inside the copper sensor tube expands. This drives out a small piston inside the control assembly. The piston acts on the thermostatic control assembly carriage, forcing the heater valve spindle closed. As the air cools down, the refrigerant contracts, and the piston allows the heater valve to open again. A phillips-head screw at the back of the control assembly adjusts the temperature at which the sensor tube turns off the heater valve. For the Fresh-Air heater valve, pulling the spindle out of the valve body (up) closes the valve, and pushing the valve spindle into the body (down) opens the valve (the opposite of the Recirculatory heater valve). 7.3 Overhauling the Recirculatory Heater Valve To the best of my knowledge, no-one has yet successfully overhauled a Recirculatory heater valve. Whilst I have started the process, I have not yet finished it. My notes to dates and the logic behind my process are included below – happy to hear from anyone who has done this previously or has better insight. To overhaul the heater valve, the following process may be followed: a) Remove the heater valve from the vehicle and remove the heater tap control bracket. b) The spindle cannot be removed from the silversoldered “bottom elbow end” of the valve body as the valve seat is in the way. This leaves the crimped “spindle end” as the means of entry. The brass crimped seal that retains the steel spindle washer is work hardened from the crimping process, and must be annealed to make it soft enough to uncrimp without splitting. Place the heater valve into a bath of water almost up to the level of the top crimp. A 400g tin can (as shown above) makes a great water bath. The water bath will stop the heat from softening
7

/16”

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the remainder of the valve body. Make sure that the heater valve spindle is in the down (off) position to keep the valve internals away from the heat. Heat the crimp area by moving an LPG torch around the circumference. The aim is to get the brass up to a dull red colour (when seen in dull light), but can be hard to achieve. When heated up, either let the brass air-cool or drop it down into the water bath (quenching brass in water does not temper the metal the same way that steel does). c) Place the valve sideways over a set of soft vice jaws or on a wooden block. Select a drift of large diameter (as close to 5/16” diameter as possible... to fit between the crimp and spindle), or alternatively grind down the tip of a screwdriver to a 7/16” radius (to almost match the crimp radius). The large radius (or large drift diameter) is used to ensure that the crimp gently rolls back. If a sharp or small-radius tool is used, it will make a series of dents around the crimp that will hamper resealing it later. Using multigrips to lever the crimp out is also unsuitable as they will likewise dent the crimp.

d) Gently tap the spindle-end crimp sideways to unroll the crimp. Rotate the heater valve regularly. The idea here is to go slowly to keep the valve body top almost round the whole time.

e) Once the crimp has unrolled enough to release the steel washer, remove the valve spindle assembly from the valve body.

f) Place the spindle assembly over a vice and tap out the steel spindle pin with a drift. Remove the steel washer and rubber bushing. Note that the steel washer may catch on any burrs on the spindle pin hole - gently dress them with a fine flat file. g) Cut the copper diaphragm band with a hacksaw, taking care not to nick the spindle. Remove the diaphragm band and any remaining rubber diaphragm. h) Place the spindle assembly vertically in a vice and use a 3/8” drill bit to gently drill out the spindle guide rivet (the rivet is actually the end of the spindle which has been peined over). Note that the brass is very soft, and no electric drill is required – spin the drill bit around by hand to avoid damaging the spindle. Remove the old brass spindle guide and rubber valve washer. The above process gets the valve fully disassembled. The following notes are my observations and views on how to replace the parts... still a work in progress.

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The valve spindle assembly is as follows: brass spindle guide rubber valve washer brass washer

copper diaphragm clamp (with bits of rubber diaphragm clamped under it) rubber bushing

brass spindle (top section is covered in orange mud/dust… I should have cleaned it off for the photo!)

steel spindle washer steel spindle pin (hidden in photo) I suspect that the diaphragm assembly is as per the picture to the right (the picture shows the diaphragm stretched right out... it is probably much shorter). The top of the diaphragm is sealed against the spindle by the copper diaphragm band. The bottom of the diaphragm ends in the thick rubber bushing that is sealed against the valve body by the same crimping process that retains the steel spindle washer.

If the brass spindle guide is in good condition, it may be reused. The spindle guide in the photos above was missing two of the four “legs” and would not guide the spindle properly (it was jamming on the valve seat), and so would need to be replaced). If the brass spindle guide is being reused, the rubber part of a tap washer from a domestic hot water tap can be used (measurements of a few tap washers from Bunnings shows the diameter is near perfect, and most already have the hole in the middle to accept the spindle). If the brass spindle guide cannot be reused, a new rubber washer is required. A heater valve overhaul kit is available from Rare Spares (“Kit Valve Ranco Heater EJ EH HD HR”, part number RSP335), pictured to the right. The overhaul kit is really intended for the Fresh-Air heater Ranco valves. The kit supplies a valve diaphragm (the large round item in the picture to the right) and a valve washer (the smaller item in the picture). The washer supplied has four “ribs” that act as a

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spindle guide. However, the washer in the Rare Spares overhaul kit is 19/32” diameter, whilst the original tap washer is 22/32” (11/16”) diameter. While the Rare Spares washer will fit, it does not seal very well. An alternate four-ribbed washer 21 of /32” is available from Jim Tucker in the US (http://www.heatercontrolvalve.com/index.html), which would be a better fit. To fit the new washer/spindle guide, I would propose to drill the spindle end and either tap it out for a brass set-screw (very fine tap required... not for the faint hearted) or drill the spindle end and use a small stainless self-tapper (with Loctite). In either case, a small brass washer should be used under the set-screw/self tapper head. The diaphragm from the Rare Spares kit is not very suitable for the Recirculatory heater valve. The Recirculatory heater valve spindle (¼”) is much larger than the Fresh-Air heater valve spindle (5/32”), making the diaphragm an overly tight fit on the spindle. The diaphragm is also larger (15/64”) than the valve body (29/32”), and hence will not easily fit when the crimp is re-peined over. One method worth considering is: a) Machine a groove in the spindle close to the steel spindle pin, similar to the one where the original copper diaphragm clamp was but of the same diameter as the Recircualtory heater valve spindle (¼”). b) Cut the Rare Spares diaphragm wire clip (with a pair of side cutters), taking care not to nick the diaphragm. c) Lubricate the spindle with some liquid dishwashing detergent, then slide the diaphragm down the spindle (wire clip side first). Care would be required to stop the diaphragm tearing. Seat the diaphragm in the new groove. d) Use some 1mm copper wire to secure the diaphragm to the spindle similarly to the original Rare Spares diaphragm wire clip (twist the ends of the copper wire then cut off neatly). e) Insert the valve spindle into the valve body. f) Apply a thin layer of sealer (for example Sikaflex) to the outside of the old rubber bushing then insert the spindle/bushing assembly into the top of the valve body (the contours of the bushing match the valve body well). The bushing then acts as a bottom seat for the diaphragm. g) Drill out the steel spindle washer to the same diameter as the hole in the Recirculatory heater baseplate (5/8”). Smooth the hole edges to stop it tearing the diaphragm. h) Apply a thin layer of sealer (for example Sikaflex) to the outside of the steel washer. Insert the washer on top of the diaphragm, sandwiching the diaphragm between the steel washer and the rubber bushing. i) Pein the top of the top of the brass heater body back over to reseal the crimp, taking care to keep the crimp circular (use a range of sockets as dies to fold the crimp evenly). j) Refit the steel spindle pin. As above this is a work in progress – will update this document as I learn more.

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7.4 Overhauling the Fresh-Air Heater Valve The Fresh-Air Ranco thermostatic-type heater valve uses the overhaul kit that is available from Rare Spares (“Kit Valve Ranco Heater EJ EH HD HR”, part number RSP335), pictured above The kit supplies a valve spindle seal and a valve washer. Balkamp (part of NAPA) in the US also make a seal kit for Ranco valves (part number BK6601000). Although it contains the valve spindle seal, it does not contain the valve washer. The instructions that come with the kit (pictured below) are very generic and (naturally) don‟t cover the valve washer replacement. The Balkamp kits are designed for RANCO valves in the following vehicles:         American Motors Corporation (AMC) (1955 – 1973) Chrysler (1950 – 1969) Desoto (1950-1963) Fiat (some early models) Ford (1953 – 1963) General Motors (1950 – 1963) Hudson (1950 – 1955) International Harvester Company (IHC) (1950 – 1975)  Packard (1953 – 1955)  SAAB (1974 – 1980)  Studebaker (1950 – 1963)  Volvo (through 1983). These vehicles may provide a lead for anyone trying to chase down replacement parts. Another resource for parts for the Ranco thermostatic-types taps can be found at http://www.heatercontrolvalve.com/index.html. Of note, the overhaul process for the Fresh-Air valves requires a number of brass and steel tabs to be unbent, then later peined over. Although annealing is used to re-soften the brass, there is still a significant risk of metal fatigue – on average, 10% of the tabs will snap off (even for professional rebuilders). A snapped-off tab can be difficult (in most cases nearly impossible) to replace. To overhaul the Fresh-Air heater valve, the following process may be followed: a) Remove the heater from the vehicle and the heater valve from the heater. b) Remove the over-centre spring from the outside of the control assembly.

c) Disengage the spindle C-clip (C-shaped pressed metal clip in the control assembly) from the spindle by pulling outwards. The top end of the spindle C-clip will remain engaged in the control assembly by a small lug.

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d) Place the heater valve upside-down in a vice by gently gripping the baseplate, taking care not to damage the tap assembly or the copper sensor tube. Do not grip the valve body as it is relatively easy to dent/bend. Straighten the four steel tabs outwards by bending with a screwdriver. e) Tap the (now straightened) steel tabs very gently with a hammer until the control assembly has separated from the baseplate/valve body. The control assembly is usually not disassembled any further unless it has a failed component. Give it a good clean up (taking care not to damage the copper sensor tube) and lubricate the pivot points. f) Put the baseplate/valve body assembly back into the vice, right side up by gently gripping the baseplate (not the valve body!). Using a sharp putty knife or sharpened bread and butter knife (a paint scraper is too flexible and a small screwdriver too narrow), lever up the edges of the brass tabs. Resist the temptation to use pliers or multigrips as they will mangle the soft brass. Work gently and evenly around the tabs, switching to a screwdriver as the tabs bend up. The pictures at this site http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/article/view.article.php?c8/253 show the bending process very well, though only covers the seal replacement in an EJ/EH type valve body... it does not cover the tap washer replacement. g) Once the four brass tabs are straightened, remove the base plate from the valve body. The steel baseplates are susceptible to rust, especially if the diaphragm has been leaking. Give the baseplate a clean-up and paint, taking care to smooth any sharp edges that may later tear the diaphragm. h) You now have a choice to make. If the only reason for overhauling the heater valve is to is to fix an external leak (water leaking past the spindle seal… dripping onto the passenger‟s feet), then you can skip to step s) below. If the problem is an internal leak (water leaking past the valve seat and into the heater… making the car warm all the time) then keep following the process to overhaul the valve washer. Skipping the valve washer overhaul is quicker and easier (no soldering involved), but remember that the heater valves are hard to repair without breaking – you may not get another chance to come back and repair the washer. i) Hold the valve body upside down in a vice, gripping the thicker brass tab area. Take care not to grip (and dent) the copper body. Using an LPG torch, unsolder the bottom disc from the valve body. Take care not to put too much heat into the soldered joint as you may inadvertently unsolder the inlet/outlet pipes.

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j) Remove the spindle hairpin clip and the brass seal cup from the spindle. Pull the spindle assembly from the valve body through the disc-end. Pull the old diaphragm from the spindle end of the valve body. k) Give the valve body and spindle a good clean up (inside and out) with a brass wire brush, taking care not put too much heat into the body or otherwise distort it by clamping. Likewise, l) Using the LPG torch, anneal the four brass tabs to give them the best possible chance of not breaking during the assembly process. Heat the tabs up with the torch and then let them slowly air cool. After annealing, gently shape the four tabs to ensure that they will fit easily into the base plate slots. m) Sweat the rough solder off the valve body and disc to leave both surfaces nicely tinned with lead solder. n) The old rubber valve washer is located on the spindle by a swaging of the brass spindle above and below it. To remove the old valve washer, file the upper swaging off (as the load for seating the valve is mainly on the lower swage). The screwdriver in the picture to the right is pointing at the upper swage to be filed. Note that the swage makes the valve spindle thin, so care is needed so that only just enough brass is removed from the swage to get the washer off. To make it easier, cut the “ribs” off the old valve washer with a pair of side cutters (they are normally brittle and easy to remove). This will let the tiny brass washer near the swage slide back a bit so you can file the swage more evenly. o) Once the swage is filed back, slip off the small brass washer, rubber tap washer and large brass washer. Give the spindle a good clean up with a brass wire brush. p) To lock the new valve washer in place, drill a 1mm diameter hole where the swaging was. Take care to drill this hole squarely, as the spindle is thin here from the swaging (a drill press is recommended). q) Refit the large brass washer, the new rubber tap washer (from the overhaul kit) and the small brass washer to the spindle. Insert a 6mm length of 1mm copper wire then slightly bend the ends to secure it in place. Note that I found it easier to use a long length of copper wire (easy to hold) then cut to length once in place rather than handle a 6mm copper wire.

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r) The spindle is fitted back into the valve body of the valve, using a pair of longnose pliers to move the spindle around to get it to poke through the hole in the top of the valve body. s) The new diaphragm (from the overhaul kit) is fitted over the spindle into the cavity where the old diaphragm was with the spindle fitted through the center of the new diaphragm. Run a tiny bead of good quality sealant (I used Sikaflex) around the lower edge of the new diaphragm where it compresses on the valve body before fitting (only with a cross section of 1mm of silastic maximum, too much will restrict the diaphragm flexibility). This takes up any small cavity that doesn't compress with the rubber diaphragm in the next stage. t) Once the diaphragm is in place, the base plate of the control mechanism is then refitted over the four brass tabs. While compressing the plate over the valve body, the four tabs are then progressively peened over to lock the plate securely in place. Providing correct support of the valve body under each of the four tabs as you are peening the tabs is vital to prevent distortion of the circular shape of the valve body. Remember that although the heat was only directed at where the four tabs, the copper body has been partially annealed, it will be extremely soft. u) In preparation for soldering the disc in place, it is necessary to make sure that the valve seat is open. This will stop heat from damaging the new rubber valve seat. Submerge the valve in enough water to keep heat from the new valve seat, but leaving access to heat the valve body enough to solder the disc securely. v) Refit the spindle hairpin clip and the brass seal cup to the spindle.

w) The control mechanism is then fitted by bending the 4 steel tabs enough to hold it in place. Reinstall the spindle C-clip and spring. Additional step-by-step methods (for replacing the seal only) in similar Ranco thermostatic valves can be found at the following sites: http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/article/view.article.php?c8/253 http://www.gearheadgospel.com/tutorials/heatvalve/ http://www.pbase.com/czechman/ranco http://www.tbirdgarage.com/Site_2/Restoration_Tips/Pages/63_Heater_Valve .html

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7.5 Replacing the Heater Valve Heater valves may be replaced with an aftermarket inline-tap – see examples below:  This is the “Universal 5/8'' or 16mm Cable Operated Heater Tap” (part number HA4008) available from Speedy Air Spares (41 Beatrice Street Bundaberg QLD 4670, Phone (07) 4152 7693, E-mail jeremy@speedyairspares.com.au, http://speedyairspares.com.au). The tap can be fitted either in the engine bay or under the dash and requires a bowden cable to operate.

Rare Spares also stocks heater taps (for example “Tap Assembly Heater HQ-HZ 2-way Cable Type”, part number HT1005) which will also require a bowden cable. Note that Rare Spares also stocks a “Tap Heater 2 or 3 Way Universal” (part number HT1004A) that would probably also do the job, but it is slightly more expensive than the HQ-HZ tap, and has a third pipe which must be capped off (one more joint to leak!). Note that you will need to fit a bowden cable to get the above two aftermarket taps to work. Bowden cables can be sourced from aftermarket suppliers. Speedy Air Spares stocks “Universal Heater Tap Actuation Cable to suit HA4008” (Product ID: HA4009). The end of the cable mounts via a homemade bracket under the dash (like the EK bonnet release cable), or a hole through the dash (like the FB/EK choke cable). By cutting the knob end off the cable, it may be possible to get it to fit to the original ventilator control. Rare Spares also stocks bowden cable as “Heater Control Cable (Universal)” in either 800mm outer/950mm inner or (part number CCH1001) or 500mm outer/650mm inner (part number CCH1000) lengths. This has no knob on the end, and will require fitting to the original ventilator control.

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8 Demisters The FB/EK Holden Warmaride heater has two rubber demister duct outlets, one on the driver‟s side (a 90º bend) and one on the passenger‟s side (a 45º bend). These are connected by flexible ducting tubes to steel nozzles (which look like a miniature metal vacuum cleaner head). The steel nozzles are held by selftapping screws to the underside of the dash (the holes are existing in all FB/EK Holdens from the factory). 8.1 Demister Ducting Tube The ducting tube is 1½” (38mm) diameter. The original type ducting consists of a steel “spring” with a convoluted paper covering. Over the years it has been common to replace the original paper ducting with either convoluted aluminium or plastic ducting. The routing of the ducting is as follows:  The passenger‟s side ducting tube exits the 45º rubber demister duct outlet and runs across and up behind the glove box, then up to the steel nozzle.  The driver‟s side ducting tube is more difficult and requires some bending (it is much easier to install the ducting tube with the instrument binnacle out). The 90º rubber demister duct outlet points the duct straight up, then it has to pass over the clutch return spring then curve again to the nozzle. The ducting and nozzles can be held together with a self-tapping screw. Note that the convoluted paper and aluminium can peel away from the ducting with repeated handling. One tip is to put masking tape on the two cut ends to stop it peeling (colour it black with texta to hide the tape). Replacing the ducting tube can be achieved as follows:  Convoluted alumium ducting is commonly available from car airconditioner repair companies, though unfortunately only in 50mm (2”) outside diameter. The 50mm ducting can be made to fit by slitting and either bending in the end of the duct (to reduce diameter and fit inside the rubber demister outlets) or bending out the end of the duct (to increase diameter and fit over the end of the demister outlets. The demister steel nozzles can be increased in diameter to match the 50mm duct by wrapping them in duct tape until they are an interference fit.  40mm outside diameter convoluted aluminium type ducting tube is stocked by Fuelmiser (part number PHD-40ML), though unfortunately only in 1‟ lengths. Contact with the Fuelmiser technical team indicates that they are not able to source longer lengths.  Clark Rubber stocks Flexi-flo Hose in different sizes (25, 30.5, 31.5, 32, 35, 38, 44, 50, 63, 76 and 102mm ID). This is a black EVA stripwound hose similar to a vacuum cleaner hose, except designed for Industrial use. The following two sizes are likely to suit:

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30.5mm 31.5mm Inside diameter 30.0 31.0 Outside diameter 39.0 41.0 Working pressure (psi) -5 to 50 Working temperature (ºC) -20 to 60 Note however that the maximum working temperature is 60ºC, which could be close to the heater air temperature (a 7psi radiator cap means that the water temperature inside the heater water-side can reach 111ºC – the air will be cooler than this though). This product is also stocked by Hoseonline (P.O. Box 3027, Mentone East 3194 Victoria, Australia, http://www.hoseonline.com.au, telephone 1300 577 731). 8.2 Demister Steel Nozzles FB/EK Holden demister steel nozzles are not currently know to be reproduced. The steel nozzles on FB/EK Holdens (pictured right) are different to those on FE/FC Holdens. The steel nozzles on the FB/EK Holden are 40mm wider than the FE/FC Holden and get attached at the back of the nozzle (FE/FC Holden nozzles are attached at the front of the nozzle). The FE/FC Holden nozzles can however be adapted to fit. The FE/FC Holden nozzles were being reproduced in fibreglass by Ed Ho of the NSW FE/FC Holden Club (username “Ed” on both the FE/FC Holden and FB/EK Holden forums). Original FE/FC nozzles are pictured below:

HD/HR nozzles are pictured below:

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As per the GMH Service Bulletin August 1960, to check correct location of demister nozzle, make up a cardboard template to dimensions shown in the picture below, and insert centrally into nozzle. The outside corner of the template – Point A – should be within ¼” of the windshield. If the gap is more than ½”, the position of the nozzle should be altered by setting the mounting lugs with pliers. Do not attempt to align nozzle by applying force to the hose.

8.3 Rubber Demister Duct Outlets The two rubber demister duct outlets can perish over time. They are available from Obsolete Rubbers (Martin Frigo, 2 Glencara St Avondale Heights Victoria 3034, Phone: (03) 93178725, Mobile 0412941799). An alternative is to make a set of outlets from radiator hoses. Ideally, two hoses are required, one 1¾” OD for the main duct, and one 2” OD for the bands either end of the duct. By the time you pay for two radiator hoses, the cost would be similar to buying (the better quality) ducts from Obsolete Rubbers. To simplify the job (and make it a little cheaper), you can make the ducts from one hose. It requires some gluing and will have some small “cut and shut” lines - those looking for perfect restoration pieces are again better off talking to Obsolete Rubbers. The picture above shows (clockwise from top) a perished original 90º outlet, a 90º outlet made using the process below and an Obsolete Rubbers 45º outlet. To make your own rubber duct outlets, the top radiator hose from a Toyota Landcuiser FZJ80 6 cylinder FZ FE petrol model (Mackay Automotive part number CH2007) may be used. It is available from SuperCheap Autos for around $20 is the right diameter (1¾”). It has two bends which may be cut out to make a pair of rubber demister duct outlets (one 45º, one 90º) and enough spare length to cut some bands (or make some mistakes on the cut). The bottom radiator hose from an FB/EK would also do the job well, though is marginally smaller in diameter (and probably harder to find in SuperCheap Autos...). To make the ducts:

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a) Clean off all the stickers and remove any plastic ties from the radiator hose. b) Lay the radiator hose on the bench and line up the 45º rubber demister duct outlet on top of the hose, moving the duct around until the contours look similar. Mark the start and finish of the duct onto the hose with a texta. c) Extend the texta lines around the radiator hose to give a neat circle to cut to. This can be done freehand (for the artistic and steady of hand), by temporarily wrapping some tape around the hose (for the less steady of hand) or by using a tubecutter to roll the line in (for the fussy).

d) Cut along the texta lines with a sharp knife or razor blade then put aside the new cut duct outlet. e) On a straight section of the radiator hose, mark out a ¼” wide band, using the same method as above to mark neat circles to cut to. Cut the band out with a sharp knife or razor blade, then cut across the band to form a strip (it will hold the curve of the original radiator hose, which is useful in the following gluing operation). f) Cut a strip from an old bike tyre inner tube that is 9/16” wide and trim such that it is just long enough to wrap around the heater hose. g) Rough up the inside surface of the two bands and the outside ends (one ¼” wide and one 9/16” wide) of the new cut duct with some sandpaper to give the glue a key to stick to. Glue the bands onto the ends of the new cut duct outlet with adhesive (Sikaflex or similar). Note that the ¼” band will not fully encircle the new cut duct outlet. For neatness, try to make the gaps lie on the piece of the duct outlet that face the firewall. h) Once the adhesive has dried, cut a small ¼” wide piece from the radiator hose and fill the gap in the band. i) Repeat for the 90º bend.

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9 Electrical Connection 9.1 Wiring The heater fan takes power (12-volt positive) from the fuse panel (located under the dash on the driver‟s side). The connection is made through the 15 amp turn signal/heater/backup fuse (the lower one on the picture below) at the back of the panel. No inline fuses are installed for the heater. A blown heater fuse will disable the heater fan as well as the indicators and reverse lights (both of which were either options or standard on FBs and EKs). The heater power lead (14/012 or 16G Brown & Sharpe wire gauge) brown wire) has a plastic connector on the end (see picture) which will connect onto the male terminal blade at the rear of the fuse panel (a simple push on fit as the male terminal is already present in all FB/EK Holden fuse panels). The plastic connector is often cut off when heaters are removed, and may be replaced with a normal crimp-on terminal. It is recommended that insulated terminals are used, as many of the FB/EK wiring terminals are bare, and easy to short. Note that connection to this fuse means that the heater only has power when the ignition is on (unlike the accessory radios, which are wired to a fuse which always has power. Power flows through the fan motor, and out to the switch. A copy of the wiring diagram (with the heater wire highlighted in red) is shown below. Note that the heater wiring is identical for all FB/EK models. The switch then connects to one of two earths:  For high speed, the earth is made directly through the heater metal body.  For low speed, the earth is made through a low-speed resistor (and then to the heater body). The resistor drops the voltage seen by the fan motor, and hence it runs slower. The heater low-speed resistor is a DUCON CEMCOAT 2.5 +/- 10%, marked “RABL 10W 070”.

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The heater internal fan wiring is as follows:  Brown wire: provides 12-volt positive power from the fuse panel to the fan motor (protrudes from heater casing).  Black wire: connects power from the motor to the heater fan switch.  Yellow wire: provides an earth for the heater fan motor on high-speed.  Red wire: provides an earth for the heater motor on low speed (via the lowspeed resistor). The heater switch connections to the black, yellow and red wires are riveted at the back of the switch (i.e. not easily disassembled). A small piece of cardboard, cellotaped on, insulates the riveted terminals from the heater casing. To check for a “bad earth” on the heater, examine the following locations for any rust, paint, grease or looseness: a) the slot-head self tapping screw/star washer from the heater earth point, inside the fan blade housing. 11 b) the two /32” heater-core-casing/fan-blade-housing nuts/spring washers/bolts/spacers, c) the two ½” bolts connecting the dash-mounting-brackets to the dash. d) The battery earth lead terminal (though if this is a bad earth, a bad heater is probably the least of your problems!). 9.2 Fan Motor The motor is stamped SMITHS FHM 4732/02 P 10-60, with an SMA symbol (SMA printed inside the outline of Australia). When testing the heater fan, switch and wiring on the bench, an easy way to get power supply is to use a 12-volt battery charger. Battery chargers usually only supply a low current, which makes it more difficult to “let the smoke out of the wires” if something is shorting. An average battery charger has more than enough current to run the heater fan. Some issues that may stop the fan motor from working: a) The motor is not getting power. Check wiring from one end to the other using a battery charger and test lead. b) The brushes may be dirty or stuck in their mountings. c) The armature wiring may be busted (check for obvious damage). d) The armature wiring where it meets the brushes may be dirty. Clean it with some fine sand-paper (around 2000 grit) then polish gently with Brasso.

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10 Heater Air Control With respect to the air side, FB/EK Holden Warmaride heaters are of three types: a) A Recirculatory type, which has no flue assembly, b) An early Fresh-Air type, which has a flue assembly, which bolts to the top of the heater core casing, and c) A later Fresh-Air type, which has a flue assembly with additional controls. Air control for each type of heater is described below. 10.1 Recirculatory Heater FB/EK Holden Recirculatory heaters do not have a flue assembly, but rather have a galvanised casing upper mounting bracket (pictured right). The bracket attaches the heater to the plenum chamber cover panel. It is often missing from heaters purchased at swapmeets and on eBay – a drawing is provided below to allow brackets to be reproduced.

6 15/16” 3 3/16”

3

/16” to centreline

60º

4 1 /8”

Made from ¼” bar (legs slightly thinner)

105 º

9

/16 ”
5

/8”

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The Recirculatory type heater has no connection to the plenum chamber cover panel and door other than that provided with the regular FB/EK Holden (i.e. the plenum chamber cover panel door is connected by a control cable to AIR lever of the dash controls). A flue is not fitted to these heaters, rather the heater is mounted to the plenum chamber cover panel by a bracket. Moving the AIR lever upwards opens the door and allows Fresh-Air to blow in behind the dash. Some air will flow through the heater, and some will bypass around it. The amount of Fresh-Air entering the vehicle depends on how far the AIR lever is moved and how many windows are open on the vehicle. Moving the AIR lever downwards closes the plenum chamber cover panel door. Operating the heater fan (with the plenum chamber cover panel door open or closed) draws air from inside the vehicle into the top of the heater, past the heater core and out either through the demister nozzles or through the lower casing louvers. 10.2 Early Fresh-Air Heater The early Fresh-Air heaters has no additional air flow controls other than that provided with the regular FB/EK (i.e. the plenum chamber cover panel door is connected by a control cable to the dash controls).

Moving the AIR lever upwards opens the door and allows fresh air from outside the vehicle to blow in and past the heater core. The recirculation flap (shown as the silver coloured panel in the left-hand photograph above) is pushed down (closed) by gravity and the air flow. The amount of fresh air entering the vehicle depends on how far the AIR lever is moved and how many windows are open on the vehicle. The temperature of the air depends if the HEAT lever has been turned on. Note however that that heater taps are prone to leakage (i.e. some hot water almost always passes through the heater core). This means that even with the HEAT lever turned off, the cold outside air will be slightly warmed (not so pleasant in summer!). Moving the AIR lever downwards closes the plenum chamber cover panel door. Operating the heater fan (with the plenum chamber cover panel door closed) creates a slight vacuum in the heater flue assembly. The recirculation flap is pulled open by the vacuum, allowing air from inside the car to be drawn into the top of the heater, past the heater core and out either through the demister nozzles or through the lower casing louvers. Temperature again depends on how far the HEAT lever is turned on. Page 46 of 63

10.3 Late Fresh-Air Heater The later Fresh-Air heaters have a flue assembly similar to the early Fresh-Air heaters. The flue assembly however has an additional air control, as can be seen in the left-hand photograph below.

The front of the flue assembly has an air control lever which operates two small air control arms by connecting rods. The arms are connected by a return spring which tends to pull the air control lever upwards. The arms are connected to shafts which operate two core covering doors inside the flue assembly. The flue assembly additionally has an air door on each of the driver‟s and passenger‟s side of the flue assembly. When the air control arm is in the upwards direction, the core covering doors are vertical, and close off the openings either side of the flue assembly. This forces the air (either fresh air from the plenum chamber cover panel door, or recirculating air from the cabin via the recirculating flap) past the heater core. When the air control arm is in the downwards position (as can be seen in the right-hand photograph above), the core covering doors are horizontal, and (almost) close off the heater core. This forces the air to (largely) bypass the heater core.

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11 Removal, Disassembly and Reassembly Note that several of the fasteners on the heater appear to be either British Association (BA) or British Standard Whitworth (BSW). Spanners and sockets for these fasteners are becoming rarer, and are often not readily available to most FB/EK Holden enthusiasts. For simplicity, I have referenced the Across the Flats (AF) spanners which will work, as these are fairly common. 11.1 Removing the Heater from the Vehicle a) Ensure the engine is cool and that the radiator hoses have no pressure in them (you should be able to squeeze the hoses readily by hand). Undo the two hose clamps and disconnect the heater hoses at both the water pump and the thermostat housing/cylinder head. Open the heater tap by moving the HEAT lever upwards. Put the end of the water pump hose close to the ground, and blow through the thermostat housing/cylinder head hose (not with a compressor!) to drain most of the water from the heater. CAUTION: the engine now has two open holes in the radiator – if you accidentally drive off, there is a good chance you will cook the motor! Ensure the two engine water connection points are either plugged or clamped off securely (don‟t leave this job until the end of the day when you may forgetten...). b) Undo the two hose clamps at the heater and disconnect both heater hoses. The heater hoses may then be pulled from the firewall. CAUTION: the firewall now has two open holes that will let in rain water, exhaust and engine fumes. Ensure the two holes are plugged with some tape, wine bottle corks or the correct blanking grommet. c) Disconnect the negative lead from the battery under the bonnet to avoid short-circuiting wiring under the dash (many of the FB/EK wiring terminals are bare, and easy to short). Disconnect the brown heater power supply wire from the fuse panel (located under the dash on the driver‟s side) and carefully pull the wire across to the heater. Take care not to disturb any of the other wiring. Curl the wire up and secure it with some tape/cable tie/twist tie to prevent is snagging when removing the heater. d) Remove the demister ducting tubes from the rubber demister outlets by gently pulling them outwards. Beware that previous owners may have used glue, silastic or screws to hold the ducting in place. The ducting tube bends well but will crush if handled roughly. Leave the ducting connected to the demister steel nozzles if possible. e) Undo the two ½” bolts connecting the dash-mounting-brackets to the dash. f) There are two phillips-head screws/flat washers mounting the heater to the plenum chamber cover panel, one on the driver‟s side and one on the passenger‟s side. These screws mount to either the top edge of the flue assembly, or to the casing upper mounting bracket (if no flue assembly is fitted). Undo the two screws. g) Undo the 1/16” allen-head grub screws and remove the knobs from the ventilator control escutcheon. Undo the phillips-head screw in the front of the escutcheon and the ¼” bolt/flat washer/spring washer at the rear. Remove the escutcheon and allow the control assembly to move into the dash cavity. The

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control assembly may remain connected to the control cable as it allows the assembly to move out of the way of the heater as it is removed. h) Move the heater downwards slightly and over towards the passenger side of the vehicle, taking care not to disturb any of the wiring. i) When removing the demister steel nozzles, the process is easier to see if the glovebox is removed (passenger‟s side nozzle) or the instrument binnacle is dropped forwards onto the steering column (driver‟s side nozzle). To remove the demister steel nozzles, place a small piece of paper across the dash air slots, located on top of the dash hard up against the windscreen. The paper will prevent the screws being dropped through the dash slots and behind the dash (they are too big to fall into the demister steel nozzles. Don‟t use tape as it may damage the dash paint, especially if it has patina. Remove the two phillips-head self-tapping screws from each nozzle. The nozzles and attached ducts should pull gently down and out (look up under the dash with a torch to guide them out, especially if the glovebox/instrument binnacle is still in place). j) The two rubber demister duct outlets can be removed from the heater casing at any stage by gently levering them from their locating recesses in the fanblade-housing (they are held in by an interference fit only). 11.2 Removing the Recirculatory Heater Valve a) Slacken the ¼” heater valve control bracket cable clamp screw and remove the heater valve control cable. b) Slacken the two heater valve connecting hose clamps. c) Remove the two slot-head bolts/nuts/star washers connecting the heater valve control bracket to the heater casing. Remove the heater valve and heater control bracket assembly from the heater casing. d) Remove the heater valve connecting hose and clamps. e) Remove the 5/16” bolt/nut/spring washer clamping the heater valve to the heater valve control bracket. Bend the clamp out slightly to release the heater valve. f) Disengage the heater valve spindle pin from the heater valve control bracket cam follower and slide the tap down and out of the bracket.

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11.3 Removing the Fresh-Air Heater Valve a) Slacken the ¼” heater valve control bracket cable clamp screw and remove the heater valve control rod. Slacken the two heater valve connecting hose clamps. b) Remove the two slot-head self tapping screws connecting the heater valve control bracket to the heater casing. c) Remove the two slot-head self tapping screws holding the copper sensor tube to the rear of the heater-core-casing. d) Undo the two slot-head self tapping screws/star washers from under the louvered-casing, and the two slot-head self tapping screws from the rear of the heater-core-casing. Separate the louvered-casing from the heater-core-casing, being careful not to damage the copper sensor tube as it is eased out of the grommet. e) Remove the heater valve, heater control bracket assembly and copper sensor tube from the heater casing. f) Remove the heater valve connecting hose and clamps. 11.4 Disassembling the Heater Assembly a) Undo the four 11/32” dash-mounting-bracket-stud-bolt nuts/spring washer/flat washers and remove the two dash-mounting-brackets. b) If the heater is a Recirculating type, undo the two nuts and remove the casing upper mounting bracket. Remove the seven slot-head self tapping screws and remove the heater-core-casing top. If the heater is a Fresh-Air type (has a flue-assembly fitted), remove the eight slot-head self tapping screws and remove the flue assembly. Note that thermostat-type heater valves must be removed before the flue assembly can be removed as one screw is obscured by the valve.

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c) Swing the heater core upwards and towards the passenger‟s side of the heater-core-casing to remove the core.

d) Undo the two 11/32” nuts/spring washers from inside, and the two slot-head self tapping screws from the rear of the heater-core-casing. e) Remove the heater fan switch knob by pulling outwards. Undo the winged heater fan switch escutcheon slot-head screw, noting that the “nut” is a cablekeeper located inside the casing (catch it as it falls out of the casing). Pop the winged heater fan switch escutcheon outwards by around ¼”. Note that the escutcheon has small plastic tangs on either wing, and must be levered out gently and evenly to avoid cracking the wings. f) Separate the heater-core-casing from the fan-blade-housing, being gentle with the wiring as it is still attached. Catch the two heater-core-casing/fanblade-housing bolts and spacers as they fall out.

g) Undo the two slot-head self tapping screws/star washers from the louveredcasing and separate the fan-blade-housing from the louvered-casing. Slide the wiring grommet from the casing hole.

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h) Undo the two slot-head self tapping screws from the wiring harness retainers and the slot-head self tapping screws/star washers from the heater earth point.

i) Undo the three 5/16” nuts/flat washers/star washers which mount the fan motor, noting that two of the nuts are longer and used to mount the two heater-core-casing/fan-blade-housing bolts. j) Turn the fan motor through 60º (1/6 of a turn) and remove the motor and fan assembly towards the fan end. Gently bend out the fan motor mounting points to ease them pass the motor casing joint.

k) Undo the 3/32” allen-head grub screw and remove the heater fan blade from the fan motor shaft. l) If the fan motor needs to be opened for servicing, the fan motor casing may be opened by undoing the two 11/32” nuts/star washers on the casing. Note however that fan motor non-drive end bearing consists of a bronze ball (similar to a ball-valve ball). The bearing is held in the fan motor non-drive end casing by a fibre bushing and a spring-steel castellated washer. The bushing/bearing/washer assembly is held in place by a pressed steel retainer which is staked into the fan motor non-drive end casing. Ideally, the bearing should slip off the fan motor shaft as the two casing halves are separated, and be retained in the fan motor non-drive end casing. However, the heater

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fan blade grub screw usually leaves a burr on the fan motor shaft. The burr will catch on the bearing, and pull it out of the fan motor non-drive end casing (as per the photograph below). It is very difficult to get back in once removed.

It is strongly recommended that before undoing the two 11/32” nuts/star washers on the casing, that the burr be removed by gently filing the fan motor shaft with a fine flat file. Note that is the only reason for servicing the motor is to lubricate the bearing, it is far easier to let a few drops of light machine oil slip down the motor shaft into the bronze ball, rather than opening the motor casing. Do not apply too many drops of oil... although the shaft appears to have a slinger ring, the fan motor does not like a bath of oil! 11.5 Reassembly and Installation Reassembly and installation is a reverse of the steps given in Section 8 above, with the following notes:  While the heater is out, it is a great opportunity to lubricate the plenum chamber cover panel door. Use a can of WD-40 (or similar lubricant) with the plastic “extension straw” fitted to the nozzle to lubricate both the door hinge and the bowden cable (the cable outer cover is not solid, so gently spraying/dribbling lubricant along the cable length will lubricate the inner cable quite well). Take care to avoid “lubricating” the radio or any of the under-dash wiring.  Before installation, lubricate the following points and check for free movement: a) heater valve control bracket cam pivot and follower. Grease between the bracket and cam. b) Heater valve control bracket rod clamp.  Clean the two motor earth points well to ensure good earthing. These are the terminal on the end of the yellow cable, and the terminal on the end of the low-speed resistor, both of which screw to the fan-blade-housing with a selftapping screw. Page 53 of 63

  

The heater fan switch originally appears to have no grommet where the wires pass from the switch through the casing. It is recommended to install one as good wiring practice, noting that the upper outer face of the grommet may need to be shaved to allow the winged heater fan switch escutcheon to seat properly. Replace the 21/8” long length of heater hose between the heater tap and the heater core, even if it looks OK (fifty years of hot summers and cold winters are not gentle on heater hoses, even inside the car). The recirculation flap inside the flue assembly can leak cold air into the car if it is not sealing correctly. One solution is to put a very thin piece of rubber around the edge of the flap hole (just enough to seal off any air leaks). Getting the heater back into the car can be difficult, especially if a flue assembly is fitted. It is a lot easier job to do with two people (one to hold in position and one to fit the screws and bolts). If an assistant is not available, it is easier to prop up under the heater to get it to sit in place. o For recirculating heaters, attach the casing upper mounting bracket to the plenum chamber cover panel (two phillips-head screws/washers), then push the heater up into position, guiding the cover plate & stud assembly into place. Attach the two stud nuts, then allow the studs to take the heater‟s weight as you put in the two ½” bolts connecting the dash-mounting-brackets to the dash. After connecting the heater, open the heater tap and run the engine for a few minutes. Allow the car to cool then check the water level in radiator (filling the heater and hoses will drop the water level substantially).

12 Other Warmaride Heaters The photographs below indicate some of the Warmaride heaters fitted to different model Holdens, and may assist in identifying some “swap meet bargains”. 12.1 FC Holden The FC Holden Warmaride heater (“Universal Heater”) was part number 7406627, with the Demister Package being part number 7406264. Many of these heaters have "Smiths" rather than "Nasco" on the front flap as they were made for Nasco by Smiths, just as a number of other genuine accessories were. Differences to FB/EK:  The FC casing is round type rather than rectangular box seen in FB/EK.  Firewall must be drilled to install them. A further Smiths heater was also available (part number 7406185).

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The FE/FC Holden Freshair heater is pictured below:

12.2 EJ Holden The EJ Holden NASCO accessory brochure indicates three types of heater were offered: a) De luxe fresh-air type, complete with demister and booster fan, b) Economically-priced Motorless type, operates by draught from plenum chamber through heated core element, and c) Recirculatory type, incorporates low drain fan, core element and demister. http://www.members.tripod.com/sixties_holdens/ej/ejnasco.html

The brochure picture above indicates an assembly very similar to the FB/EK type (i.e. with a casing built of different sections, with a louvered casing at the bottom). However, discussion with EJ/EH Holden gurus indicates that EJ and EH Holdens had identical heaters, and that only two types of heater were fitted: a) a Motorless type, consisting of a bare heater core which bolts up under the plenum. These heaters can be found both with, and without demister tubes.

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b) A heater with booster fan, housed in a square casing with the winged Warmaride fan switch knob on the front. These heaters can be found both with, and without a Premier console that mounts the fan switch knob remotely from the heater casing. No EJ/EH Holdens are known to have been sold with the FB/EK Holden type Warmaride heater shown in the EJ brochure – the brochure artwork is likely to be a hangover from the EK Holden sales process. 12.3 EH Holden

The EH Holden NASCO accessory brochure indicates only two types were offered: a) De luxe fresh-air type, complete with demister and booster fan, and b) Economically priced Motorless type, with provision for demister package.

http://members.tripod.com/~sixties_holdens/eh/ehnasco.html Differences to FB/EK:  Integral casing design.  Tap assembly on driver‟s side of casing.  Square outlet ducts.

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Was offered with a console to suit the Premier (see photograph at left), which had a 3-pin male plut for the fan switch to fit to.

12.4 HD Holden The HD Holden NASCO accessory brochure indicates only two types were offered: a) De luxe fresh-air type, complete with demister and booster fan, and b) Economically priced Motorless type, with provision for demister package.

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http://www.members.tripod.com/sixties_holdens/hd/hdnasco.html 12.5 HR Holden HR Holdens offered two types of Warmaride heater as options: a) A “Motorless Freshair” model similar to the “poverty pack” heater shown in Section 1 above, and b) A Deluxe freshair with two-speed electric fan.

http://www.members.tripod.com/sixties_holdens/hr/hrnasco.html

12.6

Smiths Beehive

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Although not offered by NASCO (and not a Warmaride!), the Smiths beehive heater was a common aftermarket heater fitted to many early Holdens. It was also offered with an optional demister package. The beehive heater fan motor is very similar to the Warmaride, although the Smith's mount plate for the brushes are totally round and the fan is held on with a 'spring split collar' (no grub screw).

12.7

Hhhhhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......

Not sure what this one is... it appeared on the FB/EK holden forum but probably originally came off eBay. It looks like an FB/EK heater-core-casing and louvered casing, but the heater fan switch has been placed on the back (firewall) side of the louvered casing instead of the front side of the heater-core-casing.

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13 Part Numbers The following part numbers are listed in the GMH Master Parts catalogue (20 Years of Holden Production). Key: * Suit Motorless Heater. + Not Suitable X2 Engine. ## Suit Fresh-Air and Recirculating Heater. # Suit Fresh-Air Heater. ### Suit Recirculating Heater. 13.1 FE/FC Holden FE-FC Universal Heater FE-FC Demister Package Connector – Hose "Smith" FE Switch - Rheostat "Smith" FE Switch - Rheostat "Preslite" FE, FC Valve assembly - Control "Smith" FE

7406627 7406264 74063431 74063421 74066361 74063411

13.2 FB/EK Holden Heater Package – Motorless FB, EK 7422438 Demister Package FB, EK M35155 Heater - Fresh-Air and Demister FB, EK Right Hand Drive 7414672 Conversion Package - Recirculating to Fresh-Air FB Right Hand Drive 7425042 Adaptor - Demister Hose to Heater FB, EK ##LH74150551 ##RH74150541 Bracket - Mounting FB, EK ##74231291 Button - Tufting FB, EK ##SP13761 Clamp - Hose FB, EK ##SP15084 Clip - Knob Retaining FB, EK ##74212241 Cover - Louvered Bottom FB, EK ##74231231 Cover Plate & Stud Assembly FB, EK ###74231331 Fan Assembly FB, EK ##74231261 Grommet - Wiring FB, EK ##74231351 Grommet - Heater Hose FB, EK *74224401 Hose - Demister 15½" FB, EK ##74150481 Hose - Demister 36" FB, EK ##7415047 Hose - Demister 26½" x 1½" FB, EK *M351521 Hose - Demister 40" x 1½" FB, EK *M351531 Hose - Heater 1¾" FB, EK ##74231381 Hose - Heater 28" FB, EK ##74170821 Hose - Heater 55" FB, EK ##74170831 Hose - Heater 28" FB, EK *74224421 Hose - Heater 61½" FB, EK *74224431 Knob - Control Lever FB, EK ##74129861 Knob - Switch FB, EK ##74231271 Lever - Hot Water Control FB, EK ##74146801

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Motor - Fan FB, EK Nipple - Hose FB, EK Nipple - Heater FB, EK Outlet Assembly - Demister FB, EK Radiator Assembly FB, EK Radiator Assembly FB, EK Resistor - Motor FB, EK Rod - Hot Water Control Lever FB, EK Screw - Control Lever Knob FB, EK Screw - Hot Water Control Lever FB, EK Shell Assembly FB, EK Spacer - Bottom Cover FB, EK Strap - Demister Hose Support FB, EK Switch & Escutcheon Assembly FB, EK Valve Assembly - Control FB, EK Valve Assembly - Control FB, EK Valve & Seal - Recirculating FB, EK Valve Chamber Assembly FB, EK Valve - Water FB, EK Volute & Tray Assembly FB, EK Washer - Tufting Button FB, EK 13.3 EJ/EH Holden Heater Package - Motorless EJ exc. EJ/235 Heater Package Motorless EH exc. EH/235, EH/239

##74231241 ##74150422 *74224411 ##74150462 ##74231321 *74224391 ##74231371 ##74146811 ##4546491 ##1889781 ##74231301 ##74231341 ##7415052 ##74231281 *74224441 #74146291 #74231251 #74231401 ###74231311 ##74231251 ##SP14421

7420461 7420458

Demister Package - Motorless Heater EJ exc. EJ/235 7420460 Demister Package Motorless Heater EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 7420460 Heater and Demister Package - Motorless EJ exc. EJ/235 7420704 Heater and Demister Package Motorless EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 7420709 Heater - Fresh-Air and Demister EJ exc. EJ/235 7419286 Heater Fresh-Air and Demister EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 7422768 Adaptor - Demister Hose to Plenum Chamber EJ, EH #LH74193951 #RH74193961 Bearing - Heater Recirculating Flap Valve EJ, EH #74228971 Bracket - Demister Control Lever Pivot Retainer EJ #74240531 Clamp - Heater Hose EJ, EH #SP16104 Clip - Heater Hose EH #SP15811 Clip - Heater Knob Retaining EJ, EH #74212241 Cover - Heater, Rear EJ, EH #74228941 Demister Offtake - Heater EJ, EH #LH74228891 #RH74228881 Disc - Spring EJ, EH #74129732-1 Flap - Heater By-pass EJ, EH #74228921 Grommet - Heater Hose EJ, EH #74146361 Hose – Demister EJ, EH #74193032

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Hose - Heater, 31" EJ Hose - Heater, 39" EJ Hose - Heater, 33" EH Hose - Heater, 42½ " EH Knob - Control Lever EJ, EH Knob - Heater Switch EJ exc. EJ/235 EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 Knob - Heater Switch EJ/235, EH/235, EH/239 Lever Assembly - Heat Control EJ, EH Lever & Trun Assembly - Demister Control EJ Lever & Trun. Assembly - Demister control EH Motor - Heater Fan EJ, EH Nipple - Heater Hose EJ, EH Nozzle - Demister EJ, EH Nut - Hex. No. 10 - 24 EJ Pivot - Demister Control Lever EJ Radiator Assembly - Heater EJ, EH Resistor - Heater Motor EJ, EH Rod - Demister Control Lever EJ, EH Rod - Heat Control Lever EJ, EH Rotor Assembly - Heater EJ, EH Screw - Flat Head Self Tapping Type "A" No. 4 - 24 x ¾"EJ, EH Screw - Hex Head Machine No. 10 - 24 x 3/8" EH Screw Hex. Socket Set No. 8 - 32 x 3/16" EJ, EH Seal - Heater to Plenum Chamber EJ, EH Shell & Bracket Assembly - Heater EJ, EH Spacer - Demister Control Lever EJ Spire Nut - Heater Valve EJ, EH Spring - Demister Control Rod EJ, EH Spring - Heater Hose EH Strip - Heater By-pass flap retaining EJ, EH Stud - Heater Mounting EJ, EH Switch Assembly - Heater Fan EJ exc. EJ/235 EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 Switch Assembly - Heater Fan EJ/235, EH/235, EH/239 Valve Assembly - Heater Control EJ, EH Valve Assembly - Heater Recirculating Flap EJ, EH Volute Box - Heater EJ exc. EJ/235EH exc. EH/235, EH/239 Washer - Friction EJ Washer – Friction EH Washer - Special Flat EJ, EH Washer – Retaining EJ, EH

#74192991 #74193001 #74227661 #74227671 #74168602 #74230321 #74212231 #74187041 #74212111 #74247161 #74228861 #74150422-1 #LH74187091 #RH74187081 #1203611 #74211041 #74228871 #74228901 #74212101 #74187061 #74228911 #1692481 #1889781 #4546492 #74228951 #74228991 #74212082 #74228961 #74247812 #74202291 #74228931 #74212121 #74229021 #74212221 #74186961 #74228981 #74229031 #74129724 #74247153 #74129711 #74149031

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13.4 HD/HR Holden Heater Package - Motorless HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive +7427704 Demister Package - Motorless Heater HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive 7427670 Heater and Demister Package - Motorless HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive +7427668 Heater and Demister Package - Motorless HD X2 Eng. exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive 7429046 Heater - Fresh-Air and Demister HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive 7427229 Conversion package - Fresh-Air Heater and Demister HD exc. HD/235, HD/239 Left Hand Drive M35477 Conversion Package - Fresh-Air Heater HD X2 Eng. exc. HD/235, HD/239 Right Hand Drive 7429047

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