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Fundamentals of Design
Release 2001 T781-320-04

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Fundamentals of Design
Copyright © 2001 Parametric Technology Corporation. All Rights Reserved. This Fundamentals of Design Training Guide may not be copied, reproduced, disclosed, transferred, or reduced to any form, including electronic medium or machine-readable form, or transmitted or publicly performed by any means, electronic or otherwise, unless Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) consents in writing in advance. User and training documentation from Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) is subject to the copyright laws of the United States and other countries and is provided under a license agreement that restricts copying, disclosure, and use of such documentation. PTC hereby grants to the licensed user the right to make copies in printed form of this documentation if provided on software media, but only for internal/personal use and in accordance with the license agreement under which the applicable software is licensed. Any copy made shall include the PTC copyright notice and any other proprietary notice provided by PTC. This documentation may not be disclosed, transferred, modified, or reduced to any form, including electronic media, or transmitted or made publicly available by any means without the prior written consent of PTC and no authorization is granted to make copies for such purposes. Information described herein is furnished for general information only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a warranty or commitment by PTC. PTC assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document. The software described in this document is provided under written license agreement, contains valuable trade secrets and proprietary information, and is protected by the copyright laws of the United States and other countries. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF SOFTWARE OR ITS DOCUMENTATION CAN RESULT IN CIVIL DAMAGES AND CRIMINAL PROSECUTION. Registered Trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation or a Subsidiary: Advanced Surface Design, CADDS, CADDShade, Computervision, Computervision Services, Electronic Product Definition, EPD, HARNESSDESIGN, Info*Engine, InPart, MEDUSA, Optegra, Parametric Technology, Parametric Technology Corporation, Pro/ENGINEER, Pro/HELP, Pro/INTRALINK, Pro/MECHANICA, Pro/TOOLKIT, PTC, PT/Products, Windchill, and the InPart logo. Trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation or a Subsidiary 3DPAINT, Associative Topology Bus, Behavioral Modeler, BOMBOT, CDRS, CounterPart, CV, CVact, CVaec, CVdesign, CV-DORS, CVMAC, CVNC, CVToolmaker, DesignSuite, DIMENSION III, DIVISION, DVS, DVSAFEWORK, EDE, e/ENGINEER, Electrical Design Entry, e-Series, Expert Machinist, Expert Toolmaker, Flexible Engineering, ICEM, Import Data Doctor, Information for Innovation, i-Series, ISSM, MEDEA, ModelCHECK, NC Builder, Nitidus, PARTBOT, PartSpeak, Pro/ANIMATE, Pro/ASSEMBLY, Pro/CABLING, Pro/CASTING, Pro/CDT, Pro/CMM, Pro/COMPOSITE, Pro/CONVERT, Pro/DATA for PDGS, Pro/DESIGNER, Pro/DESKTOP, Pro/DETAIL, Pro/DIAGRAM, Pro/DIEFACE, Pro/DRAW, Pro/ECAD, Pro/ENGINE, Pro/FEATURE, Pro/FEM-POST, Pro/FLY-THROUGH, Pro/HARNESS-MFG, Pro/INTERFACE, Pro/LANGUAGE, Pro/LEGACY, Pro/LIBRARYACCESS, Pro/MESH, Pro/Model.View, Pro/MOLDESIGN,Pro/NC-ADVANCED, Pro/NC-CHECK, Pro/NC-MILL, Pro/NCPOST, Pro/NC-SHEETMETAL, Pro/NC-TURN, Pro/NC-WEDM, Pro/NC-Wire EDM, Pro/NETWORK ANIMATOR, Pro/NOTEBOOK, Pro/PDM, Pro/PHOTORENDER, Pro/PHOTORENDER TEXTURE LIBRARY, Pro/PIPING, Pro/PLASTIC ADVISOR, Pro/PLOT, Pro/POWER DESIGN, Pro/PROCESS, Pro/REPORT, Pro/REVIEW, Pro/SCAN-TOOLS, Pro/SHEETMETAL, Pro/SURFACE, Pro/VERIFY, Pro/Web.Link, Pro/Web.Publish, Pro/WELDING, Product Structure Navigator, PTC i-Series, Shaping Innovation, Shrinkwrap, The Product Development Company, Virtual Design Environment, Windchill e-Catalog, Windchill e-Series, Windchill ProjectLink, CV-Computervision logo, DIVISION logo, and ICEM logo.

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PRINTING HISTORY Document No. Date T781-320-01 T781-320-02 T781-320-03 T781-320-04 06/26/01 08/22/01 09/13/01 10/31/01

Description Initial Printing of Fundamentals of Design for Release 2001 Revisions to Fundamentals of Design for Release 2001 Revisions to Fundamentals of Design for Release 2001 Revisions to Fundamentals of Design for Release 2001

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Precision Learning
THE PRECISION LEARNING METHODOLOGY
PTC Global Services is dedicated to continually providing the student with an effective, comprehensive learning experience. Toward this goal, PTC developed Precision Learning, which matches the right training to the right people at the right time using the right method. Precision Learning is based on a three stage Learn—Assess—Improve methodology.

Stage 1: LEARN The student attends a PTC training course, including any: • Instructor-led training course at a PTC training center. • On-site training course. • Customized training course.

• Web-based training (WBT) course.
Stage 2: ASSESS The impact of a training course is assessed using the Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator. 7KH
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Precision Learning
Stage 3: IMPROVE The Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator findings enable customers to identify areas for improvement. The training wizard will direct customers to the appropriate class based on their job responsibilities. Customers have access to a range of resources that include:
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CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
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Precision Learning
PRECISION LEARNING IN THE CLASSROOM
The Learn—Assess—Improve Precision Learning methodology is also implemented in selected PTC instructor-led courses. Throughout the class, students will take Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator assessments to evaluate their own comprehension. The group results are also used to identify areas for the instructor to review with the class as a whole. At the end of the class, each student will complete an Education Circuit form. This Education Circuit is the student’s action plan, identifying topics for improvement, as well as the steps to take in order to enhance the skills in those areas.

The following pages provide a sample Education Circuit action plan, and a blank action plan. Instructions for using the Education Circuit action plan will be discussed in the course.

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Precision Learning
EDUCATION CIRCUIT EXAMPLE
The following is an example of a student’s Education Circuit at the end of the Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER training class.

Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator Exam Results
After reviewing the results of the Evaluator exams for this course, the following lists the questions I answered incorrectly and need to research further:

Question
Weak and strong dimensions

Improve Action
Practice creating simple features with the desired dimensioning scheme. Web Lesson Dimensioning Scheme See colleague at work for advice and product examples. Consult company user group for guidelines.

Draft Features Configuration file options

Class Evaluation Form Topics
After reviewing the questions on the class Evaluation form, the following lists the topics I need to research further:

Objective
Setting up the default view of a part Creating sweeps Resolve Mode Resolve Mode

Improve Action
Practice on simple parts using different sketching planes and reference planes. Web Lesson Swept Forms Create some simple models and make them fail. Web lesson Resolve Mode

Future Courses
After reviewing the Role Based Training guidelines, the following lists the courses recommended to improve my skills and enhance my job performance:

Next Courses
Fundamentals of Design Designing with Surfaces

Next Courses

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Precision Learning
Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator Exam Results
After reviewing the results of the Evaluator exams for this course, the following lists the questions I answered incorrectly and need to research further:

Question

Improve Action

Class Evaluation Form Topics
After reviewing the questions on the class Evaluation form, the following lists the topics I need to research further:

Objective

Improve Action

Future Courses
After reviewing the Role Based Training guidelines, the following lists the courses recommended to improve my skills and enhance my job performance:

Next Courses

Next Courses

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Training Agenda
Fundamentals of Design
Day 1
Advanced Sketching and Geometry Drafts and Rounds Creating Advanced Geometry Surface Creation and Style Features

Day 2
Family Tables and Inheritance Advanced Part Tools and Patterns Local Groups and User-Defined Features Advanced Assembly Tools

Day 3
Simplified Representations and Shrinkwrap Top-Down Design and Layouts Designing with Skeletons Skeletons with Mapped Geometry

Day 4
Managing References Project Part I: Design Intent Project Part II: Skeleton Design Project Part III: Creating Final Assembly

Day 5
Project Part IV: Completing Final Assembly Resolving Failures Pro/PROGRAM Mechanism and Design Animation Creating Photorealistic Images

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Table of Contents
Fundamentals of Design
Advanced Sketching and Geometry 1-1
DEFINING ADVANCED GEOMETRY SKETCHING ...................................................1-2
Creating an Axis Normal to the Sketching Plane............................................................... 1-2 Sketching Conic Entities.................................................................................................... 1-2 Creating Elliptical Fillets ................................................................................................... 1-5 Creating Splines ................................................................................................................. 1-6 Replacing Sketched Entities............................................................................................... 1-7 Replacing Dimensions ....................................................................................................... 1-8 Inserting and Modifying Sketcher Text ............................................................................. 1-8

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................................................1-10
EXERCISE 1: Working with Splines............................................................................... 1-11 EXERCISE 2: Advanced Sketch and Text Functionality ................................................ 1-17 EXERCISE 3: Creating the Go Cart Mirror Housing ...................................................... 1-24

OPTIONAL EXERCISE ..................................................................................................1-31
OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Importing External Spline Data........................................... 1-31

MODULE SUMMARY....................................................................................................1-35

Drafts and Rounds

2-1

CREATING DRAFTS........................................................................................................2-2
Guidelines for Using Drafts ............................................................................................... 2-2 Defining a Draft Feature .................................................................................................... 2-3 Creating Neutral Plane Drafts ............................................................................................ 2-4 Creating Neutral Curve Drafts ........................................................................................... 2-5

CREATING ROUNDS.......................................................................................................2-6
Defining Simple Rounds.................................................................................................... 2-6 Selecting Round Feature References.................................................................................. 2-7 Creating Advanced Rounds................................................................................................ 2-9 Creating Round Sets......................................................................................................... 2-10

DEVELOPING GEOMETRY WITH ROUNDS .............................................................2-12 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................................................2-13
EXERCISE 1: Inserting Neutral Plane Drafts.................................................................. 2-13 EXERCISE 2: Creating Advanced Rounds ..................................................................... 2-21

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EXERCISE 3: Creating Intent Chains..............................................................................2-32

OPTIONAL EXERCISES................................................................................................ 2-39
OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Inserting Neutral Curve Drafts ............................................2-39 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Creating Advanced Drafts ...................................................2-44 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 3: Creating Simple and Advanced Rounds ..............................2-49

MODULE SUMMARY ................................................................................................... 2-54

Creating Advanced Geometry

3-1

CREATING SWEPT BLENDS ......................................................................................... 3-2
Creating Spines...................................................................................................................3-2 Using Swept Blends ...........................................................................................................3-3

CREATING VARIABLE SECTION SWEEPS ................................................................ 3-3
Creating Normal-to-Original Spines ..................................................................................3-3 Defining Shapes with Additional Trajectories ...................................................................3-4 Using Variable Section Sweeps..........................................................................................3-7 Orienting Cross-Sections....................................................................................................3-8

CREATING HELICAL SWEEPS ..................................................................................... 3-9 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ....................................................................................... 3-13
EXERCISE 1: Using Swept Blends .................................................................................3-13 EXERCISE 2: Creating Variable Section Sweep Reference Curves................................3-22

OPTIONAL EXERCISE.................................................................................................. 3-30
OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Controlling Cuts with Datum Graph Features .....................3-30

MODULE SUMMARY ................................................................................................... 3-31

Surface Creation and Style Feature

4-1

USING SURFACES IN MODEL DESIGN ...................................................................... 4-2
Advantages of Using Surfaces............................................................................................4-2

DEFINING SURFACE OPTIONS .................................................................................... 4-2
Working in Part Mode........................................................................................................4-2 Open Ends versus Capped Ends .........................................................................................4-4 Creating Merged Surfaces ..................................................................................................4-4

CREATING SOLID FEATURES...................................................................................... 4-5 DEFINING ISDX............................................................................................................... 4-5
Using the Style Feature ......................................................................................................4-6 Parallel Modeling ...............................................................................................................4-7

USING ISDX ..................................................................................................................... 4-8
Creating 2-D and 3-D Curves.............................................................................................4-8 Creating Curves on Surfaces ..............................................................................................4-9 Creating Styling Models...................................................................................................4-10 Creating Freeform Surfaces..............................................................................................4-10

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Creating Blends and Transitions ...................................................................................... 4-11 Using Style Surfaces in Engineering Models................................................................... 4-12

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................................................4-13
EXERCISE 1: Creating Cuts Using Surfaces .................................................................. 4-14 EXERCISE 2: Applying Variable Section Sweeps.......................................................... 4-21 EXERCISE 3: Creating Style Surfaces............................................................................ 4-30

OPTIONAL EXERCISE ..................................................................................................4-39
OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Flashlight ................................................... 4-39

MODULE SUMMARY....................................................................................................4-45

Family Tables and Inheritance Features

5-1

USING FAMILY TABLES................................................................................................5-2
Family Table Structure....................................................................................................... 5-3

CREATING FAMILY TABLES........................................................................................5-4
Creating the Generic Model ............................................................................................... 5-4 Creating the Table.............................................................................................................. 5-5

MODIFYING FAMILY TABLES .....................................................................................5-8 DEFINING FAMILY TABLE OPTIONS........................................................................5-12 DEFINING INHERITANCE FEATURES.......................................................................5-12
Using Inheritance Features............................................................................................... 5-13 Capabilities ...................................................................................................................... 5-13 Creating Inheritance Features .......................................................................................... 5-13

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................................................5-16
EXERCISE 1: Creating Part Family Tables .................................................................... 5-17 EXERCISE 2: Using Inheritance Features....................................................................... 5-24 EXERCISE 3: Inheritance Feature in New Models ......................................................... 5-27

OPTIONAL EXERCISE ..................................................................................................5-29
OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Assembly Family Tables ...................................... 5-29

MODULE SUMMARY....................................................................................................5-34

Advanced Part Tools and Patterns

6-1

ADVANCED COMPONENT OPERATIONS ..................................................................6-2
Creating Part Intersections ................................................................................................. 6-2 Merging and Cutting Out Parts .......................................................................................... 6-2 Creating Mirrored Parts ..................................................................................................... 6-3 Creating Assembly-Level Features .................................................................................... 6-4

USING PATTERNING ......................................................................................................6-6
Creating Dimension Patterns.............................................................................................. 6-7 Creating Pattern Tables...................................................................................................... 6-7 Creating Patterns in Assembly Mode............................................................................... 6-11

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............................................................................................................................................................8-27 MODULE SUMMARY ...........................................................................................................................LABORATORY PRACTICAL ............................................................................................................................................. 8-2 Modifying Subassemblies .Commercial Use Prohibited - ........7-30 MODULE SUMMARY ....................................7-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ..................................................... 7-30 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Adding the Splined UDF to the Hub ...................................................... 6-12 EXERCISE 1: Mirroring the Knuckle Part .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7-34 Advanced Assembly Tools 8-1 MODIFYING ASSEMBLIES...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7-26 OPTIONAL EXCERCISE ..................................................................................................................................................................................8-3 Replacing Components..................................................6-16 EXERCISE 3: Creating Pattern Tables .......................................................... 8-27 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Exploded Views and Dynamic Repositioning ...............................6-22 MODULE SUMMARY .......6-19 EXERCISE 4: Patterning Components in Assembly Mode .......................................................7-23 EXERCISE 4: Placing UDFs .....8-7 EXERCISE 1: Restructuring the Carburetor ..................................7-13 EXERCISE 3: Creating UDFs..................8-23 OPTIONAL EXERCISE................................................. 7-5 Creating UDFs..................9-2 CREATING SIMPLIFIED REPS ................................................8-4 Repeating Component Placement.......................................................................................................................................................................7-2 USER-DEFINED FEATURES .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 6-25 Local Groups and User-Defined Features 7-1 LOCAL GROUPS...................... 9-5 For University Use Only ................................................................8-10 EXERCISE 2: Replacing the Brake Hub Assembly Components............8-7 Creating Exploded Views........................................8-16 EXERCISE 3: Repeating Components...............................................................................8-2 Repositioning Components ........................................... 7-2 Manipulating Groups........................................................ 7-9 EXERCISE 1: Creating Local Groups ............................................. 8-38 Simplified Representations & Shrinkwrap 9-1 SIMPLIFIED REPRESENTATIONS..................................................................................................................................................................................6-13 EXERCISE 2: Creating Assembly Features.................................7-10 EXERCISE 2: Using Group Options.............. 9-2 Simplified Representation Types...........................................................................

................................................................................................................................................... 9-6 Creating Rules.. 9-10 Other Substitution Options................................ 10-12 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ....................................9-17 Exported Shrinkwrap Models ................................................................................................. 9-13 SHRINKWRAP .............................................................. 9-5 Specifying the Default Rule ...... 9-24 EXERCISE 2: Using Shrinkwrap and Substitution in Simplified Reps............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 9-6 Selecting Components..................................................................Commercial Use Prohibited - ..... 9-8 SUBSTITUTING COMPONENTS...........................................9-9 Selecting Components for Substitution......................................................................................... 10-2 Using Assembly Skeletons............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10-11 Using Global Dimensions .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................9-24 EXERCISE 1: Creating Assembly Simplified Reps ........ 9-41 MODULE SUMMARY.......................................................9-41 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Part Level Simplified Reps.............................................................................................................................Creating Customized Representations ..................................................................................................10-13 EXERCISE 1: Using Layouts ........9-16 Shrinkwrap Capabilities............................. 10-7 Creating Engineering Notebooks .................... 9-16 SHRINKWRAP TYPES.................................... 10-18 For University Use Only ........................................... 9-33 OPTIONAL EXERCISE .................. 9-5 Defining Action for Components................ 10-7 Controlling Designs with Global Information............ 10-13 EXERCISE 2: Developing Layouts .................. 10-7 Sketching Designs.............................................................................................................. 9-7 Selection Rules......................................................................................................... 9-9 Envelope Methods...............................................................10-6 Capturing the Design Process ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 10-5 Copying Reference Geometry between Models........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9-9 Substitution using Envelopes .......9-46 Top-Down Design and Layouts 10-1 DEFINING TOP-DOWN DESIGN TECHNIQUES...................... 10-8 Linking Parts to Layouts .....10-2 Identifying Design Intent ..................... 10-11 Capturing Design Intent ................................................................................. 10-5 USING PRO/ENGINEER LAYOUT ............................................................................................................................................................... 9-17 Associative Shrinkwrap Features...................................................... 10-2 Using Assembly Structures ................................. 9-22 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .......

............................................................................................................................................................................................. 11-23 Skeletons with Mapped Geometry 12-1 USING SKELETONS WITH MAPPED GEOMETRY ................................................................................................................................................11-14 EXERCISE 3: Using the Skeleton to Complete the Assembly ...........................................................................MODULE SUMMARY ................................12-2 Using Model Geometry ...................................................................................................... 11-2 Creating the Skeleton ..................11-4 Using Skeleton Geometry for Modeling.....12-6 EXERCISE 2: Mapping the Exhaust........................................................... 13-23 For University Use Only ......................13-9 EXERCISE 2: Breaking External References ..............13-4 Global Reference Viewer ............................ 13-6 Setting Object-Specific Reference Control ................................. 12-2 Constructing Mapped Skeletons..............................................................................................................................13-2 Creating Dependencies................. 13-2 Benefits of Designing with External References....13-5 CONTROLLING INTERDEPENDENCIES .............................................................................................................Commercial Use Prohibited - ...................................................................................13-6 Reference Control Settings................................................................................................................................................................13-14 EXERCISE 3: Interrogating the Suspension Assembly ................................................................................................................................................................................................................13-7 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .....................................................................................................................................................................12-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................11-20 MODULE SUMMARY .................................................................................... 11-7 EXERCISE 1: Building the Motor Skeleton ........................................ 10-30 Designing with Skeletons 11-1 USING SKELETON PARTS.........................................................11-8 EXERCISE 2: Creating the Crank Model .....................................................................................................................................................................13-2 INTERROGATING EXISTING OBJECTS ........12-11 MODULE SUMMARY .............................................................................................. 12-6 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Map Skeleton .....................................12-3 Using the Mapped Skeleton at the Subassembly Level .13-4 Model Tree Tool....................................... 12-15 Managing References 13-1 DEFINING THE PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIP....................................................................................................... 13-4 Info Pull-Down Menu...........................................................................................................................................................................................................11-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .... 13-9 EXERCISE 1: Modifying the Piston ........................11-4 Relating Assembly Components to Skeletons .................................................................................................13-20 MODULE SUMMARY ................................................

........................... 17-10 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Using Behavioral Modeling .................. 14-2 Design Requirements ....Project Part 1: Design Intent 14-1 PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS ........14-2 Scenario ............................................................................. 14-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .................................................................................................... 15-6 EXERCISE 3: Creating Skeleton Features for Space Claims ..................................17-10 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Blades ......................................................................................................................................................................18-2 USING THE RESOLVE ENVIRONMENT ............................. 15-17 Project Part III: Creating Components 16-1 EXERCISE 1: Communicating Layout Information to the Skeleton.............................................. 14-6 EXERCISE 2: Developing Initial Product Structure ........................... 15-13 EXERCISE 4: Creating Skeleton Features for Interfaces ........................................................................18-2 Examples of Regeneration Problems .................. 18-8 EXERCISE 2: Resolving Assembly Failures.......................................................................................18-8 EXERCISE 1: Resolving Failures ..................................... 17-21 Resolving Failures 18-1 DEFINING REGENERATION FAILURE................................................................................................. 17-17 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 4: Finishing a Model ....................................................................... 17-14 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 3: Creating a Pedestal Part ................................................................................................. 15-2 EXERCISE 2: Creating Skeleton Features for Motion ..................................................... 18-4 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ..........Commercial Use Prohibited - ...................................................................................................... 14-12 Project Part II: Skeleton Design 15-1 EXERCISE 1: Creating the Basic Skeleton ........................................... 16-12 EXERCISE 5: Creating Features in the Drive_Arm Part........................................ 18-16 For University Use Only ....................................................................................... 17-18 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 5: Creating Exploded States ...................14-6 EXERCISE 1: Capturing Initial Design Intent.................................................................................. 16-8 EXERCISE 4: Creating Features in the Link Part .................... 16-3 EXERCISE 3: Creating Features in the Support_Arm Part ....................................................................... 17-5 OPTIONAL EXERCISES ....... 17-2 EXERCISE 2: Completing the Assembly Population................................. 16-15 Project Part IV: Completing the Assembly 17-1 EXERCISE 1: Creating Features in the Housing_Rear Part .............................................................. 16-2 EXERCISE 2: Creating Features in the Main Base Part.......................................................... 17-20 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 6: Testing Size Requirements..................................................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................... 20-4 Dragging Assembly Components...........................................................................19-2 Automating the Part Design Process .......................19-6 Incorporating Changes into the Program.............................................................................................20-22 For University Use Only ....................... 18-22 Pro/PROGRAM 19-1 USING PRO/PROGRAM ............... 19-2 Defining the Program Structure............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20-10 Integrated and associative........................19-11 OPTIONAL EXERCISE..........................20-14 OPTIONAL EXERCISES.................................20-6 Mechanism Design with Cam and Slot Connections...................................................... 20-2 CREATING MECHANISM ASSEMBLIES............................................................19-9 Editing the Program..................................................................................................................................MODULE SUMMARY .........................................................................................................................................................................20-5 IMPLEMENTING MECHANISM . 20-22 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Fan Mechanism...................................................20-4 Drivers and Motion.................................................................20-10 Key frame sequences.............................................................................................................................................................. 20-9 DESIGN ANIMATION CAPABILITIES .................................................................................................................................................................... 20-6 Mechanism Design without Cam and Slot Connections.....................19-10 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .........................................20-3 Selecting a Connection Type.... 20-3 Comparing Connections to Constraints .......................................................................................19-9 Manipulating Features Using Pro/PROGRAM ................................................................................................20-3 SIMULATING MOTION ...................................................................... 19-20 OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Automating Assembly Design......................................................................................................................19-2 Automating the Assembly Design Process.......... 19-11 EXERCISE 1: Automating Part Design . 20-13 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Basic Mechanism .....................................................................20-10 Animation Tools...............................................................................................19-20 MODULE SUMMARY .....................................................................................................................................................20-4 Selecting a Driver .................................Commercial Use Prohibited - .......................................................................................................................................................................20-12 Mechanism Re-use ..........................................................................20-12 LABORATORY EXERCISES ........ 19-26 Mechanism & Design Animation 20-1 DEFINING MECHANISM ANIMATION..................19-8 Running the Program........................................................................................................20-11 Animation Manager...20-8 DEFINING DESIGN ANIMATION .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

..............................B-6 Terminology used by Technical Support ............................................A-2 PTC Help Features ...................21-2 PhotoRender Interface.............21-9 EXERCISE 1: Using PhotoRender ................. B-3 Routing Your Technical Support Calls ................................................................B-2 Opening Technical Support Calls via E-mail..........B-6 FINDING ANSWERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE BASE ................................ B-4 Technical Support Call Priorities ............................... 21-5 Setting up Lights ...................................................................................................21-7 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ..........................20-43 Creating Photorealistic Images 21-1 CREATING PHOTOREALISTIC IMAGES ............................................ 20-26 MODULE SUMMARY...................................................................... B-7 GETTING UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION .....OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Creating an Animation .......A-2 Launching Help: Four Methods ......... A-2 USING PRO/ENGINEER HELP ....................................................................................................................................................... 21-6 RENDERING A SCENE................. 21-10 MODULE SUMMARY.............................................................. A-2 There are four procedures for launching the help system...21-2 Setting up Views and Room..... 21-2 SETTING UP A SCENE .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. B-5 Software Performance Report Priorities ..B-2 OPENING TECHNICAL SUPPORT CALLS ................... B-3 Opening Technical Support Calls via the Web ....................................................................B-9 For University Use Only ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................A-7 PTC Global Services: Technical Support B-1 FINDING THE TECHNICAL SUPPORT WEB PAGE................................................................... 21-3 Defining and Setting Appearances.............................B-5 ONLINE SERVICES......................... A-2 PTC HELP MODULES........................................................................................................Commercial Use Prohibited - ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... B-3 Sending Data Files to PTC Technical Support..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... B-2 Opening Technical Support Calls via Telephone...........................................................................................................B-8 CONTACT INFORMATION....21-17 Using PTC Help A-1 PTC HELP OVERVIEW................................................................................................................................................................. .................... B-5 REGISTERING FOR ON-LINE SUPPORT...............................................

..................................................................................... C-2 ASSESSMENT CRITERIA ..................................................... B-10 ELECTRONIC SERVICES ...................................................................................... C-3 EXERCISE 1: Completing Evaluator Assessments ........................ C-4 MODULE SUMMARY .............................................Commercial Use Prohibited - .......................................................................................... C-7 INDEX……………………………………………………………………………………I-1 For University Use Only ............ B-9 Telephone ............................. C-2 PRO/FICIENCY EVALUATOR .............PTC Technical Support Worldwide Electronic Services................... B-14 Using the Pro/FICIENCY Evaluator C-1 TECHNOLOGY-BASED LEARNING @ PTC..................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Commercial Use Prohibited Page 1-1 . axis points. you will be able to: • • • • Create ellipses. For University Use Only . Use the Replace and Text options. Sketch and dimension splines. and fillets. while defining tangency conditions.Module Advanced Sketching and Geometry In this module you learn how to create and modify advanced geometric entities. conics. Objectives After completing this module. Modify splines.

For University Use Only . select another endpoint.NOTES DEFINING ADVANCED GEOMETRY SKETCHING For most common sketching purposes. as shown in the following figure. as you would do to construct a 3-point arc. select one endpoint. you can specify a value for the parameter “Rho. where segments AE = EC. To construct a conic. It is similar to the type of axis that the system creates automatically when you extrude cylinders. lines. Sketching Conic Entities Using the Conic option. To create complex shapes. you can create conic sketched entities to construct elliptical. Entering Parameter Values To define the shape of a conic. This type of axis is not a datum axis feature. Advanced sketching options include: • • • • Axes that are normal to the sketching plane through a particular point Conics for constructing elliptical. parabolic. it is an axis within the sketched feature.2 Fundament als of Des ign . and hyperbolic sections. and hyperbolic sections Elliptic fillets (a fillet between two sketched entities) Splines Creating an Axis Normal to the Sketching Plane Using the Axis Point option.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. and then select a third intermediate point. simple sketched entities such as arcs. you can create an axis that is normal to the sketching plane through a particular point.” which is the ratio of BE/DE. and circles are sufficient. you need advanced geometry sketching options. parabolic.

you can use the following three constraints: • • • The positions of the two endpoints determined by dimensions or assumptions of coincidence with adjacent entity vertices. For University Use Only .05 to <.5:Elliptical round ¥  1RUPDO TXDGUDQW HOOLSWLFDO URXQG .05 and .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1.5 to . determined by angular dimensions or assumptions of tangency to adjacent entities or centerlines. A rho parameter—created in the same manner as a radius dimension.NOTES D B A E C Figure 1: Definition of RHO You can use values for the conic parameter between . • • • • .5: Parabolic round >. The slope of the conic at each endpoint.3 .95: Hyperbolic round Constraining Conic Sections To constrain the conic section.95. The following values have specific significance.

or part vertex.NOTES Figure 2: Using a Rho Value Using Sketcher Points You can constrain a conic by locating two endpoints and providing a third.4 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 3: Using a Sketcher Point For University Use Only . Pro/ENGINEER internally defines the value of “rho.” The following figure illustrates the required dimensioning scheme. intermediate known point through which the conic must pass. for example. The known point can be. datum point. a sketched point.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1.

You use the same method that you would used to create a radius fillet. you can sketch a fillet between two sketched entities.5 . Figure 4: Dimensioning Schemes of Elliptic Fillets For University Use Only . You must locate the endpoints of the elliptic section by using linear dimensions or x and y radius values.NOTES Creating Elliptical Fillets Using the Elliptic Fillet option.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1.

you can: • • • Sketch points. as well as the tangency angle and radius of curvature at the spline ends. Using Control Polygons You can also use the Control Poly option to generate a control polygon. Sketching Splines To create a spline. Select existing Sketcher points. you can dimension any of the internal points. as illustrated in the following figure. To control the shape of the spline.NOTES Creating Splines Splines are curves that pass smoothly through any number of intermediate points. Select a chain of previously sketched entities.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Figure 5: Spline with Control Polygon For University Use Only .6 Fundament als of Des ign . You can create them by using the Spline option.

then you must dimension the individual Sketcher points.NOTES Note: When you use Select Points to create a spline by selecting existing Sketcher points. Modifying Splines The modification options available for sketched splines are different from the options available for other sketched features. to avoid feature failure.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Alternatively. there is no further link between the points and the spline. You can drag the sketcher points. or you can modify the internal control polygon. the geometry can be replaced by a newly sketched entity.7 . If you do not delete the sketched or imported points at the system prompt. For University Use Only . Figure 6: Modify Spline Dialog Box Replacing Sketched Entities If you attempt to delete a sketched entity with child references when redefining a sketched feature. a warning message displays cautioning against the deletion of a parent entity.

Note: To determine the dimension of an existing feature.NOTES When an entity is redefined. Replacing Dimensions Dimensions to the old entity can usually de deleted without consequence. the system changes the symbol names (that is. You can use it to create section relations. When you delete a dimension and create a new one to redefine the dimensioning scheme. Inserting and Modifying Sketcher Text You can use the TEXT dialog box to insert text onto sketched entities. one part of it retains the old entity identifier. and the other part gets a new identifier.8 Fundament als of Des ign . However. you can use this new entity to replace the old one. The system assigns it a symbolic name in the form KD#. you can also replace a dimension. Figure 7: Text Dialog Box For University Use Only . To retain the children. you can create a Known dimension in Sketcher.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. but keep in mind that a known dimension creates a parent/child relationship to the geometry that you select to create it. and to modify text styles as well. SD# in Sketcher mode and D# in PART mode).

set the pro_font_dir configuration option by specifying the full path to the font directory. option affects how the text is slanted with respect to the sides of the rectangle that contains it. Font Note: To make additional. leroy. Use the Flip option to determine the orientation of the text along a curve. filled.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. font3d.9 .NOTES The TEXT dialog box has the following fields: • – The standard fonts are cal_alf. third-party fonts available for selection. isofont. font. Slant Angle – This Place Along Curve – Select the check box to add or remove text from a curve. For University Use Only . cal_grek. and norm_font. • • • Aspect Ratio – Enter the new aspect ratio factor or use the slider to modify the value.

Tools Table 1: Advanced Sketching Icons Icons Description Create a spline curve through several points Create reference coordinate system Insert collinear constraint Insert constraints Sketch datum curve Toggle datum plane Toggle dimensions Dynamic trim Make two entities tangent Select primary items Sketch circular fillet Sketch elliptical fillet For University Use Only . you work with elliptic fillets and sketched text. You also replace sketched entities. you work with splines to create a model using various sketching tools. Method In Exercise 1. In Exercise 2.10 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you learn additional methods for creating sketched entities. you demonstrate the procedure for creating and dimensioning a conic by saving the conic as a section and then creating solid geometry from the section.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. In Exercise 3.

4. Click [Insert sketched datum curve]. 2. Create a new part called SPLINE using the default template. 3. Sketch a spline. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Toggle off 5. Sketch two circles and a rectangle.NOTES Icons Description Toggle datum axes Select geometry Sketch a conic Sketch text Sketch ellipse Divide section Symmetry constraint Mirror geometry EXERCISE 1: Working with Splines Task 1. For University Use Only . . 1. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. Select the FRONT Datum. as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1.11 .

Click [Toggle dimensions]. 9. Constrain the left side tangent using [Tangential constraint]. [Dynamic trim] and trim all but the following: Figure 9: Trimming Geometric Entities 8.NOTES Figure 8: Sketching Two Circles and a Rectangle 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1.12 Fundament als of Des ign . Click to sketch the spline. For University Use Only . Select the points shown in the previous figure. Click 7.

Note: This polygon or the original spline points could be dimensioned. Click > Modify . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. as shown in the following figure. 12. 11. Click Create Control Poly . Select a few points on the spline.NOTES Figure 10: Adding Constraints 10. Move the points around approximately. Click Add . Select the spline. Click Move . Figure 11: Moving Sketch Points 13.13 .

15.14 Fundament als of Des ign . Complete the dimension scheme as shown in the following figure.NOTES 14. Move few points to see the effect on curvature. Click box. Click Display Curvature . Clear Display Curvature . For University Use Only . Click Delete Control Poly . Note: Not all spline points need to be dimensioned.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. from the MOD SPLINE dialog 17. Click to display dimensions. Figure 12: Moving Points 16.

the vertical line and then select the right tip of the spline. 1. Click to place the angle dimension.NOTES Figure 13: Displaying Dimensions Task 2. 5. Type [180] for the angle.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. 3. For University Use Only . Select the spline. Click . Sketch a vertical centerline. 2. 4. Create a tangency angle dimension on the right tip of the spline. Click . Click . Increase the sensitivity slider to ¾. as shown in the following figure.15 . Select the angle dimension. Use the wheel button to dynamically modify the angle.

8. Drag the curve to desired angle.16 Fundament als of Des ign . Click to complete the feature. Save the model and close the window. on the background to 10. Select the datum curve. Click 7. Click Insert > Protrusion > Revolve . [Select primary items].Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. For University Use Only . Figure 15: Final Model 11.NOTES Figure 14: Sketching a Vertical Centerline 6. Click regenerate. Optional: Shell the model and color the inside surfaces as shown in the following figure. 9.

Click Insert > Protrusion > Extrude . Figure 16: Sketching Straight Lines 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. For University Use Only . 1. Create a new part called ADV_SKETCH. Add circular and elliptic fillets as shown in the following figure using and respectively. 2.PRT using the default template. Sketch as shown in the following figure.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Advanced Sketch and Text Functionality Task 1.17 . Select the TOP datum plane. 3.

Repeat the previous step for the Y-radius. change the dimension scheme for the elliptic fillet. In the RESOLVE SKETCH dialog box. Referring to the following figure. In the ELLIPSE dialog box. click X-Radius . For University Use Only . Click . 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1.50 dimension. Delete the vertical 1.NOTES Figure 17: Adding Fillets 5.0 dimension. delete the horizontal 1. 7. Select the elliptic fillet.18 Fundament als of Des ign . then click Accept . Figure 18: Deleting Horizontal and Vertical Dimensions 8. Click . Exit sketcher. Click OK .

[Select geometry]. 10. Complete the feature. 1. Insert three axis points using Sketch > Axis Point as shown in the following figure. Notice the axes created. Task 3. [Select primary items].Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Using Dynamic Modify. Click 2. Select the protrusion just created. Press <SHIFT>and select the three edges as shown in the following figure. 1.75 and 1.0. Click 2. Notice no axes were created. Use the replace function.NOTES 9. Create axis points.19 . Figure 19: Inserting Three Axis Points 4. Click Regenerate . Toggle on Task 2. For University Use Only . Click 3. Redefine the sketch. drag the depth of the protrusion to be a value between . . > Redefine .

Use the Dynamic Modify function to create a radius between 0. Select the protrusion.125 and 0.20. Click > Round Edges .15. Select the 45° line.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Notice the round follows a tangent chain. and attempt to delete it. Modify the Rho value to 0. Click No. Click to redefine the sketch. Sketch a conic with both ends tangent using 7.20 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Figure 20: Selecting Edges to Round 3. Read the warning message. 4. . Figure 21: Sketching a Conic For University Use Only . 6. 5.

3. 1. 2. Figure 22: Dimensioning Task 5.NOTES Task 4. Return the model to the default view and click surface.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Click to begin a sketched datum curve and sketch a spline as shown in the following figure. Modify dimensions as shown in the following figure and complete the feature. then click Edit > Replace . . Replace references used by the 45° line with the conic. Select the 45° line. 5. For University Use Only . 4. Create sketched text. Read the message window.21 . Select the conic. Click 3. Click Yes to delete dimensions associated with the line. Delete the conic’s centerline. 2. Select the top 1.

Begin the creation of another curve as before. Figure 24: Sketching a Line as Reference 7. Set the font to CG Times. For University Use Only . Exit sketcher and complete the spline datum curve.NOTES Figure 23: Sketching a Spline 4. Click [Sketch text].22 Fundament als of Des ign . as shown in the following figure. 6. 8. and flip if necessary. Select the spline. 5. Sketch a line using the start of the datum curve as a reference.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Click Place Along Curve . Type [ProE] in the TEXT dialog box.

13. Complete the text datum curve feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Click > Suppress . Drag the the text definition line to dynamically modify. Figure 26: Extruded and Shaded Model 15. Click to exit the TEXT dialog box. Drag to desired depth. Click Insert > Protrusion > Extrude . Select the text datum curve. 10. 14. Click Insert > Cut > Extrude . Select the text datum curve.25. 16. Save the model and close the window. For University Use Only . 12. 17. Drag to approximately 0.NOTES 9. Regenerate and shade the model. Figure 25: Dynamic Modification 11.23 . Click . Select the text protrusion.

Sketch a coordinate system for the first section. 1. . 3. Open the model. For University Use Only . Click Insert > Protrusion > Blend > General > Done > Smooth > Done . Select Task 3. Start the definition of the protrusion using a smooth general 1. at the intersection of the 1. Open the MIRROR_MOUNT. Select the top surface of the mirror mount base as shown in the previous figure. 2. to accept the default direction.24 Fundament als of Des ign . blend.NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating the Go Cart Mirror Housing Task 1. Figure 27: The Mirror Mount Model Task 2. Sketch a coordinate system using references.PRT. Toggle off 2. Click Bottom .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Click DTM3.

For University Use Only . Click [Symmetry constraint] and assign symmetry about both centerlines. Add centerlines to the section along DTM1 and DTM3.NOTES Task 4. 1. 1. Use [Ellipse] to sketch an ellipse at the intersection of the references. Modify the dimensions: Ry = 70 and Rx = 50. Click [Divide section] and select the ellipse at the 4 intersections of the references. Figure 28: Sketching the Ellipse 2. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1.25 . Divide the ellipse into four sections so that it can blend to the final section consisting of four conic sections. 3. Task 5. Define an ellipse using the default-dimensioning scheme.

For University Use Only . Task 6.26 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Open. 2. 6. 3. Create the second section. 5. delete the Rx and Ry dimensions. Click and create horizontal and vertical dimensions. Modify the dimensions as shown in the following figure. Type [ellipse] and click OK. Select ELLIPSE. Re-establish symmetry if necessary. If presented with conflicts. Click the icon.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1.SEC from the dialog box. Click File > Save A Copy . Type [45] [0] [0] for the rotations of the second section. 1. Save this section to be used for the next sub-section. Click Sketch > Data from File .NOTES Figure 29: Creating Centerlines 4.

2. 5. Define a sketcher coordinate system.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Sketch a horizontal and vertical centerline through the coordinate system.27 . Figure 31: Sketching the Conic For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 30: Horizontal and Vertical Dimensioning 4. Type [45] [0] [0] for the rotations of the third section. 3. Task 7. 1. Sketch a [Conic] in the upper left quadrant. Sketch the third section using parabolic conic sections. Click > Yes to create a third section.

Modify the dimensions as shown in the following figure. Select the left most endpoint. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Select the 8. Remove the symmetric constraint about the horizontal centerline and add tangency constraints. Select the conic section. Complete the sketch. 9. Click vertical centerline. 5. the centerline.NOTES 4. Click . Delete the angled centerline. [Mirror geometry]. Repeat to mirror the two conic sections about the horizontal centerline. 6. Locate the left endpoint relative to the centerline using a diameter dimension. then click dimension. as shown in the following figure.28 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 32: Modifying Dimensions 7. to place the and the left most endpoint again.

Click Yes when prompted to define tangency for the first end. if you wish to continue to the next section. Preview and shade the model. 11. Click No when prompted. Tips and Techniques: You have the ability to define tangency conditions at the first and last section of the general blend. Click . 14. For University Use Only . 15.29 . 16. Type a depth of [200] for the third section.NOTES Figure 33: Completing and Constraining Sketch 10. 12. 13. Type a depth of [100] for the second section. Click > Start Point .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Define the first section of the general blend to be tangent to the base of the mirror mount. Double-click the Tangency element. Select the right-most vertex between the upper and lower conics.

Do not define tangency for the second end. Erase all the objects from memory. Click OK . When prompted. Figure 34: Selecting References 18.30 Fundament als of Des ign . Click OK to create the feature. 21.NOTES 17. For University Use Only . Build the feature. Save the model and close the window. Figure 35: The Completed Model 20. Click File > Erase > Not Displayed . 19. Select the top surface for all four references to be tangent to as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. select No .

Sketch a spline.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Dimension as shown in the following figure. 2.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. Create a spline and use it to create a blended wing section. Sketch a horizontal and a vertical centerline. Sketch a spline with three points. Click File > New > Sketch . Type [WING] for the name. [Create spline through several points]. Click 2. 1. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Importing External Spline Data Task 1. Figure 36: Sketching a 3-Point Spline For University Use Only .31 . Task 2. 3. to complete the 1. and click spline.

Select the coordinate system that you defined. then click Task 4. Click [Create coordinate system]. Select the spline. 3. from the Intent Manager. Click Insert > Protrusion > Blend > General > Done > Smooth > Done . Close the REFERENCES dialog box. 2. 1. Read in external data to drive the shape of the spline by dimensioning the section to a local coordinate system. Sketch a horizontal line from left to right that is coincident with the endpoints of the wing section. Figure 37: Horizontal Line Coincident with Wing Endpoints 6. 4. 4. Click to accept the default direction.32 Fundament als of Des ign . In the MOD SPLINE dialog box click the Coordinates tab. Read the prompt. Click Sketch > Data from File . Create a protrusion using the section that you just created. 3. Click Open . 2. Click Yes to insert points on the spline.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. 1.PTS. Save the section. Define the bottom of the foil section.PRT.SEC from the dialog box.NOTES Task 3. Select WING. Select TOP as the top reference. then click > Modify . For University Use Only . Create a new part called WING. then click Read . Specify FRONT as the sketching plane. Select WING. 5. Click Open . Place the coordinate system at the intersection of the two centerlines.

1. Figure 39: Placing the Section 3.SEC.0]. [5.0] as the X. Figure 38: Aligning the Section 8.0]. Modify the section length to [15.Z rotations. 7.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. For University Use Only . 9. Using Data from File . click NO. When the system asks you if you want to proceed to the next section.0] as the scaling factor. Task 5. Click > to align each centerline with the corresponding reference line. Click to toggle to the next section. and zoom in on the section. Begin sketching the next section in the new sketcher that appears. get WING. [0. Drag the section approximately to the intersection of the datum planes. Type [20. Cancel the DATUM display.33 . Type [0. Click . 2.Y. 6. Click to toggle to the next section.0].NOTES 5. then click .

The resulting wing should resemble the one shown in the following figure. Figure 40: Resulting Wing 5.34 Fundament als of Des ign . Select the protrusion. Save the model and close the window. Click OK . Erase all the objects from memory.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1. Modify all three angle values to 15° and regenerate the model. 6. Type [18. Click > Modify > All . Click File > Erase > Not Displayed .NOTES 4. For University Use Only . 7.0] as the depth of the section.

35 . Create a conic section when the section is not a simple ellipse.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Sket ching and G eom et ry Pag e 1. Create and save sections in sketcher to be used at a later date. For University Use Only . Define and modify splines and read in point data from an external file.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you learned how to: • • • • • Manipulate entities within the new sketcher environment. Create ellipses and define different dimension schemes based on design intent.

Commercial Use Prohibited - .For University Use Only .

Create intent-chain rounds.Module Drafts and Rounds In this module you learn how use drafts and rounds to finish your part designs. Add advanced drafts to your models. You also learn to create transitions between round sets for more complex geometry. Page 2-1 . Create edge-to-surface and surface-to-surface rounds. Create rounds with single and multiple references.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited . Objectives After completing this module you will be able to: • • • • • Prepare models for casting or molding by adding draft features.

30 degrees) to existing surfaces of a molded or cast part. To incorporate a draft into a model that has rounds.NOTES CREATING DRAFTS The Draft feature adds a draft angle to individual surfaces or to a series of selected planar. the system will maintain a constant wall thickness. you can draft the surfaces first and then fillet the edges.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. For University Use Only . When you add a draft to a shelled part before adding the shell feature. you should add the draft before rounding the edges. A draft can add and remove material from the model. You can create a draft feature to add an angle (+/. You cannot draft surfaces with fillets around the edge boundary. However. The draft direction must be normal to the neutral plane if a draft surface is cylindrical. cylindrical or other ruled surfaces.2 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 1: Draft for Molding Guidelines for Using Drafts Consider the following when creating drafts: • • • • • You can draft only the surfaces that are formed by tabulated cylinders or planes.

cylindrical. and splined surface.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.NOTES Defining a Draft Feature The following figure illustrates the process of defining a draft feature on a model. You can apply a draft feature to a planar.3 . Neutral Plane remains constant size Draft Surface Neutral Plane remains constant size -10° +10° Figure 2: Draft Definitions For University Use Only .

Figure 3: Variations of the Draft Feature Creating Neutral Plane Drafts To create a neutral plane draft. you can split the surfaces.NOTES Draft Types The following figure illustrates all the variations of the draft feature available in Pro/ENGINEER. you can select whether or not to split the surfaces at a plane or sketch.4 Fundament als of Des ign . If the parting line for the mold is located in the middle of the draft surface.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure.

you can select whether or not to split the surfaces at a curve or surface. Neutral curve Figure 5: No Split Neutral Curve Draft For University Use Only . To create a neutral curve draft.5 .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.NOTES Split at Plane Sketch No Split Split at Sketch Figure 4: Neutral Plane Drafts Creating Neutral Curve Drafts Use a neutral curve draft when the perimeter that has to remain fixed and it is not planar. If the parting line for the mold is located in the middle of the draft surface. you can split the surfaces.

The geometry must be tangent to adjacent geometry at all points along the round’s edge.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. whereas advanced rounds can contain multiple sets of references along with various transition options where the sets merge together.6 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only .NOTES Split surface Neutral curves Figure 6: Split at Surface Draft Neutral and split curve (mid-plane remains constant size) Figure 7: Split at Curve Draft CREATING ROUNDS A Round is a Pro/ENGINEER feature that can add or remove material from a model. Defining Simple Rounds Simple rounds are composed of a single set of references.

and location of the feature.7 .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. The type of reference that you select influences the round shape and extent. radius. you can use various methods.NOTES Round Set 1 Transition Round Set 2 Simple Round Advanced Round Figure 8: Simple versus Advanced Rounds To define a simple round. you must define elements to determine the shape. You should experiment with these selection options to fully develop the round geometry: One-by-one Tangent Chain Surface Chain Edge-Surf Surf-Surf Full Round Figure 9: Selecting Surfaces Rounds For University Use Only . Regardless of the method that you select. Selecting Round Feature References You should select references for round features carefully for two reasons: • • If you remove a single reference for the round. the system must resolve the entire round feature.

NOTES When you select surfaces for round set geometry. Pro/ENGINEER tries to define the round set tangent to the selected surface. • • • • Pag e 2. However.Commercial Use Prohibited Fundament als of Des ign . Note: The additional selected references references in the round feature. you must specify the round radius. you can prevent the round from continuing onto adjacent surfaces. the system automatically tries to continue the round geometry along these tangent surfaces. Setting Round Extents In some cases. create parent/child Terminating Surface Auto Blend Auto Figure 10: Round Extent Options Defining Radius Values After you define the references.8 Constant radius Variable radius Through a curve Full round For University Use Only . you may want to continue the round feature or stop it at some point along the selected references that the system develops automatically. If adjacent surfaces are tangent to the selected surface or surfaces.

The transition element also enables you to specify how Pro/ENGINEER should handle the intersection of round sets with model geometry. Using Transitions By creating transitions between round sets. vertex. you can use a greater variety of geometry shapes at the intersection of round sets without compromising the flexibility of the model. Using round sets. A round set is a set of references with attributes and radius values.NOTES Figure 11: Constant and Variable Radius Options Using Points or Vertexes You can select a datum point. One of the major advantages of the advanced round feature is that it gives you the ability to create transitions between round sets. Creating Advanced Rounds Advanced rounds give you more flexibility in creating robust geometry. created with the same options and attributes as a simple round.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. The radius is a direct result of the position of the other geometry. The selected entity must be on an adjacent surface to the geometry. or edge end through which the round should pass. For University Use Only . Note: Using a point or vertex to define the round size creates a parent/child relationship between the round feature and the selected point. you can combine surface-to-surface rounds with edge rounds or define rounds that have multiple radii. curve.9 . The system does not assign a radius dimension to the round.

the system creates a circular cross-section of the round defined with a true radius. The normal-to-spine shape looks as if you created the round surface by sweeping an arc normal to the selected spine. but you can drive the cross-section to use a conic section. • • The rolling ball shape looks as if you rolled a ball between the two references. For University Use Only . A round with a conic section uses two values to drive its shape: a radius value and a conic parameter (rho) value.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2.10 Fundament als of Des ign . Setting Round Shape Cross-Sections By default.NOTES Figure 12: Blend Surfs and Continue Transitions Setting the Default Transition You can set up a transition between round sets to customize the shape of the round geometry in the following ways: Corner Sphere Corner Sweep Corner Patch Figure 13: Corner Transitions Creating Round Sets You can create a round set by making a rolling ball or a round surface normal to a spine.

Some of these values have specific significance: ½ .NOTES • The radius value determines the point of tangency on the model. The value of Rho determines the shape of the conic itself as seen in the following figure.05.11 .5: elliptical round ½ √2 –1: normal quadrant elliptical round ½ . You can use values of the conic parameter between .05 to <.95: hyperbolic round • Using a [true ellipse] value for the conic parameter creates a circular shape on the round feature. Rho is the ratio of BE/DE where segments AE = EC.5: parabolic round ½ > .95 and . Figure 14: “Rho” Figure 15: Round Shape For University Use Only .5 to .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.

etc. you can use surface techniques to develop specific geometry. you should break it up into separate round features. Create swept or extruded protrusions. or change to an advanced round and add a transition.NOTES DEVELOPING GEOMETRY WITH ROUNDS As you create simple or advanced rounds. etc). Instead of creating the round geometry using surface features entirely. Using surfacing techniques. If those methods do not resolve the problem. you must choose one of these options: Make Solid Make Surface Figure 16: Developing Needed Geometry Tips for Creating Rounds If you are having difficulty creating a particular round feature. you can actually use a round feature to generate surfaces. try any of the following: • • • • Type a different radius.12 Fundament als of Des ign . you can fix the problem areas manually.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Use a different round option (Surf-Surf . cuts. For University Use Only . Create the round as a surface. Edge-Surf . When you create a round.

as shown in the following figure.PRT. 1. In Exercise 3. you learn advanced round techniques. Open DRAFT_PLANE. 2.13 . In Exercise 2. Open a sample model and insert a simple draft.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.you learn how to insert neutral plane drafts. you experiment with various intent chain rounds. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Tools Table 1: Icons for Advanced Geometry Creation Icons Description Saved view list Use edge EXERCISE 1: Inserting Neutral Plane Drafts Task 1. Method In Exercises 1.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory. you learn how to apply draft and round features as finishing features. Figure 17: Draft Plane Part For University Use Only .

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Click Insert > Draft .14 Fundament als of Des ign . No Split . Click 5. and select the surface as the neutral plane. Figure 18: Selecting Draft Surfaces 7. Figure 19: Selecting Neutral Plane 8. 6. Click Use Neut Pln to automatically use the neutral plane as the reference plane. 4. Constant . For University Use Only . once again to accept Tweak . as shown in the following figure . as shown in the following figure. Click to accept the default selection Neutral Pln .NOTES 3. Select the two surfaces. Click > .

10. Click Intent Surfs and select the surface shown in the following figure. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Create another draft with variable angles. For University Use Only . 3. Observe the direction of the circular arrow. Click Preview . Figure 20: Completed Neutral Draft Feature Task 2.NOTES 9. 11. Click to complete the draft. The system automatically selects all side edges of the protrusion. Click Insert > Draft > 2. Type [. Click Variable > Done .10] as the draft angle. . and notice that the base of the cylinder increased in size.15 .

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. as shown in the following figure. Click to complete the feature. Click .16 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 22: Selecting a Reference Plane 6. For University Use Only . 7. Click > .10] for the right side. and select the datum TOP from the Model Tree as the neutral plane.NOTES Figure 21: Selecting Intent Surface 4. 5. and type [+ 10] as the draft angles of for the left side and [. Select the surface as the reference plane.

17 . Figure 24: Regenerated Model with Variable Angles For University Use Only . Switch to a front view of the model. Modify the two right-side angles to [.NOTES Figure 23: Completed Model with Variable Angles 8. The ‘waistline’ remained neutral. 9.20] and regenerate. Notice how material was removed from the top of the part and added to the bottom.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.

Select the surface shown in the following figure as the reference plane. Click Intent Surfs and select the surface shown in the following figure. Create a draft using split at plane. Figure 26: Selecting a Reference Plane For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. and select the datum Top from the Model Tree as the neutral plane. Click .NOTES Task 3. 1. Click Insert > Draft > 2. Figure 25: Selecting an Intent Surface 4.18 Fundament als of Des ign . 3. . Click Split at Pln > . 5.

Sketch a spline similar to the one in the following figure. Select HEX from the Model Tree and > Redefine . Investigate the robustness of the intent chain based draft. 1.19 . Enter the sketch and delete the six lines. leaving the construction circle. Figure 28: Sketching a Spline 4. Type [+ 13] as the draft angle and click feature. Complete the redefinition and observe how the draft adapts to the new geometry. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. 3. 2. to complete the Figure 27: Completing the Draft Feature Task 4.NOTES 6.

NOTES Figure 29: Redefined Draft Feature 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2.20 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . Save the model and close the window.

Use the attributes for Full Round > Edge Pair . 3.21 .NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Advanced Rounds Task 1. For University Use Only . Click OK . Click > Quick _Round . Click Insert > Round > Simple . 4.PRT Figure 30: Multi-Round Part 2. Open the MULTI_ROUND. Insert a full round. Use the round functionality. Orient to a saved view. Select the edges shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. 1.

For University Use Only .22 Fundament als of Des ign . > Round Edges . and on the background. Drag the radius to a reasonable value.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 31: Selecting Edges 5. Click Click to select the edge. Figure 32: Selecting Edge to Round 6.

1. Click > Mult_Trans.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Figure 34: Multiple Transitions For University Use Only . Experiment with round transitions. Task 2. Orient to a saved view.NOTES Figure 33: Dragging Radius Hint: The round may be dynamically edited whenever needed by using > Dynamic Modify .23 .

as shown in the following figure. Click Insert > Round > Advanced >Done . Define the first round set’s attributes.50] as the radius values. Insert an advanced round. Click OK > Done sets to complete Round Set 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Click Variable > Edge Chain > Done and select the tangent chain. Type [0. 6. Select the edge shown in the following figure and click Done .0] and [2. Click OK > Add to begin the definition of round set 2. Figure 35: Defining First Round Set Attributes 4. 3. Figure 36: Selecting Edge 7. 50] as the radius. For University Use Only . 5. Click Constant > Edge Chain > Done .NOTES 2. Type [1. Click Done > Done .24 Fundament als of Des ign .

Type [1. Select the three edges (green). 11. Click Round Sets > Define > Add . 9. Click Stop at Pnt > Done and select the datum point named STOP . Figure 37: Clicking Datum Point Stop 10. select the left green edge of Round Set 2.25 . Click Transitions > Define > Add by Select .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.50] as the radius and click OK > Done Sets . and > . For University Use Only . Click Transitions > Define > Add By Select . as shown in the following figure.NOTES 8. 13. Click Constant > Edge ChainDone > Tangent Chain and select the edge shown in the following figure. Click > . Begin definition of round set 3. Figure 38: Setting Edge Attributes 12.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Corner Sphere . Click and drag over the menu options for Intersect .26 Fundament als of Des ign . The corner sphere is shown in Figure 40: Solid Model For University Use Only . and Patch . Corner Sweep . 15. Click Corner Sphere > 16.NOTES Figure 39: Selecting Edges for Transitions 14. Alternate between the following figure. > Done Trans > Preview . and .

Figure 42: Corner Sweep Figure 43: Wireframe Display For University Use Only .27 .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Select Corner Sweep transition type and complete the round feature.NOTES Figure 41: Wireframe Display 17. The Corner Sweep is shown in the following figure. Click Transitions > Define > Transition 2.

Complete Round Set 1. Click 2. Utilize the other round transition types.28 Fundament als of Des ign . 5. Tip: Use the CNTR datum point to reposition your spin center for easier manipulation. 25] as the radius and click . For University Use Only . Figure 44: Selecting Surfaces 3. Task 3. click Transitions > Define > Add by Select and select the two edges (green). as shown in the following figure and . to orient to the saved view Blend_Cont 1. Constant and Surf-Surf . Repeat the redefine process for the other two transition types. Type [5.NOTES 18. Notice the round does fit all the way around.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Select the two surfaces shown in the following figure. Insert a round using Advanced. 4. Click OK > Done Sets .

Select all round surface patches and . For University Use Only . a curvature plot will show otherwise. however. 9. Click Blend Surfs and > > > Preview .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Click Analysis > Surface Analysis . 7.NOTES Figure 45: Selecting Edges 6. 8.29 . The round looks smooth and continuous to the eye. Shade and spin to observe the transition. Notice the curvature plot is discontinuous. Do not click OK .

12. 11. Click Transitions > Define > Redfine > Transitions 1 > Continue > Done > Done Trans. Redefine the transition.NOTES Figure 46: Curvature Plot Shows Discontinuities 10. Figure 47: Continuous Curvature For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Rerun the Surface Analysis . Close the SURFACE ANALYSIS dialog box. and notice that the curvature is continuous.30 Fundament als of Des ign .

> Hide . Click Insert > Round Simple > Done > Thru Curve > Edge Chain> Tangent chain . and click Notice how the round follows the curve contour. click OK . Click to orient to the saved view Thru_Curve . Figure 48: Selecting Tangent Chain 3. For University Use Only .NOTES 13. Task 4. Click Done Sel > Done . click Done > OK . To complete the feature.31 . Figure 49: Round Follows Curve Contour 7.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Insert a round through a datum curve 1. 6. 2. 4. Click the Rnd_Curve from the Model Tree. 5. Use Curve Chain and Select All to select the entire datum curve. To complete the feature. Optional: Modify the sketch of the Spline (within reason) and Regenerate the round. select the edge shown in the following figure.

type a radius of [1. For University Use Only .0]. Delete all sketched entities. click Done . Accept the third option listed.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. and Query 2. 2. In Model Tree. round. and click OK . Click Insert > Round > Select on the vertex shown in the following figure. There should be three possible options for feature 51 (the barbell shaped protrusion) as seen in the message window: ½ Intent Chain (F51 X PART) ½ Intent Chain (SIDE SRFS F51 X START SRFS F37) ½ Intent Chain (SIDE EDGES) created by feature 51 4. leaving the reference intact. Figure 50: Selecting a Vertex 3. select PROT_F51 and redefine the sketch. Completely redefine the sketch and observe the impact on the 1. Experiment with Intent Chains 1. > > Intent Chain .NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Intent Chains Task 1. Task 2.32 Fundament als of Des ign . Click > Intent Chain .

Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.0]. Redefine PROT_F51 to be Both Sides with a blind depth of [24. 6. Then click View > Previous . Sketch a rectangle as shown in the following figure. Complete the feature and notice the adaptability of the ‘Side Edges’ Intent Chain driven round. Figure 51: Sketching a Rectangle 4. 7.33 . Allow its associated round For University Use Only . Figure 52: Adaptability of Side Edges 5. Reorient to the saved view Intent _Bot . > Suppress .NOTES 3. Select PROT_F51 and to also be suppressed.

Repeat the above procedure to insert another Intent Chain Round from PROT_F50 . 4.0] dimension. 5. select PROT_F50and > Modify . Click the vertical [10. and Regenerate. except use the (SIDE SRFS F49 X START SRFS F37) Intent Chain. Figure 53: Inserting Another Intent Chain 2. Query Sel the edge shown in the following figure and Accept the (F50 X PART) Intent Chain. Type a radius of [1. Orient to the saved view INTENT_TOP.34 Fundament als of Des ign .0] and complete the feature. For University Use Only . Note: Both rounds will be visually identical at this point. Create other Intent Chain round 1. modify to [2.NOTES Task 3. 6. Repeat for PROT_F49. 5].Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Orient the model suitably and notice the changes. 3.

Figure 55: Regenerating Model 9. select PROT_F50 and > Modify . 8. Notice the robustness of the round.NOTES Figure 54: Selecting the Vertical Dimension 7. For University Use Only . Orient to the saved view INTENT_TOP.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Click on the vertex shown in the following figure. drag the section approximately as shown in the following figure and regenerate.35 .

NOTES Figure 56: A Robust Round Feature 10. Figure 57: Round Feature Interacts only with its Intent Chain 11.it only interacts with its intent chain (SIDE SRFS F49 X START SRFS F37). Notice the difference in the round feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Repeat the drag procedure again on PROT_F50 as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . Repeat the drag procedure for Prot_F49.36 Fundament als of Des ign .

For University Use Only . and click View > Previous .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.37 . Notice how the two intent chains above are different.NOTES Figure 58: Repeating Drag Procedure 12. using a depth of [24. Figure 59: Differing Intent Chains 14. Orient to the saved view INTENT_BOT.0] 13. Redefine both PROT_F49 and PROT_F50 from One Side to Both Sides.

50] Figure 60: Creating a Final Round 16. Complete the feature and notice how the round adapts. Redefine the Sketch for Prot_F49. close all windows. and sketch a 2. Create a final round using the Intent Chain “(END EDGES) created by feature 49” as shown. Delete all geometry.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .NOTES 15. Save the model. Figure 61: Round Adapts to New Criteria 17. Use a radius of [0.38 Fundament als of Des ign .5 radius circle. For University Use Only .

PRT Figure 62: Neutral Curve Draft Feature 2. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Inserting Neutral Curve Drafts Task 1.39 . Open DRAFT_CURVE. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. 3. Click Tweak > Split at Srf > Both Sides > Dependent > Constant > Done. You may work on these as time allows. model. Click Indiv Surfs and select the surfaces shown in the following figure. 4. Open the model and insert a split at surface draft on the upper 1.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISES The following exercises provide supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. Click Insert > Draft > Neutral Curve > Done .

NOTES Figure 63: Selecting Individual Surfaces 5. This type of draft requires two neutral curves (or sets of edges).Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Select the round shown in the following figure.40 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Intent Surfs . For the first curve. Click Done to continue. For University Use Only . Figure 64: Selecting Round Surface 6. as shown in the following figure. use Tangent Chain to select the upper set of edges.

NOTES Figure 65: Selecting Upper Set of Edges 7.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. as shown in the following figure. 10. For University Use Only . click Sel By Menu > Top > Select . Click Done > Tangent Chain to select the lower set of edges. and click OK . To select the pull direction plane.0°]. Figure 66: Selecting Lower Set of Edges 8. Click Done .41 . type [10. Note the direction of the green draft arrow. 9. Select the parting quilt.

as shown in the following figure. Click > Front > Modify to change the and zoom. Note the direction of the green draft arrow. Then click Select All > Done . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. 4. 0]. type [10°]. 7. Figure 67: Selecting Surfaces from Lower Model 3. click Curve Chain . 5. 6. Insert another neutral curve draft.42 Fundament als of Des ign . To select the neutral curve. Use the previous techniques to select the surfaces from the lower model. Select the datum curve.NOTES Task 2. as shown in the following figure. Use the attributes Tweak > Split at Crv > Both Sides > Dependent > Constant . and click OK . 2. Insert a split at curve draft on the lower model 1. Select the OFFSET plane and use offset dimension to [2. Select the OFFSET plane as the reference plane.

43 . and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Save the model.NOTES Figure 68: Front View 8. Notice that the upper model increased in size. close all windows. while the lower model decreased. 9. For University Use Only .

44 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 69: Draft Example Part 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . Open DRAFT_SKETCH. using non-parallel neutral and reference planes. Select the surfaces to be drafted. as shown in the following figure. Select the neutral plane.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Creating Advanced Drafts Task 1. Figure 70: Selecting Draft Surfaces 4. 3.PRT and create a draft on the rectangular protrusion on the top of the part. Click Insert > Draft > > .PRT. Open DRAFT_SKETCH. 1.

and complete the feature. Type [-5.0] as the draft angle. Figure 72: Investigating Draft Angles Task 2. 6. Insert a split at sketch draft. and investigate the draft angles created. Select the Top datum plane from the Model Tree as a reference plane for angle measurement.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2.NOTES Figure 71: Selecting the Neutral Plane 5. Click For University Use Only . 1. > Sketch . 7. Click > Front .45 .

Select the surface shown in the following figure as the neutral plane. Select the surface shown in the following figure as the draft surface. Click Split at Skt > . 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2.NOTES Figure 73: Inserting a Split at Sketch 2.46 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 74: Selecting Draft Surface 5. Click Insert > Draft > 3. . For University Use Only .

and select the five datum curve segments.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. click Close > Yes . type [-7. When prompted for a sketching plane.47 . To close the REFERENCES dialog box.0] and [7. Complete the sketch.0] as the draft angles.NOTES Figure 75: Selecting a Neutral Plane 6. 8. and complete the feature. select the draft surface. Select the TOP datum as the top reference plane. For University Use Only . 9. 7. Figure 76: Selecting Datum Curve Segments 10. as shown in the following figure. Click .

NOTES Figure 77: Completed Model 11.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2.48 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . Save the model. close all windows. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .

Click Constant > Edge-Surf > Done . as shown in the following figure. Figure 78: RR Knuckle Part 2. Insert an edge-to-surface round to make a smooth transition where the knuckle tapers to connect to the suspension link. For University Use Only .49 . Open RR_KNUCKLE. 4.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 3: Creating Simple and Advanced Rounds Task 1.PRT. Click Insert > Round > Simple > Done . 1. Select the edge and the cylindrical surface. Specify the round attributes.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. 3.

Type [1. 2. Specify the round attributes. For University Use Only . Insert a round between the main body of the part and the lower cylinder that connects to the suspension. Click Constant > Surf-Surf > Done . 6. Repeat the round for the other side of the part.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2.NOTES Figure 79: Selecting Edge and Cylindrical Surface 5.50 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Insert > Round > Simple > Done .0] as the radius and click OK to create the round. 1. Figure 80: Repeating Round Feature Task 2.

51 .5] as the radius. Select the two reference surfaces as shown in the following figure. 7.Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Select the two surfaces shown in the following figure. 6. Specify the attributes for the set. Click Insert > Round > Advanced > Done . and click OK to create the feature. For University Use Only . Figure 81: Selecting Surfaces 4. Figure 82: Model after Feature Creation 5. Click Constant > Surf-Surf > Done . Type [0.NOTES 3.

Figure 84: Previewing Geometry Task 3. Type [0. 1. Click Done Sets > Preview . Click OK to accept the round set. Click Transitions > Define .2] as the radius. Add a transition to the round. to view the geometry.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. For University Use Only . Notice the lower round edge is straight.52 Fundament als of Des ign . 9.NOTES Figure 83: Selecting References 8.

and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . Click Done Sel > Done > Done Trans . Specify the edges to create the transition. Click OK to create the round.NOTES 2.53 .Commercial Use Prohibited D rafts and Ro u nds Pag e 2. Save the model. 5. For University Use Only . Notice the system automatically adds a blend transition. Select the two inside green edges. Figure 85: Automatic Blend Transition 4. close all windows. 3.

Define radius values for rounds.54 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only .NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. you have learned how to: • • • • • • Prepare a model for casting or molding by adding draft features.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2. Insert rounds with single and multiple sets of references. Utilize various intent chain rounds. Create transitions between round sets for more complex geometry. Use advanced types of drafts for more complex applications.

Commercial Use Prohibited . Define the purpose of using helical sweeps. Page 3-1 . Objectives After completing this module you will be able to: • • • • Create swept blends.For University Use Only .Module Creating Advanced Geometry In this module. you learn how to use advanced techniques to create and manipulate construction features that would otherwise require multiple steps to create. Create variable section sweeps. Define the types of variable section sweeps and their purpose.

• For University Use Only . defined as the spine.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. Varying the cross-section of the feature along the specified path. You define additional elements when creating a swept blend feature using Blend Control and Tangency . Creating Spines To create a swept blend feature. you blend several cross-sections along a single trajectory.2 Fundament als of Des ign . Spine Cross-sections Figure 1: Swept Blend • You define the cross-sections by sketching or selecting them at specified segment vertices or datum points located on the curve. You can sketch the spine trajectory as an open or closed loop.NOTES CREATING SWEPT BLENDS The swept blend and variable section sweep features enable you to capture the design intent of your model by: • • Following a specified path that you can control parametrically.

Creating Normal-to-Original Spines The following points have to be kept in mind when creating normal-tooriginal spines: • • • You must define at least one additional trajectory. you create use a section at the start points and end points. you use the underlying curve segments or edges from which you constructed the composite curve. you must create two sections: one sketched at the start point. To use an open trajectory. To use a closed trajectory. The section plane is always normal to the spine at their intersection as shown in the following figure. you sweep a single variable section along one or more trajectories. For University Use Only . To define sections of a swept blend. the other sketched at any other location. all sections must intersect the trajectory.3 . The system uses this trajectory to orient the section during the sweep.NOTES Using Swept Blends • • • • To create a swept blend.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. CREATING VARIABLE SECTION SWEEPS To create a variable section sweep (VSS) feature. called the x-vector or horizontal vector trajectory.

Known vertex for automatic alignment Spine Additional trajectories For University Use Only .NOTES Spine trajectory x-vector trajectory x-vector trajectory sets up horizontal for Sketcher Resulting feature twists due to change in horizontal determined by x-vector Figure 1: Result of X-Vector Defining Shapes with Additional Trajectories Once you have defined the spine and x-vector.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.4 Fundament als of Des ign . you can select or sketch additional trajectories to define the shape of the swept section.

the value of trajpar is 0. It is a normalized value between 0 and 1. You can use this value to your advantage by writing relations to control the section. it is 1. it automatically evaluates an internal parameter called a trajpar (trajectory parameter).5 . If possible. At the beginning of the sweep. For University Use Only . you should avoid making unnecessary alignments in the section of a variable section sweep.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3.NOTES Figure 2: Using Multiple Trajectories Note: You do not have to add explicit alignments to a known vertex. representing the percentage length of the swept feature at every point along the spine trajectory. at the end. Using the Trajectory Parameter When the system regenerates a variable section sweep.

6 Fundament als of Des ign . Before trajpar relation After trajpar relation Figure 4: Driving a Surface to Zero For University Use Only .NOTES Sketcher dimension No relations Added relation sd4 = trajpar + 1 Added relation sd4 = sin ( trajpar *360 ) + 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. or by evaluating a Datum Graph feature (evalgraph).5 Figure 3: Using Trajpar to Drive the Section You can use the trajpar parameter to drive surfaces to zero anywhere along the trajectory by using complex relations to drive the section.

so you must use default datums first. However. but they do not have to be the same length as the spine trajectory. The x-vector trajectory cannot cross the spine. unless the Pivot Dir option is used.NOTES Figure 5: Using a Datum Graph Feature Using Variable Section Sweeps The following points have to be kept in mind when using variable section sweeps: • • • • • • A variable section sweep cannot be the first feature in a model. For University Use Only . you can use a datum point (on the spine) to define the start point. All additional trajectories must intersect the sweep’s sketching plane. The spine curve must consist of only tangent entities.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. either endpoint may intersect the spine. If the sweep feature’s sketching plane cannot intersect all trajectories at the sweep’s start point. The sweep feature’s sketching plane may intersect any trajectory only once at any given location along the sweep.7 .

8 Fundament als of Des ign . • Normal to the original trajectory Other trajectory Spine Figure 7: Normal to the Original Trajectory For University Use Only .NOTES Spine trajectory Internal sketch plane defined at point Figure 6: Using a Datum Point to Define a Sketching Plane Orienting Cross-Sections Both the swept blend and the variable section sweep enable you to control how the system sweeps the cross-section with respect to the spine trajectory. The following options provide flexibility in defining a feature by allowing you to specify the orientation of its cross-section.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.

Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3.9 . you sweep a single section along a helical path that is defined by a profile and a pitch value.NOTES • Normal to trajectory Figure 8: Normal to Selected Trajectory • Pivot direction Normal to DTM2 Figure 9: Normal to Pivot Plane CREATING HELICAL SWEEPS To create a helical sweep feature. For University Use Only . The following figures illustrate a straight profile section and a resulting ‘spring’ feature. You must first specify a sweep profile using a sketch.

NOTES Figure 6: Straight Profile Section and Spring Feature Variations of the profile can easily be created.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. you specify a pitch value to be used and sketch a cross section. The following profile has three line segments. centered on the provided crosshairs. Figure 7: Profile variation with Three Line Segments For University Use Only .10 Fundament als of Des ign . The section was simply a circle. After specifying a profile.

11 .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3.NOTES Helical Sweep Options • Right or Left Handed Figure 8: Right and Left Handed Helical Sweeps • Thru Axis or Normal to Traj Figure 9: Thru Axis and Norm to Traj Sweeps • Constant or Variable Pitch Figure 10: Constant and Variable Sweeps For University Use Only .

and the pitch values for each point are entered. Figure 11: Sketcher Points on the Original Profile Figure 12: Pitch Values at Various Points For University Use Only .NOTES You can control the pitch with sketcher points and a graph using variable pitch. Once sketcher points are added.12 Fundament als of Des ign . as shown in the following figure. The sketcher points are located on the original profile.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. they can be added to a pitch graph.

Open the models and configure the display.13 . Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. 3. In Exercise 2. 1. 2.PRT. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. you create a swept blend including all the steps it takes to create an intake port for a go-cart. Method In Exercise 1.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory. Tools Table 1: Icons for Advanced Geometry Creation Icons Description Saved views list Use Edge Offset Edge Select Geometry Collinear Constraint EXERCISE 1: Using Swept Blends Task 1. Click > Intake . you create a variable section sweep using a graph. you practice the techniques used to create swept blends and variable section sweeps. Open ENGINE_BLOCK.

These are Copy Geometry features that are ‘mapped’ geometry transferred from the engine block viewed previously. 5. Open CARB_INTAKE_PORT. View the geometry making up the intake ports on the engine block.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.PRT. For University Use Only . Figure 14: Carb_Intake_Port Model 6.NOTES Figure 13: Intake View of Engine Block Model 4. and then close the window. Notice the surface quilts.14 Fundament als of Des ign .

Note the location of your start point. Click Select All > Done . 3. Click Select Traj > Curve Chain . Select the first Copy Geometry feature from the Model Tree and click > Hide. 1. Use the copied geometry and supplied datum curves to create a mating intake manifold part that ‘fits perfectly’.NOTES Task 2. Figure 15: Selecting Datum Curve 5. Define the cross sections for the swept blend. and select the datum curve shown in the following figure. 4. select the eight datum curve segments that form the loop shown in the following figure.15 . 2. (Using a different start point is acceptable. Using Select Curve. Begin by defining a trajectory. and maintains tangency on inner surfaces. 1. Click Insert > Protrusion > Swept Blend. Task 3. Click Select Sec > NrmToOriginTraj > Done.) For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3.

as shown in the following figure.16 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 17: Selecting Curve 3. Use the same technique to select the eight curve segments for the second section. and select a new location. Click Done > No > OK to complete the feature. If necessary. 4. click Start Point . Check that the start points of the two sections line up. Click Done .NOTES Figure 16: Selecting Datum Curve Segments Tip Using the option for Sel Chain is an easy way to select multiple continuous curve segments. 2. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.

5. 1. 2. Click Automatic > Done to automatically orient the sketching plane. Click as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. create a cut to hollowout the protrusion while maintaining tangency with the copied geometry. Use the same start point as the protrusion. Figure 19: Selecting Edges For University Use Only . Click Select Traj > Curve Chain . > Chain and select the two edges of the copy geometry 7. 3. Click Select All . Click Next to skip definition of intermediate sections. Click Done . 6.17 . Select the same curve that you used as the trajectory for the protrusion.NOTES Figure 18: Completed Feature Task 4. Type [0. Click Insert > Cut > Swept Blend > Done. 4. Using the capabilities of a swept blend.0] for the Z-axis rotation.

0] for the Z-axis rotation. 15. Click Accept to select the entire loop. Verify the material removal arrow faces the inside of the section and click Okay .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. Ensure that the start point lines up with the start point of the first section. If necessary. 10.NOTES 8. Click Preview . 9.18 Fundament als of Des ign . Click > Automatic > Done . > Loop . (The surfaces in the following figure are shown using a Gaussian Curvature Surface Analysis) For University Use Only . 11. > 14.125] for the offset. Notice that there is currently a sharp transition between the cut and the copy geometry surfaces. 13. and select the surface shown in the following Figure 20: Selecting Surface 12. Type [0. Note the location of the Start Point. Click figure. Type [-. select the proper location and click StartPoint . Click .

For University Use Only . The system now highlights the section in blue and the edge shown in red.NOTES Figure 21: Gaussian Curvature Surface Analysis Task 5. 3. Click Yes to define the blend tangent at the first end. Eliminate the ‘sharp’ by defining Tangency. 2. 1. Figure 22: System Highlights Edge 4. Select the surface shown in the following figure as the tangent reference for the highlighted edge.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. Click Tangency > Define .19 .

Notice that the cut is tangent to the surfaces of the engine intake.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.20 Fundament als of Des ign . Continue to select tangent surfaces for each highlighted red edge in sequence. Click No to skip tangency definition at the other end. you must repeat the whole process.NOTES Figure 23: Standard Surface Reference for Edge 5. Figure 24: Cut is Tangent to Surfaces of Engine Intake For University Use Only . 6. Tips & Techniques: Use Query Sel when defining tangency on a blend. You cannot change one of the edges on the fly. 7. (The surfaces in the following figure are shown using a Gaussian Curvature Surface Analysis) 8. If you inadvertently select the wrong reference. Click Preview . Click OK .

Save the part and close the window. Figure 25: Model after Hiding Features Task 6. [Optional] Create mounting tabs at each end of the port to complete the part.NOTES 9.21 . Figure 26: Model with Mounting Tabs 1. Hide the remaining Copy Geometry feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure.

For University Use Only . 2. Click Insert > Protrusion > Variable Section Sweep > NrmToOriginTraj > Done . Begin by defining trajectories 1.PRT Figure 27: Start Model Task 2.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Variable Section Sweep Reference Curves Task 1. 1.22 Fundament als of Des ign . Create a variable section sweep for the body of the bottle. Click Select Traj and select the datum curve shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. Open the BOTTLE. Utilize datum curves as variable section sweep trajectories.

6. as shown in the following figure. Define the cross-section. 7. Click Select All > . Continue using Select Traj > Curve Chain. 1. Select the rightmost curve. 5.23 . and Select All > to select the remaining curves in any order. . click Start Point and modify. Sketch fillets and then dimension/constrain. Sketch a rectangle with all four sides snapping to the provided sketcher points. and verify that the start point is at the bottom of the curve. For University Use Only . Click Task 3.) 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. Click . (If necessary.NOTES Figure 28: Selecting Datum Curve 3. Click > Select Traj > Curve Chain to define the X-vector.

24 Fundament als of Des ign . Hide all datum curves using the Model Tree. 3. and the radius on the corners is constant. Notice the top of the bottle is not cylindrical.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. Click > OK . Figure 30: Analyzing the Bottle Model For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 29: Sketching Fillets and Constraining 2.

NOTES Task 4. 3. Dividing each by 5 yields 23 and 10. Observe the following: ½ ½ The Graph is 140 units in ‘X’. Create a datum graph that will control the radius on the corners of the bottle. insert a saved sketch. It has horizontal segments at ‘Y’ values of 115 and 50. Type [radius]. Click 6. For University Use Only . reorder it before the variable section sweep by dragging in the Model Tree. 2. Click Insert > Datum > Graph .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. which relate to the dimensions of the original curves. To save time. 1.sec > Open . 5. In order to control the variable section sweep with the radius graph. Figure 31: Inserting a Saved Sketch 4. . Click Sketch > Data From File > Radius.25 . which is the height of the spine trajectory curve.

3. Click > OK . Redefine the variable section sweep and link it to the graph. > Figure 32: Dimension Number sd9 4. Click Sketch > Relations > Add .TRAJPAR*140)/5]. 1. (SD9 in this example). Using your dimension number. Select the protrusion with the Model Tree. Observe your dimension number for the radius. type [SD9=EVALGRAPH(“RADIUS”. For University Use Only . 2. and click Redefine > Section > Sketch . Notice the changing radius forms a cylindrical surface near the top and at the ‘squeezed’ mid portion.) 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. (Notice the 140 and 5 are the X and Y graph scales respectively.26 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Task 5. Figure 33: Changing Radius on Bottle 6.

then select the FRONT datum plane. Type [. and drag the radius to a value between 4. 5. 5 and 5. Select the bottom surface. 0] as radius of the dome and click . For University Use Only .25.NOTES Task 6. Set allow_anatomic_features option to Yes . 3.27 . Figure 34: Selecting Bottom Surface 4. as shown in the following figure. Click Insert > Advanced> Radius Dome . Figure 35: Selecting Bottom Edge 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. Click and select the edge shown in the following figure. 2. Add a few finishing touches. 1. 0. Click > Round Edges .

Type [1. Click Insert > Shell and select the surface shown in the following figure.28 Fundament als of Des ign . Click OK to complete the feature. 0] and click . Click > . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3.NOTES Figure 36: Rounding Edges 7. Figure 37: Selecting Surface for Shell Feature 8.

Save the model. close all windows.29 .NOTES Figure 38: Completed Model 9.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . For University Use Only .

30 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. For University Use Only . .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 3. Remember to factor out the scaling value when writing the relation. Tips & Techniques: It may be easier to scale the Y values when creating the graph feature. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Controlling Cuts with Datum Graph Features Figure 39: The Finished Cam Drawing Task 1. Create a revolved protrusion as the foundation for the cam and use a datum graph to control the height of the variable section sweep cut.

you sweep a single section along a helical path. When the system regenerates a variable section sweep. For University Use Only . To create a swept blend feature. you blend several cross-sections along a single trajectory.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned that: • • • • The swept blend and variable section sweep features allow the creation of designs that follow a specified path controlled parametrically. it automatically evaluates an internal parameter called a trajpar. which is defined by a profile and a pitch value.31 .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Ge omet ry C r eation Pag e 3. To create a helical sweep feature.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Utilize ISDX capabilities. Create surfaces and manipulate surface displays. Use single-view and four-view window layouts.For University Use Only . Page 4-1 . Create 2-D and 3-D freeform curves. These features are part of the Interactive Surface Design Extension (ISDX). Apply the Parallel Modeling paradigm.Commercial Use Prohibited .Module Surface Creation and Style Feature In this module you learn to create solid geometry using surface creation techniques and the Style feature. Create freeform surfaces using boundary curves. Objectives After completing this module you will be able to: • • • • • • • Use surfaces to improve model design.

and helical sweep. variable section sweep. In addition. sweep.2 Fundament als of Des ign .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. you create surface features using all of the same options that you would use for a solid feature—such as extrude. DEFINING SURFACE OPTIONS Working in Part Mode Normally. Create geometry on an existing solid model. Reduce the number of features. Represent the master model without affecting mass properties. blend. Increase regeneration speed.NOTES USING SURFACES IN MODEL DESIGN Surfaces can be used in model design to: • • • • Define an entire model with surface features. and their silhouette edges in magenta. Manipulating Surface Displays Pro/ENGINEER distinguishes surfaces from the white and gray hidden lines of solid geometry by displaying them in yellow. Reference parts in Assembly mode. you can use some unique surface functionality options in part mode. They are: • Flat – Sketches the planar boundaries of a surface For University Use Only . swept blend. Reduce screen clutter by blanking layers. Reference and generate additional geometry. Advantages of Using Surfaces Using surfaces to design your models enables you to: • • • • • Create robust complex geometry. revolve.

3 .NOTES Figure 1: A Flat Surface • – Uses selected curves in one or two directions to define the outer boundaries of the surface By Boundaries Figure 2: Surfaces by Boundaries • – Offsets a new surface feature from an existing surface by a specified distance Offset Figure 3: Offset Surface For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.

Use Join for mating edges or where one edge lies on the other surface. Join Intersect Resultant merge Figure 5: Using Merge Join and Merge Intersect For University Use Only . This is illustrated in the following figure. you can use the Capped Ends option to automatically create flat surfaces that close off the ends of the feature. or blended surface is a closed loop.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Any single-sided edge that becomes a two-sided edge changes from yellow to magenta. Figure 4: Open vs.4 Fundament als of Des ign . Capped Ends Creating Merged Surfaces You can combine one or more surface features into a single surface quilt. The system automatically merges two flat surfaces with the other surfaces to form an enclosed volume. revolved. swept.NOTES Open Ends versus Capped Ends If the cross-section of an extruded. If you delete the merge. the old surfaces return. When you create a merged surface: • • • It consumes the old surfaces and becomes a child.

You can create different features such as protrusions. slots. Within the Style feature. You can use ISDX to create freeform surface models as part of: • • • Conceptual design Engineering design Reverse styling ISDX allows you to create Style features. you can create freeform curves and surfaces easily. For University Use Only . you can use it to create new solid or thin features. or cuts with the Use Quilt option. Creating a cut Creating a thin protrusion Figure 6: Using Surfaces to Generate Solid Features DEFINING ISDX The Interactive Surface Design Extension (ISDX) offers a spline-based freeform modeler that enables you to create 2-D and 3-D curves and freeform surfaces.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.5 .NOTES CREATING SOLID FEATURES If a surface extends to or beyond the boundaries of a solid part or defines a closed volume.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4.NOTES Figure 7: A Style Feature with Several Curves and Surfaces Using the Style Feature A Style feature can contain several curves and surfaces or quilts.6 Fundament als of Des ign . It displays in the MODEL TREE as Style. For University Use Only . Style Feature Concepts The following are the important concepts of the Style feature: • 4-view Layout – Allows you to work around the model.

– Style offers a flexible hierarchy of the curves and surfaces you create.NOTES Figure 8: Four-View Window Layout • Soft Point Technology – Allows you to snap a curve on to other entities with a soft point. The Style feature enables you to integrate the feature based parametric modeling of Pro/ENGINEER with freeform unconstrained surfacing.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.7 . For University Use Only . You can create a total product design in a single modeling environment. • Switching Parent Child Relationships Parallel Modeling Most products are a combination of geometric forms and freeform shapes. You can alter the parent child relationships. which can be interactively located at a desired location.

Freeform surfaces along with parametric surfaces in engineering design models. curves. you can use ISDX to create: • • • • • • 2-D or 3-D curves(referenced or unconstrained). Styling design models.NOTES USING ISDX You use ISDX to create curves and freeform surfaces. or edges. Reverse styling surfaces. you use it when the design intent is dependent on visual or aesthetic criteria. Blends and transition surfaces. where geometry is either not defined or requires great flexibility. Also. Curves On Surface (COS). Figure 9: Defining Curves in 3-D Space For University Use Only . Specifically.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Creating 2-D and 3-D Curves You can use the Style feature as a 2-D (2-dimensional) or 3-D (3dimensional) sketcher to create unconstrained or referenced curves. These curves can be attached to features. They can also be used to create other Pro/ENGINEER features. such as points.8 Fundament als of Des ign .

Figure 12: Using COS for Trimming For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.NOTES Figure 10: A Blend Surface based on a Freeform 3-D Curve Figure 11: Surfaces Created from 3-D Curves Creating Curves on Surfaces You can create curves on surfaces (COS) by sketching them directly on to the base surface. You can use COS to build further surfaces or to trim the surfaces. Style allows easy manipulation or modification of the COS in order to capture the design intent. or by using the Drop tool.9 .

as shown in the following figures. ISDX allows freeform curves and surfaces to reference with parametric curves or surfaces. intuitive curves and surfaces to conceptualize products. enabling you to control the freeform surfaces using dimensions.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4.NOTES Creating Styling Models You can use freeform. You can also model using concept images that can be applied on to base surfaces. For University Use Only . (A) (B) (C) Figure 13: (A) Sketch (B) Sketch Applied on to the Base Surface (C) Model Developed Using the Sketch Creating Freeform Surfaces While designing products.10 Fundament als of Des ign . Integrating parametric surfaces with the freeform surfaces enables you to complete a product design on a single platform and database. you may need to impose dimensional controls on freeform surfaces.

11 .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.NOTES Figure 14: Dimensionally Controlling a Style Model Creating Blends and Transitions You can use the Style feature to create quick and high quality spline blends to improve the aesthetics or smoothness of products. Figure 15: Typical Transition Surfaces For University Use Only . You can create tangent or curvature-continuous transition surfaces with interactive control over the tangency.

12 Fundament als of Des ign .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4.NOTES Figure 16: Interactive Manipulation of Tangency Using Style Surfaces in Engineering Models You can combine style surfaces with parametric surfaces while creating high curvature or transition surfaces. Figure 17: High Curvature Transition Surfaces Reverse Styling You can conveniently refer to imported scan curves and faceted or surface data to build Style curves and surfaces. Figure 18: Reverse Styling For University Use Only .

you learn surface creation techniques using Pro/SURFACE and ISDX. and using them to create solid geometry. Tools Table 1: Surfaces and Style Feature Icons Icons Description Wireframe display Create datum curve Toggle datum plane Set active datum plane Create and edit curves Display curvature plots Delete all curvature points Regenerate all Create surfaces from boundary curves For University Use Only . you explore the power of the variable section sweep feature by using trajpar and datum graph features to create geometry.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.13 . In Exercise 3. you merge surfaces into a quilt.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory. Method In Exercise 1. In Exercise 2. you create a simple surface by combining unconstrained freeform functionality with parametric modeling.

using the default template. Select the FRONT datum. SURF_CUT. For University Use Only . Exit Sketcher. as shown in the following figure. and drag the section to a depth of approximately [5. Create a new part. 1.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Creating Cuts Using Surfaces Task 1. then click Insert > Surface > Extrude and sketch. Begin a new model and create the first feature. orient to the default view. Figure 19: Sketching to Extrude a Surface 4. 625]. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. 3. 2.14 Fundament als of Des ign .

Redefine the surface to use the options for Both Sides and Capped Ends .15 . Note that this method results in a surface that is one-sided and open-ended. Select the surface. Click Task 2. 1.NOTES Figure 20: Creating Depth Dimension 5. Figure 21: Redefining for Capped Ends For University Use Only . to verify this (magenta and yellow). and click > Redefine . Then click four times. Click Attributes and specify Both Sides and Capped Ends . Note that this has created a ‘hollow’ surface (magenta). 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.

. select the surface. For University Use Only . Figure 22: Creating Sketch 4. Click Insert > Protrusion > Use Quilt . Be sure to specify the horizontal centerline as the axis of revolution. 2. and use the options for Both Sides and Open Ends . click Okay . 3. Note the use of dimensioned construction lines. Note that the model is now solid (white). 1.NOTES Task 3. Create the first of two surfaces that will define a later cut. Select the RIGHT datum as the sketching plane. Create the sketch using a spline with a total of five points. Finish the sketch and revolve the surface by 180°. 1. and click Task 4. Click Insert > Surface > Revolve . as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Create a solid from the existing surface. and select the TOP datum as the reference.16 Fundament als of Des ign .

1. Task 5. Click Insert > Surface > Extrude .NOTES Figure 23: Sketch after Revolving Surface 3. Create the second of two surfaces that will define a later cut. Select the TOP datum as the sketching plane. 3. For University Use Only . Sketch the ellipse shown in the following figure. and select the FRONT datum plane. Complete the feature. 2.17 .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Hint: Use two centerlines and four sketcher points. Use the options for One Side and Open Ends . click Okay > Bottom .

Click Insert > Surface Operation > Merge . Create a surface merge and a cut.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Figure 25: Using Base of Block as “Up to Surface” Depth Task 6.18 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 24: Creating a Sketch with Two Centerlines and Four Sketcher Points 4. Complete the sketch and use the base of the block as an Up to Surface depth. 1. and select the two surface features.

Figure 26: Required Quilt Side Option 3. Complete the merge feature. and click Insert > Cut > Use Quilt . 4.19 .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Add finishing rounds to the model. For University Use Only .NOTES 2. Toggle through the various Quilt Side options to result in the mesh shown in the following figure. then round the edges. Click and <SHIFT> to select both edges. as shown in the following figure. Figure 27: Cut Feature Task 7. 1. Select the surface and specify the removal side to result in the cut shown in the following figure.

Redefine the second surface depth as UP TO SURFACE .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. What was different about the merge? 3. and QUERY SELECT the entire first surface.20 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Figure 28: Rounding Edges of Cut 2. [Optional] Delete the last three features from the Model Tree. For University Use Only . and rounds. Save the model and close the window. Then re-create the merge. cut.

View the Go-cart.21 .ASM. Notice the following: ½ The cyan blue surfaces are copied from the engine. 1. Figure 29: Go-Cart and Engine Compartment Detail 2. Figure 30: Exhaust Pipe Assembly 3.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Applying Variable Section Sweeps Task 1. For University Use Only . The task is to create a custom exhaust pipe. Open the EXHAUST_PIPE. The go-cart and the engine compartment detail are shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. ½ The Green surface (swept blend) is a portion of the exhaust that was started for you.

3. Select the Top Datum from the Model Tree. The edge of this surface strip will form a second trajectory for the final variable section sweep. Click Okay. 2. Click Select Trajectory > Curve Chain . Click Insert > Surface > Variable Section Sweep > Pivot Dir > Done. Task 2. > Figure 31: Opening the Exhaust Pipe Part through Model Tree 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. A common technique for creating a second trajectory for a variable section sweep is to use a surface strip. 4. 1. created to avoid the copied brown and white surfaces from the engine assembly that the exhaust cannot touch. For University Use Only .PRT in the Model Tree and click Open . Create a surface strip that follows the existing trajectory.22 Fundament als of Des ign . Click the EXHAUST_PIPE. Select anywhere on the datum curve and click Select All > Done > Done > Done > Origin Start .NOTES ½ The orange datum curve is the pre-defined trajectory. and uses trajpar to change orientation.

type the following two lines: /* equation to rotate line 90-0 during length of trajectory sd3 = 90 – trajpar *90 Notice how the angle changes after regeneration.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Figure 33: Angle Changes after Regeneration For University Use Only . 2.NOTES Task 3. Figure 32: Sketching Line 1. Click Sketch > Relations > Add . Sketch the following line.23 . Using your dimension number for the angle dimension (sd3 in this example). 3. Click > OK .

3. Click Insert > Datum > Graph. trajpar *100)/10 Note The diameter dimension at the circular end of the green surface is known to be d60. type the following lines under the previous entries: /*vary width of strip according to graph feature sd5= (d60/2) + evalgraph ("pipe_stretch". Use the Model Tree to reorder the graph before the strip surface. > 2. 1. The 100 and 10 values are the X and Y graph scales respectively. Click Sketch > Data From File > pipe_stretch.24 Fundament als of Des ign . 4.sec > Open Figure 34: Controlling Width of Strip with Graph Feature 3. Click . 2. Using your dimension number for the length dimension. Task 5. Select the strip surface in the Model Tree and click Redefine > Section > Define > Sketch . 1. For University Use Only . Link the graph feature to the variable section sweep so that it controls the width of the strip surface. Click Sketch > Relations .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Note the dimension number for the length dimension (ex: sd5) and click Edit Rel .NOTES Task 4. and type [Pipe_stretch ]. Create and reorder a graph feature using a saved sketch that will be used to control the width of the strip.

NOTES 4. For University Use Only .25 . Figure 35: Length Dimension Variation Task 6. Save and exit the Notepad. 5. The sweep should have a circular cross-section adjacent to the existing green surface and be elliptical at the other end of the sweep. 1. Click > OK . Use the two edges of the strip surface as trajectories for the final variable section sweep.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. 2. Click Select Traj > Bndry Chain . Select the surface shown in the following figure. Click Insert > Surface > Variable Section Sweep > NormToOriginTraj > Done .

Click Done > No Join > Done > Done > Open Ends > Done > Origin Start . 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Figure 37: Creating Tangent Chain 6. and select the edge of the surface strip shown in the following figure. select the appropriate edge. Click Done >No Join > Done . Using From-To .NOTES Figure 36: Selecting Datum Curve 3. 5. For University Use Only .26 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Select Traj > Tangent Chain .

0] and click .sec > Open . Drag the center of the imported sketch until it snaps to the crosshairs. as shown in the following figure. Figure 39: Imported Sketch Snaps to Crosshairs 1.NOTES Figure 38: Open Ends 5. Task 7. Click Sketch > Data From File > pipe_ellipse.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. For University Use Only . Edit the scale to [1.27 .

Figure 40: Selecting Sketcher Points 3. and Query Select the two sketcher points shown in the following figure. Click > OK . Click > . 4.NOTES 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4.28 Fundament als of Des ign . 7. Click Insert > Surface Operation > Merge and select the two surfaces shown in the following figure. Select the surface strip and the origin curve from the Model Tree and click Hide . Figure 41: Ellipse Conforms to Circle 5. For University Use Only . Notice that the ellipse now conforms to a circle at the beginning of the trajectory.

9. Save the model and erase it from memory.ASM. Select anywhere on the exhaust surface. Figure 43: Creating Thin Protrusion by Using Quilts 11.NOTES Figure 42: Merging Surfaces 8. Open the EXHAUST_PIPE. For University Use Only . Figure 44: Opening Exhaust Pipe Assembly 12. 10. Click . Click Insert > Thin Protrusion > Use Quilt .Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. type [0. verify the material arrow points to the outside.29 . 25] as the thickness and click .

PRT. Select the FRONT datum plane. 1. If necessary. Begin a new Style feature for the main flashlight body. click View > Show All to revert to a single pane view. 3. Click [Set active datum plane] in the side bar. 4. Open FLASHLIGHT. Figure 45: Start Model 2. Click Insert > Style . Figure 46: Setting Front as the Active Datum Plane For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4.30 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Style Surfaces Task 1.

Click [Create and edit curves] > New > Planar . 5. 3. To display curvature plot. as shown in the following figure. Figure 47: Plotting a Curve 2. Drag the curve points to form the shape of the curve. Check that the curve is located above the batteries. click [Display curvature plots]. as shown in the following figure. Create a planar curve.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. 4.31 . Click > Front . In the CURVE dialog box. click Edit . Create a curve and refine its shape. Figure 48: Editing and Adjusting the Curve For University Use Only . then click the locations on the active plane.NOTES Task 2. 1.

NOTES 6. Refine the shape of the curve using the same techniques as the previous curve so it appears approximately as shown in the preceding figure. as shown in the following figure. Click OK . Figure 49: Creating the Bottom Curve 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. [Clear all curvature points] 1. Click > New > Planar and click the locations on the FRONT plane as shown in the following figure. 3. Task 3. 2. Then click and turn off . Create the first cross-sectional curve and refine its shape. Click OK to finish creating the curve. Hold <ALT> and click the top-curve. then click on the lower curve. Click > New > Free . Click > DEFAULT.32 Fundament als of Des ign . Task 4. 1. Create another curve on the lower side. For University Use Only .

33 . Click Edit. as shown in the following figure. then click on the two locations to add points. Figure 52: Creating a Curve by Manipulating Points For University Use Only . Figure 51: Adding Points 4.NOTES Figure 50: Plotting the Back of the Flashlight 3. as shown in the following figure. Click Add.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Press and hold <SHIFT> and then drag the points.

and select the FRONT plane. Click and modify the shape by manipulating point locations and tangent lengths. Task 6.NOTES Task 5. 1. Select the upper endpoint of the newest curve. Make the curve normal to the FRONT plane. Refine the shape of the curve.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Click Tangent . Figure 53: Creating a Tangent to the Front Plane 2. Repeat the above step for the lower end of the same curve.34 Fundament als of Des ign . 1. Click 2. Figure 54: Modifying Shape by Manipulating Points For University Use Only . > RIGHT. change its type to NORMAL.

35 . 4.0] in the OFFSET text box. Modify the shape of the curve. Click > Right . as shown in the following figure. Click Styling > Snap to turn snap off. then click the bottom curve. Click Styling > Snap to turn snap on. Task 7. Click menu. Click the top curve. Task 8. Click an endpoint and on the TANGENT bar. Click Edit . click the next two points on the active plane. Figure 55: Creating the Face of the Flashlight 5. Click Planar to open the drop-down 2. 3. Constrain the endpoint tangents. > New > Planar . 2. select Normal from the shortcut menu. > Default . 1. Type [-75.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4.NOTES 3. as shown in the following figure. and select the FRONT plane. Click Then click and select the RIGHT plane. 3. Click OK . Create another cross sectional curve as a planar curve. For University Use Only . 1.

36 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Task 9. Click [Create surfaces from boundary curves] and select the four style curves. click OK . if necessary. Figure 57: Selecting Boundary Curves For University Use Only . 5. In the CURVE dialog box. Regenerate the model. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 56: Modifying Shape by Manipulating Points 4. Create a surface from the Style curves.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. 1. [Regenerate all].

Figure 58: Created Surface Task 10. 1. Figure 59: Selecting the Planar Cross-Section Curve 2. Click OK . 3. type [ – 90]. 4. Click to regenerate the Style feature. press <ENTER> and click OK . 3. Click Planar to expand the box. Click > Definition .NOTES 2. Redefine the location of the offset plane. cross-section curve.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. For University Use Only . Select the planar. Click to shade the model.37 . as shown in the following figure.

Exit Style. Save the model.NOTES Figure 60: Regenerated Style Feature 5. For University Use Only . 6. close all windows.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .38 Fundament als of Des ign .

Click > New > Free and create the first cross section curve. 3.PRT. Click and select the FRONT datum. Click > New > Planar and create the two curves. Figure 61: Creating Two more Curves 5. then click > Front . as shown in the following figure. Redefine the STYLE feature. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Flashlight Task 1.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. Offset is zero. 2. 1. 4. Check that the Planar . Press <ALT> to snap to the existing curves. Redefine the style feature to continue creating handle curves and surfaces.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Open FLASHLIGHT. For University Use Only .39 . as shown in the following figure.

Click Edit . For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure. Place the endpoint tangents normal to the FRONT datum plane and shape the curve. 8.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. Figure 63: Selecting a Midpoint Location 7. then press <SHIFT> and drag the point perpendicular from the FRONT plane.NOTES Figure 62: Creating a Free Curve 6. Click Add and select a location for a midpoint. as shown in the following figure.40 Fundament als of Des ign .

and click 12. Select the four curves that form the handle.Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Click to exit Style. create another new curve and shape. .41 . 13. For University Use Only . 11. Using the same techniques. Click OK . Shade the model.NOTES Figure 64: Shaping Curve 9. Click OK to close the CURVE dialog box. as shown in the following figure. Figure 65: Creating and Shaping a Second Curve 10.

Click . 15. Click Feature > Mirror Geom .NOTES Figure 66: Creating Surface from Four Style Curves 14. Figure 67: Quilting Sides 17. 18. Select the handle surface. Select the FRONT plane. 16.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. 19. as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . Toggle the mesh for the Quilt Sides. then select the body surface. Click Insert > Surface Operation > Merge .42 Fundament als of Des ign .

Repeat for the other side of the handle. Select the edges shown in the following figure. Click Round Edges . Dynamically modify the radius to a value of [5].Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. Click Insert > Surface Operation > Merge .NOTES Figure 68: Mirroring Geometry 20. and click . 23. 21. select the left and right halves of the flashlight body. > Figure 69: Rounding Rough Edges 22. For University Use Only .43 .

44 Fundament als of Des ign . Type [2. Save the model. close all windows.NOTES Figure 70: Rounded Edges 24. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . Flip the MATERIAL SIDE arrow to add material to the inside of the surface. 25. Click Insert > Thin Protrusion > Use Quilt . 26. Select the surface quilt.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 4. For University Use Only . (You may wish to add the Style curves to a layer and blank the layer) Figure 71: Finished Model 27. 0] as the thickness value and click .

Commercial Use Prohibited Su rf a ce C re ation and St yle Fea tu re Pag e 4. A curve can be created as a free 3-D curve or as a planar curve. you need to manipulate the shape of the boundary curves. • • • • For University Use Only . enabling you to create product forms that require flexible surfaces.45 . ISDX integrates freeform surfacing and parametric modeling to enhance existing surfacing capabilities of Pro/ENGINEER. To create a Style surface you need four touching boundary curves.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned that: • • • Surfaces can be used to create model designs. Style allows you to create geometry using a single-view layout or 4-view layout. The quilts can form solid geometry using the Use Quilt and Patch options. To change the shape of a surface. Surfaces can be merged to form quilts.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Objectives After completing this module. Page 5-1 . Manage family tables.Module Family Tables and Inheritance Features In this module you learn how to use Family Tables and Inheritance features to efficiently reuse data. Describe how to use inheritance features.Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only . you will be able to: • • • • Create and modify part family tables. Create and modify assembly family tables. You also learn how to use these features to create quickly create variations of existing designs.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. A family table would never consist of both parts and assemblies. Every family table has one or more instances. bolts come in various sizes but they all look alike and perform the same function. Thus. Every family table has one and only one generic. The generic model is the main object in the family table.NOTES USING FAMILY TABLES Family tables are collections of parts (or assemblies or features) that share similar features. For example. Create slight variations in parts without having to use relations. it is useful to think of them as a “family” of parts. Parts in family tables usually have one or more dimensional variations. Generate variations of a part without having to re-create and generate each one separately. Instances Generic Figure 1: Family of Bolts You can use family tables to: • • • • • Create and store large numbers of objects simply and compactly. the bolt on the left is the “generic” model and the rest are “instances” of the generic. You can make either part family tables or assembly family tables. In the following figure. Save time and effort by standardizing part generation.2 Fundament als of Des ign . Create part lists that can be printed and included in catalogs or other materials.

user-defined feature names. For University Use Only . 2. For example. The names of all family members (instances) created by the table and the corresponding values for each of the table-driven items. Figure 2: Family Table for Bolt Family Tables consist of three components: 1. feature numbers. consisting of columns and rows. Advantages of Using Generics and Instances There are several advantages to using family tables. Columns display feature names.NOTES Family Table Structure Family tables are displayed as spreadsheets. Dimensions and parameters.3 .Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. and specified assembly member names. you can increase productivity by: • • Storing multiple similar models within the same file. The generic object on which all family members are based. Saving different positions of a moveable assembly. 3. Rows display instances (of parts) and their corresponding feature values.

CREATING FAMILY TABLES To create a part family table.NOTES • • Saving different steps to the manufacturing of a model. and features will change from one instance to the next.4 Fundament als of Des ign . parameters. The following figure illustrates the generic bolt. you should determine which dimensions. Figure 3: Generic Bolt After modeling the generic part. Creating the Generic Model The first step in creating a family table is to model the generic part with all its possible features. Permanently saving model variations that you created using Pro/PROGRAM. you must first model the generic part and determine the variants before you can create the table and generate instances.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. For University Use Only .

features) to the family table clicking Family Tab in the menu manager. parameters. For University Use Only . Figure 4: New Family Table Dialog Box Select the appropriate icons to add items to the family table.5 . therefore. add items in a logical order. If you name features using Setup > Names . the names appear in the heading for the column. you can add instance rows to the Family Table. If you change dimension symbols using Modify > DimCosmetics . Use Edit > Copy with Increments to create several instances by patterning. You can use any of these methods to accomplish this: • • Manually fill out the table by typing in values for the instances. these symbols appear in the heading for that column. Creating Instances After you add items to the table. Guidelines for Using Family Tables • • • The system lists columns in the order in which you add the items. grouping similar items.NOTES Creating the Table Next.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. you can add the item columns to be varied (dimensions.

to generate the instances. Note: Never save a model within a PDM environment without regenerating or verifying the instances. Never rename an instance in PRO-TABLE if that part has been submitted.NOTES • • Read in a previously saved table.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. Review the FAMILY TREE dialog box to be certain that all the information is correct prior to saving. Figure 5: Family Table for Bolt Confirming Instance Validity As a final step. For University Use Only . and indicates if each instance regenerates successfully. If a family table is submitted to either Pro/PDM or INTRALINK with typographical errors in the naming of the instances it will typically require an administrator to resolve the problem. Pro/ENGINEER regenerates each instance in sequence. such as Microsoft Excel. Use a spreadsheet.6 Fundament als of Des ign . you should use [Verify icon] to verify that all instances are valid and can be regenerated prior to saving changes to the part/assembly.

You can add the following items to an assembly family table: • • • • Assembly-level dimensions such as mate offsets and align offsets Assembly-level features Assembly parameters Components Retrieving Instances You can retrieve the various instances using these three methods: • • • Use Family Tab after first highlighting the instance and opening it. [Preview icon] in the dialog box will preview the selected Creating Assembly Family Tables To create a family table for an assembly. Retrieve the generic model to obtain a menu listing of the family table. and then add the items that will vary from one instance to the next. Retrieve the instance directly if an instance index file exists.7 . you must model the generic assembly with all of the components needed for all of the instances.NOTES Figure 6: Family Tree Clicking instance. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5.

8 Fundament als of Des ign . Each type of change affects the family table differently: • – If the dimension is listed in the table. Any change causes all instances to update. Modifying a table-driven dimension Figure 7: Modifying Variable Dimension • Modifying a non table-driven dimension – Dimensions that are not listed in the table are invariable dimensions. it is a variable dimension. you can modify either the generic model or the instances.NOTES MODIFYING FAMILY TABLES Once you have set up the family table. For University Use Only . Changing this dimension updates the table.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. regardless of the location of the change.

Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. an N for the generic.9 .NOTES Hole dimension changed in all instances Figure 8: Modifying Invariable Dimension • Adding a feature to the generic – Adding a feature to the generic causes it to appear in all of the instances. Round added to generic is automatically added to instance Figure 9: Feature Added to Generic • – The system adds a column for the feature to the family table and enters a Y for that instance. Adding a feature to an instance For University Use Only . and an * (same as generic) for all other instances.

Chamfer deleted from generic automatically deletes it from instances Figure 11: Deleting Feature from Generic For University Use Only .NOTES Added column Hole added to an instance Figure 10: Adding Feature to Instance • Deleting a feature from the generic – The system removes the feature from all instances. it removes that column as well.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5.10 Fundament als of Des ign . If it has a column in the family table.

½ Pro/E model is verified or is saved and is submitted: Only rename within Pro/PDM or Pro/Intralink. Deleting a feature from the instance Figure 12: Deleting Feature from Instance • Renaming Instances with a PDM systems – The procedure for renaming an instance is dependant upon whether the model has been verified. saved and submitted: ½ Pro/E model not verified. it creates one and enters an N for that instance.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. not saved and not submitted: Rename the instances within Pro/TABLE. For University Use Only . and an * for all other instances. not submitted: Rename the instances using Pro/E rename functionality. ½ Pro/E model is verified or is saved. a Y for the generic. Do not edit table instance names directly.11 . If a column does not exist. Pro/PDM and Pro/Intralink are not aware of the existence of the instances yet.NOTES • – The system places an N in the column for that feature.

In addition. Using the configuration file option “save_instance_accelerator. you can also use instance index files and accelerator files to increase the efficiency of family tables.xas to assembly accelerator files. For University Use Only .12 Fundament als of Des ign . It is specific to a directory and has the name “directory_name. Inheritance features are always created by referencing existing parts. To decrease regeneration time when retrieving instances. Using Accelerator Files Accelerator files decrease the amount of time that the system requires to directly retrieve an instance.” you can control when the system creates these accelerator files.idx. You can select dimensions and features in the base model for value changes both at the time of the Inheritance feature creation and later. you can examine each instance file of a generic that is currently in session and delete any that are not current with the generic. Then you can identify the geometry and feature data that can change on the inherited feature without changing the original part. you can create accelerator files.NOTES DEFINING FAMILY TABLE OPTIONS Pro/ENGINEER offers several useful tools for effectively managing family tables. An inheritance feature begins with all of its geometry and data identical to the part from which it is derived. However. The system gives part accelerator files the .” If an instance index file exists.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. DEFINING INHERITANCE FEATURES Inheritance features allow a one-way associative merge of geometry and feature data from one part to another. Using Instance Index Files An instance index file contains a list of all instances that exist for all family tables within a directory. the system lists all instances when you retrieve a model. Using File > Instance Operations . they require more hard drive space since they are roughly the same size as the part file.xpr extension and appends .

2. 3. which is a limitation if you use a merged part in a drawing. and so forth) Parent-child relationship • • • • • Creating Inheritance Features There are a few important steps in the creation of an inheritance feature. Dimensions can be shown in a drawing of the derived object. Initially. all data from the base model are present in the inheritance feature. You first open the Inheritance dialog box and the LOCATE MDL menu. 1. Surface Finish. Access to dimensions in drawing mode as well as part and assembly mode.NOTES Using Inheritance Features • • An inheritance feature is used similarly to a merge feature. The LOCATION menu opens. Capabilities • • Access to parameters of inherited models. Multilevel nesting of inheritance features Support of RefPattern Special Resolve Mode for inheritance failure cases Non-geometry elements are copied in addition to 3D Notes (GeomTols. Define the placement of the inheritance feature as Default or External coordinate system .13 . More than one inheritance feature can be used in one part. its features. With the LOCATE MDL menu open the base model.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. For University Use Only . The model opens in a separate window. and their usage provided the prefix "IID_" is used. It also can be used for creating design variations without the use of a family table.

NOTES 4. For University Use Only . Figure 13: Varied Dimensions Dialog Box 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. Either you suppress them before creating the inheritance feature or you decide not to do this and will be allowed to do this later. Figure 14: Varied Features Dialog Box 6. Select what you would like to define as variable. Open the VARIED DIMENSIONS dialog box and select base model dimensions. Use the Var Feats element definition to open the VARIED FEATURES dialog box. You may then change the values.14 Fundament als of Des ign .

Use Copy Notes to define whether 3D notes will be copied to the inheritance feature. Changes made in the base model will be reflected in the derived object. In the first case you create a dependency between the derived object and the base model. You can make the Inheritance feature dependent or independent of the base model.NOTES 7. An independent inheritance feature will not update when the base model is modified. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. but they will not be modifiable or erasable in the derived object. 8.15 . 3D notes can be copied to the derived object.

You also learn how to create a totally new model and add a group of features to an existing geometry using inheritance features.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. you create an inheritance feature with and without varied dimensions and features. You also learn how to create an inheritance feature and to compare this with the use of merge parts and family tables. Tools Table 1: Icons for Family Tables and Inheritance Features Icons Description Verify Preview Add item Add row For University Use Only . you create and manipulate part and assembly family tables. You also modify the family table.16 Fundament als of Des ign . Method In Exercises 1 you open the generic instance and define the family table based on the generic.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory. In Exercises 2 and 3. You add a varied dimension later.

Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. Open TIRE. Figure 15 Task 2. Notice that there are three instances of the generic that exist: 12_INCH. In the PART menu. 13_INCH. 2. click Family Tab . thus “nesting” an instance. and 14_INCH rim diameters. Retrieve the generic tire part and review the family table. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. 3. 1. Click The generic > Open . Figure 16: Family Table For University Use Only .NOTES EXERCISE 1: Creating Part Family Tables Task 1. 1.17 .PRT. Create a family table for the 12_INCH instance of the Tire family table.

00 dimension. Select the revolved protrusion from the model tree to view its dimensions. Select the 6. .NOTES 2. Select the 12_INCH instance name and click instance designation on the screen. Click Family Tab and click table. to add a column to the family 4. Figure 18 5. Click Info > Switch Dimensions to view the symbolic names of the other dimensions.18 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. Notice it is added to the Item list as TIRE_WIDTH. 6. Notice the Figure 17 3.

In the FAMILY ITEMS dialog box. The dialog box should appear as shown in the following figure. 9. Select 1 from the Quantity column. 10. Type the values for TIRE_WIDTH and SIDEWALL_HEIGHT as shown in the following figure. select TIRE_WIDTH and click . click Parameter . 5. and type [3]. Click Edit > Copy with Increments . 7. Select the New Instance cell.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. Select the SIDEWALL_HEIGHT parameter and click Done Sel > Done/Return > OK . Type [2] as the increment. 4. Select the 12X4X1 cell. and type [12X4X1] as the name. Select the Quantity for Direction2 (currently 1 ) and type [3]. Click . For University Use Only . 8.0] as the increment. Click to add a row to the family table. Figure 19: Adding the First Instance Task 3. 1. 6. Create the remaining instances by copying the new instance. 2.19 . Type [1. 8. Select SIDEWALL_HEIGHT from the items list and click 3. . This will be the quantity for the pattern in the first direction.NOTES 7.

For University Use Only .20 Fundament als of Des ign . Task 4. Edit the names of the tire instances.NOTES Figure 20 9. (In this case the 12x4x10 instance is the duplicate) 10. Edit the table to modify only the instance names as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. Right-click the 12x4x10 cell and select Delete Rows > Yes . 1. Figure 21 Note: Every time you use Copy with Increments. the system creates a duplicate of the original instance with a slightly different name. Click OK to create the patterned instances.

The system regenerates all instances.21 .Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. This is useful for larger tables needing more involved editing.NOTES Figure 22: 12_INCH Family Table Tips and Techniques: You can also edit a Family Table with Microsoft Excel by clicking File > Edit with Excel . Task 5. Click > Verify . placing an arrow next to the instance being regenerated. Verify the Family Table to ensure that Pro/ENGINEER can regenerate all instances. Figure 23 For University Use Only . The results should appear as shown in the following figure. 1.

If you are on a UNIX station. 6. Task 7. 2. 2. From Notepad. 2. From the Notepad window.ptd] and press <ENTER>. and click Save . Click Window > Open System Window. Type [12 ] and [13 ] into the fields and click Replace All . Click File > Export Table > PRO/TABLE file . For University Use Only . and click Ok from the Family Table dialog.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. use an appropriate editor.22 Fundament als of Des ign . 5. Task 8.NOTES Note: Verify also generates a text file called <modelname>. 4. Close the Preview window and preview a few other instances. Select the 12X4X3 instance and click . Close the Replace window. Save the Pro/TABLE file (. 1. Edit the name to [12_INCH_EXPORT] and click Save. 3. The Verify option only confirms if the model regenerates successfully. The following step assumes a Windows operating system. Click Search > Replace . it does not verify that the model satisfies the design criteria of the model. Preview other instances 1. Close any Preview windows. click File > Save As .ptd ) so you can import it to another instance. 4. 1. click File > Exit. close the Verify window.PTD]. 3.tst. type [13_INCH_IMPORT. Task 6. 2. Type [Notepad 12_inch_export. Edit the family table data for importing. Click Window > Close to close the 12_INCH instance.

Click Close > OK. Task 9. 1. All instances should be successful. 6. Click Window > Activate to activate the generic TIRE instance. and select SIDEWALL_HEIGHT.23 . Click Parameter . 5. Select the TIRE_WIDTH dimension. Click . 8. Click Family Tab . Click File > Import Table . 4. Save the generic model and close any open windows. Click Done Sel > Done /Return > OK .Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. Create the instances for the 13_INCH tire.NOTES 7. For University Use Only . and select the revolved protrusion from the model tree to display dimensions. Note: The 14_INCH tire instances have already been created for you.PTD and Click File Open . Click > Verify . and click 3. 2. 9. Type [Exit] in the DOS window to return to Pro/E. Figure 24: 13_Inch Instances 7. Select 13_INCH_IMPORT. select the 13_INCH instance.

PRT. Select IF_ABSORBER_FASTENER. For University Use Only . 2.PRT > Open . Click Insert > Shared Data > Inheritance > Open . Zoom as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. and notice where the coordinate system is located. 1. Figure 25 2. Retrieve the ABSORBER_BAR. Create an inheritance feature.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Using Inheritance Features Task 1.PRT and determine where its coordinate system was created. Open IF_ABSORBER_BAR. Figure 26 Task 2. 1.24 Fundament als of Des ign .

Click Default > OK . 4. 1.NOTES 3. Figure 27: Added Group of Inheritance Feature Task 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. Notice it indicates which model was used as the source for the inheritance. Modify the value of the hole dimension. Expand the Model Tree to view the entry for the Inheritance feature. and also listed the inherited features. Figure 28 For University Use Only .25 . Note the location of the Csys in the subwindow model.

3. 5. Click Cancel > Cancel > Yes. and click Erase > Not Displayed. For University Use Only . Save the model. Confirm adding this dimension to the Inherited Var Dim Table by clicking Yes. Right-click the Inheritance feature from the MODEL TREE and select Open Base . Close the window and activate the IF_ABSORBER_BAR window. close the window. Notice the model is unaffected by the diameter change. 3. Click Regenerate . Modify a feature in the Base model. Task 4. Modify Round id 70 from [0. Notice the modified dimension was added to the table. 2.38 dimension. Right-click Hole id 68 and select Modify.26 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 29 7. 6. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5. Notice the round has updated. 4.2] and click Regenerate .NOTES 2.1] to [0. Right-click the Inheritance feature from the MODEL TREE and select Redefine > Var Dims > Define. 6.25] and click Regenerate . 5. Click Regenerate from the IF_ABSORBER_FASTENER window. Type [0. Select the 0.

Select IF_BOLT.27 . You will see a warning by using two different unit systems. 1. 4. Create a new part called [HEX_BOLT] using the default template.Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5. Click Var Dims > Define .NOTES EXERCISE 3: Inheritance Feature in New Models Task 1. 2.00 and 0. Modify the New Value of d1 to [5. Figure 31: Varied Dimensions Dialog Box For University Use Only .PRT and click Open > Default .0] as shown in the following figure. Click Insert > Shared Data > Inheritance > Open . Figure 30 5. Select the 3.95 dimensions. Create a new part named HEX_BOLT and an Inheritance Feature. 3. Select the protrusion shown in the following figure.

NOTES

6. Click OK . 7. Click Var Feats > Define and select the Hole. 8. Select the Hole entry and click Suppress . Refer to the following figure.

Figure 32: Varied Features Dialog Box

9. Click Ok > Ok.

Figure 33

10. Save the model, close the window, and click Erase > Not
Displayed.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 5- 28 Fundament als of Des ign

NOTES

OPTIONAL EXERCISE
The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal.

OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Assembly Family Tables

Figure 34: Variations on Wheel Assembly

Task 1. Add the components of the wheel assembly to the family table and regenerate the rim. 1. Open WHEEL.ASM.

Figure 35

2. Notice that the Assembly was created with an ‘extra’ interfering component in the center. Some versions of the assembly will use this component.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Famil y Tab les and Inhe ritanc e Pag e 5- 29

NOTES

3. The differences in the styles of rims are based upon family table instances of the rim component itself. Right-click RIM.PRT and select Open from the popup menu. Select The generic and click Open . 4. Click Family Tab and use instances. to preview and examine a few

5. Click Cancel and Window > Close. 6. If necessary, Activate the WHEEL.ASM window. 7. Click Family Tab >
> Component .

8. Select the RIM, TIRE, and SPINDLE_BUSHING from the Model Tree. Click Done Sel > OK . Task 2. Create a family table of the assembly by manually editing.

1. Click

four times.

2. Edit the instance names as shown in the following figure.

Figure 36: Wheel Family Table

Task 3. Add the rim instance names using the assembly instance names. Highlight the four instance names, as shown in the following figure. 1. Enter instance names into the RIM column so that the RIM instances are used in the assembly Family Table. Refer to the following figure. Hint: Highlight the desired portion of the neighboring cell and use Copy and Paste.

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NOTES

Figure 37: Adding the Rim Instances

2. Type names for the TIRE instances as shown in the following figure.

Figure 38: Adding the Tire Instance Names

Task 4. Instances with the “SP” designation require a spindle bushing, while those designated with the “4N” designation do not. Use the Family Table to remove the spindle from the assembly when lug nuts will be used. 1. Use the Yes/No option in the Spindle Bushing column as shown in the following figure.

Figure 39: Adding the Spindle Bushing

2. Click

> Verify .

All instances should be successful.

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NOTES

3. Click Close > OK. 4. Save the assembly and close the window. Task 5. Replace the wheel on a higher level assembly with one of the instances. 1. Open FT_FRT_SUSP.ASM.

Figure 40

Task 6.

Use family tables to replace a Wheel assembly.

1. Click Component > Adv Utils > Replace . Use Query Sel to select the first WHEEL assembly listed in the model tree. 2. Click By Family Table Member > Browse .

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NOTES

3. Select the W_12x6-BR-SP instance that you created. Click OK > Apply > Done . Notice the Hub in the center of the Rim, instead of the four lugnut holes.

Figure 41: First Wheel Assembly: Replaced with W_12x6-BR-SP

4. Repeat the process to replace the other wheel assembly with an instance of your choice.

Figure 42: Second Wheel Assembly: Replaced with W_12x6-AR-4N

5. Save the model, close the window, and click File > Erase > Not
Displayed.

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NOTES

MODULE SUMMARY
In this module you learned that: • • • • • • • You can rapidly create parts and assemblies using a Family Table. Family Tables are invaluable when parts are similar in nature and need to be controlled with one file. Family Tables reduce the number of files that exist on your system thus making possible the optimal use of system memory. The instances of a Family Table are associative. Family Tables are useful in replacing components and exploring design alternatives. You can create inheritance features and parts with the capability to include varied dimensions and features. Inheritance features can be used in many cases to avoid the use of a family table and also for copying from a different model.

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For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited - Module

Advanced Part Tools and Patterns
In this module you learn how to create geometry in models at the assembly level utilizing the top-down design functionality in Pro/ENGINEER.

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to • • • • • • • • • • Create part intersections and bulk items. Mirror geometry. Create independent features in components and assembly level features. Use relations to control geometry. Create assembly-level features. Use style surfaces to define solid geometry. Create derivative assembly parts from a single part model. Create dimension and reference patterns. Manipulate existing patterns. Maintain patterns from one component to another.

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NOTES

ADVANCED COMPONENT OPERATIONS
Creating Part Intersections
Using the intersection between two components, you can define a new component. The Intersect option in the MODIFY PART menu, enables you to trim an existing part to the volume defined by the intersection with another part. When you trim a part, the part becomes dependent on the assembly for the intersect feature.

Figure 1: Intersection Part from Two Tubes

Merging and Cutting Out Parts
You can merge the existing material of one part into another part by copying the geometry into the model or by always maintaining a reference. If you copy the geometry, the model is independent of the reference part. Using the cutout technique, you can also remove material from one component, based on the intersecting material of another component. You can either copy or reference the geometry, creating dependence or independence. The following figure illustrates the merge and cutout techniques.

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NOTES

Base component

Second component

Assembly

Resulting merge

Resulting cutout

Figure 2: Using Merge and Cutout

Creating Mirrored Parts
When creating a component at the assembly level, you can use Part > Mirror to mirror a new component from an original component. You can mirror a part using either the Reference option or the Copy option.

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NOTES

Original part

Temporary assembly

Mirrored component

Figure 3: Mirrored Parts

Creating Assembly-Level Features
In the manufacturing process, some features are not added to the assembly until the parts are actually assembled. Using Assembly features, you can: • • • • • Model holes, cuts, and slots machined at the time of component assembly by making them visible only at the assembly level. Create datum and surface features to reference when assembling components and creating part features. Define machining operations in assembled weldments. Create matching holes/cuts in multiple parts by making the features visible at the part level as well. Create cutaways in the assembly to look behind certain components.

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NOTES

Using Assembly Features to Define Part Features
You can create independent part features at the part level instead of the assembly level.
Visibility Level

By default, Pro/ENGINEER displays a subtractive assembly solid feature (such as a hole, or cut) in the assembly only, but not in the part or any subassembly. By specifying the appropriate visibility level, you can view assembly-level features in the parts themselves or in the subassemblies.
Specifying Models to Intersect

If you use the Add Model and Auto Sel options, the feature cuts material from all the parts in the specified path, from the sketching plane out to the specified depth. If you select Add Model and Manual Sel , you can specify the parts in the path that the feature should cut. To redefine the visibility level of an assembly feature or change the models that it intersects, you can use the Redefine option and select the INTSCT PARTS element from the dialog box.

Auto Selection

Manual Selection of Bottom and Top Components

Figure 4: Intersection of Assembly Cut

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NOTES

Note:
Assembly-level features automatically create family table instances in the components that you select for intersection.

USING PATTERNING
Using patterning, you create multiple instances of the lead feature. You manipulate the instances as a single feature. To control the size and position of pattern instances, you use dimensions or reference an existing pattern. Patterning enables you to: • • • • Increase your productivity by quickly and easily reproducing a feature multiple times. Perform operations on the entire pattern, rather than individual features. Control a pattern parametrically by changing pattern parameters. Increase your efficiency by modifying a pattern rather than changing many individual features.

Pattern Types
In Pro/ENGINEER, you can create two types of patterns to define the location of instances: • •
Dimension Patterns

– Uses dimensions to control the position of the – References an existing pattern.

instances.
Reference Patterns

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Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6. Figure 6: Pattern Table Examples You use a table-driven pattern when a pattern is too complex or irregular to control using incremental dimensions.NOTES Creating Dimension Patterns The default method for creating a dimension pattern is to increment the driving dimensions of the lead feature. you can create complex configurations. Number of instances Increment Dimensions Lead feature Figure 5: Incremental-Driven Pattern Creating Pattern Tables With a pattern table.7 . Using this technique. as shown in the following figure. for example: For University Use Only . You enter each dimension in tabular format and edit each dimension independently. you control the location of the instances by creating an absolute dimension to the same reference as the leader. such as unequal spacing or irregular sizes.

Figure 7: Converting an Incremental Pattern to a Pattern Table Note: Once you have converted a pattern to a table. you use an existing pattern to define incrementally.00 1.00 8.00 5. you use the To Table option to convert the existing incremental pattern.00 1.00 6. To create the pattern shown in the following figure.00 4. Table 1: Pattern Table Table Name: HOLES_1 idx 1 2 3 4 5 d5 (1. The design intent requires you to locate each instance from the same references.00 8.00) 2.00 d6 (2.00 5. rather than incrementally from the previous instance. For University Use Only . you cannot convert it back to its original form. you convert the incremental pattern to a table. Multiple models must share the same pattern. To redefine an instance.00) 5.00 Redefining Pattern Tables To create a pattern table.NOTES • • • Different variations of the model require multiple pattern configurations.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6.8 Fundament al of D esi gn . and then delete two instances.

Any change that you make to a variable dimension affects only the instance that you modify. When you change an invariable dimension.00 1. and the table updates.00 5.00) 1 2 3 4 5 6 Modifying radius affects all instances. • • • • Variable dimensions are listed in the pattern table and can vary from one instance to another.00 6.00 4.00 4.00) 2. Table 2: Pattern Table Table Name: HOLES_2. d6 (2.9 .00 1.00 3.NOTES Editing Pattern Tables When modifying a pattern table. it affects all instances.00 8. All other dimensions for the patterned feature are invariable.00 Figure 8: Modifying Table-Driven Dimensions For University Use Only .00 8. it is important to be able to distinguish between variable and invariable dimensions. so all instances must share the same value.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6. !idx d5 (1.00 5.00 5.

Delete an existing pattern table.10 Fundament al of D esi gn . Add a new pattern table to the feature.PTB. Change which pattern table to use for the feature upon regeneration. and modify instances. Assign a new name to an existing pattern table. you can create different variations within the design. Figure 9: Modifying Dimensions That Are Not Table-Driven Editing Features in Patterns Using Modify > Pattern Table . Figure 10: Using a Pattern Table for Design Variations For University Use Only . you can select a feature in the pattern and make the following modifications: • • • • • • • Add a new pattern table to a feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. Creating Design Variations in Patterns By adding multiple pattern tables to a single feature.NOTES Modifying radius affects all instances. delete an existing table pattern. Save a pattern table to the hard drive using the name PATT_TABLE_NAME. Read in a pattern table from the hard drive. enabling change from one to the other using the Switch functionality.

the first bolt references the lead hole. Figure 12: Patterning Components in an Assembly • You can use a reference pattern to assemble a component to each instance of another patterned component in the assembly. and then use it to drive another pattern by reading the file into another model. You can also reference a patterned feature. you can use a constraint. For a dimension pattern.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6.11 . In the following figure. This technique ensures that pattern tables have the same configuration on different models. and saves time. such as Mate • For University Use Only .NOTES Using Patterns on Multiple Models You can save a pattern table in a file. such as a hole in a part. Figure 11: Using a Pattern Table to Maintain a Relation Between Two Parts Creating Patterns in Assembly Mode You can pattern components in Assembly mode the same way that you pattern features in Part mode. using both dimension and reference patterns.

you create a simple identical pattern of a hole incrementally on a brake disk. you assemble the remaining nuts by following the existing pattern. you create the steering wheel and airbag cover parts from the steering wheel master model. After assembling the first nut. In Exercise 2. Method In Exercise 1. and features within the context of the assembly.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you create patterns. Tools Icons Description Show View Repaint Apply and close Save Select All Insert Datum Plane For University Use Only . you assemble the lug nuts to the wheels by creating a radial pattern. The left knuckle is a mirror image of the right knuckle that already exists.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6.12 Fundament al of D esi gn . Then you convert the pattern into a table to gain more control over the location of the holes. you create the left knuckle part for the go-cart by mirroring in a temporary assembly. In Exercise 3. part. In Exercise 4.

1. 3. For University Use Only .13 . Create an empty assembly and assemble the right knuckle as the first component.PRT 4.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Mirroring the Knuckle Part Task 1. select Empty and click OK . 2. Select the part. Figure 13: RIGHT_KNUCKLE. Clear the Use Default Template check box. Click Modify > Mod Part . Note: Do not create default datums in this assembly since you only want to reference the two components to each other. click Component > Assemble . click Assembly. Click View > Layers .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6. Select RIGHT_KNUCKLE. In the NEW FILE OPTIONS dialog box. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Type [mirror_knuckle] and click OK . Select the DATUMS layer. Create a datum plane in the part about which to mirror the part. Click > > Close . 5. To create a new assembly. 6. Notice that the system places the component in its default orientation.PRT and click Open > Done/Return . To assemble the first component. In the NEW dialog box. click File > New .

[Insert Datum Plane] > Offset . Click OK . Note: You do not use an assembly-level datum because this would create a dependency to the assembly. you can now delete the assembly file. Create the new left-knuckle part. Click Component > Create . Click OK . Since you used a part datum from the original part. Click Done until you reach the ASSEMBLY menu. click Copy .NOTES 7. In the MIRROR PART dialog box. Select DTM5 on the RIGHT_KNUCKLE. Click Enter Value . 9.PRT. In the COMPONENT CREATE dialog box.PRT. 4. Type name [left_knuckle]. 1. click Part and Mirror . 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. Figure 14: New Datum Plane for Mirroring Task 2. For University Use Only . Select RIGHT_KNUCKLE. 3. Click plane. Type [–5] and click .14 Fundament al of D esi gn . Select the SIDE datum 8.

Do not save the assembly. Erase the assembly from session. Click .15 . 6. Save LEFT_KNUCKLE. Type [left_knuckle].Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6.PRT.NOTES Figure 15: Mirrored Part 5. instead of accepting the assembly name. For University Use Only .

For University Use Only . 2. 5. Click Select > Done Sel . In the INFORMATION window. Notice that the assembly feature intersects the outer casing. Click OK > OK to finish. Leave the visibility level unchanged. 4.PRT. Shade the assembly. Open SHELL. 4. Click Info > Bill of Materials . The model consists of three components. Click Sel By Menu .ASM with Spline Cut Task 1. Select SHELL_INNER. Repaint to view the results. Click Info > Feature . notice that the cut was made in Assembly mode as an assembly feature. Click Feature > Redefine . select the Cut feature [F8(Cut:Shell)]. Click Close to close the Information Window. Task 2. 3. Select Top Level > OK . Open the shell assembly and obtain information about it.16 Fundament al of D esi gn . 1. Shade the assembly again and make sure that the cut goes through both shells. 1.ASM 2. Using Query Sel.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Assembly Features Figure 16: Completed SHELL. Click Intsct Parts > Define .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. Change the intersection of the feature to include the inner casing. Close the window. Select the Cut feature. 3.

Select SHELL_OUTER. read the message and click Confirm .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6.PRT and SHELL_INNER.PRT. Click Window > Activate to return to the assembly.PRT window. Click Feature > Redefine . click Part Level . In the CUT dialog box. Make the assembly feature visible at the Part level. 3. From the LEVEL list.17 . The assembly cut visibility level is set to the top level. For University Use Only . 2. While in Assembly mode. Note that the cut is not visible in Part mode. 5. 2. 4. 3. try to add a feature to the SHELL_OUTER. Click Done from the MODIFY PART menu.PRT. 4. Close the SHELL_OUTER. The assembly feature should appear here also. Open the SHELL_OUTER.PRT. Select SHELL_OUTER.PRT. Open the SHELL_INNER. Task 4. The assembly feature returns.PRT. Click Modify > Mod Part . 1. Verify this by inspecting the parts individually. Open SHELL_OUTER. Click OK > OK to complete the feature. click Intsct Parts > Define and click Remove twice to remove both models from the list of intersected components.PRT.NOTES Figure 17: Assembly Feature Task 3. In the MESSAGE AREA. The assembly feature should appear. Select the Cut feature. 1.

[Optional] Create an assembly cut as shown in the preceding figure. Figure 18: Assembly Feature Example 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. 7.18 Fundament al of D esi gn . Save the assembly and erase it from memory. Close the part windows and reactivate the assembly. For University Use Only .NOTES 5.

Click Done .0 angular dimension.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6. type [30]. 2. 3. Click Identical > Done . type [12] as the number of instances. Open BRAKE_DISK_VENTED.PRT. Select the 20. Click Feature > Pattern . 7. type [4] as the number of instances. select the small hole feature.5].NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Pattern Tables Task 1. 6.19 . 1. Increment these dimensions in the first direction.000 radius dimension. Increment angle again for second direction. type [0. Click Done . Select the 20.0 angle dimension again. Type [5]. For University Use Only . 4. Create a dimension pattern of the lead hole using increments to drive the pattern. Select the 2. Figure 19: Hole Pattern Dimensions 5.

For University Use Only . In the HOLES dialog box. 2. 7. In the DELETE/ROWS COLUMN dialog box. select HOLES1. select one of the holes. Select To Table . select the rows beginning from idx 8 to idx 15 as shown in the following figure. 4. 5. Click Edit > Delete . 8. Change the hole pattern to a table and edit the table to remove the extra holes.20 Fundament al of D esi gn .. To delete the rows in the editor. type [holes1]. The system should inform you that it has created the pattern table HOLES1. Click Done /Return > . click Modify > Pattern Table . Click Done to return to the PART menu.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. To specify the pattern name. click the Pattern button. 6. Figure 20: Modified Hole Pattern 1.NOTES Task 2. 3. In the TABLES dialog box. Click Actions > Edit . To edit the pattern table. Click Redefine. click Rows > OK .

Incorporate holes into the solid disk brake. Click OK and Regenerate . 3. According to the design intent. it should have the same hole pattern as the vented disk. Similarly. Select the HOLES1 pattern table. Click Actions > Write . For University Use Only . Click OK.21 . Tips & Techniques: You do not have to renumber the idx column to account for the removed holes. To accomplish this. delete the rows from idx 24 to 31 and from idx 40 to 47. The instance index numbers have to be unique. Click Modify > Pattern Table . 1. 2. save the pattern table to the hard drive so that the system can read it into another part. but they do not have to be consecutive.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6.NOTES Figure 21 1. Save the model. Task 3. Exit the editor. 2. The system saves the pattern table information for the HOLES1 configuration to the hard drive (another pattern table called HOLES2 already exists on the hard drive).

Write. Click Ok > Regenerate to view the new hole pattern.PTB. Add another pattern table to the hole feature by reading it in to the vented disk part from the hard drive.22 Fundament al of D esi gn . 1. 2. Select the hole. Click Actions > Read . 4. Click Identical > Done . Read. Use the pattern tables on another model. The system then informs you that it created pattern table HOLES2. Click Modify > Pattern Table . etc. Read in the HOLES2. Select HOLES2 Click Actions > Activate . Figure 22: Alternate Hole Pattern Task 5. Select HOLES2.PTB file. Click Open .NOTES Task 4. Click Feature > Pattern . Note: You may use the icons in the TABLES dialog box to perform operations such as Activate. A variation on the design requires a different configuration of holes. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 6. 3. Open BRAKE_DISK_SOLID. Switch the pattern to use the table that you read in. 2. 1.PRT. Select HOLES1 in the TABLES dialog box. Drive an existing hole on the disk solid part.

Click Actions > Activate > Ok > Done . For University Use Only .0 angle dimension. 10. Select HOLES1. Select HOLES2.000 placement radius. 9.. Click Done > Done. Note: It is important to select these dimensions in the correct order because this determines the order of the columns in the table.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced Pa rt Too ls and Patte rn s Pag e 6. You must follow the order of the columns in the pattern table that you saved on the hard drive.23 . Click Table . Select the 20. Click Regenerate and the model appears with the Holes2 pattern. Click Done .PTB and click Open . You have read the two pattern tables into the part. 4.NOTES 3. 5. then select the 2. 7. Notice that the Holes1 pattern appears. 8. 6. Save both models and erase them from memory. Click Modify > Pattern Table and select HOLES2. Click Read .PTB and click Open . Click Read .

NOTES

EXERCISE 4: Patterning Components in Assembly Mode
Task 1. Assemble the first nut to the lead hole; then reference pattern it to add the other nuts to the assembly. 1. Open the WHEEL.ASM assembly file. 2. Click Component > Assemble . Select LUG_NUT.PRT. 3. Select Mate from the CONSTRAINTS, TYPE list. Mate the tapered surface on the nut to the tapered surface inside the hole. This fully defines the placement. Click OK to finish.

Mate the conic surfaces.

Figure 23: Lug Nut Assembly References

4. Click Pattern from the Component menu . Select the lug nut. 5. Click Ref Pattern > Done . 6. Save the model and erase the entire assembly from memory. Use to erase all components.

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NOTES

MODULE SUMMARY
In this module you learned: • That you need to be concerned about establishing external references when creating merge parts, features on a part while in the assembly, mirror parts and assembly level features. Use the Design Manager to control what references you define. How to access the different levels of the assembly. How to create a style surface. That you can create a single part made of surface geometry that represent the final assembly and use that part to create the individual components, thus ensuring proper fit. The differences among pattern types and when they should be used. How to create a simple pattern in two directions. How to create a pattern table. How to export pattern information and import it into another model to save time. How to pattern components in assembly mode.

• •

• • • • •

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For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited -

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited - Module

Local Groups and User-Defined Features
In this module you learn how to use local groups to organize your models. You also learn how to create and use libraries of commonly used geometry by defining user-defined features (UDFs).

Objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to: • • • • • Create and manipulate local groups. Reuse data. Work on multiple features as if they were one feature. Break the dependency of features within groups. Create and place user-defined features (UDF).

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NOTES

LOCAL GROUPS
A group is a set of features within a part or a set of components in an assembly that behave as a single entity. A Local Group is a group that you create within a model. A Local Group: • • • Is particular to the model in which it is created. Cannot be transferred to another model. Appears in the Model Tree as a single feature with a substructure.

Figure 1: Model Tree Before and After Creating a Local Group

Manipulating Groups
On a local group you can perform various operations such as suppression, deletion, or reordering and the group still behaves as a single feature. You can also: • • • • Pattern and Unpattern the group. Ungroup it. Break the dependencies that develop between features. Redefine the group to add features.

Patterning Features
Grouped features can use the same patterns as other regular features. When patterning, you can access all dimensions of all features in the group.

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NOTES

Figure 2: Group Patterning

You can create some configurations in local group patterns that you cannot create in reference patterns, as shown in the following figure.

Cannot reference pattern the draft, but you can create a group pattern.

Figure 3: Reference Patterning

You can break the group pattern by unpatterning it into individual groups with their own dimensions that you can then modify or delete individually.

Figure 4: Unpatterned Groups

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NOTES

Ungrouping
You can break a group into individual features so that you can work on them individually.

Figure 5: Ungrouping of One Group

Breaking Dependencies
When you create a group, the system creates a dependency between the original group and the copied or patterned group. When you unpattern or ungroup the group, it still maintains a dependency at the feature level. Using Modify > Make Indep , you can break this dependency.

Figure 6: Height of One Group Made Independent

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NOTES

USER-DEFINED FEATURES
UDFs are groups of features, references, and dimensions that can be saved for future use on models. UDFs save time and energy by helping establish a library of common geometry. The following figure shows a UDF that can be reused.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Cylindrical protrusion Rib Copy of ribs Coaxial hole

Figure 7: Screw Boss Geometry

Creating UDFs
To create a UDF, model the geometry that you want to save and then define the UDF by following these steps: • Beginning the definition and specifying storage.
½

At this stage, specify whether you would like to store the UDF as a Stand Alone feature or a Subordinate feature. • Storing reference parts. ½ When creating a standalone UDF, you can store a reference part to use later. The system creates a copy of the current part and assigns it the name UDFname_GP.PRT. ½ If you store the UDF as a subordinate feature, the current model automatically becomes the reference part.

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NOTES

Naming the group. ½ When the system stores the file, it appends the file extension .gph The UDF should have a valid filename that is unique and descriptive.

Selecting features. ½ Use Query Sel or the Model Tree to select the model features to include in the UDF.

Creating external reference prompts. ½ These are user-defined prompts that help you to select corresponding references while placing the UDF in a new model.

Placement plane

Side plane

Front plane

Figure 8: External References for Screw Boss

Defining variable dimensions and elements.As you select features for the UDF, you can do the following: ½ ½ ½ ½ Make some or all the driving dimensions variable. Increase the UDFs flexibility by creating variable elements. Define prompts and logic statements. Create predefined variations of the UDF.

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NOTES

Completing the definition. ½ Once you have defined all of the UDF elements, you can click OK in the dialog box to automatically save the UDF and the reference part to the hard drive. The system assigns the UDF the name UDFname.gph.

Placing UDFs
When you place a UDF on a new model, the system creates a group within the new model containing the UDF features.

Figure 9: New Part Needs a Screw Boss You can place a UDF file, using the following steps: • Select the driving options to control the geometry. To control the geometry after placing it, you can define it as either independent or UDF-driven. Retrieve a reference part to assist you in placing the UDF, if necessary. Type values for any variable dimensions that you created and select placement references.

• •

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NOTES

Placement plane

Side plane

Front plane

Figure 10: Selecting References for UDF Placement • Specify the display for invariable dimensions as Normal, Read Only, or Blank.

Figure 11: Invariable Dimensions Blanked

• •

Define any optional elements. Finish the placement.

Creating Assembly-Level UDFs
By creating user-defined features at the assembly level, you can create component groupings and place them as a single unit.

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NOTES

LABORATORY PRACTICAL
Goal
In this laboratory you create and manipulate a local group. You also create and utilize common library components known as UDFs.

Method
In Exercise 1, you use local groups to pattern vented disks for the brakes of a go-cart. You work on multiple features as if they are one feature and break the dependency of features within a group In Exercise 2, you first gain mastery over the procedure for creating a UDF. You then place the UDF in different models. In Exercise 3, you create a UDF from the end spline of an axle. In Exercise 4, you place the spline-end UDF on the end of an axle part.

Tools
Table 1: Icons for Local Groups and User-Defined Features

Icons

Description
Select Geometry Apply and close Save

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NOTES

EXERCISE 1: Creating Local Groups
Task 1. Retrieve a part and resume currently suppressed geometry in it.

1. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. 2. Open BRAKE_DISK_VENTED.PRT.

Figure 12

3. Click Utilities > Model Player .

Figure 13: MODEL PLAYER Dialog Box

4. Click

to ‘rewind’ the model.

5. Click repeatedly to step through each feature in the model. Notice that a single ‘blade’ is composed of four features.

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2. 1. 4.11 . Task 2. Select the Group BLADE in the MODEL TREE. Click Finish . Figure 15 Task 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r. Pattern the group radially around the disk. 3. 2. Click Pattern from the Group menu. Create a local group containing the features comprising the 1.NOTES Figure 14: Blade Geometry 6. All of the dimensions for the group appear. Click Done Select > Done. For University Use Only . blade. Press and hold <SHIFT>. then select Protrusion id 50 and Round id 148 in the MODEL TREE. Click Feature > Group > Local Group . and type [blade] as the name for the group.Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7. Expand the group in the model tree.

Select the 30° angle dimension and type [30] as the increment. and click Done. Figure 17: Finished Blade Pattern 5.12 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Figure 16 3. Click Done . 4. For University Use Only . type [12] as the number of instances.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 7. Save the model and close the window.

13 . Figure 18: Start Model 2. Open LOCAL_GROUP. Open the model and create a group pattern.Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r. and the hole from the Model Tree. Select the protrusion.PRT. 1. Click Feature > Group > Local Group and type [volcano]. Figure 19: Group Branch in Model Tree For University Use Only .NOTES EXERCISE 2: Using Group Options Task 1. the draft.Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7. 3. and click > . Notice the group branch in the Model Tree.

click Done and type [2].0]. click Pattern and select anywhere on the group. 7. Figure 20: Dimension to Increment in First Direction 6. For University Use Only . Figure 21: Direction to Increment in the Second Direction 8. as shown in the following figure.NOTES 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 7. Select the dimension to increment in the second direction. While still in the GROUP menu. click Done and type [3]. Type [3. as shown in the following figure. Type [5.0]. Select the dimension to increment in the first direction. 5.14 Fundament als of Des ign .

Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r. Investigate the Unpattern option. 1.Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7.15 . Select any group and click > Modify. Drag to a radius of approximately 0. Select the round and click Task 3.NOTES Figure 22: Created Pattern Task 2. Using . select the edge and click > Round Edges . > Pattern . 1. 3. Create a reference pattern on the group. Figure 23: Rounding Edges 2.20. For University Use Only .

6. 3. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 7. Modify the dimension back to [5] and Regenerate .16 Fundament als of Des ign . (Hint: Query Select the protrusion within the group). the members of the group functioned as instances in a pattern. 4. Modify the quantity back to [3] and Regenerate . 5. Modify the draft angle back to [7] and Regenerate . 8. to [3] and Regenerate . Notice that during the previous modifications. Modify the draft angle to [13] and Regenerate . Figure 25: Modified Dimensions 7. Modify the dimension as shown in the following figure. Modify 3 VOLCANOS to [2] and Regenerate .NOTES Figure 24 2.

Figure 26 2. In the Model Tree. First delete the patterns. select Pattern (Round) and > Delete Pattern . > Delete Figure 27 For University Use Only . In the Message Area. Click Feature > Group > Unpattern and select any group. Notice that the group can not be unpatterned due to the reference pattern. 1. select Pattern (VOLCANO) and Pattern . include the round in the group and then create the group pattern again.Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r. recreate the model. In the Model Tree. read the prompt. Delete the reference pattern.Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7. Task 4.17 .NOTES 9. To investigate the Group manipulation possibilities.

Click Feature > Group > Unpattern and select any group. Recreate the group pattern using the instructions outlined in the earlier steps.NOTES Task 5. Notice that the round Task 6. select GROUP (VOLCANO) and Redefine.0]. click select the ROUND. Redefine the Group. Investigate the Group manipulation possibilities. and click Done Sel > is added to the group.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 7. Use a vertical increment of [3. . Modify the dimension on the protrusion to [5. Pattern the Group. In the Model Tree. and a horizontal increment of [5.18 Fundament als of Des ign .0] as shown in the following figure. 3. > 2. . For University Use Only . 2. In the FEATURES area of the GROUP HEAD dialog box.0]. Figure 28: Reconstructing the Model Task 7. 1. Click > and read the prompt. 1. 1.

and notice now groups can be repositioned individually. Notice that the change affects all groups. Figure 30: Modifying Radius 6. Click Regenerate .NOTES Figure 29: Modifying Dimensions 4. Click Feature > Delete and select the hole.Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7. then Regenerate .Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r.19 . Figure 31: Deleting Hole Feature For University Use Only . Modify the radius on the round as shown in the following figure. as shown in the following figure. 5.

Task 8. Select the groups. Modify the radius value as shown in the following figure. Click > . Figure 33: Deleted Holes 3. Figure 32: Selecting Groups to Ungroup 2. Click > . Click Feature > Group > Ungroup .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 7. Delete the holes from the groups just selected. For University Use Only . Notice the deletion of the feature forced the deletion of the group. Notice you can now delete individual features from the groups. 1. as shown in the following figure.20 Fundament als of Des ign . 8. Delete the group in the upper left corner using the Model Tree.NOTES 7. then Regenerate . Investigate the UnGroup option.

0] and regenerate. Notice now independent feature modifications are possible. Select the two protrusions without holes and click . Notice that the dimension values are still linked after being unpatterned and ungrouped. Select the 2. as shown in the following figure. 4. Select the protrusion (not the draft). Investigate the Make Independent option.Commercial Use Prohibited Local G roup s and U se r. Task 9. 1. > > For University Use Only . 3.NOTES Figure 34: Modifying Radius Value 4.0 height dimension. Figure 35: Selecting Protrusion 2. and read the prompt.21 . Click Modify > Make Indep > Dimension .Defi ned F eatu re s Pag e 7. Modify the height of the two protrusions previously selected to [3.

NOTES

Figure 36: Protrusions with Modified Height

5. Save the model and close the window.

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NOTES

EXERCISE 3: Creating UDFs
Task 1. Create a UDF from the end spline of the axle.

1. Open AXEL_END.PRT.

Figure 37

2. Click Feature > UDF Library > Create. 3. Type [SPLINE_END] as the name and click Subordinate > Done . 4. Select the features shown in the following figure.

Figure 38: UDF Features Highlighted in Model Tree

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NOTES

5. Click Done > Done /Return . Task 2. Provide prompts for each reference that was used to create these features. 1. Read the message in the Message Area. Notice the highlighted edge in the model. Type [end edge] as the prompt and click .

2. For the axis, click Single > Done/Return , and type [main axis] and click .

3. For the datum plane, type [datum plane along axis] and click .

4. For the surface, click Single > Done /Return . Type [end
surface] click

.

6. For the next reference. Type [cylindrical surface] and click . 7. Review your prompts using the Next and Previous options. If necessary, correct any of the prompts, using Enter Prompt. When all prompts are correct, click Done/Return . Task 3. Define the optional elements for the UDF to make it more flexible for future use. Make the depth of the spline cuts and the hole depth option variable. 1. Click Var Dims > Define .

Figure 39

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NOTES

2. Select the 1.25 dimension defining the length of the cuts. Click Done/Return > Done/Return . 3. Specify a prompt for this dimension. Type [spline length]. 4. Define a variable element. Click Var Elements > Define . 5. Specify the feature for which to define variable elements. Select the hole and click All > Done. 6. Click Done Sel > OK . The system creates the SPLINE_END.GPH file on the hard drive. 7. Save the model and close the window.

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NOTES

EXERCISE 4: Placing UDFs
Task 1. Place the SPLINE_END UDF on the ends of the axle part.

1. Open the AXEL.PRT and click The generic > Open .

Figure 40

2. Click Feature > Create > User Defined . 3. Select the SPLINE_END.GPH file and click Open . 4. Notice that the system automatically retrieves the AXLE_END model in a subwindow. 5. Relocate the AXLE_END window such that you can read the messages in the main window. Also reposition/reorient the AXLE part such that you can clearly view all the features. Note:
According to this design intent scenario, place the UDF so it is independent from the original.

6. Click Independent > Done > Same Dims > Done . 7. Type [1.00] as the spline length.

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NOTES

Note:
According to this design intent scenario, you should not be able to modify the dimensions easily after placement, but you should still be able to view them.

8. Click Read Only > Done to make all other dimensions visible but not modifiable. Task 2. One by one, specify appropriate references on the axle part

1. Select the End Edge as shown in the following figure.

Figure 41

2. Select the Main Axis as shown in the following figure.

Figure 42

3. Select the Datum Plane Along Axis as shown in the following figure.

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NOTES

Figure 43

4. Select the End Surface as shown in the following figure.

Figure 44

5. Select the Cylindrical Surface as shown in the following figure.

Figure 45

6. Click Ok > Ok to accept the arrow directions. 7. Since you selected the hole to have variable elements, the system allows you to change it. Select Depth One and change it to Variable . 8. Type [0.75] as the depth and click
> Done .

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NOTES

Figure 46: Finished UDF on Axle

Task 3.

Attempt to modify the placed UDF.

1. Try to modify the cuts creating the spline end. Notice that all of the dimensions highlight. Select the dimensions for the width of each cut. Notice that this is a read-only dimension, so you cannot modify it. Task 4. Add another independent UDF to the other end of the axle part, as shown in the following figure. 1. Use the same options as you did for the first UDF. 2. Make sure that you select the lower edge and flip both datum plane arrows to match the correct orientation of the UDF on this end of the model.

Figure 47: Finished Axle

3. Save the models, close all windows, and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .

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NOTES

OPTIONAL EXCERCISE
The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal.

OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Adding the Splined UDF to the Hub
Task 1. Place the UDF on the hub part.

1. Open the R_HUB.PRT.

Figure 48

2. Click Feature > Create > User Defined . 3. Select the SPLINE_END UDF and click Open. Note:
According to this design intent scenario, place the UDF so it can be updated from the original.

4. Click UDF Driven > Done > Same Dims > Done . 5. Type [0.5] as the spline length. Note:
According to this design intent scenario, you should not show the dimensions in the model.

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NOTES

6. Click Blank > Done for the other dimensions. Task 2. hub. Follow the prompts and select appropriate references on the

1. Select references appropriately. Refer to the following figures.

Figure 49: End Edge and Main Axis

Figure 50: Datum Plane Along Axis and End Surface

Figure 51: Cylindrical Surface.

2. Complete the UDF using the Hole defaults.

Figure 52: Finished Hub

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NOTES

Task 3.

Investigate Blanked dimensions

1. Modify the placed UDF. Notice that the only dimension that displays is the overall length because you blanked the other dimensions.

Figure 53: Blanked Dimensions

Task 4. Change the UDF file and observe how it affects the UDF-driven spline end in the hub, but does not affect the independent spline end in the axle. 1. Open AXLE_END.PRT. 2. Modify the width of one of the cuts from 0.2 to 0.1 and regenerate.

Figure 54: Change Width of Cut in AXLE_END.PRT

3. Activate the R_HUB.PRT window. 4. Click Feature > Group > Update > Done/Return > Done .

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NOTES

5. Regenerate the model to see the changes.

Figure 55: Updated Hub

Task 5. Try to make the same modification to the axle part that you made to the UDF earlier. 1. Open the AXLE.PRT and click The generic > Open . 2. Click Feature > Group . Notice that Update is unavailable. Because Independent was chosen for the UDF. Therefore, it is not associated with the SPLINE_END UDF file. 3. Save the models, close all windows, and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .

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NOTES

MODULE SUMMARY
In this module you have learned: • • • • • • • How to create local groups. How to manipulate groups. How to reuse data. How to work on multiple features as if they were one. How to break the dependency of features within groups. How to create user defined features (UDF). How to place UDF’s on new models.

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Module Advanced Assembly Tools In this module you learn different ways to manipulate assemblies. Create exploded assembly views. Repeat component placement. you will be able to: • • • • • Modify subassemblies.For University Use Only . Page 8-1 . You do this by modifying subassemblies and components. Reposition and add components. Replace components.Commercial Use Prohibited . Objectives After completing this module.

repositioning or replacing components. and creating exploded views. You must perform operations on components within the subassembly to which they belong. You can also restructure to a new subassembly by using Component > Create > SubAssy .2 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 1: Restructuring an Assembly For University Use Only . and replace components without displaying the subassembly in its own window. Restructuring Subassemblies Using the Restructure option. assemble. you can use the Mod SubAsm option to redefine. delete. However.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. it applies component operations to the entire subassembly. Modifying Subassemblies Because Pro/ENGINEER assembles a subassembly into the current assembly as a single component. you can easily move assembly components from one level to another. from the top-level assembly to a lower subassembly.NOTES MODIFYING ASSEMBLIES Once you have created an assembly. you can manipulate it by modifying its subassemblies. for example.

and the extent to which you want to control the component after making the change. The method that you use depends on the type of change that you make. • Using Pro/PROGRAM –Using the PRO/PROGRAM functionality. resulting in external references.NOTES Note: When restructuring a component. These references should be redefined to avoid possible component placement failure. For University Use Only . Repositioning Components Using various methods. • Using the package move functionality – By packaging. • • Redefining or rerouting components – This can be used to assemble a component into a different position. To create angle dimensions.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. you can drag a component to a new position and automatically add offsets while moving it. you can set up the system so that it prompts you automatically for the values of component dimensions. Although it assembles the part in a new level or subassembly. you can use the Mate Offset or Align Offset placement constraints.3 . it maintains the original assembly references. you can reposition components after constraining them. • • – You can use skeletons to represent the framework of a moving assembly. you can create a datum and use the Angle option when assembling. Using offset constraints – To translate a component to a different position. Using assembly skeletons Temporarily translating or rotating a component – You can temporarily translate and/or rotate a component away from its placement position—with respect to the axis of an assembly coordinate system—without changing the component’s constraints. the system sometimes requires you to reselect its assembly references to reference geometry in the desired level of the assembly.

both pin instances below have the same ‘head’ feature (required for Mate constraint) and also the hole (used for a child clevis pin component). the system places the new component in the same order in which it assembled the original component. and each instance contains the required references. Figure 2: Instances of the Pin For University Use Only . For example. • • • Manually By New Copy By Shrinkwrap Replace By Family Table Member Instances of a family table are automatically interchangeable as long as they were created from the same generic instance. If you simply deleted the component and assembled a new one. You can use the following tools to replace components within an assembly. you can remove one component from an assembly and replace it with a different one without deleting the component and reassembling.4 Fundament als of Des ign . you would have to reorder the new component to return it to its original place. The system can also replace with child components if those references are available as well.NOTES Replacing Components Using Adv Utils > Replace .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. • • • By Family Table Member By Interchange Assembly By Layout Note: When replacing a component.

Replace By Interchange Assembly An Interchange Assembly is a special type of assembly that can contain two types of components: • • Simplify Components Functional Components Both types allow components to be interchanged with other compatible members of the interchange assembly. Use this method to change the configuration of the model rather than to simplify the model.NOTES Note: When using any of the replacement methods. Uses reference tags between components for assembly or child references. The interchange assembly can be saved and used repeatedly.5 . if the replaced component has child components assembled to it. Functional Components • Used with the component advanced utilities Replace functionality. Simplify Components • Used with Simplified Reps for Substitution. you can set up functional interchangeability between two or more independently modeled parts or assemblies. Allows functionally equivalent components to be easily exchanged in an assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. • • • For University Use Only . you may have to replace the children’s missing references by redefining or rerouting them to the new component.

the components may be interchanged. you can use placement constraints or packaging techniques to place the new component as you would in a normal assembly.6 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . Replace Manually Using Replace Component > Manual .NOTES Figure 3: An Interchange Assembly with Functional Components Figure 4: Using an Interchange Assembly Replace By Layout If adequate global datum references have been established between two or more components and a Layout.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.

Repeating Component Placement You have the ability to repeat the placement constraints of a component to place additional instances of the same component into an assembly. This new component is an independent copy of the entire original model and is given a name during the replace process.7 .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. This reduces the number of selections required since you do not have to reselect all of the references on the component that you are placing. For University Use Only . you can generate a default explode state for an assembly. Figure 5: Repeated Placement of Bolt Creating Exploded Views Using View > Explode . Exploding an assembly affects only the display of the assembly—the system does not alter actual distances between components. Replace By Shrinkwrap Allows you to select a component that contains a shrinkwrap of the component to be replaced.NOTES Replace By New Copy This option will replace the selected component with a new component. such as a common mating plane. The system also allows you to skip redundant references.

as shown in the following figure.8 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 7: Setting Explode Positions For University Use Only . offset lines may be added between components. In addition. you can use Modify > Mod Expld to generate one or multiple exploded states. To modify the exploded positions.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Within each exploded state you can drag components into a desired position using the EXPLODE POSITION dialog box.NOTES Figure 6: Exploded Assembly View The default explode may or may not explode your assembly as desired.

NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you manipulate components in an assembly. Table 1: Advanced Assembly Tools Icons Icons Description Fix to current position Assemble at default placement Change orientation of constraint Preferences Remove selected constraint Specify new constraint Show component in assembly window Show component in separate window For University Use Only . In Exercise 3. you restructure a component in an assembly rather than deleting and reassembling it. In Exercise 2. you create an interchange assembly of components that have the same function in an assembly but are physically different. you demonstrate how to quickly assemble the same component numerous times using the Repeat option.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.9 . Method In Exercise 1.

NOTES EXERCISE 1: Restructuring the Carburetor Task 1. 1.ASM. 2.10 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 9 For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. View the structure of all of the components in the Model Tree as shown in the following figure. Investigate the top-level assembly. Open CARB_RESTRUCT. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Figure 8: The Carburetor Assembly 3.

Task 2. Click Done . notice that the VALVE. In the MODEL TREE. click Restructure . For University Use Only . Select the VALVE. In the ASSEMBLY menu. 1. Figure 10 3.PRT is now part of the VALVE. Notice the assembly and the subassembly structure. The valve part is in the shaft subassembly.NOTES 4. Select VALVE. This marks the component as moving. Also notice that the VALVE is the part of the SHAFT subassembly. 2.PRT. Change the level at which the valve part was placed.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.11 . which would make the valve shaft physically impossible to assemble into the housing part.ASM.ASM as the target. Figure 11: The Valve Moved into the Valve Assembly 4.

but displays the handle in its last known position. Determine if the subassembly has any problems. Save the assembly. Select SHAFT. 1. Move the handle part into the shaft assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. 2. Select the HANDLE. close all windows and click File > Erase Not 3. 1.ASM as the target. Click Restructure. Notice that the assembly fails to regenerate the handle placement.12 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 13 For University Use Only . Displayed.NOTES Task 3. The handle could be assembled to the shaft before assembling to the valve. The Model Tree should display as shown in the following figure. Figure 12: Moving the Handle 2.PRT from the Model Tree. Task 4. Click Done.ASM. Open SHAFT.

1. Replace the missing references with surfaces on ARM1. click Done . The component should display in a subwindow as shown in the following figure. With Placement checked. Click Confirm .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Figure 15 For University Use Only . 5. In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box notice that the assembly references are missing. Figure 14 Task 5. In the RESOLVE FEAT menu.NOTES 2. 3.PRT. click Quick Fix > Redefine > Confirm. Read the prompt. Click and . 4.13 . In the dialogue box.

0] offset. Select the flat circular surfaces on the ARM1. Figure 17 4.PRT as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . Figure 16 3. and select Coincident from the drop down list.PRT and the HANDLE. Click to accept the [0.0 Offset for the Mate constraint.PRT. Select the cylindrical surfaces of the ARM1. as shown in the following figure. This creates a Mate constraint. This creates an Insert constraint.14 Fundament als of Des ign . 5.NOTES 2.PRT and HANDLE. Select the 0.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.

Click Yes to resume the assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.15 . For University Use Only . Figure 19 8. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed. 7. close the window. Click OK to finalize the component placement. Save the model.NOTES Figure 18 6.

Task 2. Attempt to replace the DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW. 1. Click Component > Add .ASM so you can replace the disk brake and preserve the parent/child relationships. Select DISK_BRAKE_SOLID PRT and click Open . Click Quit > Quit Del/Sup . Create a new interchange assembly called DISKS. Select DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW. For University Use Only . Type [DISKS] as the name and click OK . 4.PRT by deleting it from the assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Replacing the Brake Hub Assembly Components Task 1. 3. Select DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW. Notice that the system highlights a BRAKE_CALIPER because it is a child of the disk. 3. 5. 1.PRT. 6.ASM. Click Add > Functional Component > OK . Click File > New > Assembly > Interchange . 2. Click Window > Close.16 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Component > Delete . Figure 20 2. Open BRAKE_HUB.PRT and click Open . 4.

Figure 22: AutoTag Creation Dialog Box Tips and Techniques: You can control the orientation of the model shown in the AutoTag Creation dialog box using the mouse. Click OK > Done/Return . Read the prompt.17 . Select the BRAKE_HUB. Click Reference Tag > Auto Tag . 3.ASM and click Open. Select the DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW from the Model Tree. Task 3. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.NOTES Figure 21 7. set up the equivalent references on the components using tags. determine the references that the hollow disk has in the brake hub assembly 1. Through the interchange assembly. 2. First.

NOTES Task 4. The dialog box should display as shown in the following figure. For the highlighted surface. type [ALIGN_AXIS] as the name and press <ENTER>. Figure 24 For University Use Only .18 Fundament als of Des ign . Click OK . Figure 23: Specifying the Tags 3. 2. Define tag names.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. The Tag names appear in the Reference Tags dialog. 1. For the highlighted axis. type [MATE_SURFACE] as the tag name and press <ENTER>.

Click to display Datum Axes. 1. Select the MATE_SURFACE and DISK_BRAKE_SOLID as shown in the following figure. 1. Assign the Mate Surface tag to the corresponding geometry on the solid disk to make it interchangeable.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. For University Use Only .NOTES Task 5. Figure 26: Creating Reference Tags Task 6. Notice that the back surface of DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW is highlighted. Use Query Select to select the equivalent back surface on DISK_BRAKE_SOLID as shown in the following figure.19 . Figure 25 2. Assign the Align Axis tag to the corresponding geometry on the solid disk to make it interchangeable.

Select ALIGN_AXIS and DISK_BRAKE_SOLID as shown in the following figure. Click OK . Task 7. Select the equivalent axis DISK_BRAKE_SOLID as shown in the following figure.ASM. Automatically replace the hollow disk with the solid disk.NOTES 2. For University Use Only . Notice that A_1 on the DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW is highlighted.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Open BRAKE_HUB. 6. Figure 27 3. Notice that the entries under ALL TAGS list now indicate Y. Save the assembly and close the window. 4. 5. 1.20 Fundament als of Des ign . signifying that you have defined all of the reference tags.

1.PRT. Click Component > Adv Utils > Replace and select DISK_BRAKE_HOLLOW. Task 8. For University Use Only . 5.ASM and click The generic > Open. Replace components in the wheel assembly using the family table definitions associated with it. Open the WHEEL_GENERIC. Save the assembly and close the window.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Click Apply > Done . 3. Figure 29: The Replaced Disk 6.PRT. 4.NOTES Figure 28 2. Click OK . Expand the tree and select DISK_BRAKE_SOLID. Click By Interchange Assembly > Browse .21 .

22 Fundament als of Des ign . Save the model. Replace the rim with another instance. Click OK > Apply > Done . For University Use Only . Click By Family Table Member > Browse .PRT from the Model Tree.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Select the 12X6-STYLE_C instance.NOTES Figure 30: WHEEL_GENERIC. 3. 6. Figure 31 5.ASM 2. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed. close the window. 4. Click Component > Adv Utils > Replace and select RIM_GENERIC.

Select the two surfaces shown below.PRT to a hole in the INTAKE.ASM. 1. This creates an Insert constraint.ASM. Figure 32: 2. Start by assembling the BOLT. Select the BOLT. Figure 33 For University Use Only .NOTES EXERCISE 3: Repeating Components Task 1. Open INTAKE.PRT and click Open . 3.23 .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Click Component > Assemble .

Click Add. Figure 36 3. Read the prompt. 2. For University Use Only . 1. Click Component > Adv Utls > Repeat . Click Ok. Select Insert and Mate from the dialog box as shown in the following figure. Figure 34 5. This creates a Mate Coincident constraint.NOTES 4. Use Repeat to place another bolt.PRT.24 Fundament als of Des ign . Select BOLT. Select the two surfaces shown below.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Figure 35 Task 2. .

Read the prompt and then select the surface shown below. Figure 39 For University Use Only .NOTES 4. Figure 38 6. Figure 37 5. Select the cylindrical surface shown below.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.25 . Notice the assembled bolt as shown in the following figure.

Select another corresponding cylindrical and mating surface as shown in the following figure. 9. For University Use Only . and click File > Erase > Not Displayed.NOTES 7. Note: The repeated bolts are completely independent to one another.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Click Confirm . Figure 40 8. Save the model.26 Fundament als of Des ign . close the window. 10. Continue to place bolts into all of the holes.

Select the ARM_EXP and click > Delete > Ok . 4. 3. Select Arm. Notice the component zooms in and out of the screen.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal.27 . Notice this rotates only the component.ASM. 1. Open the assembly and experiment with dynamic repositioning. Press and hold <CTRL> + <ALT> and click and drag the mouse. Click Component > Assemble. Open VALVE_EXP.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. For University Use Only .prt and click Open . Figure 41: 2. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Exploded Views and Dynamic Repositioning Task 1. Press and hold <CTRL> + <ALT> and click and drag the mouse. 5.

Task 2. as shown in the following figure. 1.28 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES 6. and select the two surfaces. Figure 43: Selecting Surfaces 3. Fully constrain the component.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Notice this pans only the component in the plane of the screen. press and hold <CTRL> + <ALT>. Figure 42: Positioning Component 2. Click and then while dragging the mouse. For University Use Only . Again. Maintain the default Automatic constraint. Notice that the component is partially constrained. Press and hold <CTRL> + <ALT> and drag the mouse. Position the component approximately as shown in the following figure.

Notice that is snaps to available surfaces. 7.29 . For University Use Only . Figure 44: Selecting Surfaces for Automatic Constraint 6. and select the surface as shown in the following figure. Notice the system has interpreted this as a Mate constraint. Position the arm as shown in the following figure using the mouse. and . Figure 45 8.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Click > Snap Options > Activate Snapping > Close.NOTES 4. Click 5. 9. Test the degrees of freedom of the component with <CTRL> <ALT> and . Click <CTRL> + <ALT> + . Drag the component up and down without releasing any keys. Snap the Arm as shown below and release all keys.

Activate the default exploded state. Notice that the arm reoriented itself to a default position. and click OK . 13. Figure 47: Unhelpful Exploded View For University Use Only . 1. > [Fix to current position]. and clear the Allow Assumptions check box. Click OK . Position the arm again. Notice the arm is now 14. Redefine the arm. 11. Click fully constrained. Click View > Explode . 12.NOTES Figure 46: Positioning Component 10.30 Fundament als of Des ign . Task 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.

Set the Motion Reference to Plane Normal . Figure 48: Selecting Surface 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Reposition as shown in the following figure. Create a custom exploded state. Click Explode State > Create . 2. Figure 49: Repositioning 5. Notice that this exploded state is likely not desirable. Select the surface as shown in the following figure. 3. Set the Motion Increment to 10 and select the Cover. For University Use Only . 1. Type [Explode_all]. Click View > Unexplode . Maintain the default Motion Type of Translate .NOTES 2.31 . Task 4. 3. Select the Arm and reposition as shown in the following figure. 6.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. 10. Select the surface shown in the following figure. Figure 51: Selecting Surface after Setting Motion Reference 9. Click anywhere in the window and reposition as shown in the following figure. and Shaft followed by .32 Fundament als of Des ign . 8. Set the Motion Reference to Plane Normal .NOTES Figure 50: Repositioning after Setting Motion Increment 7. For University Use Only . Cover . Select the Arm . Click Preferences > Move Many > Close .

Select the surface shown in the following figure. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8.33 . as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 52: Repositioning 11. Reposition the VALVE_PLATE. Figure 53: Selecting Surface after Setting Motion Reference 12. Set the Motion Reference to Plane Normal .

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.NOTES Figure 54: Repositioning the Valve Plate 13. Use the edge shown in the following figure as a reference. Reposition the Arm. Figure 55: Selecting Edge For University Use Only .34 Fundament als of Des ign .

as shown 2. Toggle in the following figure. 1. For University Use Only . to display datum axes and select the two axes.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. Click OK > Offset Lines > Create . Use a combination of the Axis and Surface Norm options for the last offset line. Repeat for other axes. Finish the explode state with offset lines. Figure 57: Selecting Other Axes 4. Figure 56: Selecting Two Axes 3.35 .NOTES Task 5.

Click View > Unexplode . 1.36 Fundament als of Des ign . Create the explode state named EXP_SUB_ASSY. as shown in the following figure. Return to the main menu to complete the explode state.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8. Create another exploded state. 2. Task 6. Figure 59: Creating an New Explode State For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 58: Using a Combination for the Last Offset Line 5.

For University Use Only . 4. Save the model.Commercial Use Prohibited Adva nced A ssemb ly Tools Pag e 8. close the window. Use View > Explode and View > Unexplode to toggle between the unexploded view and the last used explode state.NOTES 3. Use Explode State > Set Current to toggle between the three exploded states. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed.37 . 5.

How to use the repeat functionality to rapidly place components into an assembly without establishing unwanted dependencies. For University Use Only . How to create and use interchange assemblies to replace components in an assembly.38 Fundament als of Des ign . How to replace components using family table instances. you have learned: • • • • How to restructure assembly components without deleting them.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 8.

and regeneration time for large assemblies and parts. Objectives After completing this module. Create Shrinkwraps in part and assembly mode. Use substitution in Simplified Reps. Create Simplified Representations with Shrinkwraps. repaint. Page 9-1 .For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - Module Simplified Representations & Shrinkwrap In this module you learn how to use Simplified representations to reduce retrieval. you will be able to: • • • • Create Simplified Representations of parts and assemblies.

visible. including all of its members and their detail. You can omit components. Mass property calculations and measurements may be performed. Automatically manage the children of components that you substitute or remove. For Part models. you can control which features are displayed. For assemblies. unlike the suppression functionality. Individual features can be selected and redefined. the Master Rep always reflects the full assembly. and substitute less complicated versions of components. you can control which components the system retrieves into session. use different reps of particular components. Master Rep Figure 1: Master Rep of an Assembly (Shown Exploded) For University Use Only . and also create work-region (cutaway) representations. Simplified Reps: • • • Increase machine efficiency when working with complex models or large assemblies. Can tailor your model for a particular task not requiring all components or features. and available for selection or referencing.NOTES SIMPLIFIED REPRESENTATIONS Simplified Representations (Simplified Reps) are the primary large assembly management tool in Pro/ENGINEER. and to what level components are retrieved. Simplified Representation Types • – Model geometry is solid.2 Fundament als of Des ign . Equivalent to the default state of a model before Simplified Rep creation.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.

with the following options: ½ ½ ½ ½ Wireframe – Model will be displayed in wireframe. and available for selection or referencing. visible. – Shading with least detail. Although visually identical. so individual features can not be selected or viewed in the model tree. Mass property calculations and measurements may be performed. Shading High Shading Med Shading Low ½ Shading LOD – Shading is dependent on the performance setting Levels of Detail. – Shading with full detail. Figure 3: Graphics Rep Shown in Wireframe For University Use Only . Geometry Rep Figure 2: Geometry Rep of an Assembly (Shown Unexploded) • Graphics Rep – Model geometry is not solid or available for selection. The model is treated as one combined solid instead of individual features.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Geometry Reps regenerate and display faster than Master Reps. – Shading with medium detail. and mass property calculations and measurements may not be performed.3 . Graphics Reps are significantly faster than Geometry Reps.NOTES • – Model geometry is solid. Visibility of Graphics Reps is dependant on the config option save_model_display when the model is saved.

4 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES • Exclude – Model(s) can be excluded from current Simplified Rep. and are not displayed or regenerated.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Figure 4: Excluded Gear Models • Substitute – Model(s) can be substituted with simplified versions Figure 5: Substituted Brake Disk Assembly For University Use Only .

½ The Open Rep option in the Open dialog box will allow you to open an existing Simplified Rep. This allows different components to be placed into various Rep levels. or Graphics Rep. excluded models must be erased from RAM to improve performance. depending on their relevance to the task at hand.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. • On-the-fly during retrieval of the assembly. Specifying the Default Rule The default rule for a Simplified Rep determines how the system will initially classify all components. only to remove some components from RAM after implementing a Simplified Rep. ½ Once the Rep is created.NOTES CREATING SIMPLIFIED REPS You can create Simplified reps in an assembly: • After retrieving the entire assembly. Figure 6: Open Rep Dialog Box Creating Customized Representations Instead of opening all components in an assembly as a Master.5 . The following four options are available: • Master • Geometry • Graphics • Exclude For University Use Only . This eliminates the need to open the entire assembly. or create a new one before the assembly is retrieved. you can define your own customized Rep. and cannot be redefined. Geometry.

Does not include the component in the Rep. Substitutes the component with representative geometry. – Select models active in another Rep.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Exclude – Graphics Rep – Geometry Rep – Default – Returns the component to the Rep level defined by the default rule. Includes the component in its Geometry Rep. By Rule By Rep By Envelope – Selects components Used with Substitute only.NOTES Defining Action for Components Once you have created a Simplified Rep and set the default rule. Substitute – Selecting Components There are several available selection tools: • • • • • • Pick Mdl All – Select the model(s) from the screen or Model Tree. From/To – Select two models or features in the model tree to select all those in between. – Setup a rule for component selection. For University Use Only . you can define one of the following actions for each component to be selected.6 Fundament als of Des ign . Includes the component in its Graphics Rep. • • • • • • Master – Includes component in its Master Rep. – Select all components. belonging to a defined Envelope.

to more efficiently select desired components. The system does not re-evaluate them when it retrieves the Simplified Rep or regenerates the assembly.NOTES Creating Rules Definition Rules Using the Definition Rules option allows you to create rules that can dynamically update a Simplified Rep as assembly components are added or modified. Selection Rules are intended to be used to select components for the original definition of the Rep. Figure 7 For University Use Only . Definition Rules are based on the same rule options as Selection Rules Selection Rules You can establish selection rules using the By Rule dialog box.7 .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9.

8 Fundament als of Des ign . Distance Size – Selects components based on their model size—the diagonal measurement of the smallest bounding box that could hold the part.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Zone Figure 8: Selecting Using Zone • • – Selects components located within a spherical region from a point defined by a radius. Figure 9: Model Size Option For University Use Only . Zones can be used to select components on one side of a plane. within an enclosed surface.NOTES Selection Rules Geometric • – Components are located within a predefined zone. or within a specified distance from an entity.

– Setup a rule for component selection. Used with Substitute only. • • Envelopes typically replace a number of components or subassemblies with simplified. Comp Type • – Can be used to select all skeleton models. – Create logic statement(s) based on model parameters. Several options and filter settings are available. By Envelope – Selects components belonging to a predefined Envelope. SUBSTITUTING COMPONENTS Model can be substituted (exchanged) with a simpler. For University Use Only . Parent / Child • Used to select all parents of children of selected component.00 AND Vendor = Boston Gear. Substitution using Envelopes An Envelope is a special part that you can create in the context of an assembly specifically for use with the Substitute option when creating a Simplified Rep.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Wildcards can be used to select multiple similar names. For example. You must designate the parameters and save the model to use this option.9 . as well as some simplified geometry to represent the substituted parts. Properties • • Model Name such as *or ? Expression – Selects components based on their names. representative geometry. representative model or subassembly. all items with Cost > 12.NOTES • Exterior Comps – Select components that contribute to the external shape of the assembly. The system preserves the references of the replaced component to allow you to work on the assembly in the future. The envelope part itself contains a list of all components that it replaces. Selecting Components for Substitution • • • Pick Mdl By Rule – Select the model(s) from the screen or Model Tree.

Envelopes offer the following substitution advantages: ½ One envelope can replace many components. Note: You can only use an envelope in the assembly in which you created it. Envelope Methods There are several methods that can be used to create envelope geometry: Figure 10 Create Envelope Part This option allows you to manually create and assemble a part model into the assembly.NOTES • • Components can be selected to be included in the envelope manually. ½ An envelope can cross over the boundaries of a subassembly to include components not included in that subassembly.10 Fundament als of Des ign . Geometry such as solids or surfaces can be created manually in the context of the assembly to represent multiple components. or by using a selection rule.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. For University Use Only . ½ The system stores envelope geometry in a separate part file so that you can make changes and assign mass properties in Part mode.

Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. and could contain solid features or surface features such as a Shrinkwrap. Surface Subset Shrinkwrap This option creates an envelope part using a surface Shrinkwrap.NOTES Figure 11: Using a Manually Created Envelope Select Existing Assembly Component With this option. which is automatically created and engulfs selected envelope component(s).11 . Typically. an existing component in the assembly is selected and used for envelope geometry. the component would have been created specifically for use as an envelope. Small surfaces are left out using lower quality values. Figure 12: Original Cylinder Head Model For University Use Only .

Small surfaces are passed over using lower quality values. Original Cylinder Head Figure 14 Envelope Using Faceted Solid For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 13: Envelope using Shrinkwrap Surface Subset Faceted Solid Shrinkwrap Creates an envelope part using a faced solid shrinkwrap. which is automatically created and engulfs selected envelope component(s).12 Fundament als of Des ign .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.

NOTES Other Substitution Options Besides Envelopes. For University Use Only . The Simplify Component is assembled directly on the component(s) it is to substitute for. The ‘simplified’ instance must support any assembly references used in the original model. there are other Substitution options available: Figure 15 By Family Table Member A family table instance may be used for substitution. A component is placed or created in the interchange assembly that represents a simplified version of a part or assembly. By Interchange Assembly A special type of assembly that can contain two types of components: Simplify Component • • • • Used with Simplified Reps for Substitution.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. For example. The Simplify Component can be assigned the mass properties of the component(s) it is to substitute for. instances of components or subassemblies with a reduced number of features or components can be substituted for the more complex instance.13 .

Uses reference tags between components for assembly or child references. Use this method to change the configuration of the model rather than to simplify the model. you can substitute it into the Simplified Rep of a higher level assembly. By Simplified Rep This option allows you to select pre-defined Simplified reps from a part or assembly. Allows functionally equivalent components to be easily exchanged in an assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.14 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . and use them for substitution in the Simplified Rep of a higher level assembly.NOTES Original Subassembly Simplify Component Figure 16 Interchange Assembly Original Assembly Simplify Interchange Component Substituted Figure 17 Functional Component • • • • Used with the component advanced utilities Replace functionality. Assembly Simplified Reps If you create a Simplified Rep in a subassembly.

15 .NOTES Figure 18: Substituted Rep Part Simplified Reps Simplified reps can be created at the part level to aid in the creation of complex models. retrieval time increases for part level reps.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. As a result. Create Work-Region cutaways. For University Use Only . Selecting surfaces to be copied into the Rep. They will be available for selection during substitution while creating an assembly Simplified Rep. Part Simplified reps offer the following capabilities: • • • Including / Excluding features without affecting parent/child relationships. the system automatically regenerates the Master Rep of that part and then the part Simplified Rep. Figure 19: Part-level Simplified Rep Substituted in an Assembly Considerations with Part Simplified Reps • When you retrieve a part Simplified Rep or an assembly that uses a part Simplified Rep.

Creates accurate representations. Provides representations of designs to suppliers and customers.16 Fundament als of Des ign . • SHRINKWRAP Shrinkwrap Capabilities A Shrinkwrap: • • • • • Provides an extremely ‘lightweight’ method for representing components or entire assemblies. while protecting proprietary design information. including: ½ ½ Surface appearance and colors.xpr ) that contains model information. Less hardware resources needed to work with data sets. • Reduces data size by 70-90% resulting in: ½ ½ ½ Less time to retrieve data sets for visualization. ½ Space claims for range of component motion using Mechanism. you can create an accelerator file (. allowing you to directly retrieve the part level Simplified Rep without first regenerating the part’s master Rep. they are best used to aid modeling of complex part models outside of the context of an assembly. Less time needed to transfer data over networks. Can be used inside of Simplified reps. Allows for distribution of complex design information. For University Use Only . Mass properties. To decrease retrieval time with part level reps.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.NOTES • Since part level reps will allow you to Exclude features without affecting parent child relationships. and not as a large assembly management technique in Simplified reps.

Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. The amount of surfaces included is dependent on the quality setting and other options. This creates a new part model which is a shrinkwrap of the model or assembly in the active window. – Creates a faceted solid that is representative of the original solid.NOTES SHRINKWRAP TYPES There are two types of Shrinkwrap: • • Exported Shrinkwrap models. Faceted Solid Exported Shrinkwrap Dialogs Other options for exported shrinkwrap models are managed in the following dialog boxes. and are non-associative. Exported Shrinkwrap Models Exported shrinkwrap models are created through the Save a Copy menu. Merged Solid • • – (Assemblies only) Merges part models in an assembly together to form one solid part. How closely the faceted solid maps to the original geometry is dependent on the quality setting and other options. Associative Shrinkwrap features. The type of geometry created in the shrinkwrap depends on the creation method used: • Surface Subset – Creates a non-parametric surface model. For University Use Only .17 .

NOTES Figure 20: Options for Exported Shrinkwrap For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.18 Fundament als of Des ign .

NOTES Shrinkwrap Examples Surface Subset Figure 21: Original Transmission: File Size 147MB Figure 22: Surface Subset: File Size 23MB For University Use Only .19 .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9.

NOTES Merged Solid Figure 23: Original Engine: File Size 591MB Figure 24: Merged Solid: File Size 18MB For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.20 Fundament als of Des ign .

Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9.21 .NOTES Faceted Solid Figure 25: Original Transmission: File Size 147MB Figure 26: Faceted Solid: File Size 17MB For University Use Only .

or ½ Available as an assembly level feature. Promote data sharing and reuse in other assemblies.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. a part level feature of a component in the context of an assembly or in an individual part model. For University Use Only .NOTES Associative Shrinkwrap Features • • • • • Are created in a new or existing component or assembly. ½ Uses geometry from a set of components in the current assembly as a source. Are accessed through the Data Sharing menu. or a part level feature of a component in the context of an assembly. • External Shrinkwrap – Created using the ExtShrinkwrap Shrinkwrap from Other Model option. since they can be parametrically updated to reflect changes made in the source geometry.22 Fundament als of Des ign . Are associative. Creating Associative Shrinkwrap Features • Attributes – Quality level (1-10) and options for filling / ignoring surfaces. Associative Shrinkwrap Feature Types • Internal Shrinkwrap – Created using the Shrinkwrap option. ½ Locates the source geometry by coordinate system. ½ Available as an assembly level feature. Only have the Surface Subset method of creation. ½ Uses geometry from any selected or retrieved model as a source.

Include Datums shrinkwrap. then select ½ components specified in Component Subset. accounting for major changes such as addition / removal of components. Select and Shrinkwrap – Select components specified in ½ Component Subset. Using Update Shrinkwrap on the shrinkwrap feature – This will allow the shrinkwrap to recalculate itself. Geom Dependency Externalize – Converts the shrinkwrap to External. then create shrinkwrap. • • • • Additional Srfs – Select additional surfaces to be included in – Select additional datum features to be included in shrinkwrap. For University Use Only . Subset Handling Shrinkwrap and Select – Create shrinkwrap. – Allows you to toggle the shrinkwrap from Dependent to Independent and back. Updating Associative Shrinkwrap Features There are two ways to update a shrinkwrap: • • Regenerating the model(s) – This will effectively update the shrinkwrap for most dimensional and other moderate changes.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9.23 . – Order of operations for creating shrinkwrap.NOTES Figure 27 • • Component Subset – Components are marked as Consider or Ignore for shrinkwrap creation in the model tree.

and click Transparency > Ok. which matches the name of this module.ASM. For University Use Only . Method In Exercise 1. you will create various Simplified Reps. 1. If necessary. Click Utilities > Environment and ensure that Colors is enabled. enable transparency by clicking View > Display Settings > Model Display . which are key tools for working with large assemblies. 2. you will create and use shrinkwrap as a tool to create envelope models. Select the Shade tab. EXERCISE 1: Creating Assembly Simplified Reps Task 1. In Exercise 2. Open the engine assembly and setup display.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you practice with simplified reps and shrinkwrap features. utilizing Rep levels and selection rules. Turn off the display of all datum features. Set the working directory to the folder.24 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Ok . Open CART_ENGINE. 5. 3. 4.

3. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Click Update Screen . Task 3. 2. No components will be displayed. Create a Simplified Rep with Exclude as the Default Rule 1. you may wish to change the transparency level to clearly view the internal engine components. Select Advanced . Type [STATIONARY_COMP] as the name. Task 2. Expand the model tree to view both columns. Click Exclude Comp as the default rule to exclude all components in this assembly except those that you will explicitly select. and select the engine block.NOTES Figure 28: Original Assembly (Master Rep) Note: Depending on your graphics card. and drag the Transparency bar accordingly. Then click Modify from Model . Select the components to include in this Simplified Rep. Click Simplified Rep > Create . For University Use Only .25 . Click View > Model Setup > Color and Appearance .

For University Use Only .PRT. Click Simplified Rep > Set Current > Master Rep > Ok. 4. Click Done and File > Erase > Not Displayed. Figure 29: Stationary_Comp Rep Note: Remember Pro/E allows you to remove components that have children using Simplified Reps without addressing parent/child relationships.PRT from the Model Tree. 3. 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Notice that the other models from the assembly are listed and click Ok . Click Update Screen .PRT.NOTES 2. Notice that several components are visually missing.26 Fundament als of Des ign . and ENG_SIDE_COVER. as shown in the following figure. Notice the erased components are retrieved back into session. Click Master Rep and select ENG_BLOCK. ENG_HEAD.

From the Simplified Rep menu. Click Exclude and select the ENG_MTR_SKEL and ENG_BLOCK from the model tree. 4. click Create and type [INTERNAL] as the name.27 .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Figure 31 For University Use Only . Create a Simplified Rep with Master Rep as the Default Rule 1. 2.NOTES Figure 30 Task 4. 3. Click Update Screen . Click Master Rep as the default rule.

4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Select Geometric > Size > Absolute > Less Than .NOTES Task 5. Experiment with selection options. Click Exclude > From/To . 1.25].28 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Update Screen . 5. and select the ENG_SIDE_COVER and ENG_FLYWHL from the model tree. and click Evaluate . For University Use Only . Click Exclude > By Rule. type [5. Notice the new components marked as Exclude in the model tree. Click Update Screen . 2. Figure 32 3.

Type [*ON*] and click Evaluate > Update Screen . Click Done > Set Current > Master Rep > Ok. there is component data that can be erased to improve performance. Select the ENG_MTR_SKEL and click Update Screen. Configure the Rep for modification of the Cover. Notice the entries in the list and click Ok . Notice that the ENG_CONNECT_ROD and ENG_PISTON models are excluded. Select Geometry Rep as the default rule. 4. At this point. 2. Click Exclude > By Rule > Properties > Model Name .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Click Done and File > Erase > Not Displayed . 2. 3. Click Undo Last > Update Screen . For University Use Only . 1. Click Create and type [COVER_MOD]. Task 7.29 .NOTES Figure 33 6. Create a Rep using Geometry Rep as the Default Rule. 1. 7. Click Redefine > COVER_MOD > Ok. Task 6. Further define the Rep.

Select any edge(s) from the ENG_BLOCK. 6. Click Analysis > Measure. 9.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Click Master Rep and select the ENG_SIDE_COVER. Geometry. select the ENG_HEAD and ENG_FLYWHL. Observe the model tree. Exclude). 8. Select any edge(s) of the ENG_FLYWHL. 1. and click Update Screen . Click Graphics Rep . and notice that it is not selectable. Notice components are now in four different Rep states (Master. Click Done/Return > Regenerate > Automatic.30 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Done and File > Erase > Not Displayed. 2. Note: Remember that the display of components in Graphics Rep is dependant on the Save_Model_Display config option. Graphics. 7. Task 8. the models were saved with the Shading_High option. Notice the models listed and click Ok . since it is in Graphics Rep.NOTES Figure 34 5. Investigate selection capabilities of the components. For University Use Only . In this case. since it is in Geometry Rep. Notice that these are selectable. There should be no visual difference.

Note the diameter value (1. 4. Make modifications to the cover 1.25) and click Close . Set the Type to Diameter .NOTES 3. Again. Select the ENG_BLOCK. Select anywhere on the ENG_FLYWHL. 5. it doesn’t register. Close the Measure dialog box. 3. Click Modify and select the hole in the ENG_SIDE_COVER as shown in the following figure. Figure 35 2. Zoom in as shown in the following figure. Since the ENG_SHAFT is in Geometry Rep. 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Task 9. Click Modify. select the surface shown in the following figure. Figure 36 4. Read the message window. Click Analysis > Measure. For University Use Only .31 .

32 Fundament als of Des ign . 7. Modify the hole diameter as shown in the following figure to accommodate for a bearing to be assembled. Figure 38 Note: In this case. Save (do not close) the Assembly. Click Simplified Rep > Set Current > Master Rep > Ok.NOTES Figure 37 6. Click Regenerate > Automatic. 9. you could not ‘accidentally’ modify the diameter of the shaft since it is in Geometry Rep. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. 8.

3.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. 2.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Using Shrinkwrap and Substitution in Simplified Reps Task 1. and type [HEAD_ENV]. Task 2. Create a shrinkwrap envelope on the cylinder head. Select the ENG_HEAD and click Done . For University Use Only . Figure 39 4. 1. Click OK . From the Envelope menu. Create a shrinkwrap envelope on the clutch assembly.ASM from the model tree and click Done . wait for the shrinkwrap to calculate. 2. and click Done . Configure the dialog box as shown in the following figure. Click Design Mgr > Envelope> Create . Select the ENG_CLUTCH. 1. Note: You must be in the Master Rep of the assembly to enable the shrinkwrap options above. and type [CLUTCH_ENV].33 . click Create .

Create a non-associative faceted solid shrinkwrap of the engine 1. Click Setup > Density and type [0. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.NOTES 3. Task 3. Figure 41 2. Click OK . Figure 40 4.34 Fundament als of Des ign .098]. and click Done > Done Return > Done Return. block. wait for the shrinkwrap to calculate. Configure the dialog box as shown in the following figure. Select the engine block and click RMB > Open .

set the Type to Shrinkwrap . Click File > Save a Copy.35 . Configure the dialog box as shown in the following figure. and wait for the shrinkwrap to appear. Figure 42 5. 4.NOTES 3. Click Preview . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. and click Ok .

and click Open . Close the dialog box and the engine block window. When the dialog box opens. 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. 2. Click File > New > Assembly > Interchange. Click Component > Add . 6. select the Eng_block. Type [BLOCK_INTCH ] and click Ok . 4. Click Add > Simplify Component > Ok. 3. Notice the component was added as a functional component. 7. Add another block as a simplify component. Task 4. while represents a simplify component. For University Use Only . Click Create . Create an Interchange assembly for the engine block 1.prt and click Open. Select the Block_fct_shrnk.36 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Figure 43 6.prt . click Window > BLOCK_FCT_SHRNK > File > Save . Note: The designation represents a functional component.

8.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Click File > Save and close the window. 11. and Activate the Engine Assembly window. 9. Click Master Rep and select the engine block. 4. Click Compute and accept the default accuracy value. Open the Engine assembly in its Master Rep. 3. created. Create a Simplified Rep that substitutes the two envelopes just 1. If necessary.NOTES Figure 44 7. Click Ok.37 . Click Substitute > By Envelope > HEAD_ENV > Update Screen . Note: The component to be substituted with an interchange assembly needs to be in its Master Rep. Click Default > Ok . Select Geometry Rep as the default rule. Click . 2. Task 5. For University Use Only . The blocks are now assembled on top of each other. Select the Mass Properties tab and select the Properties of a specified functional component option. Click Simplified Rep > Create and type [ENVELOPES]. 10.

Click Ok > Ok > Update Screen. 7. 3. Click Substitute and select the ENG_BLOCK. Click Substitute > By Envelope > CLUTCH_ENV > Update Screen. Substitute using the interchange assembly you created. For University Use Only .38 Fundament als of Des ign . Select By Interchange Assembly and click Browse . Figure 45 6. 2. 1.NOTES 5. Notice the small clutch surfaces left out due to low quality levels.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Expand BLOCK_INTCH and select BLOCK_FCT_SHRNK . Zoom in as shown and note that the head now has no holes and some surfaces have been left out. 4. Figure 46 Task 6.

7. The entire engine assembly is now represented by a single associative shrinkwrap feature in the model tree. Notice that several components are now set to Consider in the model tree.39 . 5. Notice the Ignore status in the model tree. Click Open . set the Quality to [4] and click Done . 9. select Cart_Engine. Task 7. Click Simplified Rep > Set Current > Master Rep Ok. Shrinkwrap the entire engine in a separate part model. For University Use Only . Click Component Subset > Define . 8. 3. Click Consider > By Rule > Geometric > Exterior Comps > Evaluate. Click Done > Ok. 11. 4. click Insert > Shared Data > Shrinkwrap from Other Model. Click File > New > Part . 6. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Click Done and Save the Assembly.NOTES Figure 47 5.asm and click Open . Click Default . 2. From the new part. 10. Click Ignore > All. type [ENGINE_SW]. and click Ok .

For University Use Only . This model could now easily be used to create an interchange assembly with the actual engine assembly. close all windows.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.NOTES Figure 48 12. 13. and then be substituted in a higher level assembly.40 Fundament als of Des ign . Save the model. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .

Tips & Techniques: If the part regenerates slowly.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. 1. For University Use Only . Type [HEAD_NO_FINS] as the name. Figure 49 Task 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Create a simplified version of this part showing only the basic shape and the important mounting locations. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Creating Part Level Simplified Reps Task 1.41 . Click Simplfd Rep > Create . Click Exclude Feat > Regenerate > Whole Model > Done . Open the engine head to create a simplified version of it. Open the ENG_HEAD. 1. 2. you could use Accelerate instead of Regenerate to retrieve it faster (you can set this option later by selecting Attributes from the EDIT METHOD menu).

Click Done > Done /Return. select DTM1 and Round id 65 . 4.NOTES 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.42 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 51 For University Use Only . The simplified part should display as shown in the following figure. From the Model Tree. Notice that the system now includes all of the features between DTM1 and the round. Figure 50 5. Click Features > Include > From /To .

6. Click Set Current > Master Rep > OK . From the references dialog. Click and Flip the arrow upward if necessary. 4. Click Work Region > Extrude > Solid > Done > Both Sides > Done . If you inadvertently select a feature to include/exclude. 2. Select DTM1 as the sketching plane and click Okay to accept the default direction for viewing. Delete DTM3 and select the outermost vertical edges of the part as references. Turn off the display of datum planes and sketch a single horizontal line as shown in the following figure. Click Okay. click Default and select the feature to set it back to the default rule.43 For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap . Pag e 9.NOTES Tips & Techniques: To view the Rep with the included features only. Create a Simplified Rep that shows a cutaway of this part. Use an accelerator file for faster retrieval. Click Create and type [HEAD_CUTAWAY] as the name. 3. 5. Figure 52 9. 1. Task 3. 8. click Update Screen . 7. Click Top and select DTM2. Click Include Feat > Accelerate > Whole Model > Done .

4. Click OK to complete the work region. set the current Rep to Master Rep. 3. Figure 53 13. For University Use Only . If necessary. Type [HEAD_CUT_REP] and click Exclude Comp as the default rule.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9. Click Thru All > Done > Thru All > Done. Spin the model and notice the cutaway section. 11. Click Done Return > Done Return. The Rep should display as shown in the following figure. Click Master Rep > By Rep > STATIONARY_COMP > OK. 1. Click Update Screen. Save the model and close the window. Task 4. Click Simplified Rep > Create. Create a Simplified Rep in the engine assembly. 2. Begin the new Rep creation by using a previously defined Rep as a starting point. substituting the part Rep that you just created. 12.ASM. Open the CART_ENGINE.44 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES 10.

45 . For University Use Only . Figure 55 5. Click Substitute . 1. 4. Select the ENG_HEAD part and click Browse to view the Simplified reps in that model. Save the models. Figure 54 3. Change the Rep of the ENG_HEAD. Select the ENG_HEAD part and click Browse to view the Simplified reps in that model. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Simp lif ied Rep resent ation s an d Sh rin kw rap Pag e 9. Click Substitute . Select HEAD_NO_FINS and Click OK > OK > Update Screen.PRT. Select HEAD_CUTAWAY and Click OK > OK > Update Screen.NOTES Task 5. Close all windows and click Erase > Not Displayed.

46 Fundament als of Des ign . you have learned how to: • • • • Create Simplified representations using predefined or customized representations.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. Create part and assembly level Simplified representations. Create a Shrinkwrap feature. For University Use Only . Use substitution in Simplified reps.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 9.

Create new parts and subassemblies while working in an assembly. Page 10-1 . Copy geometry between assembly components. Build a layout or engineering notebook. you will be able to: • • • • • • • • Identify a project’s design intent.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - Module Top-Down Design and Layouts In this module you learn how to use concurrent design techniques to develop models in a top-down design environment. Objectives After completing this module. Use 2-dimensional (2-D) layouts and engineering notebooks to set up and document designs. Link parts to layouts. Propagate design intent from top-level data into subassemblies. You also learn how to use layouts to control the design intent of an assembly in a top-down design environment. Define assembly structures.

It provides you with many tools to interrogate assemblies and determine how they are built. Using Assembly Structures Using the following techniques. Before performing any work in Pro/ENGINEER. Creating New Subassemblies You use the CREATION OPTIONS dialog box to: • • • Copy existing assemblies. Identifying Design Intent Using Pro/ENGINEER.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can plan your designs before creating any models. You can then use the layout functionality to control the design at all points though out the development process. you can save time and also increase design accuracy by: • • • • Sketching preliminary geometry. Define only the subassembly’s existence in the assembly structure.NOTES DEFINING TOP-DOWN DESIGN TECHNIQUES Pro/ENGINEER offers several methods that you can use to successfully design in a top-down environment. Establishing relationships between model parameters. you can define the structure of the assembly prior to creating or assembling all of the components. Defining critical sizing and fit information. Specifying how components are to be assembled. Place the three default datum planes directly into the assembly without manually adding placement constraints. For University Use Only .

NOTES Figure 1: Creating an Assembly Note: When you select Leave Component Unplaced and Copy From Existing or Empty from the CREATION OPTIONS dialog box. because you do not have to start a subassembly in a separate assembly window. This technique saves time. however. For University Use Only . Copying Existing Geometry You can define a new subassembly by copying an existing assembly. the system displays the component in the Model Tree—but not in the actual assembly window—even if the component contains geometry. you cannot copy the assembly if it contains any components.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. Start assembly files are particularly useful if you would like to use the subassembly immediately. Defining Default Datum Planes You can create a new subassembly by placing the three default datum planes directly in the assembly. and you do not have to manually add assembly constraints.3 .Commercial Use Prohibited T o p .

you can place the three default datum planes directly in the assembly.NOTES Defining Empty Subassemblies You can define the existence of the subassembly in an assembly structure. This allows you to indicate the part’s existence in the assembly BOM. you can copy start part information to obtain the appropriate position and constraints. you can use constraints to assemble it or leave it unplaced.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . This allows you to list the component as a member of the assembly. • Empty – The system lists an empty part file in the Model Tree without displaying any features in the graphics window. Using the Copy From Existing option. you can create features in the part by using Modify >Mod Part . Placing Components in the Default Position You can include a component as a member of an assembly without actually placing it in the assembly window. it does not have geometry). • – When you copy a start part or other existing part. however. During or after development of your product model. you may need to redefine the placement of the part. Copying Existing Parts Locating Default Datums • – Without creating the actual part geometry. You can place the empty part in the default position. Packaging Components Using the Package functionality. even if the component is not ready to be assembled (for example. For University Use Only . you can assemble a component quickly into a default position to view it in the assembly and Bill of Materials. or leave it unplaced. in the Bill of Materials (BOM) and Model Tree. you can place a component in the assembly window without specifying exact placement constraints. Creating Parts without Geometry Using the same methods described above for creating new subassemblies. you can also create new parts without geometry by defining their existence in the assembly structure. The default position for a component is the point at which its origin matches up with the origin of the assembly. that is. If you are not ready to specify constraints yet. by creating an assembly that contains no geometry.

but use the skeleton as a guideline. Concept Blocks Instead of creating fully developed components and subassemblies to place in an assembly. space plan. To convey design intent from the skeletons to the assembly components.5 . Using various methods. Copying Reference Geometry between Models When modifying parts or subassemblies in Assembly mode. you can use these blocks in the assembly to develop space claims temporarily. Later. and to visualize the assembly design without developing the components. you can: • • • • Design features in the parts with external references to the skeleton. Later. Reference higher level skeletons with subassembly skeletons. Using this feature in a top-down design allows you to: • Control change propagation by redefining the dependency for the copy geometry feature. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . or use relations in a layout to control the skeleton and components. while you develop the final models.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. Using Assembly Skeletons You can use skeletons to create a 3D layout of an assembly. Design features in the parts without external references to the skeletons. Use relations through the skeleton to control parts. you can use the skeleton as a central reference that you can change to update components by passing information down through the assembly structure. you can use the Copy Geom feature to copy reference geometry from one model to another. you can replace the components later in the design. you can create simple parts that represent them. simulate motion.NOTES Defining Object Relationships in Pro/INTRALINK You can use Pro/INTRALINK to set up assembly structures—or virtual assemblies within a workspace.

and coordinate systems for automatic assembly Global dimensions and parameters Tabulated data Global relations Using an engineering notebook or layout. you can: • • • Access and control several models from one centralized location by consolidating critical parameters. Ensure the proper fit and size of design components. Consolidate external references into a single feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . axes. you can easily determine which parts and assemblies have global datums and parameters that belong to a notebook. Provide a visible entity for an external reference. points.NOTES • • • • • Copy skeleton data into parts for feature design in Part mode. Copy references to subassemblies that can have external references. Using the Where Used functionality in the RELATIONS menu. or into subassemblies or their skeletons for design in subassembly windows. such as: • • • • • • 2-D non-parametric sketched geometry Design notes Global datum planes. Create map parts. Drive any number of geometric models and drawings. For University Use Only . capture. USING PRO/ENGINEER LAYOUT A layout is a centralized location in which you can develop. The information that you can include in a layout is similar to the information that you would find in an engineering notebook. and control the design intent of your project models.

It is important to add as much information to your layout as possible to make it easily understandable. if necessary. you can create an additional notebook and connect the two.NOTES Capturing the Design Process Pro/ENGINEER enables you to capture your design intent and control it throughout the development of your project. and each notebook can consist of several sheets. Figure 2: Example of Draft Geometry For University Use Only . The geometry can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be. you create geometry using the same 2-D drafting tools that are available for production drawings. You can build several notebooks for one design project. The creation of a notebook is similar to that of a production drawing. you begin by initializing the layout. Creating Engineering Notebooks To create an engineering notebook. You can create a notebook for the overall project and additional notebooks for the subassemblies of the design.7 . You set a sheet size.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. If the notebook becomes too complicated. Sketching Designs To sketch your design. and add multiple sheets.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . Pro/ENGINEER does not use layout geometry to create your parts.

and then label them in the lower left corner of your layout. such as project name. cost. Figure 4: Adding Parameter Dimensions For University Use Only . You can also add text notes to display information.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can control key elements of your design. material.NOTES Documenting Components with Balloons To document your design. Figure 3: Adding Balloons and Notes to a Layout Controlling Designs with Global Information The power of a Pro/ENGINEER layout increases with the addition of parameters. you can use balloons to call out the components. By incorporating global dimensions and parameters into your layout.

NOTES To increase the power of your layout and capture your design intent. so that one global dimension obtains its value from a relation with another global value. Use parameter sets to change parameter values automatically. Set up global relations. Organizing Layouts You can use tables to organize the parameters and relationships that you add to the layout. axes. Add global datum planes. points.9 . Develop the relationships between the parameters. and coordinate systems to enable automatic assembly. Interrelating Parameters with Relations By adding relations. Figure 5: Adding Parametric Tables For University Use Only . even if the components that they will control do not exist.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. you can: • • • Increase the level of design intent controlled by the layout.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . you can: • • • Use relations to interrelate parameters.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-10 Fundament als of Des ign . dimensions. points. you cannot change it at the part or assembly level. Once you have created a layout to control the geometry of your model. The system references the features when it assembles a part. axes.NOTES Changing Parameter Values Automatically In the Layout mode. you use parameter sets to change parameter values automatically. For University Use Only . The layout controls the parameters. and features. and coordinate systems to the notebook. you can set up your layout to enable automatic assembly. You define all of the surfaces and axes that are necessary to assemble one component to another using the Align command. Figure 7: Adding Global Datum Planes and Axes Note: A layout limits user access to your design. Only users who can access the layout can make modifications to these key parameters. Figure 6: Big Bolt Instance Set Applied Enabling Automatic Assembly By adding global datum planes.

you must declare the part to the layout. Using Global Dimensions When you want a part to reference a global dimension. the part can now reference the layout for certain values. Note: Pro/ENGINEER automatically retrieves the layout into RAM when you retrieve a part that has been declared to it. Once you retrieve the assembly.e. you create a direct connection between them—that is. If the assembly is not in RAM.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . it should indicate to the designer that this is a critical dimension that should be used in designing the part. you use them in their symbolic form. For University Use Only . the system resets the part to the value dictated by the relation. referred to as a coding symbol. Symbolic dimensions at the assembly level have an additional suffix on the end. you can modify it at the part level.NOTES Linking Parts to Layouts When you use an engineering notebook to design a part. even at the part level. When you declare a part to a layout.1 1 . Writing Assembly Relations Relations are mathematical equations involving symbolic dimensions and parameters that you can use to capture design intent. d25:8) belong to the same part. you cannot modify the dependent variable of the relation. d0:8. if you add a global dimension to a layout.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. They enable you to take advantage of the parametric nature of Pro/ENGINEER. When you use dimensions in relations. All dimensions with the same coding symbol (i. it is important to understand the layout and the global information it contains.. For example. d12:8. Note: If the assembly is in RAM.

Part relations through assembly mode Part and assembly relations in a notebook • – You can make all changes in the central layout. you can capture and preserve design intent with different results. Using assembly relations – You must have the driving part in RAM. d2:0 = d0:2 + .005. • – Without using relations or a layout. you must control the design intent and ensure proper fit and function when dimensional changes are made to the model. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Using any of the following techniques.NOTES The following figure shows an example of an assembly relation. The relation always makes the hole diameter (d2:0) larger than the shaft diameter (d0:2) by . because the driving part controls the dependent part dimensions. because all parts and assemblies are tied to the layout.005 Figure 8: Assembly Relation Capturing Design Intent You can design a model in various ways. Making modifications manually • • – You can automate the modifications to the models to ensure proper fit and function.

The change has such a dramatic effect. Open GO_CART. You also develop control of existing components in an assembly.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . it would have been very difficult to manage manually.1 3 . Open the go-cart assembly. In Exercise 2. For University Use Only . Note: To achieve the best performance.ASM. you should retrieve the gocart assembly while in wireframe representation. you develop a layout to drive the components in an engine assembly to develop parameters and relationships without assemblies and components. you use a layout to propagate a change throughout an assembly.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you create and develop layouts in the design process without modeling a part or assembly. Methods In Exercise 1. Tools Table 1: Icons for Top-Down Design and Layouts Icons Description Create Lines Select EXERCISE 1: Using Layouts Task 1. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. 2. 1.

NOTES Task 2.LAY. Open GO-CART. Attempt to change the frame width directly. In the SELECTION TOOLS dialog box. Select GO-CART. Click File > Open . Select the feature that controls the frame width.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-14 Fundament als of Des ign . All of the dimensions that control the size of the frame now display as shown in the following figure. 3.0 dimension controlling the width of the frame. Select the 20. Figure 9: Frame Width Dimension 5. 1. then click Open . Open the layout. Click Sel by menu . Notice that the first sheet is simply a cover sheet showing the completed go-cart. 1.PRT and click Select . Read the prompt displayed in the MESSAGE AREA. For University Use Only .LAY. Select MAIN_FRAME from the SELECTION TOOL dialog box and click Select . 4. Click Modify > Mod Part > Sel By Menu . A layout documents this design and controls it. select FRAME. 2. In the GET SELECT menu. Task 3. view all the sheets then change the FRAME_WIDTH parameter. The system informs you that this dimension is driven in FRAME by relation D11=frame_width.

6. Click Set Current .Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. View the remaining sheets. Change its value to 40. Click Edit > Value and select the FRAME_WIDTH dimension from the table on the layout. Click Next to view the SHEET 4. In the LAYOUT menu. Change the frame width. as the design progressed. Task 4. The errors occurred because the frame is too wide to allow room for the suspension. 4.1 5 . Note: This type of early error detection is another powerful use of layouts. the layout also progressed. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p .NOTES 2. 5. type [3]. and defines the major components and their placement during the initial development of the go-cart. more details were added to the layout to define the position of the user interface (seat and controls). click Sheets > Next . you would not discover the error until you regenerated the assembly and the system placed you in the Resolve environment. For University Use Only . Click Previous several times to go back to SHEET 3. Click Next to view the SHEET 3. 1. Without this detection. Notice that. Notice that the SHEET 2 organizes the assembly. click Regenerate . Notice that this causes several errors to display in the error box. then click Done/Return . Notice that it defines the dimensions governing the size of the go-cart. To view the next sheet. Notice that as the design progressed.

To correct this problem. Click Regenerate > Automatic . Task 5. For University Use Only .NOTES Changed dimension Figure 10: Modifying FRAME_WIDTH to 40 Produces Errors 2. 1. Change to the assembly window and regenerate the go-cart to view the effect that takes place. make the FRAME_WIDTH value more reasonable. Change to the go-cart assembly window. The error box should now indicate that there are no errors remaining. This indicates that you still have a problem and will not be able to regenerate the assembly successfully. do not proceed. Note: If your error box does not say NO ERRORS.ASM 2. Click Window > GO_CART.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-16 Fundament als of Des ign . Change the value to 30 and regenerate.

Replaced the tie rod links with shorter parts. click File > Erase Current .NOTES 3. Replaced the steering rack with a longer rack. • • • • • • • Replaced the front and rear wishbones with shorter parts. Replaced the half axles with shorter parts. by making the following changes: • Increased the width of the frame part. Erase the assembly and the associated model.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . Figure 11: Modified Go-Cart Assembly 4. Erase the layout from memory. For University Use Only . Replaced the top suspension links with shorter parts.1 7 . Click > OK . including the frame and all other affected components. Notice that the system completely updated the assembly. Changed the left and right front wings to fit the new frame. Replaced the main axle with a longer axle. 5. To erase the generic assembly members. click File > Erase > Current > Yes . 6.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. click File > Erase > Not Displayed > OK .

click Insert > Data from File . Develop a 2-D sketch in the layout to represent the piston. 2. 1. Task 2. Start the creation of a layout called ENGINE. then click Open . 1. Select Sketch > Parametric Sketch . Click File > New > Layout . Click OK . Select PARTIAL_SECTION.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Developing Layouts Task 1. In the NEW LAYOUT dialog box. Click OK . For University Use Only . select A. The section represents part of a piston assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-18 Fundament als of Des ign . from the STANDARD SIZE list.IGS. To import a file. 1. 2. Import an IGES file into the layout to initiate the development of a figure. To specify the drawing sheet size. without the piston. Figure 12: Imported IGES File Task 3. The drawing border displays on the screen. Type [engine] as the name.

Click Utilities > Sketcher Preferences and select the option to snap to Horizontal/Vertical. 4. Close the window. In the REFERENCES dialog box. Create a crossed pair of two construction lines to use as a guide.1 9 .Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . Click [Create Lines] and draw a vertical line to represent the left side of the piston. Sketch a vertical line from the top vertex to the bottom vertex. Figure 14: Sketching the Piston For University Use Only . 3.NOTES 2. Click Sketch > Construction Line > Crossed Pair . Click Done Sel .Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. Select the top vertex and the center of the circle from the imported geometry as references. 6. click . Figure 13: Sketch References 5.

Select the small radius (as the item to which the system should attach the note). 2. Sketch another horizontal line to represent the base of the piston. 9. Select the vertical construction line.NOTES 7. Click Done /Return to exit from the TOOLS menu. Sketch a horizontal line representing the top of the piston. Repeat the same step for the lower horizontal line. Mirror the vertical line about the vertical construction line. Small radius Figure 15: Mirroring the Vertical Line 10. In the DISPLAY area. 1. From the LAYOUT menu. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. 12. Create balloons attached to the section. Click Insert > Balloon > Leader > Make Note . click Tools > Mirror . Click Trim > Corner . For University Use Only . Type [crank_shaft] as the name of the component. Select the mirrored vertical line and the upper horizontal line. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-20 Fundament als of Des ign . select where the balloon should display. Task 4. 11. Select the vertical line and click Done Sel . 8. Trim the lines so that they form a box. Clarify what the geometry represents by annotating the drawing. Click Done Sel > Done .

Create another balloon for the piston representation. If necessary. move the note that documents the names. then click once to place the balloon. In the NOTES TYPE menu. move the balloons.2 1 . 2. Add a dimension for the diameter of the piston called PISTON_DIA Click Insert > Dimension > New References . Type [piston_dia] as the name.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . to place the . Select the top horizontal line representing the piston. and click Done /Return .Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. Click press and hold <SHIFT> and select both the text lines that you created. Click . Drag the balloon to the new location. Figure 16: Adding the Balloons 5. type [piston]. Click Done Sel > Done . and type [3. Drag the notes. For University Use Only . Select location for balloon. 6.NOTES 4. Click dimension. If necessary. retain the selections and click Make Note . Document the layout of the engine further by adding dimensions to the section. Task 5. 1.00] as the value. Select the right vertical line.

Select the slanted line.00] as the value. Right-click and select Properties from the pop-up menu. . Notice that the PROPERTIES dialog box opens. then click . and type [5. Position the diameter dimension vertically on the screen. The dimension now displays linear. Click OK . To create another dimension for the connecting rod length. For University Use Only . Return to the LAYOUT menu. Convert the diameter dimension to linear. Click the circle twice. 5. 6. 4. Click and select the STROKE dimension. Remove the diameter symbol from the text line. Using the arrow keys and backspace key. Select Toggle Type from the pop-up menu. and type [4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-22 Fundament als of Des ign . represented by the construction circle. Create a diameter dimension for the stroke. then click [stroke] as the name. delete the portion of the text line that reads {0:∅}. Right-click the selected dimension. Type [rod_length] as the name.NOTES 3.00] as the value. 8. move the dimensions. If necessary. Click the DIMENSION TEXT tab. Type Figure 17: Adding the Dimensions 7.

select the second 5 from the left. move the dimension value. Notice the strings of numerals displayed next to the point that you have chosen. then click to finish. For University Use Only . 1. Select a point to define the left vertex of the table. Refer to the following figure. then select a parameter directly from the table to modify it’s value. In the LAYOUT menu. To define the width of the columns as 15 characters. Task 6. Click to finish defining the column. click Table > Create > By Num Chars . Organize the layout and make it easier to use by tabulating the parameters that you have created. Select 3 from the numerals displayed on the screen. For the next column.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . 3. Define six rows to allow for two lines of text. Create a table and locate it to the right of the figure. select the second 5 from the left again to define the width of the second column.NOTES 9. If necessary. select this point Figure 18: Adding the Table 2. 4.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0.2 3 . Repeat the process to define six rows for the table.

Specify the title of the table. For University Use Only . In the TABLE menu.NOTES 5. type the names in the left column. Select the top cell. then press <ENTER> twice. Read the prompt in the MESSAGE AREA. Select the two cells across the top of the table. Type [parameters] as the name. Click Enter Text . Notice that the system automatically adds the parameter to the table. Change the justification of the cells. Select the cell beside the STROKE entry. Using the method outlined in the previous step. 10. In the TABLE menu. Figure 19: Entering Text 9. Merge the cells at the top of the table to create one cell. Click Enter Text . Type the parameter values for ROD_LENGTH and PISTON_DIA using the same method. click Modify Table > Merge . Note: Do not add the values for CYLINDERS and DISPLACEMENT at this time. Select a cell in each column. 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-24 Fundament als of Des ign . 7. as shown in the following figure. click Mod Rows/Cols > Justify > Center > Middle . Type [&stroke] in the cell and press <ENTER> twice. Add the parameter values in the right cell. 8.

Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . Show the existing parameters. 5. Add the new parameters into the table using the & symbol.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. 2. 1. Notice that the INFORMATION WINDOW lists the cylinder parameter. Confirm that the parameters have the correct values. click Add and type the following relation: /* calculate the displacement of the engine displacement = pi * (( piston_dia/2 )^2 ) * stroke * cylinders 4. Figure 20: The Added Parameters For University Use Only . Type [cylinders] as the name. In the RELATIONS menu. and type [2] as the value. Click Done/Return to exit the TABLE menu. Click Close .2 5 . Task 7. Add parameters to the layout to determine values for the cylinder and displacement entries in the table. In the LAYOUT menu. Add a parameter named DISPLACEMENT by writing a relationship to determine its value. as well as the other dimensional parameters. click Done/Return > Relation > Add Param > Integer .NOTES 11. 3. Click Show Rel .

4. Click File > Open to retrieve the ENGINE_LAYOUT. Show the relations of the model. click Declare > Declare Lay . Notice that the parameters of the layout are now associated to the part.00]. Type [6. Type the following relationship: /* Length of rod controlled by layout d83 = ROD_LENGTH For University Use Only . Add a relationship to drive the length of the connecting rod from the layout. 2. Regenerate the assembly. Regenerate the layout and note the change in the displacement value. Select the base protrusion of the connecting rod. Click Modify > Mod Part . Select the ENGINE layout from the menu. 8. Click Edit > Value . Drive the connecting rod component using the layout. Notice there are no relations for this model. Select one of the CONNECTING_ROD_LO_PRT entries from the Model Tree. In the PART menu. Task 8. Declare the part to the engine layout.00 value beside the STROKE entry. 7. 6. Show the relations of the model again.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-26 Fundament als of Des ign . 6. Use the layout to drive an existing assembly. Close the INFORMATION WINDOW. Click Regenerate > Automatic . 3. Notice the dimension parameters that the system displays.NOTES Note: Keep in mind the layout has no models declared to it yet. Modify the stroke value to six. Modify the length of one of the connecting rods. Click Done . Click Relations > Show Rel . Select the base protrusion and modify its length from 5 to 10. 1.PRT.ASM. Select the 4. Open CONNECTING_ROD_LO. Click Relations > Show Rel . Click ADD . Notice that the connecting rods have pushed through the tops of the piston. 5.

The system retrieves a model consisting of datum curves. Click Add . Change the layout so that it controls both the rod and skeleton.2 7 . click Done . 11.PRT. Declare the model to the layout.00inch length. Open LAYOUT_SKELETON. Notice that the rod returns back to the 5. so that the assembly will update correctly.NOTES Figure 21: Dimensions of the Rod 9. Only the curves are visible. Add a relation to the component to drive the stroke represented by the circle. Regenerate the part. Select the ENGINE layout.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. Click Set up > Declare > Declare Lay .Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . 3. Task 9. axes and planes. the other features are on a layer and blanked. Select the circle and the bottom curve to show the dimensions. 2. 1. Click Done . since the layout now drives it. Close the window. Click Relations . The piston will not update its location in the assembly because it was assembled to a component called a skeleton part instead of the connecting rod. 10. In the MODEL REL menu. Type the following relation on two lines: /*drive the engine stroke from layout engine d3 = STROKE For University Use Only .

Add another relationship to drive the length of the curve that represents the connecting rod. Click Declare > Declare Lay . Declare the piston to the layout. Type the following two lines: /*drive connecting rod length from layout engine d22 = ROD_LENGTH 5. Task 10. Click Add and type the following: /*Piston diameter is driven by layout engine d2 = PISTON_DIA Figure 22: Driving the Diameter of the Piston from the Layout 4. 1. Save the piston and close the window. Add a relation to control the piston diameter from the layout.PRT. Select the ENGINE layout. 2. For University Use Only . Drive the diameter of the piston from the layout.NOTES 4. 3. Click Relations .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-28 Fundament als of Des ign . Select the base protrusion of the piston. Open PISTON_LO. Save the model and close the window.

Regenerate and save the layout. Click Window > ENGINE_LAYOUT. click File > Erase > Not Displayed > OK . 9.Commercial Use Prohibited T o p . You have declared the components to the layout and written relations using the layout parameters.00 to 7. To erase the generic assembly members. Erase the assembly and the associated model. Activate the engine layout assembly. 4.Do w n Des ig n a n d L a y o u t s Pag e 1 0. and ROD LENGTH from 5.NOTES Task 11. Original Assembly Modified Assembly Figure 23: Modifying the Assembly 6. 5. 1. Click Edit > Value . Erase the layout from memory. Click > OK .ASM. Click Regenerate > Automatic . Control the assembly from the layout. 8. Change the values of STROKE from 6.00 to 4. Click Window > ENGINE. 2.00.2 9 . Save the assembly. 7. click File > Erase > Current > Yes .00. Regenerate the assembly. Notice that the entire assembly updates correctly. For University Use Only . PISTON DIA from 3. click File > Erase Current .00.00 to 10. Activate the layout window.LAY:1. 3.

NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. Layouts can be used to control the design from one central location. Models may be changed by changing the layout rather than by opening the entire model to make a simple change. you learned that: • • • • Layouts are useful in documenting the design process. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 0-30 Fundament als of Des ign . Layouts can be created at any time during the design process.

Use various skeleton properties. Objectives After completing this module. Use skeleton geometry for modeling.Module Designing with Skeletons In this module you learn how to use skeleton models to develop products in a top-down design environment.Commercial Use Prohibited . Control a skeleton model.For University Use Only . Relate assembly components to a skeleton. you will be able to: • • • • • Create a skeleton part. Page 11-1 .

NOTES USING SKELETON PARTS A skeleton part is a special part model created in the context of an assembly to develop design criteria without having to create components and assemble them together. Figure 1: Plastic Container Interfaces Figure 2: Engine Assembly Interfaces For University Use Only . You can use skeleton parts for: • Interfaces – Skeletons can be created and employed as design interfaces between components.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . The skeleton part is a 3-D layout of an assembly that is used as the framework to build the assembly.

Figure 3: Space Claims for Subassemblies • – Skeletons can specify the movement of an assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-3 . which establishes an interface between the master assembly and subassemblies in the model. Determining Assembly Motion Figure 4: Skeleton for Motion of Piston For University Use Only . in order to establish complex linkage motion before adding components.NOTES • Staking Space Claims – Skeletons can be used to create space claims for subassemblies.

NOTES Creating the Skeleton You can create a skeleton part in the assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . You have full control of the level and the location of its existence. Notes: You can only create one skeleton in each assembly. the system automatically redefines the placement of the skeleton as the first component using an “origin to origin” constraint. establishing a relationship between the assembly components and the skeleton models. If you create the skeleton after assembling the components. but skeletons can exist in each subassembly that belongs to a toplevel assembly. To make it easier to use skeletons in your model. Figure 5: Example of Parent/Child Relationship For University Use Only . Relating Assembly Components to Skeletons You can assemble components on to the skeleton part. in order to: • Reduce the parent/child hierarchy – The skeleton becomes the master parent to many of the components in the assembly. [You can have multiple skeletons in each assembly with the config option “multiple_skeletons_allowed” set to “yes”]. you can add layers and modify the names of features.

Defining Additional Skeleton Properties The following additional skeleton properties help you to effectively use skeleton models in the development of your design: • Deleting Skeletons – You can delete a skeleton model from the assembly. you can reference skeleton geometry by copying it. This offers the following advantages over manually copying a skeleton feature: • • You can select different forms of geometry. • • Controlling the Skeleton Model You can control and modify the skeleton model in various ways. but removing it does not remove the skeleton part file from the disk. such as axes. • Using Skeleton Geometry for Modeling When you create or add a part to an assembly. if the selected feature is associated with a layer in the skeleton. you control the motion of a component linkage. The system automatically associates geometry features to layers of the same name. Control motion at a centralized location – By modifying the skeleton component. curves. as well as add and define geometry. and surfaces in a single feature.NOTES • Limit the scope for selecting constraints – The Reference Control option in the Design Manager functionality allows you to assemble models only to the skeleton rather than to each other. The geometry automatically updates when the assembly containing the geometry feature is in RAM. Using Modify > Mod Skel . which allows you to control change propagation. • Control component locations – You assemble the components to the skeleton. You can turn the dependency on and off. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-5 . You also have the option to create geometry features. the system updates the components’ locations automatically when you modify the space claims in the skeleton. you can modify assembly dimensions.

Tracking For University Use Only .NOTES • Filtering the Skeleton from a Bill of Materials – When creating a Bill of Materials (BOM) report in a production drawing using Pro/REPORT. • Excluding Skeletons from Simplified Representations – You can easily exclude skeleton models from simplified representations of an assembly. The Model Tree labels a skeleton model with a unique icon to distinguish it from other part models. only the relationship between the assembly and the components. Pro/ENGINEER does not automatically filter skeleton models from the display. • – Pro/PDM and Pro/INTRALINK do not manage the references between the skeleton and the components.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .

change the parameters in the associated layout. and then modify the crank shaft at the part level. Method In Exercise 1. you make modifications to the skeleton assembly. you build a skeleton to represent the motion of a onecylinder engine for the go-cart motor.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you create a skeleton part that can be used to simulate motion in an assembly. Tools Table 1: Icons for Skeletons Icons Description Insert datum curve Insert datum axis Insert datum plane Insert datum points In Session For University Use Only . In Exercise 2. assemble the crank shaft by copying the skeleton geometry. In Exercise 3. you set up a parent/child relationship between the components and the skeleton model. and verify the parent/child relationship.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-7 .

Sketch a circle with a diameter of 4. Click File > New > Assembly.PRT. Create an assembly. 5. 4.00.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Building the Motor Skeleton Task 1. Select the FRONT datum as the 2. Save the assembly. Finish creating the sketch and the feature. 4. the system lists the skeleton part as the first component in the assembly. Change to the DEFAULT view. 6. Select SKEL_ENGINE_SKEL.PRT > Sketch > Done . Click OK . Click File > Open . then close the window. Use a standard part file to create a skeleton model as the first part. 3. 1. Click Open > OK . Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Task 2. Define a curve to represent the stroke of the engine. For University Use Only . Note: In the Model Tree.ASM.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Select the START_PART. Type [SKEL_ENGINE]. Click sketching plane and click OKAY 3. click Copy From Existing > Browse . Click and click OK . In the CREATION OPTIONS dialog box. Notice the skeleton icon in the Model Tree. Click Component > Create > Skeleton Model > OK . Develop the linkage for the crank and piston. Create the SKEL_ENGINE. 2. 1. . It automatically adds the datums of the start part to the skeleton part. Click Top and select the TOP datum plane.

> Two Planes . Figure 7: New Sketching Plane For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-9 . Create a sketching plane for the curve. Click the FRONT datum plane from which to offset. Select 2.75] and click Done . > Offset . Click Enter Value and type [1. 1. Create a sketched datum curve to represent the crankshaft connecting rod connection. click TOP datum planes. To create an axis.NOTES Figure 6: Sketch for Circle 7. Select the SIDE and Task 3.

Endpoint to TOP datum Endpoint to Datum Axis A-1 Endpoint to circular datum curve Figure 8: Sketch for Connecting Rod and Crank 8. Finish creating the sketch and the feature. ½ The second line represents the rod length and is of 5 length. 9. Click Top and select the SIDE datum plane. as shown in the following figure. > Sketch > 4. For University Use Only . if there is a conflict. 7. Delete the tangent constraint. The model should appear as shown in the following figure. 6. Define the left side of the datum circle and the datum axis as references for sketching. Change to the DEFAULT view.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-10 Fundament als of Des ign . 5. Create the curve to represent the connection. Sketch two lines. ½ The first line represents the crank rotation and is 30 degrees from the top datum plane.NOTES 3. 10. delete the F1(SIDE) reference. Select DTM1 as the sketching plane and click Okay. In the REFERENCES dialog box. Click Done .

1. click > On Vertex . Using the same procedure. To aid in the assembly and component creation process. Create a datum axis through the point PNT0. Click > . Figure 10: Creating Datum Axis 2. 3.NOTES Figure 9: Connecting Rod Number One Task 4. Click . add a datum axis to represent the joints of the connecting rod and piston. Select the two vertices. > Pnt Nrm > Select DTM1 and then select PNT0.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-11 . To create datum points through the vertices of the curves. Select these vertices. create another axis through the point PNT1. For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure. Click Pln .

you can reduce the number of menu selections that you have to make to create multiple datums. click Modify. Make note of the symbolic name of the angle dimension. 2. For University Use Only . Click Show Dim > the straight line. Type [0] as the parameter value. then select the one of 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Relations > Add Param > Real Number . To check the skeleton motion. Select a straight line. Task 5. Confirm that the skeleton’s motion is appropriate by modifying the angle on the datum curve. 1. Change the 30 angle to 75 and regenerate. Automate the modification by using a relation. The relation should cause the angle to increment by 30 degrees each time that you regenerate the part.NOTES Figure 11: Finished Skeleton Tips & Techniques: By setting the configuration file option repeat_datum_create to yes. . Define the relation. Type [crank_angle] as the name.

In the Notepad. Click Edit Rel . 6. Regenerate the model. Continue to regenerate until the section rotates back to 30 degrees from the TOP datum plane. For University Use Only . Save the part and close the window. click File > Exit > Yes . 7. To finish defining the relations.NOTES 4. 5. type the following: crank_angle = crank_angle +30 IF crank_angle > 340 crank_angle = 0 ENDIF D# = crank_angle [Where D# is the symbolic name for the angle] In the Notepad.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-13 . click Done in the MODEL REL menu.

Select the skeleton model. Investigate the associativity between the skeleton part and the assembly. 1. Click Through again. Note the full associativity. click > Through . Set up this assembly such that components are children only to the skeleton. In the EXTERNAL REFERENCE CONTROL dialog box. The system has updated the assembly to reflect all of the work that you performed in Part mode. you could create the other geometry in the assembly using Modify > Mod Skel . Note: Once you added the default datums to the skeleton part. Task 2. Click Modify > Mod Skel . select Skeleton Model . 2.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating the Crank Model Task 1. 2. Task 3. Open SKEL_ENGINE. To create a datum plane.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-14 Fundament als of Des ign . 1. Set up datums in the skeleton so that the crank model retains its orientation to its own datum planes when it rotates.ASM. 2. Click Design Mgr > Ref Control . Click Done . Click OK > Done /Return . 1. For University Use Only . Select the axis shown in the following figure. Select axis A_1 in the skeleton.

Define the crank shaft within the context of the assembly. 4. In the COMPONENT CREATE dialog box.NOTES Figure 12: Adding a Datum Plane 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-15 . retain the selection PART and type [sample_shaft]. Figure 13: Completed Datums Task 4. To create another datum plane. For University Use Only . Select axis A_1. Click Component > Create . click > Through . Click Normal . 1. Click OK > Locate Default Datums > Three Planes > OK . Select DTM2 and click Done . Return to the ASSEMBLY menu.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-16 Fundament als of Des ign . Save the assembly and close the window. Select DTM1 in the skeleton part. click Data Sharing> Copy Geom . 2. In the MISC REF dialog box.NOTES 2. For University Use Only . Click Done/Return . Click OK from the COPY GEOMETRY dialog box. Copy references into the part to create the crank. Select DTM2 and the FRONT datum as the other two planes on the skeleton. Select these two axes. Click Dtm Plane . In the COPY GEOMETRY dialog box. click Axis . Task 5. 3. Select the axes shown in the following figure. Click Ok . 4. Select this datum. in the FEAT CLASS menu. 4. 1. To copy the geometry from the skeleton into the shaft. Select DTM3 on the skeleton to define the first plane. Figure 14: Selecting Features to Copy 3. click Misc Ref > Define .

Sketch the section shown in the following figure. Figure 15: Sketch for Central Shaft 7. 3. 5. 1. 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-17 . Modify the shaft at the part level. For University Use Only .PRT. Specify axis A1 and A2 as references. Finish defining the protrusion. Sketch a circle of 1.25 diameter and finish the sketch. The system automatically adds the geometry to the sample shaft part. 2. Open SAMPLE_SHAFT. click Insert > Protrusion > Extrude > Solid > Both Sides > Done . Click Top and select DTM2. 12. Click Insert > Protrusion > Extrude > Solid > Both Sides > Done . Click Top then select the DTM2 datum plane. 6.NOTES Task 6. 9. Select DTM4 as the sketching plane and click Okay. 11. To create the central shaft of the part. 10.25. Select DTM3 as the sketching plane then click Okay. 8. Create a protrusion on DTM4. Define the depth as 12.

Figure 17: Sketch for Cut For University Use Only . 14. Create an extruded cut on both sides using the same sketching and reference plane. Cut away the opening for the connecting rod.NOTES Figure 16: Sketch for Crank Lobe 13. Remove the material from the outside of the section.5. Finish defining the feature with depth as 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-18 Fundament als of Des ign . Create a circle for the section as shown in the following figure. Extrude to a depth of 1.

Regenerate the assembly a few times to confirm that the shaft maintains its relationship with the assembly.NOTES Figure 18: The Completed Sample Shaft 15. Open SKEL_ENGINE. 16. 17. Erase the assembly and associated models from memory. 18. For University Use Only . Save the part file and close the window.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-19 .ASM again. Save and the assembly. Notice that the sample shaft updated.

NOTES EXERCISE 3: Using the Skeleton to Complete the Assembly Task 1. An assembly cut was added so that you can see the detail in the components. Open COMPLETE_SKELETON.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-20 Fundament als of Des ign . Notice that the components update their location because of the relations.ASM. 2. Regenerate a few times to observe the changes.ASM. 1. Click Regenerate > Automatic . Tips & Techniques: You may want to turn off the display of axes and points. Make modifications to COMPLETE_SKELETON. Figure 19: Modified Skeleton For University Use Only . 3.

The layout drives some of the parameters in the assembly. Select the 4-inch parameter in the table next to the entry STROKE. Click Window > Activate .Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-21 . Select the circular datum curve. Save the layout and close the window. Open COMPLETE_SKELETON. Click Modify > Mod Skel . Try to modify the diameter to 5. Select SAMPLE_MOTOR_SKEL. Task 3.NOTES 4. For University Use Only . 3. Check the changes that you made to the assembly. Select the 5-inch dimension next to the table entry of ROD LENGTH. Type [7]. 4. 1. Click Edit > Value . Regenerate the layout.LAY. Modify the parameters in the layout table. 5. Type [5]. Read the prompt in the MESSAGE AREA. Modify the stroke of the assembly. Figure 20: Displacement Layout 2.PRT from the Model Tree. 1. Task 2.

Task 4.NOTES 2. 1. Select the two connecting rods. Click > OK . Save the assembly and erase all objects from memory. 2. Click Component > Suppress . Check the parent/child association between components. For University Use Only . Click File > Erase > Current . Regenerate the assembly. Suppress the connecting rods in the assembly. Regenerate the assembly. Notice that the pistons retain the reference to the skeleton model. Notice that the system updated all of the models with respect to the skeleton model.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 1-22 Fundament als of Des ign .

Top-down design techniques can be implemented by using the copy geometry features to create new geometry that references the skeleton. Skeletons can aid in parent child relationship definition when all of the components are assembled to the skeleton.Commercial Use Prohibited Des igning w ith Sk eleto ns Pag e 1 1-23 .NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. you learned that: • • • • Skeletons can be used to simulate motion in simple assemblies. Skeletons can be as simple or as complex as necessary. For University Use Only . but are typically components of surface and datum geometry only.

Commercial Use Prohibited - .For University Use Only .

Module Skeletons with Mapped Geometry In this module you learn techniques for sharing information throughout different design groups. Share associative geometrical information between models. you will be able to: • • Construct a skeleton for mapping existing geometry. while maintaining associativity with the top-level assembly.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited . Page 12-1 . Objectives After completing this module.

Provides access to top-level information in the subassembly without resulting in increased regeneration and repaint time.NOTES USING SKELETONS WITH MAPPED GEOMETRY Using a skeleton with mapped geometry in a large design project: • • • • Provides a mechanism for driving and maintaining form. and function in each subassembly that you use at the top level. fit. Constructing Mapped Skeletons You construct a mapped skeleton in an assembly and locate it to the toplevel default datum planes using Component > Create . Enables multiple users to accomplish concurrent engineering. Reduces assembly-level revision conflicts.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Figure 1: Creating Map Skeletons The following table outlines the steps for creating skeletons with mapped geometry. For University Use Only .

shrinkwrap.Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-3 . etc. The data sharing feature does not allow you to select references from more than one component. Note: The assembled components should be those components that define the needed references for the mapped skeleton. This offers the following advantages over manually copying a skeleton with mapped geometry: • • You can select different forms of geometry. 2 3 4 5 Create a new subassembly using a template. Use the shared data features in the skeleton to design models in the subassembly. which allows you to control change propagation. or a single feature that uses all geometric references. curves. you can either create individual datum and surface features.NOTES Table 1: Steps for Creating Skeletons with Mapped Geometry Step 1 Action Add the main components to the top-level assembly using typical assembly techniques. Using Model Geometry When referencing a mapped skeleton in a large design project. The data sharing feature automatically updates when the assembly within which you created the feature is in RAM. Copy needed references into the skeleton using data sharing features—copy geom. such as axes. you can create a Data Sharing feature. • • • For University Use Only . Create a skeleton using a template and assemble in the default location of the subassembly as the first component. The system automatically associates data sharing features to layers of the same name if the selected feature is associated to a layer on the component from which you copied the geometry. To create or modify the skeleton with mapped geometry in the context of the assembly. You can turn the dependency on and off. and surfaces in a single feature. such as copy geom and shrinkwrap.

A magenta edge denotes a two-sided edge.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Using Surface > Copy. tangency line. or silhouette edge of the surface. For University Use Only . you can duplicate any other surface of a feature by selecting only the surfaces that you need. Figure 2: Map Skeleton for Pipe Routing Note: You should avoid copying surfaces of components that have been assembled to the mapped skeleton. This can create a circular reference. • • The yellow edge of a surface denotes a one-sided edge. such as the mounting face on a flange.NOTES Copying Surfaces Surfaces are infinitely thin features.

you can work at the subassembly level by assembling components to the mapped skeleton geometry.Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-5 . Figure 3: Piping Added into Subassembly Figure 4: Pipes Automatically in Top-Level Assembly For University Use Only .NOTES Using the Mapped Skeleton at the Subassembly Level Once surfaces are copied into the subassembly.

Method In Exercise 1. 2. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. you create a skeleton with mapped geometry to define the exhaust system references.ASM. In Exercise 2.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you create a mapped skeleton that captures critical design criteria. Using a mapped skeleton allows you to have high-level assembly geometry in session without having the actual large assembly in RAM. you create the exhaust reference geometry based on the assembly. 1. you create geometry based on a large and complex assembly. Tools Table 2: Skeletons with Mapped Geometry Icons Icons Description Assemble at default location Make selected layers blanked Repaint the Screen EXERCISE 1: Creating a Mapped Skeleton Task 1. The carburetors require an exact fit to the engine.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Create a mapped skeleton with this information inside a new subassembly. You use a mapped skeleton to copy only the references that are needed for the particular component. To save time. Open M_ENGINE. For University Use Only .

Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-7 . Use an existing layer to blank the components. Select CLEAN_UP_DISPLAY.NOTES Figure 5: The Engine Assembly Task 2. Click View > Layers . The screen is fairly cluttered with extraneous parts. > Figure 6: Engine with Layer Blanked For University Use Only . click > Close . 1.

ASM. Click Open > OK . Select M_CARBURETOR. Define the subassembly and mapped skeleton for the carburetor. Select START_ASM. Click Skeleton Model from the dialog box. > OK . Click Done/Return to reach the highest level menu. 3. Click Open > OK . 2. 4. Click Modify > Mod Subasm . In the CREATION OPTIONS dialog box. Click Component > Create > SubAssembly. Type [map_carburetor].ASM. Click Copy From Existing > Browse . Start the definition of the mapped skeleton. Click OK . Click OK . Figure 7: M_Carburator Subassembly For University Use Only .PRT. Select START_PART.NOTES Task 3. click Copy From Existing > Browse . 3. Type [m_carburetor]. click Task 4. In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . click > OK . 1. 1. Click Component > Create . In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box. 2.

Pro/ENGINEER automatically selects all of the surfaces that are adjacent to the selected surface. Select one of the outer edges of the selected surface as shown in the previous figure. Select these mating surfaces Outer edge Inner edge Figure 8: Selecting Surfaces 5. In the COPY GEOMETRY dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-9 . Copy some of the assembly references from the engine into the carburetor subassembly. Copy the surfaces and axis of the mounting locations for the carburetor from the engine block. 6. For University Use Only .NOTES Task 5. 3. 4. double-click Surface Refs . Select both mating surfaces for the carburetor. Click Modify > Mod Part . 2. Click Loop Surfs and select the front surface again. Click Loop Surfs and select the front surface of one of the parts again. 1. Tips & Techniques: To confirm which surfaces you selected.PRT from the Model Tree. Click Done Sel . Click Done /Return twice to access the ASSEMBLY menu. then select one of the inner edges of the surface. Select MAP_CARBURETOR. Click Feature > Create > Data Sharing > CopyGeom . as shown in the following figure. use the Show > Mesh option before clicking Done .

Copied surfaces and axes Figure 9: The Finished Carburetor Map 13. Save M_ENGINE. For University Use Only . 9. To finish copying the surfaces. 10. 12. Open M_CARBURETOR.NOTES 7. Click Axis from the ADD ITEM area.ASM. 8. 14. select the four axes required to mount the carburetors. Click Done from the SURF SELECT menu. Click Done Sel > OK . 11. click OK from the dialog box. Double-click Misc Refs . Repeat the process for the second intake port. Click File > Erase > Not Displayed > OK . Erase models from memory. The assembly should display as shown in the following figure.ASM. Do not click OK yet. Close all windows.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-10 Fundament als of Des ign .

ASM.Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-11 . 1. click > OK . In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box. Reorient the model to a view that is similar to the one shown in the following figure. 1. Create a mapped skeleton that contains this reference geometry. 2. Click Open > OK . 3. Click Component > Create > SubAssembly. Click OK . Add the mapped skeleton as the first component in the subassembly. Click Done /Return to access the ASSEMBLY menu. Open the MAP_CART. 2. Type [exhaust].ASM. Task 3. Start a map for the exhaust assembly by defining a subassembly in the mapped skeleton 1.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Mapping the Exhaust Task 1. For University Use Only . Create a part in the context of the top-level assembly. The exhaust pipes require an exact fit to the engine and frame along with various frame mounting locations. Figure 10: The Map View Task 2. Select START_ASM. Click Copy From Existing > Browse .

Select START_PART. as shown in the following figure. Select EXHAUST.ASM from the Model Tree. 5. Task 4. Double-click Surface Ref . Click Modify > Mod Subasm . click > OK . Select MAP_EXHAUST. 4. Select the mating surfaces of the exhaust ports.PRT. Click Copy From Existing > Browse . 4.PRT from the Model Tree. 3. Click Feature > Create > Data Sharing > CopyGeom . Click Modify > Mod Part . Do not click OK yet.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Open > OK . Click Done /Return twice to access the ASSEMBLY menu.NOTES 2. Figure 11: Map_Exhaust Part 2. 5. Click Done from the SURF SELECT menu. 3. Type [map_exhaust]. For University Use Only . In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box. Add copy data sharing features to create references that you can use at the subassembly level. 6. Click Component > Create > Skeleton Model . Use Loop Surfaces to copy the outer and inner loops of surfaces. 1.

Click Create > Data Sharing > CopyGeom . Click Done Sel > OK > OK .Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-13 . Task 5. Click Axis from the ADD ITEM area. Copy both sides of these frame tubes. Select the four axes required to mount the exhaust pipes. Copy the surfaces of the frame around which the exhaust system must wrap. 1. Create another data sharing feature for the frame.NOTES Select these outer loops Select these mating surfaces Select these inner loops Figure 12: Mapping the Port Surfaces 7. Figure 13: Mapping the Frame For University Use Only . Double-click Misc Refs .

4. 7.NOTES 2. 3. Open MAP_EXHAUST. Select the surfaces shown in the previous figure. Erase models from memory. Close the windows. Remember to select both sides of each cylinder. Figure 14: The Exhaust Mapped skeleton Shaded 6. For University Use Only . Double-click Surface Refs . Click File > Erase > Not Displayed > OK .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 2-14 Fundament als of Des ign . Click OK from the dialog box.PRT. The part should display as shown in the following figure. Save the assembly 5.

NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. For University Use Only . you have learned: • • • • How to make high-level assembly information available at the subassembly level using mapped skeletons. How to create parts while in Assembly model. How to create subassemblies within the context of the large assembly. How to create Data Sharing features that can be used to copy references into mapped skeletons.Commercial Use Prohibited Sk eleto ns with Mapp ed Geomet ry Pag e 1 2-15 .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Control dependencies between components.Module Managing References In this module you learn how dependencies. Page 13-1 . Find dependencies within a design by interrogating parts and assemblies.For University Use Only . develop between various objects and features within Pro/ENGINEER. Objectives After completing this module. you will be able to: • • • Create parent/child dependencies.Commercial Use Prohibited . known as parent/child relationships.

referred to as parent/child relationships. sizing by. – a relationship between an object and another referenced entity. Dependency Benefits of Designing with External References Creating external references offers many benefits. To establish effective dependencies throughout your design model and to avoid unwanted ones. Consolidate control of geometry in skeleton model(s) so that making a change to it ripples down to components that reference it.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Creating Dependencies The following table lists various ways that you can create parent/child relationships within a design model. you frequently create dependencies between objects. such as allowing you to do the following: • • • • Design features that meet overall design intent by locating to. as when locating or sizing a feature within an assembly. Establish relationships between models so that if one or more of them changes. Reference External reference – an entity the system uses to locate or size a feature that exists in another model outside the current model. you should become familiar with Pro/ENGINEER terminology pertaining to parent/child relationships: • • • – an entity used to define a relationship between two items. For University Use Only . and shaping by geometry in the assembly.NOTES DEFINING THE PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIP During the Pro/ENGINEER design process. others change automatically. Easily copy geometry from one model to another.

Use the Align constraint Use Edge or Offset Edge. Between a component and an assembly Create or modify part features and reference other components for the sketching plane. etc. For University Use Only . Select the placement and dimensional references for select and place features.Commercial Use Prohibited M a n a g i n g Ref e ren ce s Pag e 1 3. Create an assembly level feature and reference a component during feature creation. edge. Dimension to or reference existing geometry. dimensioning reference. horizontal or vertical reference plane. Create concentric arcs and circles only when you select existing geometry. Use Dependent when copying a feature. Use Mirror. or you use the New Names option at the assembly level. or Cutout to create a dependency between components but not to the assembly (one part then depends on another part for its geometry).3 . or point (Up to Curve. Between two components in an assembly Assemble a component to other components in the assembly (the component then depends on the other components for its placement within the assembly). Up to Surface. Use the depth options that require you to select a reference such as a surface. and Thru Until). aligning reference. Create an assembly level feature and make the feature visible at the part level. datum. Up to Point. during part creation Action Select a sketching plane and reference plane. Merge.NOTES Table 1: Creating Parent/Child Relationships Dependency Between two features.

You can access information about a model by using the TREE pull-down menu. you should become familiar with the part or assembly and determine how it was constructed. This tool shows only the regenerated objects in their respective order by default. models. components. dependencies.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can customize the format to meet your needs. • • • Regeneration Information Parent/Child Component • • Model BOM Model Tree Tool The Model Tree tool can provide you with dynamic feedback concerning the creation of an object within Part and Assembly mode. you can use any of the following three tools. Figure 1: Model Tree Tool (Separate Window) For University Use Only . To interrogate existing objects.NOTES INTERROGATING EXISTING OBJECTS Before making design changes to a model constructed by another user. however. and Bill of Materials (BOM). Info Pull-Down Menu You can use the Info option to obtain information about regeneration.

Commercial Use Prohibited M a n a g i n g Ref e ren ce s Pag e 1 3.5 . or assembly. then click Actions > Set Current . select a feature. you can interrogate the model using the Global Reference Viewer. you can list the parent or child references of components or features that have internal and/or external references to the active item. component. Figure 2: Global Reference Viewer Listing Parent/Child References Using this Global Reference Viewer tool. Using the PARENT AND CHILD REFERENCES dialog box. you can interrogate the selected reference to determine the following: • • • Parent or child references based on the creation of features with external references Models that have parent/child relationships Placement constraints that develop parent/child relationships For University Use Only . To set a different current item.NOTES Global Reference Viewer To identify internal and external references within a part or assembly.

NOTES Limiting the Scope of Information Using the FILTER SETTINGS. The objects that have parent relationships rather than objects that have child references. For University Use Only . you can define the scope for creating references to other models in a working session of Pro/ENGINEER. Setting Object-Specific Reference Control When you specify the scope setting and reference-handling scheme for each object individually. you can also determine the hierarchy to the references associated with a model. Determining Relationship Hierarchy Using the GLOBAL REFERENCE VIEWER. You can access the REFERENCE CONTROL dialog box using any of the following methods. The reference type. Figure 3: Relationship Hierarchy CONTROLLING INTERDEPENDENCIES Using Utilities > Reference Control . You can customize it to show: • • • The component you want to view in the initial tree. the system stores the information with the object and applies it to each assembly in which the object appears.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can define the scope of information that the Global Reference Viewer provides.

Commercial Use Prohibited M a n a g i n g Ref e ren ce s Pag e 1 3.7 . Method: For a particular part or skeleton For a part in the assembly For a skeleton in the assembly For a subassembly For the top-level assembly of the active assembly window From the Model Tree Action: Click Part Setup > Ref Control Click Modify > Mod Part > Ref Control Click Modify > Mod Skel > Ref Control Click Modify > Mod Subasm > Design Mgr > Ref Control Click Assembly > Design Mgr > Ref Control Select any object with the right mouse button.NOTES Table 2: Accessing the Reference Control Dialog Box. Figure 4: REFERENCE CONTROL Dialog Box Reference handling options define the system behavior that should occur when you attempt to create an external reference that violates the defined scope. then click Ref Control from the pop-up menu. Selection settings provide color feedback for out of scope references and selection options for out of scope references. you can select settings from the REFERENCE CONTROL dialog box. For University Use Only . Reference Control Settings To specify the scope.

NOTES Note: If you bring into session the model containing the original reference. Using Copy Geometry Features to Track and Control External References Using the Copy Geom option. Note: While assembling components into a subassembly at the toplevel assembly. but the original reference has been deleted or suppressed. even if you have local backup copies of the references. If you retrieve the subassembly without the top-level assembly in session. you can easily track and control external references by consolidating them into one copy geometry feature.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can specify assembly references (among the constraints) that are outside of the subassembly into which you are assembling. For University Use Only . By changing the Dependency element of the feature. component placement fails because the references are missing. the system places you in Feature Resolve Mode. you can specify whether the system should reflect changes made to the original model in the copy.

1. In Exercise 2. In Exercise 3. Tips & Techniques: To obtain more information about the regenerating feature. Method In Exercise 1. Notice that the features are listed in the order of creation.Commercial Use Prohibited M a n a g i n g Ref e ren ce s Pag e 1 3. Investigate the regeneration order. Click Info > Model from the menubar. 3.PRT. Close the window. Click Utilities > Model Player to regenerate the model one feature at a time. Open PISTON_PC. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. click Info Feat to display feature information or Show Dims to view the dimensions used to create the feature. For University Use Only . you investigate the head part to determine how it was constructed and identify the parent/child relationships of certain features.9 . 4. you investigate the front suspension assembly to determine how it was constructed and identify the dependencies that were established.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you investigate a model to determine how it is constructed and to identify the parent/child relationships. you use the global reference viewer to interrogate the model and you use Reroute and Redefine to change the references. Interrogate the model to determine feature dependencies. Determine how it is being regenerated. 2. EXERCISE 1: Modifying the Piston Task 1.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-10 Fundament als of Des ign . expand all of the items. in order to determine how the part was constructed. Tips & Techniques: It is always good practice to use Setup > Name to assign names to important features. Use the Model Tree to interrogate the model. Figure 5: Expanded Model Tree For University Use Only .NOTES Task 2. 1. In the MODEL TREE. 2. Click Utilities >Customize Screen > Options > Display as separate window > OK.

Task 4. The system lists DTM3 because it is the sketching plane reference for the feature. 3. Review the REFERENCE INFORMATION WINDOW. Click Close . In the MODEL TREE. Select EDGE ID 12 and note the dimensional reference to the top front edge of the piston. right-click ROD_PIN_HOLE > Info > Parent/Child Info . Figure 6: Reference Information Window 2. Interrogate the first cut feature to identify any parent/child relationships. Click the + next to PROTRUSION ID 7. Also note that AXIS A_1 was referenced. 1. For University Use Only . 2. 1. Interrogate the individual references. Select SURFACE ID 13.NOTES Task 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-11 . This highlighted surface is the reference plane.

Click Same Ref to accept the bottom horizontal reference. 2. Change the dimensional reference for the rod pin hole from the edge to the surface. 4. click Same Ref . Read the prompt in the MESSAGE AREA and accept the existing sketching plane. For University Use Only . right-click ROD_PIN_HOLE > Edit References. 1. Figure 7: The Piston Model Task 5.NOTES Tip: You should avoid selecting edges as references if you can select a coplanar surface in the model.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Same Ref . Click Yes to roll back the part. In the MODEL TREE. It would be more appropriate to dimension to the top piston surface. When AXIS A_1 highlights for the dimensioning reference. 3.

Finish the redefinition of the feature. For the next dimensioning reference.NOTES 5. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . Click Top then DTM2. Pro/ENGINEER automatically regenerates the section to determine if it is still valid. Click Sketch Plane . To avoid Sketcher regeneration. Select the top surface of the piston. Task 7. [Optional] Use the information options that you learned previously to check the parent/child references. To change the section. 1. double-click Section from the dialog box. Task 6. click Reroute . 3. This is an unnecessary parent/child relationship. Save the model. > OK . 2. In the Model Tree. 3. Change the reference. 2. Recall that the orientation reference of the model was the bottom of the piston when the dimensional reference was the top of the piston. For University Use Only . click Alternate. Click Note: The main difference between redefining and rerouting a sketching and reference plane is that redefining automatically brings up the dialog box. The system places you in Sketcher mode. close all windows. Retain ALTERNATE as the default.Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-13 . 4. 1. Click Same Ref to retain DTM3 as the sketching plane. right-click Rod_Pin_Hole > Redefine .

1. 1. Use the Info menu to interrogate the model and determine feature dependencies. the system completes the regeneration of the model. Click Info > Global Ref Viewer . For University Use Only . Click Utilities > Model Player to regenerate the model one feature at a time. It is good practice to determine how a model was constructed before making any changes to it. If you click Quit .PRT. Task 2. Investigate how the engine head part was created. Note: You do not have to step through every feature using Continue .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-14 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 8: Engine Head Part 2. Retrieve HEAD_PC.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Breaking External References Task 1.

ASM. Note that this feature has an external parent reference to ENGINE_PC. View individual feature references as shown in the following figure. Identify all features that have external references to other parts. Select the FILTER SETTING bar to expand it. Click Feature in the REF TYPE area.NOTES 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-15 . The GLOBAL REFERENCE VIEWER only displays those features with external references. Figure 9: Global Reference Viewer 3. 4. Click All in the REF EXTENT area. Click External in the REF EXTENT area. Click All Objects in the DISPLAYED OBJECTS area . Double-click GASKET_MOUNT to make it the current object. For University Use Only .

Click Modify > Mod Part .PRT using the + icon then select GASKET_MOUNT . For University Use Only . Select HEAD_PC from the Model Tree.ASM. 3. In the MODEL TREE. Expand the HEAD_PC.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-16 Fundament als of Des ign . 1. 2. Click Feature > Redefine . Open ENGINE_PC. Use the MODEL TREE to select the GASKET_MOUNT.NOTES Figure 10: Showing Features with External References Task 3. Redefine the GASKET_MOUNT cut. click Tree > Item Display > Features. Redefine the GASKET_MOUNT feature to be independent of the assembly.

Specify references for the centerlines to the part datums. Select DTM3 and DTM2. In the OPEN REP dialog box. then click Sketch . Add two diameter dimensions and a horizontal dimension as shown in the following figure. Click Delete .Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-17 . Click Sketch > References from the menu bar. 7. click Master Rep > OK . 6. 8. For University Use Only . Select all references in the dialog box. Double-click Section from the CUT: EXTRUDE dialog box. 5.NOTES Figure 11: Gasket Mount in Model Tree 4. Click Close .

Activate the HEAD_PC. Double-click HEAD_PC.PRT window. After the section regenerates successfully. External and All Objects are selected in the REF TYPE.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-18 Fundament als of Des ign . Use the REFERENCE VIEWER to verify that the system has removed the external references for this feature. 11. 10. Click Info > Global Ref Viewer . REF EXTENT and DISPLAYED OBJECTS areas. > OK from the 12.PRT . Notice that HEAD_PC.PRT has no external parental references. Save and erase the assembly from memory. 13.NOTES Figure 12: Sketcher Dimensions for the Gasket Mount 9. For University Use Only . click dialog box. Make sure that Feature. Set up the filter options to show external feature references.

NOTES Figure 13: Global Reference Viewer Dialog Box 14. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . close all windows. Save the model. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-19 .

To identify the referenced entities. AXIS A_17. Interrogate the assembly to determine its regeneration order. Click Info > Component from the menubar. For University Use Only . select the first ALIGN constraint from the dialog box. highlights in magenta. 2. AXIS A_2.ASM. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-20 Fundament als of Des ign .ASM. Select PC_SHOCK_RF. Task 2. Select the other two constraints and observe which components highlight on the screen. Close the dialog box. 1. highlights in cyan. Figure 14: The Front Suspension 2. The component reference. Interrogate the assembly to identify references between components and determine how components were assembled. Open PC_SUSPENSION. The assembly reference. 1.NOTES EXERCISE 3: Interrogating the Suspension Assembly Task 1. Investigate the order in which components regenerate in the assembly.

Right-click PC_KNUCKLE_RF. Notice that the PC_KNUCKLE_LF part was created as a mirrored component from the component PC_KNUCKLE_RF part. 2. Notice that this component has parent references outside this assembly. 1.PRT.ASM .PRT is a parent reference.NOTES Task 3. Notice that PC_FRNT_SKEL.Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-21 . Tips & Techniques: You can use Highlight in the TREE pull-down menu of the GLOBAL REFERENCE VIEWER dialog box to select a feature or component and highlight it on the screen.PRT . double-click PC_SHOCK_RF. All. Close the window.PRT and the PC_WHEEL. Expand PC_WHEEL_HUB_LF. Determine why there is an external reference between the PC_WISHBONE. Use the Global Reference Viewer to interrogate model information. 2. REF EXTENT and DISPLAYED OBJECTS areas.PRT . Task 4. All Objects from REF TYPE. In the dialog box. right-click PC_WHEEL. Recall that the A_17 axis is an alignment reference for assembling the component. 3. click Component. The INFORMATION WINDOW explains that this component is part of an interchange assembly. Double-click PC_KNUCKLE_LF. 6.ASM > Info . Click Feature from the REF TYPE area. 1.ASM. Repeat the process for the PC_KNUCKLE_LF.PRT > Full Path . Change the current model. 4. In the MAIN TREE. For University Use Only . shown in the following figures. Use the GLOBAL REFERENCE VIEWER to interrogate component information. 5. In the MAIN TREE. Click Info > Global Reference Viewer menu bar. double-click PC_WISHBONE. In the PARENT / CHILD TREE.ASM by using the + icon.

8. to determine what kind of references were established. as well as how they were established. For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 15: PC_KNUCKLE_LF Part Figure 16: PC_KNUCKLE_RF Part 7. Save and erase the entire assembly when you have finished.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 3-22 Fundament als of Des ign . [Optional] Use the GLOBAL REFERENCE VIEWER to investigate other components inside this front suspension assembly.

• • For University Use Only . You must consider the effects downstream when you establish references.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. you learned that: • Parent Child relationships are an integral part of the design process. The Global Reference Viewer should be the first tool to use on a model created by someone else.Commercial Use Prohibited Managi ng Refe rence s Pag e 1 3-23 . The Design Manager is an important tool that allows you to control what references you want to retain and those you want to modify or delete.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Module Project Part 1: Design Intent This is the first of four major stages in a Top-Down Design project in which you are provided all critical design information without step-by-step instructions. The broad focus of Part 1 is on the capture of design intent and the creation of a product structure.For University Use Only . Objectives In this module you will complete the following: • • Capture initial project parameters and design intent in Pro/ENGINEER using a layout. Page 14-1 .Commercial Use Prohibited . Develop the initial product structure in assembly mode.

Figure 1: Completed Fan Model For University Use Only . as they had traditionally manufactured only for the industrial market. a well-known design and manufacturing company in Massachusetts. F3 is committed to creating a new household product design before the current fiscal quarter ends. Internally. the newest adaptation of F3’s popular VORTEX commercial line of air management products.NOTES PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND REQUIREMENTS Scenario You are an engineer at the Faneuil Fan Factory (F3). the design is known as the VORTEX1200. Creating fans for individual consumer use is a new market area for F3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . The rapid development of intelligent Pro/ENGINEER models is critical to continued success at F3. VORTEX 1200 Project Goal The goal of the entire project is to create a flexible assembly model for the oscillating desk fan (shown in the following figures) using Top-Down Design techniques.

Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4.NOTES Figure 2: Rear View of the Fan Assembly Figure 3: Exploded View of Fan Assembly For University Use Only .3 .

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES Figure 4: Fan Layout Information Figure 5: Layout Table For University Use Only .

The height of the fan must be easily modifiable from the base to the tilt axis and from the tilt axis to the main axis. Initial values are [2. A final decision from F3’s design team has not been issued. and a depth of 2. There is a clearance value of [0. Also. or 5 fan blades.50] between the fan tip and the cage. The unit must have a total oscillation spread of at least 45°.5 .25] respectively. The switch unit controls power to the fan and can also switch the oscillation on and off with a patented gearbox mounted Electro-clutch. The unit will be modeled without wiring or electrical connections.75. according to recent customer surveys.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4. The fan must adapt to use 3. A hole with a [0. The unit must be able to pivot vertically 90° to allow for the ‘wallmount’ capability. • • • • • The entire Fan model must fit in a 12x12x15 container for shipping and shelf space requirements. As per F3 standards. The Fan’s base needs to have a ‘sculpted’ look. The Tilt axis height may get drastically modified for a ‘floor-stand’ version. the general styling of the fan will have a ‘retro’ look and feel. and therefore need not be modeled or assembled at this stage of development. The fan blades must fit within a safety cage diameter of 11 inches. 4. • • • • • • For University Use Only .125] and [4. the blade diameter is defined by the cage diameter. All hardware fasteners will be standard from F3’s hardware library. They will design the wiring and install a F3 standard cord-mounted switch unit. The Fan will use F3’s standard ¼ HP 110-volt motor/gearbox Drivetrain Assembly as on the VORTEX-1800 model.50] diameter (this may change) must be left in the lower side of the rear housing for the electrical group.NOTES Design Requirements The following is a list of requirements and parameters defined by the product management team at F3.

Task 2. Setup the layout for sketching.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Clear all RAM and change the working directory to the PROJECT folder. In Exercise 2. EXERCISE 1: Capturing Initial Design Intent Task 1. you develop an initial product structure in the assembly. Set the following Sketch preferences. For University Use Only .LAY. 1. Use the options for EMPTY and C-SIZE. Prepare for working on the project and create the layout file. 2. 1. Method In Exercise 1. you use a layout in Pro/ENGINEER to capture initial project parameters and design intent.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you capture the initial project parameters and design intent in Pro/ENGINEER. and then develop the initial product structure. Create a new layout named VORTEX-1200.

1. For University Use Only .250]. The overall size is roughly 8” wide by 12” tall.NOTES Figure 6: SKETCH PREFERENCES Dialog Box 2. Task 3. Create the 2D geometry approximately as shown in the following figure. 3. Enable the Parametric Sketch option. Click View > Draft Grid > Grid Params and set the X&Y Spacing to [0. Sketch layout geometry.7 .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4.

Add the dimensions and axes. Add the details. Figure 8: Adding Dimensions and Axes For University Use Only . type [0] temporarily. When prompted for values. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES Figure 7: Creating 2D Geometry Task 4.

8. as shown in the following figure. Create the table and fill in only the captions (first two rows). INTERFACE_HEIGHT. 6. Modify the CAGE_DEPTH. BLADE_CLEARANCE.9 . Use the Real Number option and the values as shown in the table. TILT_ANGLE. 7. 4. Create the relation: blade_dia = cage_dia – (blade_clearance*2) 5. Type the entries in the NOTES column as plain text. For Example: MAX_HEIGHT. Create parameters for MAX_HEIGHT. CAGE_DIA.NOTES Task 5. Regenerate the Layout. MAX_WIDTH. and ELEC_HOLE_DIA. and TILT_AXIS_HEIGHT dimensions to the values shown in the table.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4. MAIN_HEIGHT. MAX_DEPTH. NUM_BLADES. For Example: &MAX_HEIGHT. Create a table of modifiable parameters. 3. For University Use Only . Type the values in the VALUE column as parametric notes. 1. Type the values in the PARAMETER column as plain text. 2. MIN_OSC_ANGLE.

as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . Finish the layout.NOTES Figure 9: Critical Specifications Task 6.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-10 Fundament als of Des ign . 1. Finish the layout.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4.11 . Save the layout and close the window.NOTES Figure 10: Completed Layout 2.

Note that the F3_CAGE-11. 3. . Refer to the following figure. create the 2.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Developing Initial Product Structure Task 1. Create a new Assembly called VORTEX-1200 using the default template. Create a new assembly and product structure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 4-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Create the BASE_UNIT assembly and its components using the start models in the PROJECT directory. and default assembly constraints. F3_HUB. 1. Using the Model Tree and the VORTEX-1200_SKEL part and the FAN_UNIT assembly using the start models in the PROJECT directory. (an existing assembly from the F3 database) 4. For University Use Only . and default assembly constraints. Use the Include option to include the F3_DRIVETRAIN assembly. Create the remainder of the models in the FAN_UNIT assembly. and F3_BLADE models already exist and are Included . 5.

Save the VORTEX-1200 Assembly.13 . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I Pag e 1 4.NOTES Figure 11: Model Tree 6.

Commercial Use Prohibited - .For University Use Only .

and interfaces. you focus on the creation of an intelligent skeleton model.Commercial Use Prohibited . Objectives In this module you will: • • • • Create basic skeleton features. Create skeleton features for motion. space claims. Page 15-1 . Create skeleton features for space claims.For University Use Only .Module Project Part II: Skeleton Design In part two of the Top-Down Design project. The skeleton involves basic skeleton features. motion. Create skeleton features for interfaces.

(Or use the presaved BASE. Rename the curve to [POST_CRV]. 2. Rename the TOP datum. Open the skeleton part and create the initial features.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Creating the Basic Skeleton Task 1. Open the VORTEX-1200_SKEL model. Figure 1: POST_CRV 3. Click Setup > Name. Create the sketched datum curve.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . as shown in the following figure. Rename the curve to [BASE_CRV]. Select the TOP plane and type [GROUND]. 1. Sketch a datum curve on the GROUND plane. Figure 2: BASE_CRV For University Use Only .SEC file).

Create a mapkey for renaming to improve your efficiency.3 . as shown in the following figure. Create the TILT_REF plane through the upper vertex of the POST_CRV.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. angle of 15° from TILT_REF). Figure 4: Creating TILT AXIS and TILT ANG Plane For University Use Only . Figure 3: TILT_REF plane 5. and the TILT_ANG plane (though the TILT axis. several datum features will be created and renamed using Setup > Name .NOTES Tips and Techniques: In the following exercises. Create the TILT axis (intersection of the TILT_REF and RIGHT planes). 4.

NOTES 6. Create the TILT_PERP plane though the TILT axis and normal to the TILT_ANG plane.125] and [4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . as shown in the following figure. Redefine its attributes to Fit Feature and select the INTERFACE plane. Figure 5: Planes Offset from TILT_ANG 7. Figure 6: TILT PERP Plane For University Use Only .50] respectively from TILT_ANG as shown in the following figure. Create the INTERFACE and MAIN_DRIVE planes offset [2.

Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . and continue to the next exercise.50 to create the PIVOT_REF plane. Redefine the attributes to Fit Feature and select the INTERFACE plane. Figure 7: Offset PIVOT_REF Plane 9. Figure 8: Create PIVOT Axis 10.5 . Save the model. Create the PIVOT axis at the intersection of PIVOT_REF and FRONT. Offset the TILT_PERP plane 1.NOTES 8.

Rename the axis to LINK_FIXED. Note: In this chapter. and rename the curve to FIXED_CRV. Create datum features that will function as the fixed attachment point for the linkage on the support arm. Return to the default view.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Create a datum point on the nearest vertex of the FIXED_CRV you just created. 1. Use only the PIVOT axis as a reference in sketcher. 3. several figures have been created with some Datum planes removed from display with the Hide option for clarity. Create the sketched datum curve on the INTERFACE plane using PIVOT_REF as the RIGHT reference. For University Use Only .NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Skeleton Features for Motion Task 1. Figure 9: FIXED_CRV 2. Create an axis Through the point just created and Normal to the INTERFACE plane.

1.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. Create a YES/NO Parameter named OSCILLATE. 3. Figure 11: Sketching LINKAGE curve 2. drag the angle value from 5-355°. Using the thumbwheel.7 . The curve should move freely in an oscillating motion. and rename the curve to LINKAGE. Use only the PIVOT and LINK_FIXED axes as references in Sketcher. Set the initial value to YES . For University Use Only . Create the sketched datum curve shown below on the INTERFACE plane using PIVOT_REF as the RIGHT reference. Create datum curves to represent the linkage. Sketch 3 lines and a construction circle. 4. Set the CONFIG option shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 10: Create LINK_FIXED Axis Task 2.

d31 in this example. as shown in the following figure. the OSCILLATE parameter may be toggled to YES or NO to toggle the linkage rotation on and off. Note: For future use. Click Relations > . (Sketch two lines. regenerate the model several times to test the operation of the linkage. Name this curve RT_ANG_CRV. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 12: Setting Config Options 5. Select the datum curve. and note the dimension number.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . 7.) For University Use Only . Figure 13: Entering Relation 6. Then type the relation. Return the linkage to the starting position of approximately 85°. Create another sketched curve using the same references. After exiting the RELATIONS EDITOR.

Figure 15: Create MAIN_FRONT Plane 2. and through the PIVOT axis.9 . For University Use Only . 1. Create the MAIN_PERP plane through the pivot axis and normal to the MAIN_FRONT plane.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. Create a plane through the curve segment shown below. Create additional datum features using the linkage as references. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 14: Create RT_ANG_CRV Curve Task 3. Name the plane MAIN_FRONT and resize it to the RT_ANG_CRV feature.

Create an axis named MAIN at the intersection of the MAIN_DRIVE and MAIN_FRONT planes. Figure 17: Create MAIN Axis 4. as shown in the following figure. Figure 18: Create LINKAGE_PTS Datum Point For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-10 Fundament als of Des ign . Create a datum point feature named LINKAGE_PTS at the linkage vertices. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 16: Create MAIN_PERP Plane 3.

Figure 20: SKEL_MAIN Coord System 7.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. Figure 19: AUX_ROTATE and AUX_ARM Axes 6. MAIN_PERP. and MAIN_FRONT planes. and LINKAGE to control the display of the many skeleton features.NOTES 5. Create the SKEL_MAIN coordinate system at the intersection of the MAIN_DRIVE. Orient the X. Y and Z axes as shown in the following figure.11 . For University Use Only . FAN. Create the AUX_ROTATE and the AUX_ARM axes through the previous points and normal to the INTERFACE plane. 8. Delete all default layers and create three new layers named BASE. Add items to the layers as shown in the following figure.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Save the model.NOTES Figure 21: New Layers 9.

Create a space claim for the base. first open the Drivetrain assembly to allow the shrinkwrap feature to regenerate properly. Open and examine the DRIVETRAIN assembly. Figure 22: Extruding Surface Task 2. Click Coord Sys > Sel By Menu > dt_main > Select . Select the F3_DRIVETRAIN. Then close the window. 1. 3. Create a space claim for the already-designed F3 drivetrain assembly by using an external shrinkwrap. Click Insert > Shared Data > Shrinkwrap from Other Model > Open . Use the option for Capped Ends and extrude upward [2. using an extruded surface. Increase the Quality Level to Then click Done > OK. as shown in the following figure. Task 1. For University Use Only . P ro j e c t P a rt I I and set . 4.0]. 1. Then select the SKEL_MAIN coordinate system.13 .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5.ASM.NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Skeleton Features for Space Claims NOTE: When using the finished version of this skeleton. Create an extruded surface using the BASE datum curve. 2.

Create a space claim for the cage and fan blades. Sketch circle of diameter 11. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 23: Drivetrain Shrinkwrap Task 3. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-14 Fundament als of Des ign .0. Refer to the following figure Figure 24: Selecting Sketching Plane 2. Create an extruded surface using the Both Sides and Open Ends options. Select the surface shown as the sketching plane and use the INTERFACE datum as the TOP reference. For University Use Only .

375] for the depth.15 .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5.NOTES Figure 25: Sketching Circle 3. Use Blind for the depth option and type [ 1. Figure 26: Completed surface For University Use Only .

Add these features to the BASE and FAN layers accordingly. 3. DRIVE_CLAIM. Test the oscillation of the skeleton by regenerating through one complete rotation of the linkage. Save the model. and then modify the TILT_ANG plane back to 15°. Test the skeleton operation. For University Use Only . Rename the three space claim surfaces to BASE_CLAIM. 4. Test the oscillation at 90°. and BLADE_CLAIM respectively. 1. Then modify to 90°.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-16 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Task 4. Test the tilt action by modifying the TILT_ANG plane to 45°. 360°. 2. 5.

Figure 27: Setting Layer Display 2.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. Task 1. as shown in the following figure. 1. using GROUND as a TOP reference. and the TILT axis as the only Sketcher reference. Create a flat surface sketched on the FRONT plane. Create the first interface between the base and support arm.17 .NOTES EXERCISE 4: Creating Skeleton Features for Interfaces NOTE: When using the finished version of this skeleton. open the Drivetrain assembly first to allow the shrinkwrap feature to regenerate properly. Set the layer display. Figure 28: Flat Surface For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure.

Name the two interface surfaces BASE_INTF and PIVOT_INTF respectively. Task 3. Figure 30: Setting Layer Status 2. Create the second interface between the fan and base assemblies at the pivot axis. Create a flat surface with the Use Prev option. and add only the BASE_INTF surface to the BASE layer. For University Use Only . and the PIVOT and LINK_FIXED axes as the only Sketcher references. 1. Create the interface between the drive arm and link 1. Reference the AUX_ARM axis as the only Sketcher reference. using FRONT as a bottom reference.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-18 Fundament als of Des ign . as shown in the following figure. Set the layer display. as shown in the following figure. Create a flat surface sketched on the INTERFACE plane. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Task 2. Figure 29: Second Flat Surface 2.

5. Add the TEMP surface to the BASE layer and the ARM_LINK_INTF surface to the LINKAGE layer. Modify the height of the BASE_CLAIM to 1.25.NOTES Figure 31: Creating third Flat Surface 3. For University Use Only .19 . 4. 6.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I I Pag e 1 5. Display all layers. Notice the circular space claim for the blades is very close to the base. Figure 32: All surfaces displayed 7. Offset the TEMP surface upward 0. Modify the TILT_ANG plane to 0° and test the oscillation of the skeleton. Name the offset surface ARM_LINK_INTF. Name the surface TEMP.125.

8.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 5-20 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . Save the model.NOTES Note: Notice how one interface is completely stationary (BASE_INTF). 9. one will tilt but not oscillate (PIVOT_INTF) and one tilts and oscillates (ARM_LINK_INTF). Return the TILT_ANG plane to 15°.

Communicate Skeleton information to components. Page 16-1 .Module Project Part III: Creating Components In Project Part III. Objectives In this module you will complete the following:: • • • Communicate Layout information to the skeleton.Commercial Use Prohibited . Build components using skeleton information.For University Use Only . you focus on the communication of geometrical and parametric information to create individual components in the assembly.

For University Use Only . 6. then open the Skeleton. 3. 7. When prompted for a dimension value. Create the part models with fewer and simpler features than shown. Enter MAIN_HEIGHT for the value and click Yes .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Modify the MAIN_DRIVE plane and select the height dimension.50 dimension. and click Yes . Declare the skeleton to the layout and then link some of the Layout parameters to skeleton dimensions. 2.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Communicating Layout Information to the Skeleton Task 1. type [tilt_axis_height]. Repeat for the CAGE_DIA and CAGE_DEPTH parameters by modifying the BLADE_CLAIM surface. Click Setup > Declare > Declare Lay > Vortex-1200 . 8. The following exercises outline the communication of data from skeleton to part models. Assemble the finished models to the skeleton instead. 2. 5. 4. Modify the POST_CRV. Repeat for the INTERFACE plane and the INTERFACE_HEIGHT parameter. But the interfaces between modeled components should interact properly. If you are short on time you can: 1. Notes: Other Layout parameters will be declared later in the project. The part models you create in this module do not need to be exactly as shown in the figures. 1. and select the 3. Open the Layout. Repeat for the TILT_ANGLE parameter by modifying the TILT_ANG plane.

Figure 1: Selecting Geometry 5. Select the MAIN_BASE part from the Model Tree. Notice the DEFAULT constraint. Using the Surface Refs . Click > Insert Feature > Data Sharing > Copy Geom . 4. Create a second Copy Geom feature referencing the large BASE_CLAIM surface. Communicate skeleton geometry to the model.3 . select the geometry as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. Since this is a stationary component. Open the top-level assembly. 2. 3. it is acceptable to leave the default constraint.NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Features in the Main Base Part Task 1. 1. Curve Refs and Misc Refs options appropriately. Select the MAIN_BASE part from the Model Tree and redefine it.

the overall goal will be met.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . 2. best practice would be to first transfer the geometry to separate skeletons at each subassembly level. or use your own methods. Open the MAIN_BASE part and Hide the Copy Geom of the BASE_CLAIM surface. and then transfer again to the individual models. Create basic features to form the post. Create protrusions and other features approximately as shown. As long as the geometry maps to the copied skeleton geometry appropriately. Note: The following series of figures illustrate one way to create features in this model. as shown in the following figure. features are copied directly with Copy Geometry features. even though they are actually in subassemblies. you could have first created Publish Geometry features at the skeleton level to make the selection of geometry easier with subsequent Copy Geometry features. If time constraints of the class were not an issue. Create a protrusion to reference the circular interface surface and extrude both sides. 1. For University Use Only . the geometry is transferred directly from the skeleton to the part models.NOTES NOTE: For this project. In order to keep references organized. In addition. Task 2.

Round the backside. Figure 3: Creating Cut 4. Figure 4: Creating Cut and Full Round 5. Create a cut referencing the interface surface. For University Use Only .5 .NOTES Figure 2: Creating a Protrusion 3.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. Create another cut referencing the interface surface and a full round.

Add a variable radius round on the front side. Merge this surface with the BASE_CLAIM surface. For University Use Only . Be sure that it overhangs the BASE_CLAIM surface in width and depth. Create an extruded surface to merge with the BASE_CLAIM.) Figure 6: Variable Radius Task 3. (Hint: A datum point was used at the apex of the round.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Create an extruded surface using a spline. 1. Figure 7: Overhanging Extruded Surface 2.NOTES Figure 5: Rounded Back Side 6. as shown in the following figure.

Color all surfaces using the defined LT_BROWN appearance.MAP file. Add a final round and blank all unneeded layers. 6. 5. Create a protrusion with the Use Quilt option to ‘fill’ the enclosed surface quilt.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6.7 . Load the PROJECT_COLORS.NOTES Figure 8: Merging Surfaces 3. Figure 9: Variable Radius Round 4. 7. There is a palette of colors stored in your PROJECT directory. Create a variable radius round. Save the model and close the window. For University Use Only . Refer to the following figure. Figure 10: Coloring Surfaces 8.

Remove the default constraint. and RIGHT planes in the part to the FRONT. Communicate skeleton geometry to the model. Figure 11: Selecting Geometry For University Use Only . Notice the default constraint. Add three Align Coincident constraints between the FRONT. 4. Select the SUPPORT_ARM part from the Model Tree and redefine it. 1. 3. 5. Click > Insert Feature > Data Sharing > Co py Geom. select the geometry (2 surfaces and 2 axes) as shown in the following figure. 2. TOP.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . and TILT_PERP planes in the skeleton respectively. Using Surface Refs and Misc Refs appropriately. you cannot accept the default constraint. Since this is a moving component. Select the SUPPORT_ARM part from the Model Tree. Open the top-level assembly. 6. TILT_ANG.NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Features in the Support_Arm Part Task 1.

As long as the geometry maps to the copied skeleton geometry appropriately.9 . 7. Create protrusions and other features approximately as shown.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. Create a series of general blends by selecting sections. Each is sketched on an offset plane from the neighboring geometry. the overall goal will be met. Use the Tangency option for smooth transitions. or use your own methods. Then create two planar datum curves. Open the SUPPORT_ARM and create two protrusions that reference the lower interface surface.NOTES Note: The following series of figures illustrate one way to create features in this model. as shown in the following figure. Figure 13: Creating Planar Datum Curves 9. For University Use Only . Figure 12: Creating Protrusions Referencing Interface Surfaces 8.

Figure 15: Creating Rounds 11.NOTES Figure 14: Creating Blend 10. Create a through cut (bottom) and two blind holes (top) referencing the interface geometry. Create rounds at the lower end of the model.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-10 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 16: Creating Cut and Blind Holes For University Use Only .

Figure 17: Coloring Surfaces 13.NOTES 12. Blank any unnecessary layers and color all surfaces using the defined LT_BROWN appearance.11 .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. Save the model. For University Use Only .

Tips and Techniques: The selection of Coordinate Systems will be common in upcoming exercise tasks. Rename the feature to LINK_CSYS. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-12 Fundament als of Des ign . 1. Open the top-level assembly window. 6. use Sel By Menu rather than un-blanking layers. and then open the Skeleton. Since this is a moving component. Select the LINK part from the Model Tree and redefine it. Create a Coordinate System using the 2Axes option. Open the top-level assembly. Figure 19: The LINK_CSYS 4. To easily select them. Communicate skeleton geometry to the model. Add a CoordSys constraint between the LINK_CSYS in the skeleton and the default Csys in the LINK part. Figure 18: Selecting Axis and Curve 3.NOTES EXERCISE 4: Creating Features in the Link Part Task 1. Select the axis and curve as shown in the following figure and click Y > X > Done . For University Use Only . 5. delete the default constraint.

and color the part using the DK_GREY appearance.13 . Create a Copy Geom feature in the link part (2 axes and 3 surfaces) as shown in the following figure. as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. Figure 22: Creating Holes 10.NOTES 7. Figure 20: Copy Geom Feature in Link Part 8. Create the protrusion referencing the copy geometry features. Create two holes referencing the copy geometry. For University Use Only . Blank any unnecessary layers. Open the model. Figure 21: Creating Protrusion 9.

For University Use Only . Save the model.NOTES Figure 23: Coloring Part 11.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-14 Fundament als of Des ign .

Select the axis and curve shown. Remove the default constraint. then click Y > X > Done . 2. Figure 24: Creating the ARM_CSYS 3. Select the ARM part from the Model Tree and redefine it. Create a Copy Geom feature in the DRIVE_ARM part consisting of 3 surfaces and 2 axes. Open the top-level assembly. Create a Coordinate System using the 2Axes option. Open the model. Figure 25: Creating Copy Geom Feature in Drive Arm Part For University Use Only . 1. as shown in the following figure.NOTES EXERCISE 5: Creating Features in the Drive_Arm Part Task 1. 4. Rename the feature to ARM_CSYS. and add a COORDSYS constraint between the ARM_CSYS in the skeleton and the default CSYS in the DRIVE_ARM part. and then open the Skeleton. as shown in the following figure.15 . 5. Communicate skeleton geometry to the model. Open the top-level assembly window.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6. 6. 7.

The base of the protrusion should be flush with the ‘doughnut’ shaped surface. Blank any unnecessary layers. Figure 28: Creating Cuts 11. Create the protrusion referencing the copy geometry.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 6-16 Fundament als of Des ign . Figure 26: Creating Protrusion 9.NOTES 8. For University Use Only . Create a cut using the Use Quilt option. Figure 27: Creating Second Protrusion 10. as shown in the following figure. and a second cut referencing the copy geom. Create a second protrusion. and color the part using the LT_GREY appearance.

17 .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I II Pag e 1 6.NOTES Figure 29: Finished Part 12. Save the model For University Use Only .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Objectives In this module you will complete the following: • • • Communicate Skeleton information to components. you complete the communication of geometrical and parametric information. and add finishing touches. populate the assembly. Build components using skeleton information.For University Use Only . Populate the assembly with existing components.Commercial Use Prohibited - Module Project Part IV: Completing the Assembly In Project Part IV. Page 17-1 .

Use an Inheritance feature to transfer geometry from the standard F3 rear housing to the current model. Figure 1: Housing Rear Model Task 2. Remove the default constraint. Open the top-level assembly. 3. Add a COORDSYS constraint between the SKEL_MAIN Csys in the skeleton and the default Csys in the HOUSING_REAR part. 1. 1. 2.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Creating Features in the Housing_Rear Part Task 1. 3.prt and click Open > Default . Open the HOUSING_REAR model. Select Dependency > Define > Independent > Ok > Ok. Click Insert > Shared Data > Inheritance > Open 2. Select the f3_rear_hsg.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Tips and Techniques: Use Sel By Menu to select blanked Coordinate systems. Communicate skeleton geometry to the model. For University Use Only . Select the HOUSING_REAR part from the Model Tree and redefine it. This housing should be independent from the original.

2. Return to the top level assembly and notice that the gearbox interferes with the rear housing. Task 3.3 . Create a copy geometry feature in the rear housing consisting of the two 180° cylindrical surfaces from the gearbox.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. Customize the housing to fit in this assembly.NOTES Figure 2: Inheritance feature created. as shown in the following figure. Figure 3: Creating Copy Geometry For University Use Only . 1.

7. Be sure to remove material on the inside of the surface.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES 3. Color the model using the DK_BROWN appearance. Figure 5: Housing with Cut. selecting the offset surface. Create a cut with the Use Quilt option. For University Use Only . Return to the Rear Housing part window. 4. Offset the surface outward [0. 6. 8. as shown in the following figure. Blank any unnecessary layers and Save Status . Save the model. 9.10]. Hide the original copy geom surface. Figure 4: Offsetting Surface 5.

Figure 6: Top-Level Assembly without Skeleton 2. Test the operation of the assembly by regenerating the assembly several times. Assemble the DRIVETRAIN. Redefine the DRIVETRAIN assembly. 1. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. Open the top-level assembly and hide the skeleton. For University Use Only .NOTES EXERCISE 2: Completing the Assembly Population Task 1. Add a COORD SYS constraint as the only constraint between the DT_MAIN Csys in the DRIVETRAIN and the SKEL_MAIN Csys in the skeleton.5 .

1. Figure 8: Drivetrain Assembly 2. Close the DRIVETRAIN assembly and return to the top-level assembly. For University Use Only . Be sure to use the flat on the shaft during assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Open the DRIVETRAIN assembly. Assemble the hub and blades. This is accomplished by assembling the driveshaft on an angled datum. 4. and using a relation similar to that in the linkage. Regenerate the assembly a few times and watch the driveshaft rotate. Redefine the F3_HUB and assemble as shown in the following figure. so that the hub will rotate with the shaft. 3.NOTES Figure 7: Redefining Assembly Task 2.

Reference pattern the blades around the hub.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7.7 . Redefine the F3_BLADE. Figure 10: Redefining and Assembling Blade 6.NOTES Figure 9: Assembling Hub 5. and assemble using a Csys constraint between the default Csys in the F3_BLADE and the Csys on the leader ear of the F3_HUB pattern. For University Use Only .

as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 11: Blades Reference Patterned Task 3. Then use a TANGENT constraint to make the cage flush with the cover. and assemble. Use INSERT constraints to center the wire loops on the cage with the holes in the cover.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . 1. Figure 12: Assembling Cage For University Use Only . Redefine the F3_CAGE-11 part. Assemble the cage.

4.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. Set the OSCILLATE parameter in the skeleton to YES. Save the assembly. Set the OSCILLATE parameter in the skeleton to NO. For University Use Only .NOTES 2. 5.9 . Test the full motion of the assembly. Save the assembly. Test the rotation of the hub and blades by regenerating. 3.

NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISES The following exercises are optional. Finish the rear cover. Use BMX to examine the oscillation angle. Trim the blades to meet the size requirements. 2. 4. Also flex the model to test design variations. Rename the surface to BLADE_DIA_SRF. main base. Open the skeleton and create a surface as shown in the following figure. Complete as many as you have time for. 6. Create exploded states. 5. Create the ‘missing’ pedestal part. 2. 3. Trim the blades to fit in the cage and change the number of blades using the layout. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-10 Fundament als of Des ign . in any order you wish. Sketch on the tip of the driveshaft and extrude Both Sides . Figure 13: Creating the BLADE_DIA_SRF For University Use Only . and the support arm. Check the size requirements from the Layout. 1. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Blades Task 1.

Modify only the four horizontal dimensions and the . Figure 14: Oversized Blades 5. Reorder the new Copy Geometry feature before the BLADE_OUTLINE cut feature. Change the shape and size of the blades 1.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7.NOTES 3. For University Use Only . Figure 15: First Blade 6. Link the two dimensions to the BLADE_DIA and CAGE_DEPTH Layout parameters respectively. 4. Task 2. Use Copy Geom to copy the BLADE_DIA_SRF to the leader of the blade pattern.74 REL dimension as shown in the following figure.11 . and then open the blade. Open the assembly and note that the blades extend past the BLADE_DIA_SRF surface. Modify the RIDGE_POINTS datum point feature to change the curvature of the ridge. Regenerate the skeleton.

For University Use Only . and blank all layers. Add the new Copy Geometry to the ALL_SURFS layer.NOTES Figure 16: Modifying Ridge Curvature 2. Save the blade and return to the assembly. 5. 4. so that it is within the BLADE_DIA_SRF surface. Redefine the BLADE_OUTLINE cut. Figure 17: Redefining Blade Cut 3. Manipulate the sketched spline. Finish redefining the cut.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-12 Fundament als of Des ign .

3. Declare the F3_HUB and top-level assembly (if necessary) to the Layout. 4. Figure 18: Corrected Blade Clearance Task 3. 2.NOTES 6. Hide the skeleton. Notice the BLADES are now within their specified clearance. Regenerate the assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. Figure 19: Assembly Regenerated For University Use Only . Open the hub and write a relation similar to: p49 = NUM_BLADES.13 . Modify the NUM_BLADES parameter in the layout to [4]. 1. Communicate the NUM_BLADES parameter.

Create a datum analysis feature. 3. which measures the angle from the MAIN_FRONT plane to the FRONT plane. Figure 20: Deleting Relations 5. (There is also a saved SKEL_ANAL you can use) 2. Save the top-level assembly. and create a copy of the skeleton called SKEL_ANALYSIS. 1. Open SKEL_ANALYSIS.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-14 Fundament als of Des ign . Setup a Sensitivity Analysis as shown in the following figure. 4. Note the number of your angle dimension (d31 in this example). and outputs an ANGLE parameter. Enter the relations editor and delete the highlighted selection shown in the following figure. Test the assembly against initial design specs for oscillation angle using Behavioral Modeling (BMX).NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Using Behavioral Modeling Task 1. For University Use Only .

Compute the Sensitivity Analysis. Therefore. Notice that the angle values on the graph are absolute. Test the assembly against initial design specs for design variations.15 .NOTES Figure 21: Sensitivity Analysis 6. the total oscillation is close to 75°. Figure 22: Output Graph 7. Task 2. Modify parameters in the Layout to test the wall-mount version of the fan by modifying the TILT_ANGLE parameter to 90° . and show an oscillation of approximately +/-35°.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. 1. For University Use Only . and study the output graph. The fan passes the minimum of 45°.

Reset the angle. and modify the TILT_AXIS_HEIGHT to 24. For University Use Only . Reset the height value to 3. Figure 24: Modifying Height 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-16 Fundament als of Des ign .50.0.NOTES Figure 23: Wall-Mounting the Fan 2.

2. 1.17 . Be sure to create it in the context of the proper subassembly and to use top down design techniques to help create the geometry. Assemble the model accordingly before creating Copy Geom features.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. One possibility for this model is shown in the following figures. Tips and Techniques: This model oscillates with the Fan Unit. create a model called pedestal. Figure 25: Creating Pedestal Figure 26: Possible Pedestal Shape For University Use Only . Notice there is actually no model mounting the fan assembly to the SUPPORT_ARM. Zoom in under the fan. Using your own techniques. Create a Pedestal part. 3.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 3: Creating a Pedestal Part Task 1.

Add three swept protrusions to form stylish ribs on the base. Creating a cylindrical surface in the skeleton to represent the electrical access hole. Figure 28: Creating Electrical Access Hole Task 2. 1. Create finishing geometry features on the rear cover. and Regenerate . Use a Copy Geom feature to copy this surface to the cover 4. Figure 27: New Cylindrical surface 2. Make sure to reference it appropriately so it will oscillate freely with the skeleton. 1. 3. Use the surface to create a cut as shown in the following figure. Link the diameter of the cylinder to the ELEC_HOLE_DIA layout parameter. For University Use Only . Complete the base part.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-18 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 4: Finishing a Model Task 1.

as shown in the following figure. Complete the support arm.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7.NOTES Figure 29: Creating Stylish Ribs Task 3.19 . Add a round to the support arm. 1. Figure 30: Rounding Support Arm For University Use Only .

Create exploded states. Create the exploded state EXP_ALL Figure 31: Explode State EXP_ALL 2. 1. Figure 32: Explode State EXP_SUB For University Use Only . Create the exploded state EXP_SUB.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-20 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 5: Creating Exploded States Task 1.

2. Assemble the box to the top-level assembly. Use an Automatic constraint on the base. Open the BOX part. and then use the dynamic component placement functions to see if the assembly will ‘fit’ in the box. 1.21 . Test the assembly against initial design specs for overall size. Declare the BOX part to the Layout and link the values for max height. Regenerate the model.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro j e c t P a rt I V Pag e 1 7. 4. 3. Figure 33: Using Dynamic Component Placement Functions For University Use Only . and depth to the appropriate dimensions of the box. width.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 6: Testing Size Requirements Task 1.

1. Task 2. Save the completed assembly. For University Use Only . Blank any unneeded layers and Save Status . and then suppress the BOX part. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 7-22 Fundament als of Des ign . Save the project.NOTES Figure 34: Completing Placement 5. Complete placement using a fix constraint.

Page 18-1 . you will be able to: • • Diagnose the cause of a regeneration failure.Commercial Use Prohibited .Module Resolving Failures In this module you learn about the Resolve Environment and Pro/ENGINEER’s solutions for regenerating a failed feature. Fix the regeneration failure. Objectives After completing this module.For University Use Only .

If a conflict develops or the relationship is violated. The feature intersection is no longer valid because dimensional changes have moved the intersecting surfaces. The feature is defined improperly.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . The new geometry is invalid due to feature definition. you must resolve the problem before continuing with normal model processing to protect the design intent of the model. For University Use Only . A reference is missing because you have redefined or deleted the parent features or components. as would be the case in the following: • • • • • • • • A feature is improperly defined causing it to be unattached. it automatically propagates throughout the entire assembly. The model no longer satisfies the pattern restrictions. Usually the problem occurs because a feature was changed and now conflicts with or invalidates other features. it cannot construct the model geometry. When Pro/ENGINEER is unable to regenerate a feature. This creates dependencies known as parent/child relationships. Component is missing. When a regeneration failure occurs. A feature is resumed that now conflicts with another. Using the Resolve Environment. USING THE RESOLVE ENVIRONMENT Pro/ENGINEER always checks the model geometry as it regenerates features. when you make a change in your design at any level in the model. Diagnose the cause of the model failure using the current (failed) model or the backup model. you can address the failure problem using any of the following methods: • • Undo all of the changes that you have made since the last successful regeneration. regeneration failure occurs.NOTES DEFINING REGENERATION FAILURE Because of Pro/ENGINEER’s parametric nature.

the most challenging task that you must perform in order to solve regeneration problems is determining why the feature failed regeneration.3 . the potential limitations of the method that was used. For University Use Only . and which of these areas is the source of the failure.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Change the failed model or a backup model using standard part or assembly functionality. reroute. delete. you must correct the problem in order to resume the suppressed features or components and continue with the project. you must determine how the failed item was constructed. you can use the INVESTIGATE menu to access other tools that can assist you in determining the cause. you can redefine. Using the QUICK FIX menu. Diagnosing the Failure Often. or suppress the feature. In addition to using these tools. If the information the system provides in the DIAGNOSTICS window is not sufficient. Fixing the Failure The method that you use to resolve the regeneration failure depends upon the information that you obtain through your investigation of the problem. However. you can use the Fix Model or Quick Fix option to undo any changes and return your model to its original state.NOTES • • Attempt a quick fix of the problem using shortcuts for performing standard operations on the failed feature only. Note: Suppressing features and components is an easy way to exit out of the RESOLVE menu. Working on the Failed Feature Only The Quick Fix option allows you to use a shortcut method to work on the failed feature only. If you determine that you should not have made the original modification. Working on Any Feature The Fix Model option allows you to work on any feature in the current model or the backup model.

The example that follows illustrates how to resolve a failure resulting from a missing component and missing feature references. Use Investigate to find which references are missing. Unattached feature: open section protrusion falls off the bounding surface. Intersection of features is no longer valid. Use the Info menu and create an offset mesh to determine maximum allowed thickness. Table 1: Regeneration Failures with Possible Solutions Type of Failure: Possible Solution: Unattached feature: direction of feature creation is away from the solid.NOTES Examples of Regeneration Problems Table 1 lists eight typical failure scenarios and a possible resolution for each. Redefine the direction of the feature so that it points into the solid. Use Quick Fix to change the thickness of the shell. Use Quick Fix and Find Component for retrieving the missed component.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . then find the component file and retrieve it into session. Use Quick Fix and Reroute to change the reference to the new reference. Use Fix Model to suppress or delete the first regenerated feature or use Quick Fix to suppress or delete the second one. Set up a search path to the failing component. Improper feature definition: shell thickness is larger than the radius of curvature of the surface. Use Quick Fix and Redefine to change the pattern option to Varying or General . Use Fix Model to modify the radius of curvature of the feature. System resumes feature that conflicts with another feature. Use Quick Fix and Reroute or Redefine to select new references. Use Quick Fix and Quit Retr to stop retrieving the assembly. Component is missing. For University Use Only . Pattern restrictions are no longer satisfied. or move the file into the assembly directory. Redefine the section of the feature to make it a closed section. References are missing due to the redefinition or the deletion of the parent component or feature.

the FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window displays. When you retrieve it to make changes. the system automatically places you in the Resolve Environment.5 . Figure 2: Failure Due to Missing Component The FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window identifies the cause of the failure to be a missing component.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. When you retrieve the assembly again. The system identifies the cause of this failure to be the third component because its feature references are missing. For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 1: Valve Assembly The following figure shows a valve assembly that was created by another user. as shown in the following figure.

the second constraint shows a missing reference.NOTES Figure 3: Failure Due to Missing Feature References When you use Redefine in the QUICK FIX menu to change the reference to the surface of the shaft. For University Use Only . the assembly regenerates successfully. Once you define the missing assembly reference.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .

Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8.NOTES Figure 4: COMPONENT PLACEMENT Dialog Box For University Use Only .7 .

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you use the Resolve mode to investigate failing feature in a model. Method In the following exercises you will perform operations that will cause the model to fail. You should focus on how to investigate why the failure occurred and then use the tools available to correct the problem. Tools Table 2: Resolving Failures Icons Icons Description Select Step Forward Done Trim Entities EXERCISE 1: Resolving Failures Figure 5: Air-Cleaner RS Part Before and After Changes For University Use Only .

Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Press <DELETE>. 4. In the MODEL TREE. Figure 6: Model Player 4. Click Yes in the message area and continue. Click Yes to delete the reference.9 . close the MODEL PLAYER dialog box. After reviewing the model. Task 2. right-click BASE-PROTRUSION > Redefine .NOTES Task 1. Then select to step forward. Double-click Section . Click Utilities > Model Player to step through the model. Select one of the arcs.PRT.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Change the base solid by replacing the tangent arcs with nontangent arcs. Delete the two tangent end arcs. Sketch two new 3-point arcs that are non-tangent and dimension them accordingly. 2. Retrieve the air cleaner and determine how it was created. 3. Click Sketch . Open AIR_CLEANER_RS. Click then select BASE-PROTRUSION from screen or model tree. 3. 2. 1. Delete the other arc. For University Use Only . 1.

Click Feature Info from the FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window.NOTES Figure 7: Changing the Section 5. Determine what has failed and the 1. Finish the redefinition. Click Task 3. 2. The model fails regeneration. Interrogate further by extracting feature information. Review the various elements of the feature. you can press <CTRL> <D>. Tips & Techniques: To quickly change to the default view. For University Use Only . Click View > Default Orientation . > OK . cause.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-10 Fundament als of Des ign . Review the FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window. Notice that the round’s references are missing. 6. Read the information that Pro/ENGINEER provides concerning the failed feature.

It is sometimes beneficial to work with a backup model to investigate and even resolve the failure of the model.NOTES Task 4. Double click AIR_CLEANER_RS. Right-click Edge id 34 > Entity Info. Notice that the edge highlights on the model. 2. Right-click Edge id 223 > Info.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Click Roll Model > Before Fail. 4. An OPEN dialog box displays. Click Show Ref .11 .PRT. Select EDGE ID 223. Expand the BASE-PROTRUSION using + icon. 1. For University Use Only . Close the Information Window. Close the Information Window. Use a backup to resolve the failure. Show the references used for the failing feature. Figure 8: Investigating the References 3. In the RESOLVE FEAT menu. The failed feature is the edge round. click Investigate > Backup Model > Confirm. 5.

Double-click References .NOTES 6. Close the dialog box. Click Confirm . Select the arc edges that are not highlighted. Notice that four holes are children of this feature and cannot be regenerated. Redefine the references used by the round.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-12 Fundament als of Des ign .4]. Change the round so that it references these new edges. then OK . Select Preview . Figure 9: References of the Backup-model For University Use Only . Determine the reason for the failure. 3. The A_2 datum axis was created through the cylindrical end surface on the part. Click Quick Fix > Redefine > Confirm . Type [. Click Done . 4. The round feature successfully regenerates. 1. Task 6. 2. Click Investigate > Backup Modl > Roll Model > Failed Feat > Show Ref . 1. The round failed because you deleted the circular edges that were referenced and re-sketched new ones. but the next feature in the regeneration cycle fails. The circular edges do not highlight when selected because they are missing references. Task 5.

and change it to 0. 1. Also modify the number of pattern cuts from 5 to 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Figure 10: References of the Current-model 4.50). Change the pattern type. Click Fix Model > Modify > Value . Task 7.13 . Click All Children . Click Investigate> Current Modl > Show Ref to see the difference. Automatically reroute all of the children features. Select the cut offset dimension (1.75. 5. Select the first Pattern(Cut) feature from the Model Tree. Close the Reference Information Window. The identical pattern now fails. For University Use Only .NOTES 2. Select the revolved surface for the axis reference on the left side of the part. Click Quick Fix > Reroute > Missing Refs > Done . 3. The reference of axis A_2 is now marked as missing.

right-click BASE-PROTRUSION > Redefine . 3. Click Fix Model > Feature > Redefine . Sketch the two tangent end arcs as shown in the following figure. Click No to re-enter the RESOLVE menu.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-14 Fundament als of Des ign . Instead. Change the pattern options using Resolve. From the dialog box. 4. Click Done/Return to exit RESOLVE mode. double-click Pattern . 1. Task 8. but do not delete the non-tangent arcs. Return the base protrusion to its original shape. In the MODEL TREE. 2. Double-click Section . You could have avoided entering the Resolve environment if you had heeded the system’s warning when deleting the arcs. 3. For University Use Only . Select the pattern cut from the model tree. 2. Do not exit from the Resolve environment. Click Pat Options > Varying > Done > Done /Return > OK . Task 9. Click Sketch .NOTES Figure 11: Modifying the Pattern 2. 1. Click Regenerate . replace the old referenced section entities with newly sketched entities.

Click Edit > Replace.NOTES Figure 12: Sketching for Replacement 4. 6. For University Use Only . you must click Yes to confirm the removal of the dimension. Note: One arc has a radius dimension. Replace the other arc and finish the redefine. 7. if asked to delete dimensions. Select one of the newly created arcs. 5. Click Yes . When you select that arc.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Notice that Sketcher automatically deleted the original arc.15 . then select the closest non-tangent arc. Save the model and close the window. Click > OK .

3. Locate the missing component. The system indicates that the failed component is CARB_BOWL.ASM. Click Feature Info . Task 3. A FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window displays at the top of the screen.PRT with right-click in the model tree.PRT from the MOVED_COMP directory. Task 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-16 Fundament als of Des ign . Open CARB_BOWL. retrieve it manually and back it up to the RESOLVE directory. Open the carburetor assembly. 1. it reports any problems in the message area. but it does not. For University Use Only . Close all windows. Review the information in the window. 2. The model should display as shown in the following figure. 5. 4. 2. Then click File > Backup . Open CARBURETOR_RESOLVE. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed >OK .NOTES EXERCISE 2: Resolving Assembly Failures Task 1.PRT and why it failed. Make sure that the current directory corresponds to the name of the current module.ASM again. Since the part is in the same directory as RESOLVE_CARBURETOR. Click > LEFT . nor is there a search path set for the directory in which it resides. Click Yes . 1. Now the retrieval of the assembly is completed.ASM. The shape of the backing plate should match the shape of the air cleaner on the sides. Open CARBURETOR_RESOLVE. Open CARB_BOWL. The part is not in the current directory. 1. As the system retrieves the assembly into memory. The component failed because the component model is missing. Click Quick Fix > Find Component . Click OK . 2. there will be no failure when you retrieve the assembly again.

For University Use Only . It states that the backing plate component has an invalid external reference. Read the DIAGNOSTICS window.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Click Show Ref . failure. Task 4. The assembly fails regeneration. Identify the references for the feature. Click Investigate from the RESOLVE FEAT menu.NOTES Figure 13: Setting the View Note: Notice that the shape of the backing plate does not match the air cleaner in the preceding figure. Determine why it failed. 2. Investigate the reason for 1. 3. Click Regenerate > Automatic .17 .

Close the dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-18 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . Select the valid references in the PARENTS window. The system dipslays a reference window with existing and missing references. Double-click Section . Change the section to reference the shape of the air cleaner. Task 6. 1. Task 5. Pro/ENGINEER cannot find the external reference for these arcs because the air cleaner base feature was redefined outside the context of the assembly. 4.NOTES Figure 14: Missing References 3. 2. Notice that there are two missing references. Click Sketch . Click Quick Fix > Redefine > Confirm . Redefine the failed feature’s section.

Sketch a 3 point arc on top of this reference. Click on the remaining two references. then click Update . For University Use Only . Select the two MISSING REFERENCES in the dialog box and click Delete .NOTES 1. Pick the inside edges of the shell Figure 15: Using the Edge of the Air Cleaner 2. as shown in the following figure.19 . Replace the tangent arcs with the non-tangent arcs in the sketch. Close the dialog box. Sketch this 3 point arc Figure 16: Left Side of Model 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8. Select the two edges as additional references. Zoom into the left side of the model.

Click Yes to exit the Resolve environment. Select the new arc and line at the four corners to generate a closed loop. 9. 8. Select the newly sketched arc. Figure 18: The Finished Section For University Use Only . Repeat the process for the left side.NOTES 4. 10. Repeat the process for the right side of the model. select the original tangent arc. Sketch this 3point arc Figure 17: Specify the right side reference 5.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-20 Fundament als of Des ign . 7. Click Yes . Trim the horizontal lines to the new non-tangent arcs. Click > OK . Click . 6. Click Edit > Replace .

close all windows.Commercial Use Prohibited Reso lvi ng Fa ilu re s Pag e 1 8.21 . Save the model. For University Use Only .NOTES Note: The Replace option replaces internal references within the part. as well as external references. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed >OK . 11.

How to prevent features from failing using the Regeneration.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned: • • • How to investigate why features fail. For University Use Only . How to resolve feature failures in part and assembly mode.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 8-22 Fundament als of Des ign .

For University Use Only .Module Pro/PROGRAM In this module you learn how to use Pro/PROGRAM to automate your design and build variations by incorporating user prompts into the model regeneration cycle. Page 19-1 . Objectives After completing this module. Use Pro/PROGRAM to manipulate part features from an assembly. Incorporate changes into the program. Run and edit the program.Commercial Use Prohibited . you will be able to: • • • • Automate the part and assembly design process in Pro/PROGRAM.

The program is actually a script of Pro/ENGINEER’s actions as it regenerates. Every program has five sections: • • • • • Header Input Relations Model Section Massprops Automating the Part Design Process To use Pro/PROGRAM to automate the design process for a part. To build variations of your design. Perform these tasks to set up for part design automation: For University Use Only . Figure 1: Custom Cabinet Variations Defining the Program Structure Pro/ENGINEER writes a program for every part and assembly as you build the model.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES USING Pro/PROGRAM Family tables are effective when you know the variations of the design. you must first create a generic model as the basis for the design variation and include all of the features needed for any of the design variations. you can access this program and manipulate it. Pro/PROGRAM is particularly useful when you do not know the variations of a design in advance. as in part libraries. or are sure that they are not going to change.

Using relations. You can edit by adding logic statements. The additions to the program are denoted with a “•”. The following is an example of an edited program file. create prompts to supply the appropriate information using this standard format: Parameter_Name Parameter_Type “prompt that you want displayed in the message window” • Write relations . Edit the model section . Generally.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. you can control the model and convey information from the input statements to the model parameters.3 .NOTES • Add input statements . you add “if” statements to model features based on the input statements and relations. Listing for Part Side_Panel INPUT • HEIGHT NUMBER • "WHAT IS THE SIDE PANEL HEIGHT" • D2 NUMBER • "WHAT IS THE SIDE PANEL WIDTH" • MATERIAL STRING • "WHAT TYPE OF WOOD IS THE SIDE PANEL" • DRAWER_CUT YES_NO • "DOES THE SIDE PANEL SUPPORT A DRAWER" END INPUT RELATIONS • D3=HEIGHT For University Use Only . Using the Input section of the program.

NOTES END RELATIONS ADD FEATURE (initial number 1) INTERNAL FEATURE ID TYPE = DATUM PLANE NAME = DTM1 END ADD 1 ADD FEATURE (initial number 2) INTERNAL FEATURE ID TYPE = DATUM PLANE NAME = DTM2 END ADD 3 ADD FEATURE (initial number 3) INTERNAL FEATURE ID TYPE = DATUM PLANE NAME = DTM3 END ADD 5 ADD FEATURE (initial number 4) INTERNAL FEATURE ID 7 PARENTS = 1(#1) 5(#3) 3(#2) PROTRUSION: Extrude NO.----------------- For University Use Only .-----------.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . ELEMENT NAME STATUS INFO --.

-----------1 Attributes Defined Section Defined One Side 2 Sk.NOTES 1 Attributes Defined Section Defined Direction Defined Depth Defined One Side 2 Sk.5 .plane .00 d4 = 1. ELEMENT NAME INFO STATUS --.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9.-----------. depth = 1 SECTION NAME = S2D0015 FEATURE’S DIMENSIONS: d2 = 18.Surface feat #4 3 MaterialSide Inside section Defined Direction Defined 4 For University Use Only .00 d3 = 30. plane .Surface DTM2 3 4 Blind.00 END ADD • IF DRAWER_CUT==YES ADD FEATURE (initial number 5) INTERNAL FEATURE ID 28 PARENTS = 1(#1) 5(#3) 7(#4) CUT: Extrude NO.

Write relations. you can exchange different components and communicate information to part programs.00 d7 = 4.25 END ADD • ENDIF MASSPROP END MASSPROP Figure 2: Edited Program for Side Panel Automating the Assembly Design Process Using programs for the regeneration cycle of the assembly.NOTES 5 Depth Defined Blind. To set up assembly design automation.25 SECTION NAME = S2D0016 FEATURE’S DIMENSIONS: d6 = 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . perform the same tasks that you would perform to automate part design as shown: • • • Add input statements. depth = 0.00 d8 = 2.00 d9 = . WIDTH NUMBER "WHAT IS THE WIDTH OF THE CABINET" HEIGHT NUMBER "WHAT IS THE HEIGHT OF THE CABINET" For University Use Only . Edit the model section.

7 . DR_12. as shown: For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. EXECUTE PART SIDE_PANEL HEIGHT = HEIGHT D2 = DEPTH MATERIAL = WOOD_TYPE DRAWER_CUT = DRAWER END EXECUTE Figure 4: Executing the Side Panel Program Interchanging Components When replacing one component with another. you can use family table instances of a component or subassembly to replace the generic model with any of its instances. OR DR_16)" END IF Figure 3: Input for Cabinet Executing a Lower Level Program You can use the EXECUTE…END EXECUTE statement to run a lower level program (part or subassembly) from within the top-level assembly. The following is an example of communicating parameters using the execute statement.NOTES DEPTH NUMBER "WHAT IS THE DEPTH OF THE CABINET" WOOD_TYPE STRING "WHAT TYPE OF WOOD IS THE CABINET" DRAWER YES_NO "DOES THE CABINET HAVE A DRAWER" IF DRAWER==YES D_SIZE STRING "WHICH DRAWER SIZE (DR_8.

the system automatically selects the proper instance. If it finds an error. You also add an input statement so that the system manually prompts you to specify an instance when you execute the program. the system automatically verifies that you have used proper syntax. it requires you to correct it by re-editing the program. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . The following is an example with the input parameter specifying size to determine the proper instance.NOTES Figure 5: Family Table for Drawer By setting up a parameter and using it in the program. ADD PART (D_SIZE) INTERNAL COMPONENT ID 27 PARENTS = 15(#9) 11(#5) END ADD Figure 6: Adding Correct Instance of the Drawer Part Incorporating Changes into the Program When you exit from the editor after making changes to the program.

NOTES Running the Program Once you have incorporated the program. Maintaining the current values.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. Note: Once you have run a program. you can run it at any time simply by regenerating the model since it is simply a script of the regeneration steps. You can use the editor’s search/find functionality to locate the feature. the system asks you to specify one of the following methods to obtain the prompt values: • • • Typing new values. work with one task at a time. However. Reading values from a text file. use the Names option in the SETUP menu. The system then shows the name in the section for that feature.9 . use these techniques: • When renaming features. Any comment lines that you add between the ADD and END ADD lines appear in the Feat Info window for that feature. Because the input section is no longer empty. Incorporate changes and then run the program to test each step. • • For University Use Only . To make editing easier. use the Symbol option in the DIM COSMETICS menu. This makes relations easier to write and interpret. Editing the Program To make troubleshooting easier. Add comment lines to the program using /*. you can permanently save that version of the model by using the Instantiate option in the PROGRAM menu. The system adds an instance to the family table for that version. To change the symbol name for a dimension. Pro/ENGINEER automatically runs it.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-10 Fundament als of Des ign . Reorder a feature or component. Add the word MODIFY before that dimension in the model portion of the program. Modify a dimension. Cut all lines between and including the ADD and END ADD for that feature or component. • • • Add the word SUPPRESSED after the word ADD for that feature or component. Pause the regeneration. and paste it in another location in the program. and then type the new value for that dimension. For University Use Only . • Add the INTERACT statement anywhere in the model section. Resume a feature or component.NOTES Manipulating Features Using Pro/PROGRAM You can also use Pro/PROGRAM to manipulate a feature within the model in the following ways: • • Delete all lines between and including the ADD and END ADD for that feature or component. Suppress a feature or component. Delete the word SUPPRESSED in the ADD statement for that feature/component. When Pro/ENGINEER regenerates the model. Delete a feature or component. it pauses at the interact statement to ask you if you want to add other features to the model.

and mounting types. Open PGM_RIM. EXERCISE 1: Automating Part Design Figure 7: Start Part Task 1. and manipulate the program to vary the styles of the rim part.11 . Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Click Regenerate > Enter > Select All > Done Sel . You also learn how to edit the existing program in a part and an assembly to vary designs. 1. The rims have different sizes.PRT. Method In Exercises 1. you access the program.NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you implement Pro/Program in the design process. Open the rim part and investigate the work that has already been done with the rim model’s program. spoke styles. ½ To define the Rim Diameter. For University Use Only . accept the default value and click . 3. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9.

To include the Left Hand Curved Spokes click No. Wait until system regenerates the model. Open PGM_RIM. 7. Click Program > Edit Design . repeat Step 3 and respond to the prompts by typing your own values. Notice that system opens up the Notepad. To include the Right Hand Curved Spokes click Yes. Erase the model from memory.NOTES ½ To define the Rim Width. To generate a different variation. Note: You must perform Step 5 to maintain consistent feature numbering for the remainder of this exercise. 1. 8. Click File > Erase > Current > Yes . For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-12 Fundament als of Des ign . Task 2. accept the default value and 4. accept the default value and click ½ ½ ½ To include the Straight Spokes click No. Figure 8: Variation with Default Values 5. Notice that all of the holes for either type are included in the model. Create a prompt for the mounting type. The rim will either use lug nuts or a spindle mount. Repeat Step 3 to build several variations of rims. click ½ To define the radius of the Spokes. 6.PRT again.

Locate the entry END INPUT and type the following statements before the entry. In the Notepad. To use another editor.0 d79 = 3.13 . Type the following statement above the entry.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. MAIN PATTERN DIMENSIONS: INCREMENTAL PATTERN DIMENSIONS: d76 = 30.” 3. CURVE_RAD NUMBER "WHAT IS THE RADIUS OF THE CURVED SPOKES?" END IF [MOUNT STRING] ["WHAT MOUNTING TYPE IS USED (LUG. Other entries are shown for your convenience to easily locate the position where you have to type).75 d81 = . you can set the configuration file option “pro_editor_command.NOTES 2. Refer to the following paragraph. SPINDLE)?"] END INPUT Note: If you are using a Unix machine. (Type only the statements that are given under parenthesis and are bold. ½ Scroll down and locate the entry ADD FEATURE (initial number 13). Add an “if-else-endif” statement around the hole features. add the input statement to ask for the mounting type.50R d80 = .75 END ADD END IF [IF MOUNT=="LUG"] For University Use Only . you may need to use the vi editor. Refer to Appendix B of this guide for the most common vi commands.

END ADD [END IF] ADD FEATURE (initial number 18) INTERNAL FEATURE ID 4668 PARENTS = 14(#4) 4(#2) 6(#3) 4. Click Yes to incorporate your changes into the model. END ADD [ELSE] ADD FEATURE (initial number 17) INTERNAL FEATURE ID 4392 PARENTS = 14(#4) 88(#5) ½ Type the following statement at the location shown in the following paragraph. For University Use Only .NOTES ADD FEATURE (initial number 13) INTERNAL FEATURE ID 589 PARENTS = 88(#5) 4(#2) 14(#4) ½ Type the following statement at the location shown in the following paragraph. Task 3. Select Mount then click Done Sel .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-14 Fundament als of Des ign . click Enter . 2. click Yes to save the file. Study the changes that you have made in the program. To specify the mounting type accept the default SPINDLE and click . 5. 1. Exit the editor. In the GET INPUT menu.

[/* SET THE NUMBER OF MOUNTING HOLES] [P1=NUM_HOLES] For University Use Only .15 . 1. Add a prompt to specify the number of lug nut holes needed. Since the prompt is only necessary when you select “LUG” as the mounting type. Click Program > Edit Design . Type the following.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. just above the END INPUT entry. Add the input statement for the number of holes. SPINDLE)?" [IF MOUNT=="LUG"] [NUM_HOLES NUMBER] ["HOW MANY MOUNTING HOLES ARE NEEDED?"] [END IF] END INPUT 2. MOUNT STRING "WHAT MOUNTING TYPE IS USED (LUG. add a relation to set the number of instances in the pattern (P1) equal to the input parameter (NUM_HOLES). use an IF statement in the input section after the input that you added earlier.NOTES Figure 9 Task 4. Before the END RELATIONS entry.

½ For Straight Spokes. Exit the editor and click Yes to save the changes. ½ To include the Left Hand Curved Spokes. type [6]. Regenerate the model.NOTES [/* SET SPACING OF BOLT HOLES] [D39=360/P1] END RELATIONS 3. 2. click Yes . Click Enter > Select All > Done Sel . ½ To include the Right Hand Curved Spokes. Permanently save some rim variations for future use. Provide the following input: ½ To define Rim Diameter. For University Use Only . Click Program > Instantiate to save the variation. Task 5. Click Yes to incorporate your changes into the model. type [N]. type [N]. 4. type [Lug] ½ For number of holes. type [4] Figure 10 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-16 Fundament als of Des ign . ½ To define Rim Width. type [R]. ½ To select the Mounting. Type [12X6AR-4N]. ½ To select between right or left handed spokes. 3. 1. accept the default [12].

Click Program > Instantiate .Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. Create two more variations and save them as instances. accept the default [12]. Task 6. 7. 6. Using the procedure outlined in the previous task. ½ For Straight Spokes.17 . click No . create another variation and save the following configuration as 12X8-BR-SP. Click Enter . ½ Define the Curve Radius as [3. type [8]. type [Y]. Regenerate again. ½ To include the Right Hand Curved Spokes. ½ To define Rim Diameter. ½ To include the Left Hand Curved Spokes. Click Done Sel .5]. Figure 11 8. Select SIDE. Type [L] for the side. Type [12X6-AL-4N] as the instance name. type [N]. ½ To define Rim Width. ½ To select the Mounting.NOTES 5. 1. type [Spindle] For University Use Only .

½ Define the Curve Radius as [3. type [N]. ½ To select the Mounting. ½ To define Rim Width. click No .NOTES Figure 12 2. type [8]. For University Use Only . Close the editor when you have finished. ½ To define Rim Diameter. This has created instances in a family table. ½ For Straight Spokes. accept the default [12]. type [Y]. Create another variation and save the following configuration as 12X8-BL-SP.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-18 Fundament als of Des ign . Look at the table.5]. Select Family Tab . ½ To include the Left Hand Curved Spokes. type [Spindle] 3. ½ To include the Right Hand Curved Spokes.

NOTES Figure 13 4. Save the model and erase it from memory.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9.19 . For University Use Only .

Open PGM_FRT_SUSP_SKEL.PRT. 5. Figure 14 2. OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Automating Assembly Design Task 1. Type [6] and [–3] for R_OFFSET and L_OFFSET.ASM. 3. For University Use Only . Display the model in Hidden Line mode. Regenerate the part. 4. Notice that some work has already been done in the program. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-20 Fundament als of Des ign . Notice that the changes made in the skeleton model reflect in the assembly. Click Enter > Select All > Done Sel . Close the window. 6. Open PGM_FRT_SUSP. The suspension changes to show the suspension linkage motion. Create a prompt asking for the suspension offset values for each side. then pass the values down to the front suspension skeleton with an execute statement. Change to the RIGHT view.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE The following exercise provides supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal.

21 . In this execute statement.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. Type an execute statement for the PGM_FRT_SUSP_SKEL. Use an execute statement to pass down information from the assembly.PRT. pass the values of the assembly parameters R_OFFSET and L_OFFSET to the skeleton parameters of the same name. 1. Type the input statements for the left and right offsets between the input entry and the end input entry of the program. INPUT [R_OFFSET NUMBER] [“WHAT IS THE RIGHT SUSPENSION OFFSET? (10 TO –9)”] [L_OFFSET NUMBER] [“WHAT IS THE LEFT SUSPENSION OFFSET? (10 TO – 9)”] END INPUT 3. Click Program > Edit Design . See the following: RELATIONS END RELATIONS For University Use Only . 2. Type the statement immediately before the skeleton component is added to the assembly. It is more practical to control the program in the suspension skeleton at the suspension assembly level.NOTES Figure 15 Task 2.

A functional interchange already exists between the two. Use the program to automatically “swap out” components in the assembly. Notice the change and click Done Return . 3. solid and vented. 2. Enter any value between 10 to –9 for the Right Suspension Offset. INPUT [BRAKES STRING] ["WHICH DISK DO YOU WANT (PGM_DISK_SOLID. Enter any value between 10 to –9 for the Left Suspension Offset. Task 3. Open PGM_RF_WHEEL_HUB. Two styles are available. Exit the editor save the changes. 5. Click Yes to incorporate the changes. Test the program. Click Program > Edit Design . Type the input prompt for the disk type in the assembly program.NOTES [EXECUTE PART PGM_FRT_SUSP_SKEL] [R_OFFSET = R_OFFSET] [L_OFFSET = L_OFFSET] [END EXECUTE] ADD SKELETON MODEL PGM_FRT_SUSP_SKEL 4. PGM_DISK_VENTED)?"] END INPUT For University Use Only .ASM. In the GET INPUT menu. 4. 2. 1. 1. Task 4. Create a prompt to ask which disks to use for the brakes.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-22 Fundament als of Des ign . click Enter > Select All > Done Sel .

Exit the editor and save the changes. Click Yes incorporate the changes. 6.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. Delete the part name PGM_DISK_SOLID and type in [(BRAKES)] in its place. Figure 16 For University Use Only . 4. To test the program. Type [PGM_DISK_VENTED] and click . Add the EXECUTE and END EXECUTE lines to the program above the ADD PGM_DISK_SOLID line. END ADD [EXECUTE ASSEMBLY PGM_BRAKES] [END EXECUTE] [ADD PART (BRAKES)] INTERNAL COMPONENT ID 19 PARENTS = 16(#4) 18(#5) Note: The execute statement retrieves the interchange assembly into memory so that the interchange can occur between the two components. click Enter > BRAKES > Done Sel .NOTES 3. Scroll down to the entry ADD PART PGM_DISK_SOLID. 5.23 .

then pass this value down to the two wheel_hub assemblies. Add a prompt asking for the style of brakes in the front suspension assembly. INPUT R_OFFSET NUMBER "WHAT IS THE RIGHT SUSPENSION OFFSET? (10 TO -9)" L_OFFSET NUMBER "WHAT IS THE LEFT SUSPENSION OFFSET? (10 TO 9)" [BRAKES STRING] ["WHICH DISK DO YOU WANT (PGM_DISK_SOLID.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-24 Fundament als of Des ign . 2. Add the input prompt for the brake style. 1. You must complete this step before adding the execute statement. END INPUT RELATIONS END RELATIONS [EXECUTE ASSEMBLY PGM_RF_WHEEL_HUB] [BRAKES = BRAKES] [END EXECUTE] EXECUTE PART PGM_FRT_SUSP_SKEL R_OFFSET = R_OFFSET For University Use Only . Activate the PGM_FRT_SUSP. PGM_DISK_VENTED)?"] END INPUT 4. It should be identical to the input statement in the PGM_RF_WHEEL_HUB.ASM.ASM window. Just after END RELATIONS add an execute statements to pass the value to the PGM_WHEEL_RF_HUB subassembly.NOTES Task 5. 3. Click Program > Edit Design.

NOTES L_OFFSET = L_OFFSET END EXECUTE 5.Commercial Use Prohibited P ro / P RO G RAM Pag e 1 9. For University Use Only . Type [PGM_DISK_SOLID] and click . then add an execute statement in the front suspension assembly to pass down the parameter information. 10. Save the assembly. 7. 9. 6.25 . click Enter > BRAKES > Done Sel. To test the program. Exit the editor and incorporate the changes. Save the assembly and erase all models from memory when you have finished (use Current and Not Displayed ). 8. Regenerate to build different suspension configurations. {Optional} Set up parameter BRAKES in the PGM_LF_WHEEL_HUB assembly as you did for the right front assembly.

NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned: • • • • • • • How to automate the design process to generate different variations of the model at the part and the assembly level. How to incorporate the program’s changes into the model. How to run the program using Regenerate . How to access the program using Edit Design . How to vary the design in the assembly and part modes.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 1 9-26 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . How to use Pro/Program to manipulate features. How to create family table instances from the variations.

Mechanism (MDX) allows you to test and showcase motion and flexibility of finished parts in an assembly. List the capabilities of Design Animation. Create a simple animation. Describe the major steps of implementing Mechanism Design. you will be able to: • • • • • • Describe the applications of Mechanism Design. Objectives After completing this module.Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only . Export an animated MPEG movie.Module Mechanism & Design Animation In this module you learn the process for implementing Mechanism Design and Design Animation. and mechanism motion. Design animation (DAO) gives you the capability of creating custom animations such as exploding/unexploding sequences. Create a simple mechanism. Page 20-1 . views.

MDX enables you to build “kinematic intelligence” into your assembly at the very beginning of the product development process.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . assemblies created using MDX be easily reused in Figure 1: Mechanism Design Window For University Use Only . Through easily defined connections during assembly creation. but also yield engineering information that can facilitate the design. MDX can be used to create optimized design based on measured geometry information. you can investigate your design by animating the mechanism throughout the range of motion.NOTES DEFINING MECHANISM ANIMATION The Pro/ENGINEER Mechanism Design Extension (MDX) is a kinematic motion simulation package that provides behavioral insight into the assembly. Once assembled. When a full dynamics simulation is needed. such as interference analysis and cam profile synthesis. The results of the motion animation not only provide graphical illustration of the mechanism. When used in conjunction with Behavioral Modeling Extension (BMX).

as well as the icons and DOFs: Table 1: Connection Types Connection Type Pin Cylinder Slider Planar Weld Ball Bearing Rigid Icon in Graphic Window Icon in the Model Tree DOFs 1 2 1 3 0 3 4 Note: In addition to these types of connections. advanced connections such as cam and slot are also available. The connection types are defined by using the same kind of assembly components that you would use in a real-world situation. and so on.NOTES CREATING MECHANISM ASSEMBLIES One of the first steps in mechanism design is to simulate assembly motion. bearings. you can create a movable system instead of one rigid body. a pin connection contains two geometric constraints: an axis alignment constraint and a plane alignment constraint. These assembly components include pins. By assembling the movable components using connections.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-3 . Each connection type is associated with a unique set of geometric constraints that are based on existing constraints used in Pro/ENGINEER Assembly mode. For example. Comparing Connections to Constraints Similar to assembly constraints. assembly connections are used to connect components together. For University Use Only . Selecting a Connection Type The following table lists the eight available connection types on the Component Placement dialog box.

Figure 2: Snapshots and Constraints in the DRAG Dialog Box Drivers and Motion As part of your mechanism analysis. you can select a body that is not defined as ground and drag it with the mouse. You can also have a body translate along or rotate about the axis of a coordinate system. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Using the drag icons in the DRAG dialog box. Drivers behave like motors in that they exert forces between two bodies within a single degree of freedom (DOF).NOTES SIMULATING MOTION Dragging Assembly Components Dragging is a powerful way to move your mechanism through an allowable range of motion. you can use a driver to study kinematic behavior in your designs. You can add drivers to your model to prepare it for a motion study.

Joint Axis Drivers Joint axis drivers are used to define the relative motion between two bodies in the joint axis direction. Figure 3: Ramp Driver Graph Selecting a Driver You can impose drivers on joint axes or on geometric entities such as points. Ramp. Profile Specification: Position. planar surfaces. Cosine. Velocity or Acceleration. Each profile magnitude will require different inputs for values.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-5 .NOTES When configuring a driver you specify: • • • Driver Type: Translation or Rotation. Polynomial. and datum planes. or Table driven. For University Use Only . Profile Magnitude: Constant. Sine Constant Cosine Acceleration. Cycloidal. The profile magnitude can then be graphed using the inputted values for visual representation. Parabolic. The following example is for a Ramp driver.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . for example: • • • The two bodies involved in the motion are not directly connected by a joint. IMPLEMENTING MECHANISM Using Mechanism Design involves two fundamental steps: defining a mechanism and making it move. They are useful when the motion cannot be defined using a joint axis. Complex 3-D motions as opposed to single translation or rotation is needed.NOTES Geometric Drivers Geometric drivers are used to define motion (rotation or translation) on points or planes. DOF needed cannot be satisfied by any existing connection. For University Use Only . Depending on whether there are cam and slot connections in the mechanism. the major steps of implementing mechanism design is slightly different. Mechanism Design without Cam and Slot Connections • Creating assembly connections $VVHPEOLQJ WKH FRPSRQHQWV WKDW are intended to move by using connections enables you to create a movable system instead of one rigid body.

as well as generate movie and image files for visualization purposes. you can move the mechanism through an allowable range of motion interactively. The mechanism will move according to your design intent that has been build in the connections. the joint axis settings and the drivers.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-7 . set the range of the motion and choose the default configuration used in regeneration. Defining Joint Axis Settings Moving the assembly • ½ 0RYH WKH DVVHPEO\ LQWHUDFWLYHO\ XVLQJ WKH 'UDJ IXQFWLRQDOLW\ Using the Drag functionality. • 8VLQJ WKH PRWLRQ UXQ UHVXOWV \RX FDQ perform various engineering studies. 7KH PRWRUOLNH GULYHUV HQDEOH \RX ½ 6HWXS GULYHUV DQG UXQ PRWLRQ to impose a particular motion on a mechanism.NOTES • <RX FDQ XVH WKH MRLQW D[LV VHWWLQJV WR quantitatively describe the displacement. Applying the results ½ Generate movie/image output ½ Interference study ½ Generate Motion Envelope ½ Create Trace curve/Cam synthesis curve ½ Graph measure results For University Use Only .

as opposed to creating assembly skeletons.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . Figure 4: CAM and SLOT FOLLOWER CONNECTIONS Dialog Boxes For University Use Only . you can capture motions that are very difficult to accomplish using the regular connections or skeletons. The build in functionality allows you to continuously monitor parameters within the motion range. Mechanism Design with Cam and Slot Connections You can create the advanced cam and slot connections in a similar fashion after you first assemble the component into the assembly using the regular connections. Using cam and slot connections.NOTES • Perform Sensitivity and Optimization studies in conjunction with &UHDWLQJ LQWXLWLYH DQG PRYDEOH PHFKDQLVPV GUDVWLFDOO\ UHGXFH BMX the workload when setting up for performing studies.

management meetings. Concept communication tools for sales and marketing. animations can be created and manipulated with ease. assemblies. For University Use Only . These animation sequences can be used as: • • • • • Away convey complex information about a product or process. using parts. Design Animation is associative. design reviews.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-9 . Guides for maintenance procedures. Animated guides to assembly and disassembly. drivers and inherited mechanism joints. so that any changes made to the Pro/ENGINEER design are fully propagated throughout the animation— making sure the animation presented is always up-to-date and correct. A method for remote communication of information.NOTES DEFINING DESIGN ANIMATION The Pro/ENGINEER® Design Animation Option enables the creation of animation sequences within Pro/ENGINEER. Using key frames. and mechanisms. Photorealistic animations can also be created combining Pro/ENGINEER's photorendering technology with Design Animation.

Design Animation interpolates between these key frames to produce a smooth animation. For University Use Only . Simply snapping current positions and orientations in Pro/ENGINEER can easily create Key frames. Key frame sequences The user defines the key frame sequences that describe the position and orientation of parts and assemblies at specified times.NOTES Figure 5: Design Animation of Assembly DESIGN ANIMATION CAPABILITIES Integrated and associative Design Animation is an integrated part of Pro/ENGINEER. and users benefit from full associativity and interoperability with other PTC products and data management tools. so there are no data transfer problems usually found with 3rd party animation packages.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-10 Fundament als of Des ign . If the design of parts or assemblies change. the animation will update automatically.

body locking and other tools. This allows for rapid manipulation of part positions to quickly build key frame sequences and animations.NOTES Figure 6: Key Frame Sequence Dialog Box Animation Tools Design Animation delivers powerful assembly manipulation functionality to help quickly set up key frames by allowing the user to specify geometric constraints. For University Use Only . translational and rotational dragging.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-11 .

manipulate. key frames. users can quickly and easily define.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-12 Fundament als of Des ign . From this one panel.NOTES Figure 7: DRAG Dialog Box Animation Manager Events. Figure 8: Managing Animation Mechanism Re-use The mechanism joints used to create and move assemblies in Mechanism Design are re-used by Design Animation where they can be selectively activated and de-activated at any stage during animation sequences. and change any aspect of the animation. and sub-animations are displayed and controlled by the easy-to-use animation manager. For University Use Only .

NOTES LABORATORY EXERCISES Goal In this laboratory you practice with the fundamental mechanism and design animation functionality.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-13 . you create a mechanism of the Fan project assembly. Tools Table 2: Icons for Mechanism and Animation Icons Description Snapshot Set coordinate system Select and drag geometry Drag link Select connections Add constraint Align constraint Body lock constraint Animation icons display Assemble default constraint For University Use Only . Method In Exercise 1.

close the player and return to Pro/ENGINEER.NOTES EXERCISE 1: Creating a Basic Mechanism Task 1. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module. Figure 9: Assembling Base For University Use Only . Use windows to navigate to the directory. 1. fund_design_320/20_mechnism_animation 3. Doubleclick FINISHED_MECHANISM mpg file to use your computers default mpeg player. 2. 2.. After viewing the FINISHED_ANIMATION mpeg. Assemble the MECH_BASE assembly with a default constraint.EXE file and use it to play the mpeg). and view the exercise goal. 1. Create a new assembly and assemble the base subassembly. Task 2. (Or.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-14 Fundament als of Des ign . Review the motion. you may double-click the MPEG_PLAYER. Prepare for creating the mechanism. Create a new assembly called MECHANISM using the default template.

3. For University Use Only . Assemble the MECH_OSCILLATE assembly using a connection. BLADES. Task 3. In the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box.NOTES 3. Notice the default connection is a PIN joint. Open the MECH_OSCILLATE assembly. 1. Notice that it enables you to use mechanism connections instead of typical constraints. 5. Figure 10: Suppressing Features 4. click Connections to expand the dialog box. Close the MECH_OSCILLATE window.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-15 . and suppress the HUB. Figure 11: Positioning 2. as shown in the following figure. Begin to assemble the MECH_OSCILLATE assembly. Activate the MECHANISM window. Use the mouse to position approximately. Select the two surfaces shown in the following figure to satisfy the Axis Alignment. and CAGE.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-16 Fundament als of Des ign . Move the mouse and notice how the pin joint has constrained the subassembly. Select the two surfaces shown in the following figure to satisfy the Translation requirement. Task 4. and select on the tip of the main driveshaft. Position as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 12: Selecting Surfaces for Axis Alignment 4. Click OK > Done Return . 2. 1. For University Use Only . click Mechanism > Drag . Dynamically drag the assembly. (This will effectively mate the surfaces.) Figure 13: Mating Surfaces 5. In the ASSEMBLY menu.

drag the part and locate it to the position shown in the following figure. An alternate technique is to use the Move tab from the Component Placement dialog box. 2. Figure 15: Drag to Position For University Use Only . Close the dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-17 . Assemble the DRIVE_ARM using a connection. Note: Be careful when dragging the drive arm since you are also able to drag the MECH_OSCILLATE assembly. Assemble the DRIVE_ARM.NOTES Figure 14: Positioning Subassemblies 3. as this will only move the current component. Establish the connection using a Pin joint. 1. Using Mechanism > Drag . Task 5.

Figure 16: Selecting Joint Axis 2. 2. 4. In the MECHANISM dialog box. Therefore we will have 36x10 = 360° of angular motion. and type [FAN] as the name. click Connect > Run >Yes . Task 6. and select the joint axis. Create the first driver. Leave all the default values and click OK. 5. 3. Click Graph to view the function to be applied to this driver. Task 7. Note: We entered 36 deg/sec for the velocity and 10 seconds time duration. Zoom in to the DRIVE_ARM. Close the dialog box. Run the mechanism. click Model > Drivers > Add .0] as the value for A. Close the Driver Profile and Graph Options windows. Click Run Motion > Add . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-18 Fundament als of Des ign . click the Profile tab and set the Specification to Velocity. 3. In the MECHANISM dialog box. Leave the MAGNITUDE set to Constant and type [36. 1. In the DRIVE EDITOR dialog box. Notice the time length of 10 seconds. Name the Driver [AUX ] and click OK > Close . For University Use Only .NOTES 3. as shown in the following figure.

as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-19 . Set the Type to Cylinder and select the surfaces. click Run .NOTES Figure 17: Zoomed View 4. Close the MOTION DEFINITIONS dialog box. In the MOTIONS DEFINITIONS dialog box. Figure 18: Assembling Link with a Pin 2. Click to add another connection. Assemble the LINK with two connections. 5. as shown in the following figure. 1. Task 8. and Click DoneReturn > Yes to exit Mechanism. For University Use Only . Assemble the LINK with a Pin connection to the support arm.

Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-20 Fundament als of Des ign . Click select the LINK and the PEDESTAL. Then Click Mechanism > Connect > Run >Yes . 2. Set the options in the ANIMATE dialog box. and 4. In the RESULTS PLAYBACK dialog box. Click Close > Results > Playback . For University Use Only . Repaint the screen. . Click Ok . click Play . as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 19: Selecting Surfaces Task 9. 1. Figure 20: Running Motion 3. Run the Mechanism with interference checking. The mechanism should cycle through one complete oscillation. Click Run Motion > Run .

Click . Click and close the ANIMATE dialog box. Save the model and close all windows.NOTES Figure 21: Animate Dialog Box 5. rotate. 6. 8. and change model and datum display while animation is running. Figure 22: Link Interferes Note: You may zoom. Close the RESULTS PLAYBACK window and click Done-Return > Yes to exit Mechanism. pan. Notice that the Link interferes with the Pedestal during portions of the oscillation. 7. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-21 .

OPTIONAL EXERCISE 1: Completing the Fan Mechanism Task 1. 3. Establish motion on the drive shaft with a connection and 1.ASM.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISES The following exercises provide supplementary tools and techniques related to this module’s goal. For University Use Only . Select F3_DRIVESHAFT part and redefine it. Figure 23: Aligning Axes 5. 4. Then click Connections to expand the dialog box. Click to delete all constraints. You may work on these as time allows. Open MECHANISM.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-22 Fundament als of Des ign . Satisfy the translation requirement by selecting the two surfaces. 2. driver. as shown in the following figure. Create an axis alignment between the following two surfaces.

For University Use Only . Type [MAIN] as the name and click Profile . as shown in the following figure. Task 2. 3. Figure 25: Selecting Joint Axes 2. Click Mechanism > Model > Drivers > Add . Therefore we will have 108x10 = 3x360° of angular motion.NOTES Figure 24: Selecting Two Surfaces 6. and select the joint axis. Set the Specification to Velocity and type [108] as the value for ‘A’ using a Constant Magnitude. 1. Click Ok > Close . Note: We entered 108 deg/sec for the velocity and 10 seconds time duration.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-23 . Add the second driver. Use Flip to make the magenta direction arrow point inwards. 4. Click OK to complete the redefinition.

Redefine the HUB. Figure 26: Shaft Rotates Task 4. For University Use Only . Exit mechanism and Resume the HUB.NOTES Task 3. 1. Cancel the Redefine. Type [ Mechanism] and click Run Motion > Run . and CAGE. Set the same Two Parts interference as before. BLADES. 3. 4. Click Results > Playback . then click Close. Observe the motion. 3. Run the Mechanism on the full assembly. 2. and click Play. Notice the shaft now rotates during the oscillation. Click Connect > Run >Yes. Notice that it is simply assembled with typical constraints to the SHAFT. Click Run Motion > Edit > Driver. Select the MAIN Driver and click Add. 1. Click OK and Run. Run the Mechanism.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-24 Fundament als of Des ign . 2.

For University Use Only . Use windows to find and play your movie file. The MPEG output will take about 10 minutes to generate. and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . Then enter mechanism results playback and restore the FINISHED_FAN.NOTES Figure 27: Oscillating Fan Task 5. 3. Clear all memory. Save the model. 2. Click Capture . and open the FINISHED_MECHANISM. and type a filename. Optional: Output a movie.ASM.PBK file. you can use the saved one if you wish. Click Ok . close all windows. Note: If you are having trouble with your mechanism. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-25 .

> OK. Figure 28: Animation Assembly 4.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-26 Fundament als of Des ign . For University Use Only . movie.NOTES OPTIONAL EXERCISE 2: Creating an Animation Task 1. (Or. 5. Doubleclick FINISHED_ANIMATION mpeg file to use your computers default mpeg player. View the finished MPEG 1.EXE file and use it to play the mpeg). fund_design_320/20_mechnism_animation 2. as shown in the following figure. To display local coordinate 6. Use windows to navigate to the directory. Prepare for creating the animation. Create a saved view called [cage_blades ]. 3. Click > systems. Click Applications > Animation . you may double-click the MPEG_PLAYER.ASM. Close the Mpeg player and return to Pro/ENGINEER. Open ANIMATION.

Create a saved view called [ISO] as shown. Figure 30: ISO View 8. as shown in the following figure and save the view as [start].NOTES Figure 29: Cage Blades View 7. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-27 . Reorient approximately.

Select the MAIN_BASE. Click the Ground body and click Edit . 4.NOTES Figure 31: Reorienting View Task 2. select the Cage part. and MOTOR parts and click Done Sel > Ok . For University Use Only . Initiate bodies and begin taking snapshots 1. 2. and drag to a position approximately as shown in the following figure. Task 3. > to take the first snapshot. Click 5. Close the BODIES dialog box. Click One Part Per Body . Click Csys. SUPPORT_ARM. and select the HOUSING_REAR part to set the current Create a series of snapshots for the cage and blades. 1. Click . 3.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-28 Fundament als of Des ign . Click .

as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-29 . Figure 33: Position for Third Snapshot 4. Click and drag the first fin to the position. Click to take the second snapshot. as shown in the following figure. For University Use Only . 3. Click to take the third snapshot. Take the fourth snapshot.NOTES Figure 32: Creating Snapshots 2. 5.

NOTES Figure 34: Fourth Snapshot 6. For University Use Only . Figure 35: Fifth Snapshot 7. The sixth snapshot is shown in the following figure. Take the fifth snapshot. as shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-30 Fundament als of Des ign .

Figure 37: Seventh Snapshot 9. The seventh snapshot is shown in the following figure.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-31 . as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 36: Sixth Snapshot 8. For University Use Only . Create the next snapshot.

4. Create a saved view for the linkage and take linkage snapshots. For University Use Only . 2. Zoom as shown below and create a saved view called [zoom_link]. as shown in the following figure. Click .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-32 Fundament als of Des ign . and create the ninth snapshot. 1. drag the link.NOTES Figure 38: Eighth Snapshot Task 4. Figure 39: Selecting Constraints to Disable 3. Click Constraints > and select the connections shown in the following figure to temporarily disable them. Click > and select the LINK to set the active Csys.

Snapshot 11 is shown in the following figure. Click and drag to create the tenth snapshot. (Hint.NOTES Figure 40: Ninth Snapshot 5. Figure 41: Tenth Snapshot 6. as shown in the following figure.) For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-33 .you will have to disable a constraint and re-select a Csys.

Figure 43: Zooming in to Create a New Saved View 8. For University Use Only . and select the REAR_COVER part to set the current 9. Create Snapshot12 as shown. as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 42: Eleventh Snapshot 7. Zoom and create the saved view [hub_covers].Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-34 Fundament als of Des ign . Click Csys.

13.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-35 . 14. and edit the End Time to [30] seconds. Click Utilities > Time Domain . Take Snapshot14. Click OK . Take Snapshot13 as shown in the following figure.NOTES Figure 44: Twelfth Snapshot 10. Figure 46: Fourteenth Snapshot 12. For University Use Only . as shown in the following figure. Close the DRAG dialog box. Figure 45: Thirteenth Snapshot 11. Click to being Key Frame Sequence (KFS) creation.

19. . type [1. Click to test the animation again. and click 17. For University Use Only . Figure 47: Adding Snapshot to Key Frame Sequence 18. Click Stop when the moving timeline reaches 15 seconds. Move the key frames for the cage and blades to be closer together on the timeline. Click Stop when the moving timeline reaches 15 seconds. as shown in the following figure.NOTES 15. as shown in the following figure. Select Snapshot2. Click OK and then click to test the animation. 16.0] as the time. Click to add Snapshot1 to the KFS. Figure 48: Adjusting Timeline 20. Add the remaining Snapshots.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-36 Fundament als of Des ign .

Figure 49: Selecting Timeline 22.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-37 . as shown in the following figure.Click > Edit KFS . as shown in the following figure. Edit the times. Figure 50: Editing Times Figure 51: Important Note 23.NOTES 21. Select the KFS timeline as shown in the following figure. Add in Snapshots 13 – 1 in a mirror sequence from time 14 to time 23. For University Use Only .

3. set the time value to [4. For University Use Only . 5.5] and click Apply . set the time value to [1. Click Ok > Task 5. 2. Click OK . Select the named view Cage_Blades . 4.5] and click Apply. Click Utilities > Time Domain to temporarily edit the End Time to [12] seconds. set the time value to [0. Add views to the timeline. Click . Note: All saved views on the timeline in this exercise should have their ‘After’ value set to ‘START’. select the Cage_Blades view. 1. and select the named view START.NOTES Figure 52: Adding Snapshots in a “Mirror” Sequence 24. Click Close > to test the animation. to test the animation.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-38 Fundament als of Des ign . Click .5] and click Apply .

5]. set the time value to [16. Apply the Zoom _Link view to a time of [10. 7. Figure 53: Studying the Timeline 8. Select the Zoom_Link view . select the Hub_Covers view. Apply the Zoom _Link view to a time of [6. 9.0]. Click on the and select Zoom In .NOTES 6. Figure 55: Setting Time Value For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-39 . Click Close > to test the animation.0]. select the Hub_Covers view. Then select a window.5] and click Apply. Figure 54: Picking a Window 12. Refer to the figure below. set the time value to 10. set the time value to [13. Click Utilities > Time Domain to temporarily edit the End Time to [20] seconds. Repeat for a value of [ 15. .5] and click Apply > Close . 11. Click OK . 13. Click [10. as shown in the following figure. Click .5] and click Apply .

17. 19. Create a body-body lock for the duration of the driver. Click Task 6. Click For University Use Only . 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-40 Fundament als of Des ign . and select the F3_DRIVESHAFT as the Lead body. Then Zoom In as Figure 56: Zooming In after Refit 20. Drag the Driver to the following location on the timeline.5]. 1. set the time value to [19] and click Apply . Add a driver to the timeline. Add the ISO view at a time value of [23. 1. Click Animation > Driver > Main > Include . Add the Start view at a time value of [22. Click Close > to test the animation. 15. Select the Start view.NOTES 14.5]. Click shown. Click OK . Figure 57: Dragging Driver Task 7. 18. 16. Click Utilities > Time Domain and edit the End Time to [30] seconds. on the and select Refit . to test the animation.

to play the animation. Reposition the Body-Body lock on the timeline as shown in the following figure. Figure 59: Final Start View 5. Click to test the animation. as shown in the following figure. and click Apply > Close . 6. Figure 58: Repositioning Body Lock 4. as shown in 7. Add a final START view. Save the assembly. 3. Setup the dialog box. For University Use Only . Select the HUB and the BLADES as Follower bodies.NOTES 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-41 . Click the following figure.

and click File > Erase > Not Displayed . and click Ok . Type [Animation] as the filename. accept all the defaults. After viewing the animation through a few cycles. The Mpeg will take about 10 minutes to generate. Save the model. For University Use Only .NOTES Figure 60: Animate Dialog Box 8. close all windows. Click to play the animation in a continuous loop. 9. 10. click Capture to export an MPEG movie.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 0-42 Fundament als of Des ign .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Mechan ism & D esign An imat ion Pag e 2 0-43 . How to animate a design.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned: • • How to create a mechanism.

Commercial Use Prohibited - .For University Use Only .

Define room and set its textures. Render a scene using different options.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited . Objectives After completing this module. Set lights. Manipulate images. Page 21-1 . you will be able to: • • • • • • Define and set appropriate views.Module Creating Photorealistic Images In this module you learn to create photo-realistic images of solid models using PhotoRender. Define and set appearances.

using PhotoRender. Define and assign appearances. Set the lights to illuminate the model. To activate the PhotoRender menu bar. PhotoRender Interface All the functions needed to set a scene and to render it can be accessed from the PhotoRender menu bar. Set a room around the model. For University Use Only . To create a scene. PhotoRender allows you to: • • • Setup a scene.NOTES CREATING PHOTOREALISTIC IMAGES You can create photo-realistic images of Pro/ENGINEER models. parts or assemblies. click View > Model Setup > PhotoRender . Render the scene.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-2 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you need to: • • • • Set an appropriate perspective view . Manipulate the images. start and shutdown the rendering process using this menu bar. Figure 1: The PhotoRender Menu Bar SETTING UP A SCENE A scene involves an illuminated model assigned with appearances and an environment. You can also save and edit images.

render the model in a perspective view instead of the trimetric. To add realism. you need to define a view in which you would like to render the model and create an environment around it. Pro/ENGINEER displays the model in trimetric view by default. Figure 3: The Trimetric and Perspective Views For University Use Only . you always see an object with a background in perspective view.NOTES Wall with texture Light Mold assigned with appearances Floor with marble texture The view to render Figure 2: The Scene for the Mold Model Setting up Views and Room In real life.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-3 . To create a realistic rendering. without exiting the PhotoRender mode. Setting and Saving Views The PhotoRender menu bar helps you to set and save the views in which you would like to render the model. You can set perspective views using the PhotoRender menu bar.

Floor and Ceiling.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-4 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . a room is displayed in the wire frame mode and the Wall2 and Floor is displayed with a grid. All the sides of a room can be mapped with different textures. It has six sides. You can choose to display the room in a shaded mode.NOTES Setting up Rooms A room helps you to locate the model in an environment. By default. These textures determine the visual component of the scene around the model. Figure 4: Room in Wireframe Display Mode For University Use Only . which are termed as Walls. Each side of the room can be independently moved and positioned with respect to the model.

Figure 6: Different Appearances. You can modify these attributes to create appearances using the APPEARANCE EDITOR dialog box. rubber etc. steel. gold.NOTES Figure 5: Room in Shaded Display Mode Defining and Setting Appearances Appearances are a combination of a number of attributes that define the look of a material like wood. These attributes include color. shininess. For University Use Only . To create complex appearances.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-5 . PhotoRender allows you to assign Texture. reflections. Bump and a Decal maps. transparency and maps etc.

The LIGHT EDITOR dialog box locates a light with respect to the model. By default the PhotoRender illuminates the model with two lights.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-6 Fundam ent al s of Des ign . you can switch on /off a light. You can define or modify the properties of a light. using the LIGHT EDITOR dialog box. Spot Using the LIGHTS dialog box. For University Use Only . The PhotoRender allows you to create four types of lights: • • • – A point light is like an incandescent light bulb. Point Direction – A direction light emits parallel beam of light rays from an infinite distance. enables it to cast shadows and manipulate the color. – A spotlight is like a Point light whose rays are confined within a cone. To create a good rendering. Ambient and Direction light. It does not have a specific position. Setting up Lights A good lighting scheme enhances the realism and visual appeal of a scene. In assembly mode. you may create appropriate lights. which emits the light from its center in all the directions. delete a light.NOTES Figure 7: Spheres with Different Maps Assigning Appearances You can set appearances using the APPEARANCES dialog box. or modify properties of a light. In part mode you can assign appearances to selected surfaces or to the full part. using the LIGHTS dialog box. you can assign an appearance to a component or to the full assembly.

transparency. the highlights. shadows etc and creates an image of the scene. Figure 8: Rendered Scene PhotoRender allows you to choose a number of options using RENDER CONFIGURATION dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-7 .NOTES RENDERING A SCENE You can render a scene after setting it up. Following are some of the major options that you can set using RENDER CONFIGURATION dialog box: • • • • • • • • Render Quality SelfShadows Reflections Render Room Reflect On Floor Shadows On Floor Geometric Texture Sharpen Manipulating Images For University Use Only . The system calculates the reflections. to create different visual effects.

Creating a Decal Sharpening the images Stylizing the images For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-8 Fundam ent al s of Des ign .NOTES PhotoRender allows you to manipulate images using the Image Editor. Figure 9: Image Editor Window Some of the major functions that you can perform using the Image Editor are: • • • • • • • Converting the image formats Resizing the Images Mirroring the Images Rotating the images.

NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this laboratory you create photorealistic images of your Pro/ENGINEER models. Method In Exercise 1.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-9 . You create lights and room ambience for the finished fan assembly from the project. you explore the PhotoRender tools. Tools Table 1: PhotoRender Icons Icons Description Modify lights Modify perspective view Render model Modify Appearance Modify room configuration Modify rendering configuration options Delete light Create spotlight For University Use Only .

2. Open the ROOM EDITOR dialog box and familiarize yourself with the room. Set your working directory to the folder that corresponds to the name of the current module.. Open the model and activate PhotoRender. The system provides a default room that you can modify to suit your requirements. For University Use Only . A rectangular room controls the environment around the model. 1. Figure 10: Finished Fan Assembly 3. Click [Modify room configuration]. Notice the default textures applied on the walls. floor and ceiling. Click View > Model Setup > PhotoRender .ASM. Open FAN_PHOTORENDER.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-10 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES EXERCISE 1: Using PhotoRender Task 1. Figure 11: PhotoRender Icon Bar Task 2. 1.

3. or switch a light on or off. Close both the APPEARANCE EDITOR and APPEARANCES dialog boxes.NOTES Note: You can change the room size using the thumb-wheels or the text box. You can create specific lights to control the illumination of your model. Spot or Direction lights using the pull-down menu or icons. 1. You can also edit. You can add the Point. Familiarize yourself with the basics of creating and setting an appearance.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-11 . Notice that the BASIC. For University Use Only . 2. Click Close when finished examining the dialog box. Notice the two default lights in the Lights dialog box. ADVANCED and DETAIL tabs contain number of attributes. Click [Modify lights]. which you can modify to create different appearances. Pro/ENGINEER illuminates the model with default lights. Notice that the Palette contains a default appearance. Click [Modify appearance]. 2. You can define your own appearances and assign them to the parts or to an assembly. Open the LIGHTS dialog box and familiarize yourself with creation and manipulation of lights. Task 4. You can also assign the appearances using the APPEARANCES dialog box. You can add more appearances. Appearances display a part in a specific material. Click Add in the APPEARANCES dialog box. Task 3. delete. 1.

Click OK to close the LIGHTS EDITOR dialog box. Wait until the system renders the model and displays the image in Pro/ENGINEER window. and lights that you have set. [Delete light] in the LIGHTS dialog 4. Task 6. appearances.NOTES Switch On/Off the selected light using this button. Notice that the transparency and textures are not visible. Direction and Spot lights using these buttons. Click box. 1. 3. even though the attributes are enabled. Click [Create spotlight] in the LIGHTS EDITOR dialog box. Notice the newly added light in the Lights dialog box. Delete the spotlight.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-12 Fundament als of Des ign . direction and spread angle of the light in the LIGHTS EDITOR dialog box. Render the Model. Close the LIGHTS dialog box. For University Use Only . 1. Create Point. 2. the system calculates the reflections and shadows in relation to the room. Create a new light. the system creates a low quality preview rendering of your scene and displays it in the current Pro/ENGINEER window. Notice that you can manipulate the position. By default. When you render a model. Click [Render model]. Figure 12: The Lights Dialog Box Task 5.

Select the ADVANCED tab and drag the Transparency slider to 50 % as shown in the following figure. Change a few settings and render the model again. 2. 4.NOTES Figure 13: The Initial Rendering Task 7. Click Modify from Model then select the color used on the front cover.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-13 . Click [Close dialog box]. 1. Exit PhotoRender temporaril. There are many configuration options to control the rendering output of your model. 3. For University Use Only . Click View > Model Setup > Color and Appearance .

Click Close and [Render model]. Wait for the system to render the model and display the image in the Pro/ENGINEER window. Click OK > Close . 8. Similarly. 10. Notice the transparency and the reflections on the main body. 7.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-14 Fundament als of Des ign .NOTES Figure 14: Changing Transparency 5. For University Use Only . Click View > Model Setup > PhotoRender . Set the options as shown in the following figure. Figure 15: Setting Options 9. modify the rear cover material and make it 50% transparent. 6. Click [Modify rendering configuration options].

Figure 17: Fan Layout For University Use Only . OPTIONAL: Change the Background display 1. The following two images are saved in current folder.NOTES Figure 16: Rendering with the Changed Options Task 8.Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-15 .

NOTES Figure 18: Scene to Experiment 2. Close all windows. Experiment with the Room Setup options to use these images as backgrounds or wall textures. Figure 19: Creating Backgrounds 3. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e 2 1-16 Fundament als of Des ign . and click File > Erase > Not Displayed .

you have learned: • • The basic capabilities of PhotoRender. How to create a photo-realistic image of a model using PhotoRender functionality.NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited C reat ing Photo real isti c Im age s Pag e 2 1-17 .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

Obtain context-sensitive help while performing a task. you will be able to: • • • Start PTC Help. Search for specific information about Pro/ENGINEER. Objectives After completing this module.Commercial Use Prohibited - Appendix Using PTC Help You can use PTC Help to quickly search for Pro/ENGINEER information.For University Use Only . PTC Help includes quick references and detailed information on selected topics. Page A-1 .

For University Use Only . Click Help > Contents and Index from the main menu as shown in the following figure. index. it may take a few seconds to launch the entire help system.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e A. and search capabilities. Main Menu This is the standard way of accessing the full-blown help system complete with contents.NOTES PTC HELP OVERVIEW PTC Help is a fully functional help system that is integrated into Pro/ENGINEER.2 Append ix A . see the Technical Support Appendix. Depending on your system speed. an index. allowing access to PTC Help with a click of the mouse Online Tutorials focussed on teaching different aspects of the software Expanded help topics available as special dialog boxes Please visit the PTC Technical Support Online Knowledge Database . and searching capability Context-sensitive help. USING Pro/ENGINEER HELP Launching Help: Four Methods There are four procedures for launching the help system. 1. PTC Help Features PTC Help offers: • • • • A new help system with a table of contents. For more information. which features thousands of Suggested Techniques.

you see a list of topics arranged in a tree structure. By clicking on each higher level topic. and by clicking the sub-topics you can access detailed instructions.Commercial Use Prohibited Usin g PT C Help Pag e A. you can access subtopics. For University Use Only .3 . and tips. explanations. Figure 2: Contents and Index in PTC Help In the left frame of the window.NOTES Figure 1 Starting PTC Help The Pro/ENGINEER Online Help homepage appears in your web browser window.

A browser window opens that explains the topic. In addition. you will also notice at the lower left there is a “See Also” link which on clicking provides a list of related topics that may be of immediate interest. Click on the right end of the main toolbar.NOTES 2. 3. Click on any icon or any part of the Pro/ENGINEER main window about which you want an explanation. 4. Figure 3: Context-Sensitive Help 5. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e A. For University Use Only .4 Append ix A . Context-Sensitive Help 1. clicking on the model tree icon in the toolbar launched a browser window that explained the icon functionality. In the following example.

Commercial Use Prohibited Usin g PT C Help Pag e A.5 . Click on the right end of the main Pro/ENGINEER toolbar. Click the topic you want to read. For University Use Only . Figure 4: The ‘See Also’ List of Topics 3. Click any menu command from the menu manager. 5. 4. You may click on any topic you want to read additionally. 2. Pro/ENGINEER Menu Manager 1. clicking on X-Section in the menu manager launched the TOPIC ROUTER browser window with a list of two useful topics. In the following example.NOTES 6. A TOPIC ROUTER browser window opens with a list of topic links that explain the menu command. 3.

Vertical Menu Commands 1.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e A. Figure 6: Right-Clicking in Menu Manager For University Use Only . Right-click and hold on a menu command until the GETHELP window appears.NOTES Figure 5: Launching Help through Menu Manager 4.6 Append ix A .

NOTES

PTC HELP MODULES
There are four main branches in the PTC Help table of contents: Welcome, Pro/ENGINEER Foundation, Using Foundation Modules, and Using Additional Modules.

Figure 7: Four Main Branches in Help System

Refer to the following list to find a particular module in the table of contents:

Figure 8: Foundation and Additional Modules in Help

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Usin g PT C Help Pag e A- 7

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited -

Appendix

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited -

PTC Global Services: Technical Support
PTC Global Services is committed to providing top quality assistance to our customers. In addition to our Technical Support Hotline, we also offer Web-based assistance to fit your individual needs by providing 24 hour / 7 day availability. PTC Global Services is committed to continually improving customer service. Through our Quality Monitoring Program we have demonstrated our commitment to service by achieving Global ISO 9000 Certification for our Technical Support offerings.

Objectives
After completing this module you will be able to: • • • • Open a Technical Support Call. Register for on-line Technical Support. Navigate the PTC Products Knowledge Base. Find telephone numbers for technical support and services.

Page B-1

NOTES

FINDING THE TECHNICAL SUPPORT WEB PAGE
Choose Support from the PTC Home Page www.ptc.com or go directly to www.ptc.com/support/support.htm.

OPENING TECHNICAL SUPPORT CALLS
Opening Technical Support Calls via E-mail
Send email to cs_ptc@ptc.com with copen as the e-mail subject. Please use the following format (or download the template from www.ptc.com/cs/doc/copen.htm): FNAME: LNAME: First Name Last Name U.S., Germany, France, U.K., Singapore, or

CALLCENTER: Tokyo PHONE: CONFIG_ID: PRODUCT: MODULE: PRIORITY: DESC_BEGIN: description starts

NNN NNN-NNNN x-NNNN NNNNNN X XX X

description continues description ends DESC_END

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NOTES

Opening Technical Support Calls via Telephone
Call us directly by telephone (refer to the Contact Information page for your Local Technical Support Center). The Technical Support Engineer will ask you for the following information when logging a call: • • • • Your PTC software Configuration ID Your name and telephone number The PTC product (module) name Priority of the issue

Opening Technical Support Calls via the Web
You can use the PTC Web site www.ptc.com/support to open Technical Support calls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, by using the Pro/CALL LOGGER

Sending Data Files to PTC Technical Support
To send data files to PTC Technical Support, please follow the instructions at: www.ptc.com/support/cs_guide/additional.htm. When the call is resolved your data will be deleted by the Technical Support Engineer. Your data will not be divulged to any third party vendors under any circumstances. You may also request a Non-Disclosure Agreement from the Technical Support Engineer.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Cu s t o m e r Su p p o rt I n f o rm a t i o n Pag e B- 3

NOTES

Routing Your Technical Support Calls

Call
Customer question

Telephone Call

Web Call

Tech SupportEngineer creates a call in the database

Call is automatically created in the database

Investigation

Call Back and Investigation

Support Engineer solves issue or reports it to Development (SPR)

SPR
Software Performance Report SPR fixed from Development

Software Performance Report (SPR) SPR Verification through Tech. Support Engineer

Update CD to customer

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e B- 4 Append ix B

NOTES

Technical Support Call Priorities
• • •
• • Extremely Critical Critical Urgent

– Work stopped

– Work severely impacted – Work impacted

Not Critical General Information

Software Performance Report Priorities
• • •
Top Priority

– Highly critical software issue that is causing a work

stoppage. – Critical software issue that affects immediate work and a practical alternative technique is not available.
High Medium

– Software issue that does not affect immediate work or a practical alternative technique is available.

REGISTERING FOR ON-LINE SUPPORT
Go to www.ptc.com/support and click Sign-up Online , to open the registration form and enter your Configuration ID. To find your Pro/ENGINEER Configuration ID, click Help > About
Pro/ENGINEER .

Complete the information needed to identify yourself as a user with your personal data. Please write down your username and password for future reference.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Cu s t o m e r Su p p o rt I n f o rm a t i o n Pag e B- 5

NOTES

ONLINE SERVICES
After you have registered, you will have full access to all Online Tools.

You can search our Knowledge Base using a Search-Engine. Our Online Support Applications controls the status of calls (Call Tracker) and SPRs (SPR Tracker) and adds comments to these. If you add a comment, the Technical Support Engineer assigned to your call will be notified automatically. Additionally, contact information such as the customer feedback line and electronic order of software and manuals are available. The Software Update Tool allows you to request the latest software updates for any PTC product.

FINDING ANSWERS IN THE KNOWLEDGE BASE
The Technical Support Knowledge Base contains over 18,000 documents. Technical Application Notes (TANs), Technical Point of Interest (TPIs), Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), and Suggested Techniques offer upto-date information about all relevant software areas. All FAQs and Suggested Techniques are available in English, French, and German.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e B- 6 Append ix B

NOTES

Terminology used by Technical Support
– Technical Application Note provides information about SPRs that may affect more than just the customer originally reporting an issue. TANs also may provide alternative techniques to allow a user to continue working.
TAN TPI

– Technical Point of Interest provides additional technical information about a software product. TPIs are created by Technical Support to document the resolution of common issues reported in actual customer calls. TPIs are similar to TANs, but do not reference an SPR. – Provides step-by-step instructions including screen snapshots, on how to use PTC software to complete common tasks.

Suggested Techniques

FAQ

– Frequently Asked Questions provides answers to many of the most commonly asked questions compiled from the PTC Technical Support database.

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Cu s t o m e r Su p p o rt I n f o rm a t i o n Pag e B- 7

NOTES

GETTING UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION
To subscribe to our Knowledge Base Monitor e-mail service, go to www.ptc.com/support. 1. Click Technical Support > Online Support Applications > Knowledge Base Monitor . 2. Select the PTC Product or Module for which you want to get information. 3. You will receive daily e-mail with update information; this can help you by upgrading to a new PTC product or to a new release.

Figure 1: Knowledge Base Monitor Sign Up

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e B- 8 Append ix B

NOTES

CONTACT INFORMATION
PTC Technical Support Worldwide Electronic Services.
These services are available seven days a week, 24 hours a day.
Web:

• •
E-mail:

www.ptc.com/support/index.htm (Support) www.ptc.com/company/contacts/edserv.htm (Education)

• •

cs_ptc@ptc.com (for opening calls and sending data) cs-webmaster@ptc.com (for comments or suggestions about the Customer Service Web site)

FTP (for transferring files to PTC Technical Support):

ftp.ptc.com

Technical Support Customer Feedback Line
The Customer Feedback Line is intended for general customer service concerns that are not technical product issues.
E-mail:

cs-feedback@ptc.com

Telephone:

www.ptc.com/cs/doc/feedback_nums.htm

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NOTES

Telephone
For assistance with technical issues, contact the Electronic Services noted in the previous section, or the Technical Support line as listed in the Phone and Fax Information sections below. PTC has nine integrated Technical Support Call Centers in North America, Europe, and Asia. Our worldwide coverage ensures telephone access to Technical Support for customers in all time zones and in local languages.

North America Phone Information
Customer Services (including Technical Support, License Management, and Documentation Requests):
Within the United States and Canada:

800-477-6435

Outside the United States and Canada:

• •

781-370-5332 781-370-5513

Maintenance:

888-782-3774

Education:

888-782-3773

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NOTES

Europe Phone Information
Technical Support Phone Numbers: Austria Belgium Denmark Finland France Germany 0800 29 7542 0800-15-241 (French) 0800-72567 (Dutch) 8001-5593 0800-117092 0800-14-19-52 0180-2245132 49-89-32106-111 (for Pro/MECHANICA® outside of Germany) Ireland Israel Italy Luxembourg Netherlands Norway Portugal South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland 1-800-409-1622 1-800-945-42-95 (All languages including Hebrew) 177-150-21-34 (English only) 800-79-05-33 0800-23-50 0800022-4519 8001-1872 05-05-33-73-69 0800-991068 900-95-33-39 020-791484 0800-55-38-33 (French) 0800-83-75-58 (Italian) 0800-552428 (German) United Kingdom 0800-318677

License Management Phone Numbers: Belgium Denmark Finland Eastern Europe 0800-75376 8001-5593 0800-117-092 44 1252 817 078

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited Cu s to m e r Su p p o rt I n f o rm a t io n Pag e B-1 1

NOTES France Germany Ireland Italy Netherlands Norway Portugal Russia Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom 0800-14-19-52 49 (0) 89-32106-0 1-800-409-1622 39 (0) 39-65651 0800-022-0543 8001-1872 05-05-33-73-69 44 1252 817 078 900-95-33-39 020-791484 41 (0) 1-8-24-34-44 0800-31-8677 Education Services Phone Numbers: Benelux France Germany Italy Spain/Portugal Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom 31-73-644-2705 33-1-69-33-65-50 49 (0) 89-32106-325 39-039-65-65-652 39-039-6565-1 34-91-452-01-00 46-8-590-956-00 (Malmo) 46-8-590-956-46 (Upplands Vasby) 41 (0) 1-820-00-80 44-0800-212-565 (toll free within UK) 44-1252-817-140 Asia and Pacific Rim Phone Information Technical Support Phone Numbers: Australia China* Hong Kong India* 1800-553-565 10800-650-8185 (international toll free) 108-657 (manual toll free) 800-933309 000-6517 For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e B-12 Append ix B .

MTF8309729 MTF8309752 001-803-65-7250 7-2-48-55-00-35 120-20-9023 1-800-80-1026 0800-44-4376 1800-1-651-0176 65-830-9899 00798-65-1-7078 (international toll free) 080-3469-001 (domestic toll free) 0080-65-1256 (international toll free) 080-013069 (domestic toll free) 001-800-65-6213 *Note: Callers dialing from India or China must provide the operator with The operator will then connect you to the Singapore Technical Support License Management Phone Numbers Japan Hong Kong 81 (0) 3-3346-8280 (852) 2802-8982 Education Services Phone Numbers Australia China 61 2 9955 2833 (Sydney) 61 3 9561 4111 (Melbourne) 86-20-87554426 (GuangZhou) 86-21-62785080 (Shanghai) 86-10-65908699 (Beijing) Hong Kong India 852-28028982 91-80-2267272 Ext.#306 (Bangalore) 91-11-6474701 (New Delhi) 91-226513152 (Mumbai) For University Use Only .NOTES Indonesia Japan Malaysia New Zealand Philippines Singapore South Korea Taiwan Thailand the respective string: China India Center.Commercial Use Prohibited Cu s to m e r Su p p o rt I n f o rm a t io n Pag e B-1 3 .

NOTES Japan Malaysia Singapore South Korea Taiwan 81-3-3346-8268 03-754 8198 65-8309866 82-2-3469-1080 886-2-758-8600 (Taipei) 886-4-3103311 (Taichung) 886-7-3323211 (Kaohsiung) ELECTRONIC SERVICES Up-to-Date + Information Worldwide ISO 9000 Certification Quality Control System = Maximum Productivity with PTC Products For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e B.14 Append ix B .

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For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited - .

1-2 Conic entities. 5-8 Options. 8-7 Replacing manually. 5-6 Fillets Elliptical. 21-6 Assemblies Components Repeating placement. 13-6 Reference Control Settings. 2-4 Creating. 12-4 Using Model Geometry. 2-12 Helical Sweeps. 8-4 Repositioning components. 8-7 Modifying. 5-13 Instance Accelerator see also Family Tables. 4-8 Layouts. 20-10 Introduction. 1-3 Creating axes normal to sketch plane. 1-2 Conic sections. 13-8 Object-Specific Reference Control. 10-10 Controlling Interdependencies Copy Geom Features. 1-2 Elliptical fillets. 10-8 Local Groups. 2-4 Guidelines for using. Constraints. 2-3 Creating Neutral Curve.1 . 20-5 Exploded Views. 20-4 Automatic Assembly. 5-4 General structure. 20-6 For University Use Only . 5-3 Generics. 7-2 Patterning Features. 20-5 Selecting. 5-13 Using. 7-2 Ungrouping.Commercial Use Prohibited IN D E X Pag e. 20-12 Tools. 5-13 Creating. 21-7 Setting up lights. 5-3 Assembly. 12-2 Subassembly Level. 4-9 Design Animation Capabilities. 20-4 Motion. 12-5 Surfaces. 10-12 Drafts Available types. 6-4 Exploded Views. 21-7 Scene Rendering. 1-4 Splines. 5-4 Instance Accelerator Files. 20-3 Dragging Components. 2-5 Creating Neutral Plane. 7-4 Manipulating. 1-5 Sketcher points. 5-12 Instance Index Files. 5-12 Testing Instances. 20-10 Manager. 1-6 Geometry Developing with Rounds. 20-3 Connections vs. 8-6 Creating features in. 5-12 ISDX see also Surfaces. 3-9 Inheritance Features. 7-2 Breaking Dependencies. 5-12 Instances. 8-3 Subassemblies. 21-5 Image Manipulation. 12-3 Mechanism Implementing. 2-2 Drivers Geometric. 7-4 Map Parts Constructing. 13-7 Curves see also Surfaces. 8-2 using with Family Tables. 1-5 Geometric Entities. 10-6 Global information. 5-12 Capabilities. 5-7 Creating. 20-9 Keyframe Sequences. 20-11 Design Intent. 8-7 Family Tables.INDEX Fundamentals of Design Appearances. 20-6 Joint Axis. 8-2 Replacing components. 20-12 Mechanism Re-use. 8-4 Assembly Connections Types. 5-2 Advantages of using. 5-5 Modifying.

20-8 Without Cam/Slot Connections. 4-4 Part Mode. 19-7 Manipulating Features. 19-2 Running. 13-5 Parts Creating intersections. 13-5 Info Pull-Down Menu. 19-8 Part Design Process. 4-4 Changing displays. 9-23 Merge Solid. 4-9 Creating freeform. 2-6 Transitions.2 IN D E X . Transitions. 6-2 Merging and Cutting. 20-6 Model Design Creating surfaces. 18-3 Fixing Failure. 4-8 Creating curves on surface. 6-7 Tables. 13-2 Hierarchy. 20-3 Motion Simulation. 9-2 Creating. 19-9 Making Changes. 20-4 Overview. 19-6 Editing. 2-9 Cross-sections. 2-10 Setting extents. 11-5 Relating Assembly Components. 13-4 References Creating Dependencies. 4-2 Creating 2-D. 2-8 Simple. 4-2 Reverse Styling. 11-4 Definition. 6-6 Photorender. 4-2 Blends. 19-9 Structure. 1-7 Dimensions. 1-8 Sketched entities. 4-2 Parallel Modeling. 6-2 Mirrored. 11-5 Properties. 4-10 Designing. 4-11 Capped Ends. 9-20 Surface Subset. 13-2 Existing. 18-2 Rounds Advanced. 19-3 Interchanging Components. 11-4 Uses. 6-3 Patterns. 3-3 STYLE. 3-D curves. 13-4 Model Tree. 4-6 Surfaces. 9-5 Customized Reps. 4-5 Swept Blends. 11-5 Creating. 13-6 Listing References. 4-6 Solid features. 21-2 Interface. 4-5 Open Ends. 18-4 Replace. 21-4 Setting views. 3-4 For University Use Only . 21-3 Pro/Program Example.In Assemblies. 1-7 Resolve Diagnosing Cause. 2-10 Geometry. 9-22. 12-2 Splines Creating. 2-8 Setting radius. 19-7 Lower Level Program. 6-11 Dimension. 18-3 Resolve Mode. 19-10 Program Assembly Design Process. 9-17 Simplified Representations. 21-2 Setting a scene. 3-2 Additional trajectories. 4-7 Parent/Child Relationship Defining. 1-6 Creating Normal-to-Original. 9-19 Types. 4-12 see also STYLE. 11-2 With Mapped Geometry. 2-12 Selecting References. 19-2 Reference Tools Global Reference Viewer. 9-22 Creating. 13-2 Regeneration Failure Examples. 4-4 Creating styling models. 6-6 Assembly mode. 13-4 External. 4-10 Creating merged. 20-2 Mechanism Design With Cam/Slot Connections. 2-7 Sets. 21-2 Setting up rooms. 2-9 Shrinkwrap Associative.Commercial Use Prohibited Pag e. 9-5 Skeletons. 4-6 Concepts. 6-7 Types. 11-2 Modeling with. 10-5 Controlling.

Commercial Use Prohibited IN D E X Pag e. 3-2 Orienting Cross-sections. 7-7 For University Use Only . 10-4 Design intent. 7-8 Placing in models. 10-2 Automatic assembly. 3-8 Variable Section. 7-5 User-Defined Features. 10-2 Assembly Skeletons. 7-5 Creating in assemblies. 10-5 Assembly Structure Definition. 1-8 Top-Down Design. 10-5 Creating parts without geometry. 10-12 Layouts. 7-5 Creating.Creating splines. 3-7 Text Dimensions.3 . 10-5. 10-2. 3-3. 10-10 Copying reference geometry. 10-6 UDF see also User-Defined Features.

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