P. 1
President Obama: Act to End Lord’s Resistance Army Violence: For Immediate Release

President Obama: Act to End Lord’s Resistance Army Violence: For Immediate Release

|Views: 8|Likes:
Published by Resolve

More info:

Published by: Resolve on Sep 21, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

En français ci-dessous   For Immediate Release

President Obama: Act to End Lord’s Resistance Army Violence in Central Africa
(Washington, D.C. 24 May 2010) – President Barack Obama should move swiftly to implement landmark legislation he signed today committing the US to help civilians in central Africa threatened by the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), a coalition of 49 human rights, humanitarian, and faith-based groups said today. The rebel group has carried out one of the world’s longest-running and most brutal insurgencies. The Lord’s Resistance Army Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act of 2009 was signed into law by President Obama during a White House ceremony today that included key Members of Congress and representatives of civil society organizations. It states that it is U.S. policy to support efforts “to protect civilians from the Lord’s Resistance Army, to apprehend or remove Joseph Kony and his top commanders from the battlefield in the continued absence of a negotiated solution, and to disarm and demobilize the remaining LRA fighters.” It also requires President Obama to develop a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to protect civilians in central Africa from LRA attacks and take steps to permanently stop the rebel group’s violence. Furthermore, it calls on the United States to increase humanitarian assistance to countries currently affected by LRA violence and to support economic recovery and transitional justice efforts in Uganda. The coalition of supporting organizations includes groups in Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan – where communities face ongoing attacks by the LRA – as well as in Uganda, where the conflict originated. Human rights defenders in Niangara, a town in northern Congo deeply affected by recent LRA attacks, in a public letter to President Obama, published last week, pleaded for concrete and urgent action against the LRA. “We feel forgotten and abandoned. Our suffering seems to bring little attention from the international community or our own government,” the letter says. “We live each day with the fear of more LRA attacks. What chance do we have if no one hears our cries and if no one comes to our aid?” The law was introduced into the US Senate and House of Representatives in May 2009, and has since become the most widely supported Africa-specific legislation in recent Congressional history. The law was cosponsored by a bipartisan group of 65 Senators and 201 Representatives, representing 49 states and 90% of US citizens. Tens of thousands of Americans mobilized in support of the legislation, participating in hundreds of meetings with Congressional offices across the country. “For years civilians in central Africa have suffered immensely from LRA violence,” said Anneke Van Woudenberg, Senior Researcher at Human Rights Watch. “This legislation gives President Obama a clear mandate to work with international and national partners to apprehend indicted LRA commanders as part of a comprehensive strategy to permanently stop LRA atrocities.” “President Obama should move swiftly to take advantage of this historic opportunity to help bring closure to one of the worst human rights crises of our day,” added Van Woudenberg. LRA violence has plagued central Africa for more than two decades. In northern Uganda, thousands of civilians were killed and nearly two million displaced by the conflict between the rebels and the Ugandan government. In July 2005, the International Criminal Court issued arrest warrants for the senior leaders of the LRA for crimes they committed in northern Uganda, but the

suspects remain at large. Though the rebel group ended attacks in northern Uganda in 2006, it then moved its bases to the northern Democratic Republic of Congo and has since committed acts of violence against civilians in Congo, Sudan, and the Central African Republic. Kony and his top commanders sustain their ranks by abducting civilians, including children, to use as soldiers and sexual slaves. In December 2008, following the collapse of a negotiations process, Sudan, Uganda and Congo began a joint military offensive, “Operation Lightening Thunder,” against the rebel group, with backing from the United States. In the subsequent 17 months the LRA has dispersed into multiple smaller groups and has brutally murdered at least 1,500 civilians and abducted at least 1,600 people, many of them children. LRA violence has often targeted churches, school and markets, and includes the massacre of over 300 Congolese civilians in an attack last December. "If left unchecked, the LRA leadership will continue to kill and abduct throughout central Africa, threatening stability in four countries and potentially undermining the referendum in southern Sudan. The LRA is a clear threat to international peace and security,” said John Prendergast, Cofounder of the Enough Project. “The US now is tasked with leading a global effort to end this threat once and for all." The law also aims to help secure a lasting peace in Uganda by increasing assistance to waraffected communities in northern Uganda and supporting initiatives to help resolve longstanding divisions between Uganda’s north and south. It seeks to increase funding for transitional justice initiatives and calls on the Ugandan government to reinvigorate its commitment to a transparent and accountable reconstruction process in war-affected areas. “Until now the world has turned its back to the suffering of our people,” said Bishop Samuel Enosa Peni of the Episcopal Church of the Sudan’s Nzara Diocese, which has been deeply affected by LRA violence. “We are praying for US and international leaders to hear our cries and end this violence once and for all.” To read the letter to President Obama from human rights defenders in Niangara, click here. With questions, please contact: Anneke Van Woudenberg, Human Rights Watch (English, French): London +44-77-1166-4960 (mobile) woudena@hrw.org Michael Poffenberger, Resolve Uganda (English): Washington, DC +1 202-596-2517 / michael@resolveuganda.org Jonathan Hutson, Enough Project (English): Washington, DC +1 587-919-5130 / jhutson@enoughproject.org Supporting organizations include: Human Rights Watch Resolve Uganda, USA Enough Project, USA Invisible Children, USA Refugees International, USA Athletes for Africa / GuluWalk, USA Genocide Intervention Network, USA Global Action for Children, USA Citizens for Global Solutions, USA Institute on Religion and Democracy, USA International Center for Religion & Diplomacy, USA Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment, Uganda Foundation for Human Rights Initiative, Uganda Grassroots Reconciliation Group, Uganda

Centre d’Intervention Psychosociale (CIP), Niangara, Democratic Republic of Congo Voix des Opprimes, Niangara, Democratic Republic of Congo Commission Paroissiale Justice et Paix, Niangara, Democratic Republic of Congo Société Civile Niangara, Democratic Republic of Congo Société Civile Faradje, Democratic Republic of Congo Commission Justice et Paix (Dungu-Duru), Democratic Republic of Congo Encadrement des Femmes Indigènes et Ménages Vulnérables (EFIM), Democratic Republic of Congo Centre de Recherche sur l’Environnement, la Démocratie et les Droits de l’Homme (CREDDHO), Democratic Republic of Congo L’Action Humanitaire pour le Développement Intégral (AHDI), Democratic Republic of Congo Centre d’Appui pour le Développement Rural Communautaire (CADERCO), Democratic Republic of Congo Fondation Mères et Enfant (FME), Democratic Republic of Congo Campagne Pour Paix (CPP), Democratic Republic of Congo Fondation Point de vue des Jeunes Africains pour le Développement (FPJAP), Democratic Republic of Congo Action Sociale pour la Paix et le Développement (ASPD), Democratic Republic of Congo Programme d’Appui a la lutte contre la misère (PAMI), Democratic Republic of Congo Groupe d’Hommes pour la Lutte Contre les Violences (GHOLVI), Democratic Republic of Congo Association des Jeunes Engagés pour le développement et la santé (AJDS), Democratic Republic of Congo Action Globale pour la Promotion Sociale et la paix (AGPSP), Democratic Republic of Congo Union d’Action pour les Initiatives des Développement (UAID), Democratic Republic of Congo Africa Justice Peace and Development (AJPD), Democratic Republic of Congo Synergie des Femmes pour les Victimes des Violences Sexuelles  (SFVS), Democratic Republic of Congo Ligue pour la Solidarité Congolaise (LSC), Democratic Republic of Congo Collectif des Organisations des Jeunes Solidaires du Congo (COJESKI), Democratic Republic of Congo Nzara Diocese, Episcopal Church of the Sudan, South Sudan Tombura-Yambio Diocese, Catholic Church, South Sudan Nabanga Development Agency, South Sudan Maridi Service Agency, South Sudan Young Women Christian Association, South Sudan Mundri Relief & Development Association, South Sudan New Sudan Women Association, South Sudan Gbudue Construction Company, South Sudan Yubu Development Association, South Sudan Zande Cultural Association, South Sudan Yambio Farmers Association, South Sudan Joint Effort for Support of Orphans, South Sudan

Pour publication immédiate  

États-Unis : Le Président Obama devrait prendre des mesures pour mettre un terme aux violences commises par l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur en Afrique centrale

  (Washington, le 24 mai 2010) – Le Président Barack Obama devrait agir sans tarder pour mettre en œuvre la loi historique qu’il a signé aujourd’hui, engageant les États-Unis à prendre des mesures visant à aider les civils d’Afrique centrale menacés par l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur (LRA, Lord’s Resistance Army), a déclaré aujourd’hui une coalition de 49 organisations de défense des droits humains, associations humanitaires et associations basées sur la foi. Le groupe rebelle a mené l’une des rébellions les plus anciennes et les plus brutales au monde.   La loi de 2009 relative au désarmement de l'Armée de Résistance du Seigneur et à la relance du nord de l'Ouganda (LRA Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act) a été signée aujourd’hui lors d’une cérémonie à la Maison Blanche en présence d’éminents membres du Congrès américain et de représentants d’organisations de la société civile. Cette loi stipule que la politique des États-Unis est d’appuyer les efforts visant à « protéger les civils contre l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur, à appréhender ou écarter du champ de bataille Joseph Kony et ses hauts commandants en l’absence persistante d’une solution négociée, ainsi qu’à désarmer et à démobiliser le reste des combattants de la LRA ». Cette loi requiert également du Président Obama qu’il mette au point une stratégie globale et multilatérale visant à protéger les civils d'Afrique centrale face aux attaques de la LRA et qu’il prenne des mesures pour mettre définitivement fin aux violences perpétrées par le groupe rebelle. La loi appelle par ailleurs les États-Unis à accroître leur soutien humanitaire aux pays actuellement affectés par les violences de la LRA et à appuyer les efforts de relance économique et de justice transitionnelle en Ouganda.   La coalition qui soutient la loi rassemble notamment des associations de la République démocratique du Congo et du Soudan – où des communautés sont la proie d’attaques incessantes de la LRA – ainsi que de l'Ouganda, où le conflit a pris naissance.   Dans une lettre ouverte adressée au Président Obama et publiée la semaine passée, les défenseurs des droits humains de Niangara, une ville du nord du Congo profondément affectée par de récentes attaques menées par la LRA, plaident en faveur d’une action concrète et urgente contre la LRA. « Nous nous sentons oubliés et abandonnés. Notre souffrance semble ne pas beaucoup attirer l’attention de la communauté internationale ni de notre propre gouvernement », déplore la lettre. « Nous vivons chaque jour dans la crainte de nouvelles attaques de la LRA. Quelles sont nos chances si personne n’entend nos cris et si personne ne vient à notre secours ? »   La loi a été présentée devant le Sénat américain et la Chambre des Représentants en mai 2009, devenant depuis lors la législation relative à l’Afrique bénéficiant du plus large soutien de toute l’histoire du Congrès américain. La loi a été coparrainée par un groupe bipartite de 65 sénateurs et de 201 députés, représentant 49 États et 90% des citoyens américains. Des centaines de milliers d’Américains se sont mobilisés pour appuyer la loi, participant à des centaines de réunions avec des bureaux du Congrès à travers tout le pays.  

« Cela fait des années que les civils d’Afrique centrale souffrent effroyablement des violences commises par la LRA », a déclaré  Anneke Van Woudenberg, chercheuse principale auprès de la division Afrique à Human Rights Watch. « Cette loi confie clairement au Président Obama le mandat d’œuvrer aux côtés de partenaires nationaux et internationaux pour appréhender les commandants de la LRA inculpés, ceci dans le cadre d’une stratégie globale visant à mettre définitivement fin aux atrocités perpétrées par la LRA. »   « Le Président Obama devrait agir sans tarder et tirer parti de cette occasion historique de contribuer à tourner la page sur l’une des pires crises des droits humains de notre époque », a ajouté Anneke Van Woudenberg.   Les violences commises par la LRA rongent l’Afrique centrale depuis plus de deux décennies. Dans le nord de l’Ouganda, des milliers de civils ont été tués et près de deux millions ont été déplacés par le conflit opposant les rebelles et le gouvernement ougandais. En juillet 2005, la Cour pénale internationale a délivré des mandats d’arrêt contre les commandants supérieurs de la LRA pour des crimes commis dans le nord de l’Ouganda, mais les accusés demeurent en liberté. Bien que le groupe rebelle ait mis fin à ses attaques dans le nord de l’Ouganda en 2006, il a transféré ses bases dans le nord-est de la République démocratique du Congo et a commis des actes de violence à l’encontre des civils au Congo, au Soudan et en République centrafricaine. Kony et ses hauts commandants renouvellent leurs troupes en enlevant des civils, y compris des enfants, afin de les utiliser comme soldats et esclaves sexuels.   En décembre 2008, suite à l’échec du processus de négociation, le Soudan, l'Ouganda et le Congo ont lancé contre le groupe rebelle une offensive militaire conjointe, « l'Opération Coup de tonnerre », avec le soutien des États-Unis. Depuis lors, en l’espace de 17 mois, la LRA s'est dispersée en une multitude de groupes plus petits et a assassiné brutalement plus de 1 500 civils et enlevé plus de 1 600 personnes, dont beaucoup d’enfants. Les violences de la LRA ont souvent pris pour cible des églises, des écoles et des marchés, et lors d’une attaque menée en décembre dernier, le groupe rebelle a massacré plus de 300 civils congolais.   « Si aucune mesure n’est entreprise contre les chefs de la LRA, ils continueront à perpétrer des meurtres et des enlèvements dans toute l’Afrique centrale, menaçant la stabilité dans quatre pays et risquant de compromettre le référendum prévu dans le Sud-Soudan. La LRA constitue une menace flagrante pour la paix et la sécurité internationales », a déclaré John Prendergast, co-fondateur du projet Enough. « Il incombe maintenant aux États-Unis de mener une initiative internationale pour mettre fin à cette menace une fois pour toutes. »     La loi a également pour objectif de contribuer à garantir une paix durable en Ouganda en augmentant l’assistance destinée aux communautés du nord de l’Ouganda affectées par la guerre et en soutenant des initiatives pour aider à résoudre des conflits qui divisent depuis longtemps le nord et le sud du pays. Elle demande un financement accru des initiatives en matière de justice transitionnelle et appelle le gouvernement ougandais à raffermir son engagement en faveur d'un processus de reconstruction transparent et responsable dans les zones affectées par la guerre.   « Jusqu’à présent, le monde est resté sourd à la souffrance de notre peuple », a déploré Mgr Samuel Enosa Peni, évêque de l’Église épiscopale du Soudan pour le diocèse de Nzara, circonscription gravement affectée par la violence de la LRA. « Nous supplions les États-Unis et les dirigeants internationaux d’entendre nos cris et de mettre fin à ces violences une fois pour toutes. »   Pour consulter la lettre adressée au Président Obama par les défenseurs des droits humains de Niangara, veuillez suivre le lien : http://www.hrw.org/fr/node/90570   Pour toute question, veuillez prendre contact avec :

À Londres, pour Human Rights Watch, Anneke Van Woudenberg (anglais, français) : +44-77-1166-4960 (portable) ; ou woudena@hrw.org À Washington, pour Resolve Uganda, Michael Poffenberger (anglais) : +1 202-596-2517 ; ou michael@resolveuganda.org À Washington, pour Enough Project, Jonathan Hutson (anglais) : +1 857-919-5130 ; ou  jhutson@enoughproject.org   Parmi les organisations qui appuient cette initiativefigurent : Human Rights Watch Resolve Uganda, USA Enough Project, USA Invisible Children, USA Refugees International, USA Athletes for Africa / GuluWalk, USA Genocide Intervention Network, USA Global Action for Children, USA Citizens for Global Solutions, USA Institute on Religion and Democracy, USA International Center for Religion & Diplomacy, USA Foundation for Human Rights Initiative, Ouganda Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment, Ouganda Grassroots Reconciliation Group, Ouganda Centre d’Intervention Psychosociale (CIP), Niangara, République démocratique du Congo Voix des Opprimés, Niangara, République démocratique du Congo Commission Paroissiale Justice et Paix, Niangara, République démocratique du Congo Société Civile Niangara, République démocratique du Congo Société Civile Faradje, République démocratique du Congo Commission Justice et Paix (Dungu-Duru), République démocratique du Congo Encadrement des Femmes Indigènes et Ménages Vulnérables (EFIM), République démocratique du Congo Centre de Recherche sur l’Environnement, la Démocratie et les Droits de l’Homme (CREDDHO), République démocratique du Congo Action Humanitaire pour le Développement Intégral (AHDI), République démocratique du Congo Centre d’Appui pour le Développement Rural Communautaire (CADERCO), République démocratique du Congo Fondation Mère et Enfant (FME), République démocratique du Congo Campagne Pour la Paix (CPP), République démocratique du Congo Fondation Point de vue des Jeunes Africains pour le Développement (FPJAP), République démocratique du Congo Action Sociale pour la Paix et le Développement (ASPD), République démocratique du Congo Programme d’Appui a la lutte contre la misère (PAMI), République démocratique du Congo Groupe d’Hommes pour la Lutte Contre les Violences (GHOLVI), République démocratique du Congo Association des Jeunes Engagés pour le développement et la santé (AJDS), République démocratique du Congo Action Globale pour la Promotion Sociale et la paix (AGPSP), République démocratique du Congo Union d’Action pour les Initiatives des Développement (UAID), République démocratique du Congo Africa Justice Peace and Development (AJPD), République démocratique du Congo Synergie des Femmes pour les Victimes des Violences Sexuelles  (SFVS), République démocratique du Congo Ligue pour la Solidarité Congolaise (LSC), République démocratique du Congo Collectif des Organisations des Jeunes Solidaires du Congo (COJESKI), République démocratique du Congo Nzara Diocese, Episcopal Church of the Sudan, Sud-Soudan Tombura-Yambio Diocese, Catholic Church, Sud-Soudan

Nabanga Development Agency, Sud-Soudan Maridi Service Agency, Sud-Soudan Young Women Christian Association, Sud-Soudan Mundri Relief & Development Association, Sud-Soudan  New Sudan Women Association, Sud-Soudan Gbudue Construction Company, Sud-Soudan Yubu Development Association, Sud-Soudan Zande Cultural Association, Sud-Soudan Yambio Farmers Association, Sud-Soudan Joint Effort for Support of Orphans, Sud-Soudan

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->