Steel

Class Notes and lecture material
For
MSE 651.01--
Physical Metallurgy of Steel
Notes compiled by: Glyn Meyrick, Professor Emeritus
Notes revised by: Robert H. Wagoner, Distinguished
Professor of Engineering
Web installation by: Wei Gan, Graduate Research Associate
Last revision date: 1/8/01
1 1
STEEL
Foreword
This document is intended to augment formal lectures on the general topic of the physical
metallurgy of steels, presented within the MSE Department during the Fall Quarter, 1998. It is
based on a variety of texts and published articles and also on personal experience. Specific
references to sources are made within the document. However, the material is often in the form of
knowledge that has been accumulated by the work of many people and is "well-known" by experts
in the field. A detailed acknowledgment of the work of each contributor to the field is not attempted
because that would be an awesome task. This document is not intended for publication and is
restricted for use in MSE 651.01.
Texts: Steels; Microstructures and Properties by R.W.K. Honeycombe (Edward Arnold)
Principles of the Heat Treatment of Steel by G. Krauss (ASM)
The Physical Metallurgy of Steel by W.C. Leslie (McGraw Hill)
The ASM Metal Handbooks.
Handbook of Stainless Steels, Peckner and Bernstein (eds.) McGraw Hill 1977
Tool Steels Roberts and Cary, Edition 4, ASM, 1980
Ferrous Physical Metallurgy A. K. Sinha, Butterworths 1989.
Introduction
Steel is a family of materials that is derived from ores that are rich in iron, abundant in the
Earth’s crust and which are easily reduced by hot carbon to yield iron. Steels are very versatile; they
can be formed into desired shapes by plastic deformation produced by processes such as rolling
and forging; they can be treated to give them a wide range of mechanical properties which enable
them to be used for an enormous number of applications. Indeed, steel is ubiquitous in applications
that directly affect the quality of our lives. Steel and cement constitute about 90% of the structural
materials that are manufactured
( Westwood, Met and Mat Trans, Vol. 27 A, June 1996, 1413).
What, then, is steel?
A precise and concise definition of steel is not an easy thing to present because of the very
large variety of alloys that bear the name. All of them, however, contain iron. We might reasonably
begin by describing a steel as an alloy which contains iron as the major component. This is only a
beginning because there are alloys in which iron is the major constituent, that are not called steels;
for example, cast irons and some superalloys. The major difference between a cast iron and a steel
is that their carbon contents lie in two different ranges. These ranges are determined by the
maximum amount of carbon that can be dissolved into solid iron. This is approximately 2% by
weight (in FCC iron at 1146 °C). Steels are alloys that contain less than 2% carbon. Cast irons
contain more than 2 % carbon. Many steels contain specified minimum amounts of carbon. This
does not mean that all steels must contain substantial quantities of carbon; in some steels the
carbon content is deliberately made very small and, also, the amount actually in solution is reduced
further by the addition of alloying elements that have a strong tendency to combine with the carbon
to form carbides.
Steels can be divided into two main groups; plain carbon steels and alloy steels. The latter
can then be subdivided into many groups according to chemistry ( e.g. standard low alloy steels),
applications (e.g. tool steels ) or particular properties (e.g. stainless steels) etc. Let us begin with
2 2
plain carbon steels; this group is the simplest to understand and it comprises steels that are used in
the greatest tonnage.
Plain carbon steels
A plain carbon steel is essentially an alloy of iron and carbon which also contains
manganese and a variety of residual elements. These residual elements were either present within
the raw materials used in the production process e.g. iron ore and scrap steel additions, or they
were added in the production process for a specific purpose, e.g. deoxidization by means of silicon
or aluminum. Hence they are called residual elements to distinguish them from alloying elements
that are deliberately added according to specified minimum amounts. The American Iron and Steel
Institute (AISI) has defined a plain carbon steel to be an alloy of iron and carbon which contains
specified amounts of Mn below a maximum amount of 1.65 wt. %, less than 0.6 wt. % Si, less than
0.6 wt. % Cu and which does not have any specified minimum content of any other deliberately
added alloying element. It is usual for maximum amounts (e.g. 0.05 wt. %) of S and P to be
specified. ( see The Making, Shaping and Treating of Steel, USS 1970)
The manufacture of steel is a subject that is well beyond the ambit of these notes. But we
should be aware that various manufacturing practices can affect the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur
content and hence the cleanliness of the product. The term “cleanliness” usually refers to the
amounts of various phases such as oxides, sulfides and silicates that can be present in steel. The
smaller the amount of these phases, the cleaner is the steel. These phases are in the form of particles
called inclusions and they can have significant effects on the properties of steel and are normally
undesirable. Thus, variations in the manufacturing process can have significant effects on the
properties of the steel, so some brief comments are in order. For many years steels have been
produced by casting the molten steel into molds and allowing it to solidify into ingots which were
then processed by rolling etc. Steel produced by ingot metallurgy is subdivided into four categories
according to the deoxidization process used. These categories are rimmed, capped, semi-killed and
killed steel. When an undeoxidized steel is cast into an ingot, carbon monoxide is evolved during
solidification because the solubility of oxygen decreases as the temperature decreases. By adding
enough ferrosilicon and aluminum, much of the oxygen can be removed from solution and also iron
oxide is reduced by the formation of silicon and aluminum oxides so that no gas bubbles form and
the steel is quiescent as it solidifies. The result is a fully killed steel. Plain carbon steels containing
more than 0.3% C , produced by ingot metallurgy, are usually fully killed. Semi-killed steels are
those which are partially deoxidized. Ingots for which the evolution of bubbles of carbon oxide gas
is permitted during solidification produce rimmed steel, while capping means the interruption of the
rimming process by freezing the top of the ingot by putting a cast iron cap on it. The different
practices produce ingots that differ with respect to segregation, inclusion content and as-cast
microstructure.
There have been major advances in the production of steel during the last 20 years and
continuous casting, in which great attention is being paid to the cleanliness of the steel, has become
the dominant production method. According to R. D. Pehlke in Metallurgical Treatises, published
by the Metallurgical Society of the AIME and reprinted in 1983, most steel produced by continuous
casting is fully killed. Vacuum deoxidization is also being used to eliminate the oxygen, and the
steel is protected by argon atmospheres in covered tundishes thereby yielding a cleaner steel with
respect to its inclusion content. This is beneficial with respect to the mechanical properties and
uniformity of the final product. Continuous casting also produces a product that is much closer to
the final shape that is required for the application of the steel.
3 3
More and more steel sheet is now being produced in what are called mini-mills. These mills charge
electric arc furnaces with scrap steel and iron, melt the charge, control the composition, and, via a
tundish continuously cast it into slabs several inches thick and a few feet wide. This slab is
immediately fed through a long furnace in which it is heat treated and from which it emerges at the
temperature desired to begin hot-rolling and passes directly into a series of hot rolls. Problems can
arise in controlling the residual element contribution to the composition of the product because of
variations in the quality of the scrap steel charged into the electric furnaces. Copper is particularly
undesirable because it is not easily removed from liquid steel, and as its concentration increases, it
can produce cracks due to hot-shortness. This phenomenon arises because when the hot steel is
exposed to air the iron is oxidized to form scale, much of which spalls off but the copper is not
oxidized and accumulates beneath the scale at the surface of the steel. The copper penetrates the
steel along grain boundaries and causes grain boundary cracking to occur during rolling.
Alloy steels
It follows from the definition of a plain carbon steel, that if one or more additional elements
are deliberately added to produce specified minimum contents then the product is an alloy steel. In
general, this is so, but we should also note that small additions of rare earth elements such as cerium
can be made to a plain carbon steel for inclusion control. ( One of the important roles of manganese
is to combine with sulfur to prevent the formation of iron sulfides which can embrittle the steel. It
has been discovered that additions of rare earth elements can produce high-melting point, complex
sulfides and oxysulfides that are smaller and less harmful to the mechanical properties of steels
than manganese sulfides can sometimes be.) The steel would not then be referred to as an alloy
steel. The definition given is a very broad one and it indicates that a clear, concise, nice little sub-
division scheme to describe all steels is not easily produced. As we shall see, there is a group of
low-alloy steels for which the compositions are specified in this country according to schemes
originally recommended by the AISI and the Society of Automotive Engineers(SAE), but alloy
steels are also classified on the basis of some important property ( e.g. stainless steels) or on the
basis of use (e.g. tool steels) or even as a consequence of a particular heat-treatment (e.g. maraging
steel). To add to the confusion, there are steels that have particular names coined by the
manufacturer and also steels that are characterized by an American Society for Testing Materials
(ASTM) specification, e.g. A306 which specifies the mode of manufacture, permissible amounts of
S and P but leaves the manufacturer to choose the carbon levels necessary to achieve specified
tensile properties. The tensile properties determine the grade of steel, e.g. A306 grade 50 specifies
a tensile strength of 50 to 60 KSI. The picture appears to be quite confusing. Our objective is to
eliminate the confusion by understanding how the properties of steel are related to their
microstructures, how particular microstructures are produced and what effects are produced by the
alloying elements. There is, of course, a wide range of properties. Mostly we will concentrate on
mechanical properties. The ASM. handbooks and the book "Making, Shaping and Refining of
steel" put out by the old U. S.. Steel Co. and in a revised tenth edition in 1985 by W. T.Lankford,
Jr. et al. published by the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers, present many details of
properties and production processing. Our purpose is to develop a fundamental understanding. In
order to do this, I propose to begin with pure iron, proceed to Fe-C, consider plain carbon steels, put
in alloying elements and finally to select some particular classes of steel for examination.
4 4
Iron and its Solid Solutions
At normal atmospheric pressure, iron, in equilibrium, is BCC below 910°C, FCC between
910°C and 1390°C and then BCC up to its melting point of 1536°C. Hence, at normal ambient
temperatures and below, iron is BCC. Its mechanical properties, as determined by testing in tension
at room temperature and at typical strain rates of 10
-3
to 10
-4
sec
-1
, are functions of purity, grain
size and dislocation content. The yield strength is also temperature dependent, increasing with a
reduction in temperature as shown in figure 1 (W.C. Leslie, Met. Trans. 3, 9, 1972.) These results
were obtained with iron to which Ti had been added to getter the interstitial elements. ( For example,
the carbon that combines with titanium is removed from solid solution. It has, therefore been “got”
by the titanium which explains why the verb “to getter” was coined.) Above 300 K, dislocation
glide can occur relatively easily so that the magnitude of the macroscopic yield stress is controlled
by the effects of long range internal stress fields on dislocation motion. Therefore, the temperature
dependence of the yield stress in this temperature realm is due to the temperature dependence of the
shear modulus of iron which decreases gradually as the temperature is increased and vice versa.
From 250 K downwards, the variation of the macroscopic yield stress with temperature increases
linearly and much more rapidly than the variation above room temperature. The rapid increase in the
flow stress at low temperatures appears to occur because the atomic displacements involved in the
movement of individual dislocations by glide becomes difficult very rapidly. As the yield stress
increases, the ductility decreases, and, if the strain rate is also increased, dislocation glide is replaced
by twin formation and brittle fracture by cleavage can occur. The temperature where brittle behavior
replaces ductile behavior depends upon the strain rate. Dislocation glide can still occur at
temperatures as low as 4.2 K when the strain rate is small.
Interstitial solutes in iron
See also Chapter 2 in Leslie's book and chapter 1 in "Principles of Heat Treatment of Steel by G.
Krauss, ASM, 1980.
FCC crystals have octahedral interstitial sites at coordinates 0.5, 0.5, 0.5 and the equivalent 0.5,0,0
positions in the unit cell, see figure 2. These are symmetric sites; i.e. in the hard sphere-central force
model for metallic crystals, the centers of these sites are equidistant from the centers of the nearest
neighboring atoms. Using 2.52 angstroms for the diameter of FCC iron atoms ( 1 angstrom =

10
-
10
meters) we find that 1.04 angstroms is the diameter of a sphere that will just fit in the octahedral
site. We do this by noting that if the lattice parameter is “a” then the length of the diagonal of a
face of the unit cell is a 2 . This is also equal to 2D
Fe ,
where D
Fe
is the diameter of an iron atom
that is assumed to behave as a hard sphere. Thus we can evaluate “a” and then the diameter of the
octahedral hole which is equal to ( a - D
Fe
). The tetrahedral sites are at 0.25, 0.25, 0.25, for which
we find the diameter of the hole to be 0.27 Angstroms. Because of this difference in size, the
interstitial solutes C and N ( of which C has a radius of about 0.8 angstroms
5 5
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000
-200 -100 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
T
r
u
e

s
t
r
e
e
,


k
s
i
Temperature, K
Temperature, C
M
P
a
Fe-0.15%T
GS=ASTM 5-6
˙
≅2.5 ×10
−4
/ s
Thermal
activation
dominant
(soft )
Peierls
dominated
behavior
(hard )
After W.C. Leslie, Met. Trans., 3:9 (1972).
6 6
OCTAHEDRAL TETRAHEDRAL
Metal Atoms
Metal Atoms Metal Atoms
Metal Atoms
(a) (b)
(a) (b)
BCC
FCC
a 3 2
a / 2
a / 2
a 5 4
a 3 4
a 3 2
a / 2
a / 2
a / 2
a
7 7
and N one near 0.7 angstroms) fit much more easily into the octahedral sites in the FCC structure
than in the tetrahedral sites.

BCC sites are also octahedral and tetrahedral, but the octahedral site is not symmetric
because two of the neighboring atoms are closer to the center of the site than the others. The sites
are at the coordinates 0.5, 0.5, 0 (and the equivalent 0.5,0,0 ) and 0.5, 0.25, 0, respectively. Using
the same diameter as before for an iron atom we find interstitial hole radii of about 0.19 and 0.36
Angstroms. Even though the octahedral holes are smaller than the tetrahedral holes the interstitial
solutes reside in the octahedral holes because then they only have two nearest neighbors to displace
markedly.
Consequences (see MSE 565)
The first consequence is that the solubility of C and N is greater in FCC iron than in BCC
iron because the interstitial holes are larger in the FCC structure, even though the hard sphere model
predicts the FCC structure to be the more close-packed. We will see that this is a very major
consequence that has far reaching effects in ferrous metallurgy.
Dislocations create elastic strain fields in the crystal around them and generate major atomic
displacements at and near their cores where the displacements cannot be described elastically.
Consequently, because the interstitial solutes, C and N, are larger than the interstitial sites within the
crystalline matrix they prefer to occupy sites along the dislocation cores and also those matrix sites
that are located in places where the elastic strain field of the dislocation helps to overcome the size
misfit. When BCC iron is annealed and slowly cooled, the interstitial solutes are able to diffuse to
and occupy, preferentially, those sites that they prefer in the elastic strain fields. Thus the solute is
not randomly dispersed throughout the iron but is segregated at preferred sites around the
dislocations and along dislocation cores. Furthermore, this is true for dislocations of any character
because the octahedral sites in the BCC structure are non symmetric so that the solutes cause
tetragonal distortions by displacing two nearest neighbors more than the other four. This enables
strong interactions with the shear strain fields of screw components as well as with the strain fields
due to the edge components of dislocations.
The interactions between interstitial solute elements and dislocations in BCC iron at ambient
temperatures are powerful. When the material is treated so that segregation takes place as, for
example, by aging at temperatures that permit the solutes to diffuse, dislocations are pinned and
many become immobile because moving the dislocation away from the segregated solute requires a
very large stress. When a tensile test is conducted on a sample of such material at room
temperature, most of the existing dislocations do not glide at yield. When plastic deformation
begins it does so only at a few particular places within the steel where there are localized stress
concentrations that are able to activate or create dislocation sources. ( Leslie used Ti gettered iron in
an attempt to minimize the influence of interstitial solutes upon the yield stress) Consequentially, at
yield there is a low density of mobile dislocations. However, the sample is forced to extend at the
strain rate imposed by the testing machine so these dislocations must glide rapidly and this requires
a high stress. When the dislocation sources (e.g. Frank-Read sources and double cross slip
sources) are activated they generate new dislocation line and the density of mobile dislocations
increases rapidly. This means that the rate of glide necessary to maintain the strain rate drops and
the applied stress needed to produce that rate also drops. The result is a yield point phenomenon of
an upper and lower yield stress and localized yield that causes Luders bands to form and spread
along the sample. In tensile tests conducted at higher temperatures, serrated yielding occurs because
the solute elements are able to diffuse fast enough to “catch up” dislocations and pin them again.
8 8
Consequently the stress required to maintain the strain rate fluctuates up and down like a series of
mini yield point phenomena.
The material is subject to strain aging and blue brittleness. Strain aging refers to a process
in which the dislocation density is first increased by plastic strain during a cold work operation and
then the material is held (aged) at temperatures high enough for carbon and nitrogen to diffuse but
not high enough for extensive recovery to take place. The resulting combination of pinned
dislocations and the greater density of forest dislocations raises the flow stress significantly. Strain
aging can be detrimental because of the loss of ductility that occurs as a consequence. ( Nitrogen
diffuses more rapidly than does carbon at room temperature and it has a greater solubility in iron at
this temperature. If the nitrogen content is high enough, strain aging and loss of ductility can arise
after prolonged aging at room temperature. Effects due to carbon arise when the temperature is in
the range of 100-200 Celsius.) Steel so treated can acquire a bluish oxide; hence the term “blue
brittleness”.
The solubility of carbon in BCC iron is small ( about 0.02 wt. % maximum) and depends
on what phase is formed when the solubility limit is exceeded. The equilibrium precipitate is
graphite but the kinetics of the nucleation and growth processes of forming graphite is very
sluggish. Metastable carbides are formed first when supersaturated solid solutions of Fe-C are
aged. The precipitate that forms above 150 to 200°C is an orthorhombic, metastable carbide, Fe
3
C,
that is called cementite. From room temperature to 200°C, another transition phase has been
observed ( Honeycombe, page 8). This is an hexagonal carbide that contains less carbon than is in
cementite and is called epsilon carbide.
Expressions for the solubility are: (from Leslie's book)
for equilibrium with graphite...log(c) = 7.81-5550/T
for equilibrium with cementite....log (c) = 6.38-4040/T
where T is in degrees Kelvin and c is in part parts million by weight.
The interstitial solutes diffuse very rapidly in BCC iron so that static and dynamic strain
aging can occur at temperatures as low as 60
°
C. ( Dynamic strain aging refers to strain aging that
occurs while the sample is being deformed). This is due to their small sizes and also because the
diffusion process does not involve vacancies so that each solute atom usually has an empty site next
to it into which it can jump. Honeycombe presents some diffusion coefficients for solutes in iron in
his book, Steels-Microstructure and Properties, page 7. It is important to note that the diffusion
coefficients vary exponentially with -1/T and that the activation energy for diffusion (of
substitutional solutes also) is smaller in BCC iron than in FCC iron, so that diffusion can be more
rapid in BCC iron than in FCC iron even though the latter is at a higher temperature.
Substitutional Solutes.
The majority of solutes in iron occupy substitutional sites. These are symmetric sites so that
substitutional solute strengthening is not as effective, for similar concentrations, as interstitial
strengthening. Nevertheless, because greater concentrations can be dissolved, substitutional
strengthening at, and above, room temperature can be significant and of practical use. It is not clear
what controls the degree of strengthening, but both size misfit and electronic differences appear to
contribute. Co and Cr are not effective while P and Pt have strong effects. Ni , Si and Mn have
significant effects. When the iron is free of interstitial solutes (either because of purification or
because the solutes are scavenged by alloying additions such as Ti, which reduces the dissolved
9 9
solute concentration by combining with solute atoms to form second phases) the effects of
substitutional elements are more clearly seen. Interestingly, experiments with these materials have
shown that it is also possible for substitutional solutes to cause static and dynamic aging. Because
these solutes diffuse much more slowly than do interstitial solutes, the aging temperatures are
higher and recovery processes occur also. However, when interstitial solutes are present in solution,
as is most commonly the case, then the aging effects due the interstitial solutes are dominant.
Slip in BCC iron and the Hall Petch relation. A brief review. See MSE 565.
When dislocations glide in BCC iron during and after general yield at ambient temperatures,
they produce wavy slip bands. ( General yield refers to plastic deformation that occurs across the
cross section of the sample not to localized micro yield processes that correspond to strains of the
order of 10
-6
) The dislocations are narrow and are not pairs of well separated partial dislocations
because the stacking fault energies are high. Cross-slip is evidently easy. The wavy slip bands and
prolific cross slip indicates that the plastic deformation of iron is dominated by screw dislocations
because dislocations of other character cannot cross slip. Slip has been identified on the {110},
{112} and {123} families of planes which, in combination with Burgers vectors parallel to <111>,
gives rise to 48 slip systems. Iron is therefore ductile and formable at room temperature and above.
As the temperature is lowered, the stress required to make the dislocations glide becomes very large
and the material shows a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when deformed at high strain
rates. This transition is commonly identified by impact tests wherein notched bars are broken by
impact and the energy expended in breaking the samples is measured. The transition from ductile to
brittle fracture is associated with a marked reduction in the amount of energy expended. The
fracture process is transgranular cleavage on {100} planes. A material that has a ductile to brittle
transition temperature has obvious limitations for use below that temperature.
The Hall Petch relation relates the yield stress ( the lower yield stress for samples that show
a yield point phenomenon) linearly to the inverse of the square root of the average grain diameter.
Iron and low carbon steels have been shown to obey the Hall-Petch relationship with a
proportionality constant near 1.9 kg mm
-3/2
( 0.31 mega Newtons M
-3/2
),( see J. D. Embury in
Strengthening Methods in Crystals, Elsevier, 1971). Armco iron ( see below) behaves similarly.
Hence grain size refinement is an important method of controlling strength in ferrous alloys. This is
particularly so for High Strength Low Alloy steels.
Zone refined iron of 99.999% purity can be produced in small quantities but it has no
commercial use. Slightly more impure iron can be produced in quantity, but it is only slightly
harder and stronger than copper. The softness of iron of high purity is not useful. Iron is used for
many applications because it is cheap and formable, e.g. enameled products like refrigerator doors;
hence nearly all commercial iron is moderately impure. For example, Armco iron has typically:
0.012% C, 0.02% Mn, 0.05% P, and 0.025% S. These modest amounts of impurities provide
significant strengthening without serious, adverse effects upon ductility. Annealed samples of zone
refined iron have been found to have yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 7000 psi (48 MPa) and
24000 psi (165 MPa) with 40% elongation compared to Armco iron's 20000 psi , 45,000 psi and
28%. Note that these figures represent “ball-park” amounts because of the effects of grain size.
Further increases in the yield stresses can be achieved by increasing the dislocation density by cold
work but this usually reduces the ductility.
10 10
Hall-Petch Relationship for Fe, 70/30 Brass, Al, and Cu
After: N. Hansen: Polycrystalline Strengthening, Metall. Trans. A,
1985, Vol. 16A, pp. 2167-2190
Fig. 9 – Yield stress – grain size relationship at room temperature for aluminum,
6 9
copper,
7 0
70:30 brass,
7 1
and iron.
7 2
0
100
200
300
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
T
r
u
e

S
t
r
e
s
s

(
M
P
a
)
Fe
70/30
Brass
Cu
Al
RT
d
-1/2
- (Grain Size)
-1/2
(mm
-1/2
)
11 11
The Iron Carbon System.
(See MSE 542.01)
Review of nomenclature.
1) The equilibrium and metastable phase diagrams.
The equilibrium binary Fe-C phase diagram depicts the phase fields that involve graphite
and the solid solutions of the allotropes of iron. However, graphite does not ordinarily form in
commercial steels unless the steel is seriously overheated. This is because there exists metastable
carbide phases that can nucleate and grow much more rapidly than can graphite when
supersaturated Fe-C solid solutions are aged. The most important of these carbides is Fe
3
C, which
is called cementite. If the sulfur and phosphorus content are very low, Fe
3
C can decompose into
graphite and iron in about 8 hours at 700°C. Graphitization, as this type of formation of graphite is
called, is undesirable because it has an adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the steel.
Fortunately, graphite does not form during the treatments normally given to steels. Cementite is
found in steel artifacts that are many hundreds of years old. Hence the relevant diagram for practical
purposes is the metastable diagram on which cementite replaces graphite.
The iron-carbon, metastable phase diagram shown in figure 3, is a very valuable tool when
one is considering the nature of steels. Provided it is borne in mind that the details e.g. the exact
carbon composition at the eutectoid point and the exact temperature of the eutectoid isotherm can be
changed by the presence of manganese and residual elements, it can be applied readily for
considering plain carbon steels. Many of the phase transformations in alloy steels can also be
considered using the binary diagram, but then it is important to evaluate the effects due to the
alloying elements in more detail as their concentrations are increased because these effects can be
pronounced and important. The iron carbon metastable phase diagram is particularly important
with respect to ferrous metallurgy. It should be consulted so frequently that it becomes burned into
one’s memory.
2) Phases: alpha ferrite is the BCC solid solution of carbon in iron that exists in the low
temperature range; austenite is the FCC solid solution, cementite is the carbide and delta
ferrite is the BCC solid solution that can exist at high temperatures. When the term ferrite is used
alone, it is usually understood that it is the low temperature phase otherwise the ferrite is qualified
with the appellation delta. Earlier we observed that epsilon carbide can precipitate from
supersaturated ferrite. However, this metastable phase is not shown in figure 3 which is really the
iron cementite phase diagram.
3) It is customary in the USA to refer to the eutectoid isotherm as the A
1
line, the boundary
between the austenite and austenite/ferrite phase fields as the A
3
line and the boundary between the
austenite and austenite/cementite phase fields as the A
cm
line. Then, for any particular alloy, the
temperatures corresponding to the intersection points with these lines of a vertical line drawn
through the composition of the alloy are called the A
1
point etc. Because the temperatures at which
the corresponding transformations begin during heating and cooling depend upon the rates of
heating and cooling, the effects of heating and cooling are indicated by using c for chauffage and r
for refroidissement i.e. A
c1,
A
r1
. These are related to the kinetics of the phase transformations that
occur during heating and cooling whereas the points on the diagram refer to equilibrium..
12 12
Graphite
+
Liquid
Liquid
Graphite (Stable Phase)
Cementite (Metastable Phase)
Graphite
(Cementite)
Liquid
Liquid
1400
1200
1000
800
600
0.52 %
0.16 %
0.11
0.020%
0.021 %
0.76 %
0.68 %
2.01 %
2.04 % 1146 C
4.27 %
0 1 2 3 4 5
Carbon, wt. %
1499 C
1152 C
910 C
738 C
727 C
1537 C
1390 C
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,


C
13 13
4) Note the extent of the gamma austenite field compared to that of the alpha ferrite field and
reflect on the importance of this with respect to the existence of steel. Many of the microstructures
that can be produced in steels, and therefore many of the properties that can be tailor-made, depend
upon the fact that when austenite is cooled it can become supersaturated and therefore undergo
phase transformations as it seeks equilibrium. Were this not so, the wealth of microstructures that
can be produced by heat-treating steel would be severely curtailed. It follows that many functions
now performed by steel would not be performed and world would be a rather different place.
5) When other alloying elements are added to Fe-C alloys the details of the phase diagram
change. As we will see, these changes can be quite large; however, for plain carbon steels the
changes due to the relatively low quantities of Mn, Si etc. are not great, so the binary diagram can be
used as a reasonable guide to the constitution of these steels. This is still true for low alloy steels,
but it is important to remember always that there will be differences from the binary diagram.
Steels can be classified with respect to the eutectoid composition : a eutectoid steel has the
eutectoid composition, a hypereutectoid steel has more carbon than a eutectoid steel and a
hypoeutectoid has less.
6) The S.A.E. / A.I.S.I. and unified numbering system for plain carbon steels.
The first two systems are very similar and use a numerical code of 10xx and 10xxx. The
more modern, unified numbering system uses G 10xxx etc. In these codes the 10 indicates that the
steel is a plain carbon steel while the xxx's indicate a range for the carbon content . Typically
compositions run from 1005 to 1095 but 10125 would have 1.25 wt.% C. Note the three steels
1044, 1045 and 1046 in the A.I.S.I. system. Here the first two digits inform us that the steels are all
plain carbon steels. The xx' s are now 44, 45 and 46. Because these digits are used to indicate the
carbon content within a range of a few points, it would appear that the steels are indistinguishable.
With respect to the carbon content this is true. Each has 0.43 to 0.5 wt.% C as the specified range.
However, the ranges for Mn differ being 0.3 to 0.6, 0.6 to 0.9 and 0.7 to 1.00 wt.%. In fact , it is
possible for one steel to satisfy the specifications for more than one standard steel. The point to
note is that when the carbon ranges are the same, the higher Mn limit corresponds to the larger xx.
Generally speaking, the numerical code gives you a fair idea of what the steel is. Then it is sensible
to have access to tabulated compositions in Metal Handbooks, rather than to attempt to memorize
many details.
For the sake of completeness we should note that carbon steels with more than 1.00 % Mn
are identified by replacing the first 0 with 5 i.e. 15xx. There is a group of steels that possess more
than 1 wt. % Mn and also have a minimum range of Si specified as between 0.15 and 0.35 wt. %.
This is 13xx and its members, strictly speaking, are alloy steels. Also, whereas it is usual to keep the
sulfur and phosphorus contents low to avoid embrittlement problems that they can cause, there are
occasions when ductility is not a major concern and machinability is more important. In these cases,
S and P are deliberately added because they endow the steel with good machinability properties .
Hence we have the 11xx and 12xx series for which the first is resulfurized and the second is
enhanced in both S and P, e.g. 1146 has 0.08 to 0.13 S and 1215 has 0.26 to 0.35 S and .04 to 0.09
P. Finally, some steels also have Pb (also for improving machinability) additions whereupon an L
is included e.g. 12L14. Typically, the lead content lies between 0.15% and 0.35%.
14 14
Ch emi c al Co mp o s i t i o n L i mi t s ( L ad l e A n al y s i s ) , Per Cen t ( 3 )
SAE Corresponding
Numb er C Mn P, max. S, max. AISI Number
1 0 0 5 0.06 max. 0.35 max. 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 0 6 0.08 max. 0.25-0.40 0.04 0.05 1006
1 0 0 8 0.10 max. 0.30-0.50 0.04 0.05 1008
1 0 1 0 0.08-0.13 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1010
1 0 1 1 0.08-0.13 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 1 2 0.10-0.15 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1012
1 0 1 3 0.11-0.16 0.50-0.80 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 1 5 0.13-0.18 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1015
1 0 1 6 0.13-0.18 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1016
1 0 1 7 0.15-0.20 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1017
1 0 1 8 0.15-0.20 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1018
1 0 1 9 0.15-0.20 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 1019
1 0 2 0 0.18-0.23 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1020
1 0 2 1 0.18-0.23 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1021
1 0 2 2 0.18-0.23 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 1022
1 0 2 3 0.20-0.25 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1023
1 0 2 5 0.22-0.28 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1025
1 0 2 6 0.22-0.28 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1026
1 0 2 9 0.25-0.31 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 3 0 0.28-0.34 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1030
1 0 3 5 0.32-0.38 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1035
1 0 3 7 0.32-0.38 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 1037
1 0 3 8 0.35-0.42 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1038
1 0 3 9 0.37-0.44 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 1039
1 0 4 0 0.37-0.44 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1040
1 0 4 2 0.40-0.47 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1042
1 0 4 3 0.40-0.47 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 1043
1 0 4 4 0.43-0.50 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 4 5 0.43-0.50 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1045
1 0 4 6 0.43-0.50 0.70-0.90 0.04 0.05 1046
1 0 4 9 0.46-0.53 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1049
1 0 5 0 0.48-0.55 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1050
1 0 5 3 0.48-0.55 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 5 5 0.50-0.60 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1055
1 0 6 0 0.55-0.65 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1060
1 0 6 4 0.60-0.70 0.50-0.80 0.04 0.05 1064
1 0 6 5 0.60-0.70 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1065
1 0 6 9 0.65-0.75 0.40-0.70 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 7 0 0.65-0.75 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1070
1 0 7 4 0.70-0.80 0.50-0.80 0.04 0.05 1074
1 0 7 5 0.70-0.80 0.40-0.70 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 7 8 0.72-0.85 0.30-0.60 0.04 0.05 1078
1 0 8 0 0.75-0.88 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1080
1 0 8 4 0.80-0.93 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1084
1 0 8 5 0.80-0.93 0.70-1.00 0.04 0.05 -
1 0 8 6 0.80-0.93 0.30-0.50 0.04 0.05 1086
1 0 9 0 0.85-0.98 0.60-0.90 0.04 0.05 1090
1 0 9 5 0.90-1.03 0.30-0.50 0.04 0.05 1095
NOTE: LEAD. When l ead i s r equi r ed as an added el ement t o a st andar d st eel , a r ang e o f 0 . 1 5 t o
15 15
After: Mechanical Behavior of Materials, N.E.Dowling, Prentice-Hall, 1999, pp.55, 56
TABLE 3.3 COMMONLY ENCOUNTERED CLASSES OF IRONS AND STEELS
Class Dist inguishing Feat ures Typical Uses Source of St rengt hening
Cast Iron More t han 2% C Pipes, valves, gears, Ferrit e-pearlit e st ruct ure
and 1 t o 3% Si engine blocks as af f ect ed by f ree graphit e
Plain-carbon Principal alloying St ruct ural and machine Ferrit e-pearlit e st ruct ure if
st eel element is carbon part s low carbon; quenching and
up t o 1% t empering if medium t o
high carbon
Low-alloy Met allic element s High st rengt h Grain ref inement , precipit at ion,
st eel t ot aling up t o 5% st ruct ural and and solid solut ion if low
machine part s carbon; ot herwise quenching
and t empering
St ainless At least 10% Cr; Corrosion resist ant Quenching and t empering if
st eel does not rust piping and nut s and <15% Cr and low Ni; ot herwise
bolt s; t urbine blades cold work or precipit at ion
Tool st eel Heat t reat able t o Cut t ers, drill bit s, Quenching and t empering, et c.
high hardness dies
and wear resist ance
TABLE 3.4 SOME TYPICAL IRONS AND STEELS
Principal Alloying Element s, Typical % by Weight
Descript ion Ident if icat ion UNS No. C Cr Mn Mo Ni Si V Ot her
Duct ile ASTM A395 F32800 3.50 - - - - 2 - -
cast iron
Low-carbon AISI 1020 G10200 0.2 - 0.45 - - 0.2 - -
st eel
Medium-carbon AISI 1045 G10450 0.45 - 0.75 - - 0.2 - -
st eel
High-carbon AISI 1095 G10950 0.95 - 0.4 - - 0.2 - -
st eel
Low-alloy AISI 4340 G43400 0.40 0.8 0.7 0.25 1.8 0.2 - -
st eel
HSLA st eel ASTM A588-A K11430 0.15 0.5 1.1 - - 0.2 0.05 0.3 Cu
Mart ensit ic AISI 403 S40300 0.15 12 1.0 - 0.6 0.5 - -
st ainless st eel
Aust enit ic AISI 310 S31000 0.25 25 2.0 - 20 1.5 - -
st ainless st eel
Precipit at ion 17-4 PH S17400 0.07 17 1.0 - 4 1.0 - 4 Cu
hardening 0.3 ( Nb+Ta)
st ainless st eel
Tungst en AISI T1 T12001 0.75 3.8 0.25 - 0.2 0.3 1.1 18 W
high-speed
t ool st eel
18 Ni ASTM A538-C K93120 0.01 - - 5 18 - - 9 Co, 0.7 Ti
maraging st eel
16 16
Phase Transformations in Iron
An important phase transformation in pure iron and its dilute solid solutions is the allotropic
transformation between the BCC and FCC phases that occurs when the temperature is varied about
910 Celsius. Let us consider the transformation from FCC to BCC during cooling. A number of
investigators have studied this transformation as a function of the rate of cooling from the high
temperature at which the iron was initially FCC. Their work has been recently reviewed by
Borgenstam and Hillert, Met and Mat. Trans., 27A, 1501, 1996. When the cooling rates are small,
of the order of a few degrees per second, the temperature of the iron falls below 910 degrees and
the iron becomes super cooled. Then BCC crystals nucleate and grow when the degree of super
cooling is sufficient to provide the necessary driving force . Nucleation is heterogeneous on grain
boundaries and at grain boundary triple junctions. (See MSE 543) The beginning of the
transformation can be detected experimentally by observing the rates of change in the temperature
of the iron because of the effects due to the evolution of heat as the transformation occurs. For
small cooling rates the degree of undercooling attained at the onset of the transformation is small
and the total transformation is completed at high temperatures by diffusion controlled nucleation
and growth processes that produce an equiaxed array of grains separated in general by high angle
grain boundaries. The degree of undercooling at which the transformation begins, increases initially
as the rate at which the FCC iron is cooled is increased but then remains constant at a plateau value.
At the same time the intercrystalline boundaries of the BCC phase become blocky and faceted and
the composition remains uniform. These are characteristics of the massive transformation and the
BCC phase is called massive ferrite. This behavior has been observed to occur in iron with a few
parts per million of dissolved carbon and also in iron containing 0.01 wt. % carbon. In the latter the
massive ferrite plateau begins near 800 degrees at a cooling rate of several thousand degrees
Celsius per second. The actual temperature of the plateau varies with the grain size of the FCC
phase, being smaller the larger the grain size.
At still higher cooling rates above 10
4
K/sec, another plateau is observed at a lower
temperature that the one described previously. At this plateau, the ferrite begins to form as acicular
plates which emanate from original grain boundary positions and also form within grains. Such a
morphology is usually called Widmanstatten, hence the phase is sometimes identified as
Widmanstatten ferrite. It is generally agreed that the equiaxed and acicular ferrite forms by
diffusion controlled processes. Cooling rates greater than 10
5
K/sec avoids these transformations
and then another plateau occurs at a lower temperature still. The transformation that begins at this
plateau is still from FCC to BCC but it now occurs so rapidly that it is not effected by diffusion.
The ferrite produced comprises bundles of narrow, lath shaped crystals in which the dislocation
density is high. These three plateaus have been observed in iron with a few parts per million of
carbon and also in Fe-0.01 wt. % C. It has been reported that yet another plateau occurs in the latter
material at even higher rates of cooling. At this fourth plateau that occurs at about 700 K the
transformation is again FCC to BCC but the product consists of twinned plates. The diffusionless
processes by which these transformations are produced are called martensitic which is the general
name given to a transformation that produces a change in crystal structure in a displacive manner
and does not require diffusion. The products of the transformations in these cases are called lath
martensite and lenticular or plate martensite. In each case the transformation begins when the
plateau is reached but the amount of the sample which transforms depends on the temperature to
which the sample is cooled not on time at that temperature, unlike diffusion controlled nucleation
and growth transformations. Lenticular martensite has not been observed to form in very pure iron
and no one has succeeded in cooling FCC iron to below the lath martensitic start plateau without
17 17
forming martensite; i.e. a 100 % FCC phase cannot be retained by rapid cooling to room
temperature.
Phase Transformations in Plain Carbon Steels.
The mechanical properties of steel are controlled by controlling its microstructure and the nature of
the phases within that microstructure. This is accomplished by choosing appropriate chemical
compositions and thermo-mechanical treatments. The final microstructure of a steel depends upon
its composition and its thermo-mechanical history. This history can involve heat-treatments alone,
mechanical treatment alone or combinations of the two. Heat-treatments can change the
microstructures of steels by processes such as recovery, recrystallization, grain growth and phase
transformations. In order to appreciate these effects let us begin with the subject of phase
transformations in steel.
Austenitization
Austenitization converts a steel into the FCC solid solution called austenite when the steel is
heated into the austenitic phase field and held there long enough. It is the first step in the majority
of heat treating processes and the nature of the austenite that is obtained is important because it has
a direct effect upon the microstructures produced during subsequent treatments in which the
austenite is transformed into other phases and the steel is returned eventually to ambient
temperature. Austenitization also precedes many hot working processes used to form steel products
because it occurs when the steel is heated to the hot-working temperatures. In our discussion of the
allotropic transformation of FCC iron to BCC iron we paid very little attention to producing the
FCC phase because in pure iron and dilute solid solutions a homogeneous polycrystalline
aggregate is easily and rapidly formed when a sample is heated above 910 °C. This is not
necessarily so in the case of steels because the starting material is usually a mixture of phases of
different compositions which means that long range diffusion is necessary to attain homogeneity.
Inspection of the metastable Fe-C phase diagram, enables us to estimate the range of
temperatures from which one could be selected for the austenitization process. These temperatures
lie in the austenite phase field. When the temperature is chosen, the time has then to be selected.
The optimum combination of temperature and time depends on the objectives of the total heat
treatment process and upon the microstructure of the steel before austenitization. We recognize that
the steel is initially at ambient temperature and has a microstructure that depends upon its past
history. Commonly, it will comprise a mixture of cementite and ferrite. There could be free ferrite
grains, discrete particles of the carbide embedded in ferrite grains and there could be regions of
pearlite in which the two phases exist as a lamellar mixture. ( It is important to understand that
cementite and ferrite are phases; pearlite is not a phase it is the name of a microstructure.)
Furthermore, if the austenitization heat -up time is long, the microstructure could change somewhat
before austenitization begins. The heating rate is an important part of the overall practical process,
however, the most important changes that occur during austenitization do so above the A
1
line and
in the austenite phase field.
First, suppose we have a hypoeutectoid steel. When the temperature exceeds the eutectoid
isotherm, the carbides wish to dissolve but the ferrite cannot accept the carbon residing in the
carbides. Hence the first part of the transformation has to be the formation of some austenite. This
occurs by a nucleation and growth process. The nucleation events are heterogeneous and take place
on ferrite grain boundaries and on ferrite/cementite interfaces. When some austenite forms it
18 18
provides a sink for the carbon in the adjacent carbides and the simultaneous growth of austenite and
dissolution of carbides takes place, and, when the temperature exceeds the A
3
line, the austenite
devours any remaining ferrite. Until these transformations are completed, the rate controlling
parameters are the nucleation kinetics and the rates of diffusion of solutes in austenite. Because the
nucleation process is heterogeneous, fine grained ferrite and finely spaced lamellae in pearlite cause
the transformation to occur more rapidly than it would in a coarse microstructure. Furthermore, the
finer the scale of the initial microstructure then the finer the austenitic grain size will be when the
carbides have just all dissolved. At this point it is important to recognize that the purpose of an
austenitization treatment is usually to produce austenite so that it can then be transformed into
something else such as a mixture of ferrite and pearlite. For producing the most desirable
mechanical properties in the final product it is usually necessary that the austenite be fine-grained.
Its grain size will depend upon the nucleation rate which will in turn depend upon the availability of
nucleation sites and also upon the temperature at which the nuclei form. When austenitization is
complete, grain growth can take place and will do so at rates that are greater the higher the
austenitization temperature. Thus it is generally desirable that the austenite be transformed as soon
as possible unless, of course, hot rolling or hot forging is being done..
The end of a typical austenitization process does not usually correspond to the time at
which the carbides have just dissolved because, although the steel is austenite, its composition is
inhomogeneous because the carbon concentration at and near the positions originally occupied by
the carbides exceeds the concentration elsewhere. Further time is required for the austenite to
homogenize. The diffusion rate of carbon determines this time in a plain carbon steel. Manganese,
however, diffuses substitutionally and therefore much more slowly than does the carbon.
Compositional variations (segregation) of manganese in an ingot can persist within the steel and
cause microstructural effects such as banding ( i.e. a cyclic variation in the local volume fractions of
pearlite and ferrite with position) in subsequent heat treatments. We note that the range of diffusion
is proportional to the square root of the product of time and the diffusion coefficient. This can be
used as a guide for the selection of the time required for the composition to approach homogeneity
when the scale of the initial compositional fluctuations is known.
It follows from the previous comments that the kinetics of producing homogeneous
austenite can be retarded considerably in steels that contain alloy carbides (e.g. molybdenum
carbides) because substitutional diffusion is much slower than interstitial diffusion.
We have noted that an important microstructural change to be considered during
austenitization is grain growth. Some austenite grains continue to grow and, necessarily, others
shrink and disappear causing a decrease in the number of grains per unit volume. Typically, the
average grain size increases with temperature at a rate that is proportional to the square root of the
19 19
Austenitizing rate-temperature curves for commercial plain carbon eutectoid steel.
Prior treatment was normalizing from 1610 F (875 C); initial structure, fine pearlite;
second curve, final disappearance of pearlite; third curve, final disappearance of carbide;
fourth curve, final disappearance of carbon concentration gradients.
1550
1500
1450
1400
1350
1300
1 10 100 1000 10,000
Austenite and
residual
carbide
Pearlite
Ae
1
840
820
800
780
760
740
720
Time, sec
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Homogeneous
austenite
Austenite
with carbon
inhomogeneities
99.5 %
Austenite
0.5 %
Austenite
Pearlite and
austenite
and residual carbide
20 20
time at the temperature. Usually a large austenitic grain size is undesirable because it leads to a
coarse microstructure when the austenite is transformed back into the microstructure in which it will
be used. Sometimes the austenitization heat treatment is performed only to create austenite and is
immediately followed by the rest of the heat treatment . On other occasions mechanical work such
as forging or rolling is carried out while the steel is austenitic. These processes can be accompanied
by recovery, recrystallization and grain growth. A valuable effect derived from using aluminum to
kill steels is relevant here. Aluminum forms fine particles of nitrides and oxides which impede grain
boundary migration below 2000°F and thereby helps to keep the austenitic grain size small. Thus it
is said to be a grain refiner (This is an example of metallurgical English. The aluminum-rich
particles certainly do not free the steel of impurities. They impede grain growth and resist grain
coarsening. Presumably, the lack of coarse grains makes the steel more refined in the same way that
young ladies are presumed to be more refined than young men.)
After this description of the austenitization process in hypoeutectoid steels, the extension to
eutectoid and hypereutectoid steels should be apparent; see figure 4.
The Decomposition of Austenite
The array of microstructures (and thus mechanical properties) that are obtainable in steels
by various heat-treatments, depends on the manner in which austenite transforms when it is cooled
to ambient temperatures. In order to appreciate how these microstructures are produced it is
important to understand the various modes by which austenite can decompose. Indeed, this is
imperative if one wishes to further develop and improve steels.
Transformations in Steel of the Eutectoid Composition.
The mode of cooling from the austenitization temperature is a very important parameter to
consider when discussing the transformation of austenite. A particularly important variable is the
rate of cooling. It is customary, for obvious reasons of convenience, to describe cooling rates as
"slow", "furnace cooling", "air-cooling", "water-quenching" etc. Such descriptions are not very
precise because the actual cooling rate that a piece of steel undergoes will depend on particular
conditions: it can depend upon its environment, the dimensions of the piece of steel, and will usually
vary from place to place within the sample. Also, the cooling rate at any particular site within a
sample will vary as the temperature at that site changes unless special precautions are taken to
ensure that the rate is constant. Air cooling means simply that the steel is allowed to cool naturally
in still air. Quite different microstructures can be produced in different forms of the same steel e.g.
a half inch round bar versus a four foot diameter coil of rolled sheet.
If a piece of a plain carbon steel is austenitized and then cooled it will attempt to transform
into a mixture of ferrite and cementite according to the phase fields indicated on the phase diagram.
Inspection of the equilibrium compositions of these phases at the temperature of the eutectoid
isotherm leads to the conclusion that a transformation to ferrite and cementite must require atomic
diffusion and that the growth rates of the new phases will depend primarily on the rate of diffusion
of carbon which has to undergo long range diffusion. The kinetics of such a transformation is
21 21
Austenitizing rate-temperature curves for commercial plain carbon eutectoid steel.
Prior treatment was normalizing from 1610 F (875 C); initial structure, fine pearlite;
second curve, final disappearance of pearlite; third curve, final disappearance of carbide;
fourth curve, final disappearance of carbon concentration gradients.
1550
1500
1450
1400
1350
1300
1 10 100 1000 10,000
Austenite and
residual
carbide
Pearlite
Ae
1
840
820
800
780
760
740
720
Time, sec
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Homogeneous
austenite
Austenite
with carbon
inhomogeneities
99.5 %
Austenite
0.5 %
Austenite
Pearlite and
austenite
and residual carbide
22 22
therefore a function of time and temperature. During continuous cooling, various parts of the
sample transform at different times and hence at different temperatures. When the cooling rates are
slow enough to allow diffusion to occur readily, the transformation is completed at high
temperatures and occurs over a small range of temperature. This is the situation to which “furnace
cooling” and “slow cooling” refer; the steel is close to its equilibrium state as its temperature
drops. Under these conditions the lever rule and the phase diagram provide reasonable estimates of
the volume fractions of various phases to be expected in the final microstructures. As the cooling
rates are increased, the transformation to ferrite and cementite begins and ends at lower and lower
temperatures and the steel is no longer close to equilibrium as it cools. Quantitative predictions
from the phase diagram such as the volume fraction of free ferrite to be present in the final
microstructure are no longer possible. Because of these complications, it is sensible to consider,
first, what happens during isothermal transformations.
Strictly speaking, the term isothermal transformation of austenite implies that the
transformation takes place at a constant temperature and, also, that none (or negligible amounts) of
the transformation take place before the austenite arrives at this temperature. This is generally
difficult to achieve in practice, especially when the transformation is rapid and the sample of steel is
large. Initially, we will suppose that the samples that we are considering are so small that the
temperature is always essentially uniform throughout them and that temperature changes can be
made instantaneously. This supposition is made now to enable us to concentrate on the nature of
the transformations and to defer until later considerations of changes that might occur while the
samples are being cooled to the isothermal transformation temperature.
Let us suppose that an experiment has been conducted in which many samples of a plain
carbon steel of the eutectoid composition (e.g. a 1080 steel ) were austenitized in the same manner,
instantaneously cooled to, and held for various times at, selected temperatures below the eutectoid
isotherm. Let us suppose also, that the microstructural changes that occurred within them were
monitored. At this stage we shall not concern ourselves with how the changes are monitored, we
simply suppose that they are. What are the results of such an experiment?
1) Transformation temperatures within a hundred degrees Celsius of the eutectoid isotherm.

During the rapid quench to the transformation temperature, each sample remains a
polycrystal of austenite. While the sample is at the transformation temperature, processes occur
which eventually produce recognizable crystals of ferrite and cementite. The time taken for this to
happen is called the incubation period. From a practical point of view, the magnitude of the
incubation period that is determined experimentally, depends on the resolution of the technique
used to monitor the process because the minimum size of a particle of a new phase that can be
detected becomes smaller as the resolution increases. Because of this, let us arbitrarily define the
end of the incubation period as corresponding to a volume fraction transformed of 0.5%. One
might similarly define the end of the transformation as a transformed volume fraction of 99.5%.
The incubation period is temperature dependent. It is large near the A
1
line and decreases rapidly as
the transformation temperature is reduced. This is because the magnitude of the thermodynamic
driving force for the transformation increases as the degree of undercooling below the A
1
line
increases. The transformation begins at grain boundaries where particles of cementite and ferrite
form adjacent to each other. These particles grow and the boundary advances into one of the grains,
23 23
Pearlite in a furnace-cooled Fe-0.75C alloy. Magnification, 500x.
From: G. Krauss: Steels: Heat Treatment and Processing Principles, ASM International,
1990, p. 20.
24 24
acting as a boundary between the untransformed austenite ahead of it and the region that has
transformed behind it. As the interface moves, the particles of ferrite and cementite develop into
plates so that the transformed volume comprises a lamellar array of alternating plates of these two
phases. These events occur at various places on the grain boundaries and at triple junctions. The
lamellar microstructure is called pearlite. It is important to note that pearlite is not a phase; the
phases in it are ferrite and cementite. Pearlite is the name of the microstructural constituent that
consists of alternating lamellae of the two phases. In each colony of pearlite, the lamellae are mostly
parallel and are frequently curved. The spatial orientations of lamellae from colony to colony are not
the same. Later, neighboring colonies of lamellae, differently oriented (in space), join together and
continue to advance into the austenite. When the transformation occurs at low degrees of
undercooling such groups of colonies become bounded from the austenite by an approximately
spherically curved boundary and are called pearlite nodules. Eventually, as the nodules continue to
grow, they impinge on one another and finally the samples are converted into an assembly of
pearlite colonies. As the temperature at which the transformation is occurring is decreased, the
nucleation process becomes so rapid that all of the grain boundaries are consumed very early in the
transformation and the pearlite nodules are in contact along the areas where the boundaries existed.
The average inter-lamellar spacing in the colonies depends upon the temperature at which
the pearlite was formed, decreasing with a decrease in the transformation temperature. It is
customary to refer to this by using terms such as "fine" or "coarse" pearlite. The spacings can vary
over the approximate range of 1 micrometer to 0.1 micrometers.
2) Transformations at lower temperatures
As the temperature at which the transformation occurs is decreased further, both the
incubation time and the inter-lamellar spacing decrease. Then, near 550 °C, the sample does not
transform entirely to pearlite, instead parts of the microstructure comprise non lamellar aggregates
of small crystals of ferrite and cementite. At lower temperatures, the incubation period begins to
increase again, and pearlite is no longer formed. Instead, the microstructure is made up entirely of
fine aggregates of ferrite and cementite. These microstructures are called bainite and will be
considered in more detail later.
3) Transformations during quenching.
The next important observation made in this experiment is that when samples are quenched
to below a particular temperature (about 220°C in the present instance) it is no longer possible to
retain all of the original austenite. This is entertaining considering that the incubation time for
forming bainite had been increasing as the temperature fell and it was getting easier and easier to
preserve the austenite phase. As the samples are quenched below this critical temperature, fine
crystals of a BCT phase appear. The transformation that produces this new phase is called a
martensitic transformation. It is an athermal transformation in plain carbon steels because it occurs
during cooling and begins when the sample is cooled below a particular temperature; the amount of
the new phase that is formed depends on the temperature to which the sample is cooled rather than
the time it spends at that temperature. The temperature at which the martensitic transformation starts
is called the M
s
temperature. We recall that the martensitic transformation occurs in relatively pure
iron which contains very little carbon. When rapid quenching suppresses the diffusion processes
necessary for the formation of cementite in the steel and the temperature continues to fall, the free
energy can be reduced by transforming the iron solvent from the FCC structure. The iron tries to
25 25
become BCC but is distorted to BCT by the supersaturation of carbon that remains in solid
solution. This statement will be elaborated upon in the future.
In ferrous metallurgy it is customary to identify the phase that is produced in the steel as it
is quenched below the M
s
point by the name martensite. We will follow this custom, but it is
important to note that the martensitic transformation is not limited to steel. It is a common mode by
which materials can transform their crystal structures, e.g. brasses, titanium alloys, stabilized
zirconia and cobalt. Hence, in materials in general, the term martensite may not necessarily refer to a
phase that occurs in steels.
The amount of martensite that is formed during quenching, increases as the temperature to
which the samples are quenched decreases. The transformation ceases when the temperature falls
below the M
f
temperature, where the samples of eutectoid steel are mostly martensite with a small
amount of untransformed austenite dispersed within them. This untransformed austenite is called
retained austenite. The amount that is present in a quenched sample depends upon the composition
of the steel. In plain carbon steels, increasing the carbon content tends to increase the amount of
retained austenite but only to a few percent. Retained austenite is more important in alloy steels
because many of the alloy steels have M
f
temperatures that are lower than the temperatures of the
usual cooling baths, e.g. water or oil at room temperature.
When the samples are held at the temperatures to which they have been quenched, further
microstructural changes can occur. Austenite can transform to bainite and the martensite can
decompose into ferrite and carbides. Details of the latter changes will be discussed later. However, it
is appropriate to note, now, that the BCT martensite is a phase that does not appear on the phase
diagram. This is because it is a metastable phase that readily transforms when held at temperatures
above a couple of hundred degrees Celsius.
Transformations during cooling.
It should now be reasonably easy to recognize the main changes associated with the
decomposition of the austenite in larger samples, continuously cooled at various rates. When the
rate of cooling is slow enough for the transformation to begin and end just below the eutectoid
isotherm the product will be coarse pearlite. As the cooling rate increases, finer and finer pearlite
will appear and the spacings throughout the sample become more variable reflecting the fact that
different colonies form at different temperatures. Mixed microstructures of fine pearlite and bainite
then become possible. For large samples in which different parts cool at different rates the
microstructures will vary correspondingly and one can expect to find pearlite, bainite and martensite
in the same piece of steel.
Hypoeutectoid Compositions.
As these steels are cooled from the austenitizing temperature they pass through the alpha +
gamma phase field before the A
1
line is passed. Consequently, the first decomposition product that
forms, provided the cooling rate is not too rapid, is the proeutectoid alpha phase. During slow
26 26
1045 steel bar. Structure is fine lamellar pearlite (dark) and ferrite (light).
From: Metals Handbook Ninth Edition, Volume 9, American Society for Metals, 1985,
p.188.
27 27
cooling, which allows adequate time for the diffusion processes to occur, the ferrite nucleates
heterogeneously on the austenite grain boundaries and then grows along these boundaries and also
into the austenite grain interiors forming equi-axed grains of ferrite embedded in the austenite. No
preferred orientation relationships exist between the two phases. These microstructural changes
involve the diffusion of the carbon ahead of the ferrite/austenite boundaries so that the growth is
controlled by long range diffusion in the austenite. When the temperature reaches that of the A
1
line, the microstructure will consist of a mixture of equiaxed ferrite and austenite grains. The
composition of the austenite and its homogeneity will also depend on the cooling rate. Very slow
cooling rates allow the composition with respect to carbon to be uniform and to approach the
eutectoid composition at the A
1
line. In such a case, the austenite is now a eutectoid steel and it
transforms as described previously, as cooling continues.
As the cooling rates are increased, the austenite becomes inhomogeneous in composition
and there is more of it present when the A
1
temperature is reached than would be indicated by
applying the lever rule to the phase diagram because the steel can no longer remain close to its
equilibrium state as it cools. Proeutectoid ferrite continues to form as the temperature falls below
the A
1
line. Then pearlite appears and grows into the austenite. As the temperature at which the
proeutectoid ferrite forms becomes lower and lower the morphology of the ferrite changes. Growth
along the grain boundaries becomes markedly easier than growth normal to them. Therefore, films
of ferrite form at the sites of the former austenite boundaries. Then, as the cooling rate increases
further, ferrite side-plates emerge from these films and project into the austenite grains. These side-
plates are wedge-like in shape and the broad faces comprise flat areas separated by ledges. The flat
areas are interfaces across which special orientations exist. The growth process now involves the
nucleation and side-ways migration of the ledges that separate the flats. These side-plates are called
Widmanstatten plates. The microstructure on a polished and etched sample resembles feathers
where the spine lies along the prior boundary and the quills project at oblique angles away from the
boundary. Eventually, the under-cooling can create a thermodynamic driving force that is large
enough to cause ferrite to nucleate within the austenite grains as well as on the boundaries. These
nuclei also grow into plates. The microstructure of a hypoeutectoid steel that is cooled rapidly but at
a rate that still permits the austenite to transform into ferrite plus pearlite will contain the
Widmanstatten ferrite and fine pearlite. The volume fraction of pearlite present when the austenite
has transformed will exceed that predicted by the appropriate tie-line on the phase diagram because
the formation of pearlite begins before the equilibrium volume fraction of free ferrite has had time
to form. This is an important point to bear in mind if one is trying to estimate the carbon
concentration in a plain carbon steel by observing its microstructure after cooling.
Eventually, when the cooling rates become fast enough, bainite and martensite begin to form
and, if the sample can be cooled fast enough, all of the diffusion-controlled transformations can be
suppressed and only the martensitic transformation occurs.
Hypereutectoid steels.
In this case the proeutectoid phase is cementite. The transformations and the resulting
microstructures are very similar to those described above with the cementite replacing the ferrite.
Widmanstatten plates of cementite occur but do not grow as easily as the ferrite.
28 28
Wid manstatten side plate formation in a quenched Fe-0.2C alloy. Grains A and B,
separated by a grain boundary, have orientations that favor growth into different
austenite grains. Electron micrograph from an extraction replica.Magnification, 7500*.
Courtesy of R.N. Caron, Olin Corp., New Haven, CT
From G. Krauss, p40
29 29
Pearlite and G.B. Cementite in an hypereutectoid steel
cementite appears white
30 30
Isothermal Transformation Diagrams in Carbon Steels.
We continue our description of the decomposition of austenite by considering reactions that
occur at constant temperatures. Many experimental investigations of isothermal transformations in
steel have been made. The results have been published in the form of TTT diagrams which depict
the Transformations as a function of Time at Temperature. The diagrams have temperature as the
ordinate and the logarithm of time in seconds as the abscissa. The times at which transformations
begin and end at various temperatures are plotted on the diagram. A typical diagram is produced by
the experiment described previously, in which small samples of the steel are austenitized so as to
produce samples of austenite of the same grain size. The samples are small so that the temperature
can be varied rapidly and temperature gradients minimized. However, cooling rates to the isothermal
temperatures vary from experiment to experiment and from laboratory to laboratory so that
particular diagrams, even if determined on identical steels, can show differences due to
microstructural changes that occur during cooling. In one method of determining a TTT diagram,
the samples are austenitized, quenched to a selected temperature, held at that temperature for various
times and then rapidly quenched to room temperature or below. The progress of any transformation
is then measured by means of quantitative metallography and the data assembled to produce the
diagram.
A eutectoid steel TTT diagram.
A typical TTT diagram for a eutectoid plain carbon steel is shown in figure 4. Let us
suppose that this diagram represents the true TTT diagram for an AISI 1080 steel, i.e. it depicts data
from truly isothermal transformations. A horizontal line marks the M
s
temperature which is the
temperature at which martensite begins to form during cooling. The diffusion controlled
transformations that occur above this line are described by a pair of "C" shaped lines that mark the
beginning and end of the transformations. The products of the transformations are ferrite and
cementite. Usually these curved lines present above the M
s
line are not projected below it.
However, it should be noted that unless the M
s
temperature is so low that diffusion is suppressed,
ferrite and cementite can still form below the M
S
temperature from the untransformed austenite as
aging is continued. Because the martensitic transformation in plain carbon steels is athermal, the
martensite forms during the cooling process and the amount that forms depends upon the
temperature to which the sample is cooled. Sometimes other horizontal lines are plotted to depict
temperatures at which 50 % of the sample is martensite etc. Then the temperature below which no
more martensite forms is sometimes shown as the M
f
temperature.
Inspection of this diagram reveals that at small degrees of undercooling below the A
1
line,
the transformation takes a long time to begin. As the degree of undercooling is increased the
incubation time decreases rapidly even though the transformation is occurring at lower temperatures
where diffusion is less rapid. Eventually the incubation time reaches a minimum, t
m
and then begins
to increase again. The part of the “C” curves at this minimum incubation time is called the nose of
the TTT diagram. The product of the transformation at temperatures above the nose is pearlite.
Bainite is formed below the nose and mixtures of both microstructures are formed at the nose.
31 31
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
1 MIN
0.5 1 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY 1 WEEK
Time - Seconds
A
A
s
A
F + C
11
32
38
40
40
41
43
50
55
57
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
-
R
C
C
I - T Diagram
A
M
s
M
50
M
90
50%
A
+
F
+
C
Type: 1080
Grain size=6
T
austenitize
=899 C
32 32
Pearlite formation
The initiation process in the transformation that produces pearlite is the formation of
neighboring nuclei of ferrite and cementite on a grain boundary in the austenite. Suppose that first
of all a nucleus of cementite forms on the boundary. It will be rich in carbon which it has obtained
from its immediate surroundings. This reduction in the carbon content encourages the nucleation
of ferrite next to the nucleus of cementite. If this occurs and the cooperative process continues,
adjacent nuclei of alternating ferrite and cementite are formed. These can then grow by a relatively
short range diffusion process in which carbon diffuses parallel to the reaction front from in front of
the growing ferrite to the growing cementite and the diffusion distance does not increase with time
as would be the case for a continuous precipitation process. This is a plausible process that leads to
the lamellar product. The colony can add more plates by additional nucleation or by branching
events in which one plate, say a cementite plate, bifurcates into two.
Consider the steady state nucleation flux equation: (See MSE 543)
J · A.exp−
∆G

kT
|
.

`
,
which relates the nucleation flux of particles of a new phase to the free energy of formation of a
critically sized nucleus, the absolute temperature and Boltzmann's constant. There is no critically
sized nucleus at the A
1
line because all three phases can coexist-exist in equilibrium at that
temperature. The nucleation flux is zero because there is no chemical free energy available to
provide the energy required to form an interface between a nucleus and the matrix. The chemical
free energy of formation of ferrite and cementite from austenite becomes negative at temperatures
below the A
1
line, and, as the temperature drops, nucleation becomes possible. To illustrate the
essence of the process, let us consider a simpler case; one in which a single phase, a, transforms to
another single phase, c, and for which ∆G
v
is the chemical free energy change for forming a unit
volume of the new phase. Let us relate this quantity to the temperature.
Let G
a
and G
c
be the molar free energies of the two phases and let H and S refer to the
molar enthalpy and entropy respectively.
Then G
a
= H
a
-TS
a
and G
c
= H
c
- TS
c.
∆G = G
c
- G
a
for forming one mole of c from a.
∆G is zero when T = T
e
which is the temperature at which a and c coexist in equilibrium. Using this
fact and neglecting any changes in S and H caused by changes in the temperature, it is easily shown
that ∆G = ∆H(1 - T/T
e
) so that division by the molar volume of the new phase gives ∆G
v
. Note
that when T>T
e
then ∆H is negative and vice versa.
Thus we see that as the temperature of the austenite is decreased below the A1 line, the
absolute magnitude of the free energy change driving the nucleation processes in the transformation
increases. This suggests that critically sized nuclei become smaller and smaller as the temperature
falls and that the nucleation flux should increase because of the decrease in the magnitude of the
free energy of formation of a critically sized nuclei. The free energy of formation of the critically
sized nucleus is in the exponential term of the equation for the nucleation flux and its changes
dominate the pre-exponential term (which contains the diffusion coefficient) in the temperature
range above the nose. Of course, the nuclei to which we are referring, form at heterogeneous sites
on the grain boundaries and the grain boundary energy that is thereby released augments ∆G. The
33 33
fact that the driving force for the phase transformation to occur increases as the temperature falls,
provides an explanation for the observation that the incubation period for the transformation to
pearlite decreases as the temperature falls. This is a common observation for a solid state
precipitation reaction that occurs by nucleation and growth.
Now we should recognize that the pre exponential factor contains the diffusion coefficient
of the rate controlling diffusion process by which the transformation takes place. This gets smaller
as the temperature falls and eventually the incubation period should increase again as cooling
continues.
If the pearlite reaction continued to take place as the temperature is continually decreased,
the decrease in the diffusion rates would become eventually become dominant and slow down the
beginning of the transformation. Also, to determine, experimentally, that the transformation has
begun, it is necessary that the products of the transformation be large enough to be observed.
Usually this means that the new phases have grown considerably larger than the sizes of critical
nuclei when they are visible. The growth rates are influenced by diffusion rates and the driving
force derived from the free energy change. At temperatures near the eutectoid isotherm the driving
force is small and the growth rates are correspondingly small. However, as the temperature is
decreased the growth rate first increases and then decreases as the diffusion rates become
dominant.. These effects lead us to predict that the kinetics of the transformation to pearlite would
be described by "C" shaped TTT diagram. In the particular case that we are considering, a “C”
curve is observed. However, the situation is more complicated than implied above because at the
nose of the TTT diagram there is a change in the mode of transformation from that which produces
pearlite to one which forms ferrite and cementite in the non-lamellar, bainite microstructure. This
transformation also involves nucleation and growth controlled by diffusion. Hence it, too, should
have kinetics described by “C” curves. Evidently the pearlite reaction is faster above the nose of
the TTT diagram while the bainite reaction is faster below it. The “C” curves describing the two
reactions merge at the nose.
The growth rate of a pearlite colony depends on the rate of diffusion of carbon. This
diffusion process is required to move the carbon from the volume of austenite that is to become
ferrite into the volume that is to become cementite. The diffusion distances are of the order of the
inter-lamellar spacing. Metallography shows us that the inter-lamellar spacing is largest in pearlite
that is formed at the highest temperatures and that it decreases as the temperature at which the
transformation takes place is decreased. Why?
Consider the sketch to represent a
portion of pearlite in which the spacing ,S,
extends from the centers of two neighboring
cementite lamellae. For simplicity, curvature of
interfaces is neglected.
Suppose the transformation interface
advances a small distance δx.
The change in the free energy, per unit area of the
interface, is given by:
∆G ·∆G
v
. x +
2
S
. x
S
ferrite austenite
34 34
where the first term on the right hand side contains the chemical free energy released per unit
volume of pearlite formed and the other term contains the interfacial surface energy created.
At a particular temperature, the total free energy change varies with the spacing of the
lamellae. As the spacing decreases, the interfacial area created increases. There is a critical spacing
at which the free energy change becomes zero. Pearlite of smaller spacing will not form because it
would raise the free energy of the system.
Let the critical spacing be given by S
min
. Then S
min
· −
2
∆G
v
∆G
v
is, of course, negative.
Hence ∆G ·
2
S
x −
2
S
min
x. When x · 1, ∆G refers to a unit volume of the pearlite and
then ∆G · 2
1
S

1
S
min
¹
'
¹
¹
'
¹
.
The growth of the pearlite in the direction shown, requires carbon to diffuse laterally at, or
ahead of the interface. A number of treatments of this process have been published. We will
consider one of the original treatments, (Zener, TAIMME Vol. 167, 550, 1946). It is not a detailed
rigorous treatment but it serves well to illustrate the nature of the problem; many subsequent
analyses have sought to elaborate on Zener’s work.
Experimental studies show that the growth rates of pearlite colonies at fixed temperatures
are constant and independent of time. This observation tells us that the diffusion process is a steady
state process. For diffusion across an area, A, due to a concentration gradient
∆C
∆X
we can write the
flux according to Fick’s first law:
J · −D. A.
∆C
∆X
Let us suppose that the rate of growth is such that the interface moves into the austenite at u
cms. per sec. As the interface moves, the carbon composition in the volume that becomes ferrite,
changes from C
γ
( the original composition of the austenite) to C
α
. The compositions refer to
volume. The width of the ferrite lamella is some fraction of the spacing S. Let us make it S.a, where
a is a number less than one. Then, neglecting differences between the specific volumes of austenite
and ferrite, the amount of solute that was transferred during one second of growth is
u. S. a. C − C ( )
This is the flux of solute, Hence, omitting the negative sign which merely indicates that
diffusion occurs down the concentration gradient, we have:
D. A.
∆C
∆X
· u. S. a. C − C ( )
35 35
The true form of the concentration gradient is unclear. However, if we assume that the
concentration is C
α
at the interface between the ferrite and cementite, and Cγ ahead of the center of
the ferrite lamella, then an approximate expression is:
∆C
∆X
·
C − C ( )
b. S
|
.

`
,

where b is another number less than unity.
The next problem we face is what to do with the area A. We have two extremes; the
diffusion flux might be restricted to the boundary between the austenite and the pearlite, or it could
be occurring over some distance ahead of this interface. Let’s suppose the latter is the case, What
can we chose for A? Who knows? If diffusion does, indeed, take place in the austenite some
distance ahead of the interface, then it seems reasonable that the distance will be smaller, the smaller
the spacing becomes. Zener chose to make this distance approximately equal to S. Using all these
approximations we have:
u ≅
D. S. C − C ( )
S. a. C − C
( )
. b. S



]
]
]

D
a. b. S
If the thickness of a ferrite lamella is much greater than that of a cementite plate, then a.b is
about a half.
This approximate treatment indicates that the growth rate at a given temperature is
proportional to D and inversely proportional to S, a result that can be predicted intuitively. An
important aspect of this relationship is that if it had been derived by means of a rigorously correct
method it would still be a relation in which u is some function of the variables D and S. The point
of this remark is that a theoretical description that enables one to evaluate u when S and D are
known, is not particularly enlightening. It would be much more useful to be able to predict both u
and S when only D is known. The meaning of this should become clearer as we continue with
Zener.
In order to evaluate u and S explicitly, when D is known, we need another equation relating
the three variables. In an attempt to obtain one, Zener noted that the rate of migration of an interface
is often expressed as the product of a mobility and a driving force. Hence he wrote:
u ∝ ∆G
.
Then because u is proportional to D and inversely to S we find
u ∝
D
S
∆G
Recalling that
∆G · 2
1
S

1
S
min
|
.

`
,

and substituting we obtain
u ·
K. D
S
.2 .
S
min
− S
S. S
min
|
.

`
,

where K is
a constant.
However, u and S cannot be separately evaluated. In this kind of a situation it is common to
search for some extremum principle. Zener proposed that the spacing that would occur would be
that which would maximize u. There is no obvious reason why this should be so, but it is a
reasonable suggestion because the colonies that grew the fastest should make up most of the
pearlite at the end of the transformation and experimentally determined spacings should belong to
36 36
them. Assuming this to be so, we can differentiate u with respect to S and equate the result to zero.
Then, after a little algebra, we find that the spacing is twice as big as the minimum possible spacing.

Now the magnitude of the chemical free energy change for forming a unit volume of pearlite
is proportional to the undercooling below the equilibrium temperature, ∆T=(Te-T).Hence we may
write:
∆ ∆ G q T
v
· .
where q is a constant.
Because ∆G
v
· −
2
S
min
then
S ·
4
q. ∆T
Although this equation is not quantitatively correct, it is of the correct form because the
average spacing in pearlite varies inversely with the undercooling.
A number of theoretical descriptions of the growth of pearlite have been published since this
early treatment. References to these works can be found in Honeycombe’s book. In general, they
attempt to refine Zener’s work by trying to take more parameters into account e.g. considering
curved interfaces and the effects of alloying elements but the difficulty of separating S and u
explicitly remains.
Pearlite has been the subject of many investigations in which the characteristics of it’s
formation are compared to the predictions of early theories of nucleation and growth kinetics. It has
also been the subject of crystallographic orientation studies. These studies are interesting and
relevant to the topic of phase transformations, however, a knowledge of specific details is
unnecessary for our purposes here.
Bainite and Martensite.
So far, we have been considering only the upper portion of the TTT diagram for a eutectoid
steel. In this region that extends from the nose to the A
1
line, the product of isothermal
transformations is pearlite. Another type of microstructure is formed during isothermal
transformations below the nose. In this temperature range, the lamellar product is replaced by
mixtures of discrete particles of cementite in ferrite. Details of these microstructures vary with the
temperature and also vary from steel to steel. In general, the product formed near the nose is called
upper bainite and that near the martensitic start temperature is called lower bainite. It has often been
stated that upper bainite looks like feathers in optical micrographs while lower bainite is more
acicular. It is not easy to distinguish between them. In practice it is wise not to identify the
microstructure unequivocally ( particularly from a single photomicrograph) without additional
supporting information. At this stage it is worthwhile for the reader to spend a few hours examining
microstructures of plain carbon steel as shown in the optical photomicrographs that are presented in
the ASM atlas of microstructures, eighth and ninth editions.
Numerous studies have been conducted by optical microscopy and by transmission electron
microscopy. As a result, the following major characteristics have been identified. In upper bainite,
37 37
the ferrite comprises bundles or sheaves of fine, elongated grains that resemble laths. The cementite
particles lie on the long boundaries between the individual laths. In contrast, at lower temperatures
the ferrite crystals that form the sheaves appear more like needles and plates. Particles of cementite
form both at the boundaries between the grains and within the crystals of ferrite. It is also observed
that when the transformation to lower bainite is conducted in samples that have been previously
metallographically polished, surface relief is generated because the flat surface becomes rumpled
and tilted during the transformation. Surface relief is uncommon in transformations that only
involve diffusion; it occurs generally during martensitic transformations.
An understanding of the mechanism(s) by which the bainitic microstructures form has been
actively sought for decades. Such details are really beyond the ambit of these notes, but it is
interesting to consider some generalities of the subject. Opposing viewpoints have been presented
and hotly debated by respected scientists. One issue concerns whether or not there is a contribution
from a displacive or martensitic mechanism i.e. diffusion creates the carbides and the ferrite forms
martensitically. Proponents of the viewpoint that there is such a contribution, have considered that
the surface relief that forms when lower bainite is created is significant. The M
s
point for the
initiation of martensite is raised as the carbon content of the austenite is reduced. Thus, if the carbon
content at various locations is reduced by the precipitation of cementite then the M
s
temperatures
for these locations would be raised and the allotropic change accomplished martensitically. Such a
mode of transformation has been dubbed a diffusion paced martensitic mode. Others believe that
the transformation is a diffusion controlled nucleation and growth process in which the crystals
grow by the lateral propagation of ledges and the sheaves form because of sympathetic nucleation
of new crystals at the boundaries of the prior crystals. Articles supporting both viewpoints have
been published in the technical literature during the past five years so one can hardly say that the
situation has been fully resolved to everyone’s agreement but it seems fair to suggest that the
nucleation and growth description is most favored. As more instrumental techniques for studying
the bainitic microstructure are created and improved more complexities are revealed. Some
examples of these microstructural details have been presented recently by Fang et al. in Met and
Mat Transactions, 27A, 1535, (1996). They interpret their observations as showing that the needles
or plates within the sheaves of lower bainite are built up of smaller units. They conclude that the
bainite plates consist of subplates which consist of subunits which are made up of sub-subunits
which consist of (you guessed it!) sub-sub-subunits. This conclusion, in part, concerns
interpretations of topographical observations made using the relatively novel technique of scanning,
tunneling microscopy and its validity awaits confirmation.
As the temperature of the austenite being quenched falls below the Ms temperature, a
transformation of structure begins to take place while the temperature is falling. This marks the
beginning of the martensitic transformation. A martensitic transformation can be defined as a
38 38
Microstructure of upper bainite: a, 0.8C steel transformed 20s at 400 C, x670; b, 0.34C
steel transformed at 400 C. Two surface composite micrograph, x330; c, 0.8C steel
transformed at 450 C. Dislocations visible. Thin foil EM; d, 0.8C steel transformed 5s at
450 C. Thin foil EM.
From: Steels: Microstructre and Properties, 2
nd
ed., eds RWK Honeycombe and HKDH
Bhadeshia, Edward Arnold, 1995, p.116.
39 39
Microstructure of lower bainite a, 0.8C steel transformed 30s at 300 C, x260; b, 0.8C steel
transfromed at 300 C. Two surface composite micrograph, x260; c, 0.8C steel transformed
6 min at 250 C. Thin-foil EM; d, 0.6C steel tranformed at 300 C. Thin-foil EM.
From: Steels: Microstructure and Properties, 2
nd
edition, eds. RWK Honeycombe and
HKDH Bhadeshia, Edward Arnold, 1995, p. 119.
40 40
mechanism for changing crystallographic structure that does not require atomic diffusion. In most
steels, this transformation occurs very rapidly during the quench and the fraction transformed
depends on the temperature to which the sample is cooled, not on the length of time spent at that
temperature. We note here that the quench rates that are of practical importance are those obtainable
by plunging the steel into liquid baths such as iced brine; the effect of these treatments are under
discussion here. Eventually, the transformation ceases at the M
f
temperature. It is customary to call
the phase produced by the martensitic transformation, martensite. It is important to recognize that
the transformation rarely goes completely to 100%. A small amount of the microstructure in a
eutectoid plain carbon steel can be retained austenite. The amount of retained austenite that is found
in steels varies with composition tending to be more prevalent in steels containing high contents of
carbon and other alloying elements. Obviously, if the M
f
temperature is below that of the quenching
bath and room temperature, austenite will be retained. For the sake of completeness we might as
well note also that there are some steels in which it is possible for a martensitic transformation to
occur as an isothermal transformation. Hence, the definition of a martensitic transformation does
not include the word quenching. If a sample of a steel is partially transformed to martensite by
being quenched to a temperature above the M
f
temperature and then held at that temperature, the
untransformed austenite can decompose to form bainite.
What is ferrous martensite?
Earlier we discussed experiments in which iron and dilute iron carbon binary alloys were
quenched at rates above 10
5
K/sec. At these rates there is insufficient time for the structural change
to be produced by diffusion. However, the samples became BCC. Evidently the iron knows another
way to change its structure and, when prevented from doing it by means of diffusion, does it
without using diffusion. Instead, it does so by means of a displacive transformation by which it is
possible to displace the atoms from FCC positions to BCC positions without requiring them to hop
from site to site by diffusion. The transformation is called martensitic. The displacements
associated with the transformation in iron are illustrated in the sketches. These show what is called
the Bain strain. This is a strain proposed by Edgar Bain to describe the distortion of a tetragonal
cell in the FCC crystal into the BCC of the martensite.
Now, when we turn to the case of a plain carbon steel and quench its austenite too rapidly
for any change to be wrought by diffusion, the iron atoms still wish to adopt BCC positions.
Cementite can only form when diffusion is possible because one out of four atoms in it is C, but the
martensitic change is available for the iron. The possibility arises that the FCC solid solution can
change to a BCC solid solution. This can happen if the free energy released is negative even though
the transformation produces an intermediate metastable state. We find that it begins to happen when
T
e
-T becomes large enough, i.e. the temperature falls to below the M
s
temperature. The martensite
in pure iron is the stable phase, even though it contains numerous defects such as dislocations and
boundaries. Because the carbon content is unchanged during the formation of martensite in a plain
carbon steel, the phase is metastable and is a supersaturated solid solution if its carbon content
exceeds the solubility in ferrite. Furthermore, inspection of the sketches illustrating the Bain strain
shows that the carbon atoms that were previously randomly distributed in the octahedral sites of the
austenite now occupy a particular selected set of sites within the martensite. When the carbon
content exceeds about 0.2 wt.% the carbon atoms produce a significant tetragonal distortion so that
the structure becomes BCT. The c/a ratio of the tetragonal unit cell increases as the carbon content
41 41
c-axis
a-axis
Range of positions for iron atoms
Probable positions for carbon atoms
c-axis
a-axis
c/a = 1 + 0.045 (wt% C)
3.05
3.00
2.95
2.90
2.85
2.80
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6
Carbon, %
L
a
t
t
i
c
e

d
i
m
e
n
s
i
o
n
,

A
From: Bain & Paxton, p.35,36
From: Leslie, p.71
42 42
In the above image, there are two FCC adjacent unit cells, with a lattice parameter ag. A
BCT cell is obtained by connecting the 8 FCC sites. This cell has sides a and a / 2.
Imagine that the BCT cell is removed and distorted so that its sides all become a . In the
below image, this is the case, with a=c.
[001]
[001]

[100]
[100]

[010]

[010]
a
o
a
o
/ 2
a
c
43 43
M
Habit
Plane
Free surface
Old position
New position of scratch
Old position of scratch
New position
Old position
Structure change
P=structure invariant shear
PBaAn undistorted plane
T=RPBaIInvariant plane strain
B ·
1
0 0
0 2
0
0 0
3
|
.



`
,



Unconstrained
martensitic
transformation
forming A plane
a axis
c axis
3
2.86
2.85
1 0.6 0.06
wt % C
Ms
1000
400
600
A
F
44 44

Fe-0.8C alloy quenched from 1100 C: a, optical micrograph x200; b, thin-foil EM
showing twinning in martensite laths.
From: Steels: Microstructures and Properties, 2
nd
edition, eds. RWK Honeycombe and
HKDH Bhadeshia, Edward Arnold, 1995, p.95
45 45
increases. To a good approximation, the variations in c and in a are linear, with the c value
increasing at a greater rate than the rate at which the a parameter decreases, as the carbon
concentration increases.
The microstructure of martensitic steel is complex and varies in detail from steel to steel.
Details depend upon the M
s
temperature. In general lath martensite forms in the high temperature
range and lenticular or plate-like martensite forms at lower temperatures. For plain carbon steels
this translates into a dependence of the microstructure on carbon content because increasing the
carbon content lowers the M
s
temperature. Martensitic crystals in low carbon steels are fine laths
which contain a high density ( >10
11
cms./cm.
3
) of dislocation line. As the carbon content is
increased, crystals shaped like plates appear. Twins begin to replace the dislocations within the
plates so that high-carbon martensite is composed mainly of twinned plates. The transformation is
also associated with an appreciable volume increase because it replaces the close packed FCC
structure with a BCT structure of smaller density. Because of this, the transformation creates
residual stresses and strains related to the specific volume change in addition to the strains due to
the misfit of the interstitial solute atoms. At high carbon levels these stresses can become so severe
that the material cracks as the martensite forms. The cracks can range from small micro cracks that
require microscopy to be detected, to large cracks easily visible to the unaided eye.
An important characteristic of the martensitic transformation is that it produces surface relief
on a metallographically polished surface. This is due to the displacive nature of the transformation.
When a portion of the austenite is converted to the other crystal structure, its physical shape is also
changed. The total strain resulting from a martensitic transformation is the result of the shape
change produced by the crystallographic change itself combined with post-transformation strains
caused by creating the martensitic crystals within the austenite matrix. Experimental studies have
shown that the transformation shape change transforms planes into planes and straight lines into
straight lines but only special planes remain unrotated. Hence, portions of the free-surface of the
sample become tilted from the previous orientation as the martensite forms.
The crystals of martensite vary from fine laths in low carbon steels, to plates in high carbon
steels. The lath morphology is such that the laths form in packets of nearly parallel units; the
individual units are often too small to be resolved in an optical microscope. The crystals have habit
planes that tend to lie close to the {111} planes in the austenite. Orientations of {557} have been
reported. Because these indices have two identical digits, there are 12 non parallel variants.
However, they occur in groups of three with each group clustered about a (111) with only 16
degrees between members of a group. Because there are only 4 non parallel variants for {111}, lath
martensite appears to be more orderly than does plate martensite. The habit plane of the plate
martensite in carbon steel varies from {225} for steels with 0.92 wt.% C to {259} for 1.78 wt. %
C. There are 12 variants for the former and 24 variants for the latter. Although each martensitic
crystal could, in principle, choose any of these variants there is a tendency for certain variants to
occur in groups. This is because the shape and volume change associated with the transformation
are resisted by the austenitic matrix. This resistance encourages the choice of those variants which,
in combination, provide the minimum macroscopic shape change. Lath martensitic crystals contain
a dense population of dislocations that are associated both with the transformation itself and with
the strains generated by the volume change. Plate martensite is much less dislocated; instead, the
plates contain arrays of very fine twins. Excellent examples of martensitic microstructures can be
found in chapter 3 of Krauss' book.
46 46
The total change in the shape caused by a martensitic transformation is the result of the
shape change associated with the transformation alone and the strains arising from the interaction
between the martensite and the matrix. It is usual to separate the two by calling any strains that do
not refer to the transformation of the structure, post-transformation strains. An important result of
the shape change is that previously flat surfaces become tilted and rumpled during the
transformation. Studies of the formation of plate martensite have shown that the general shape
change can be described as being produced by a homogeneous strain, i.e. a strain which does not
change the degree of an equation. This conclusion has been reached because planes are tilted but
remain planes, straight lines (such as a scratch on the surface of the sample) become kinked but
remain made up of straight segments. There are distortions but these are attributed to the post-
transformation strains, which are not relevant to the actual phase transformation mechanism. During
the transformation, a crystal of plate martensite in contact with austenite at the habit plane clearly
shares the same interface; hence, we conclude that if we were to describe the transformation by a
homogeneous strain then the strain would have to leave at least one plane (the habit plane) of the
austenite unchanged. Thus the strain that describes the transformation of austenite to martensite is a
homogeneous invariant plane strain.
Theoretical attempts to determine the strain have led to the phenomenological theory of the
martensitic transformation. The objective of this theory is to determine a strain that would produce
both the crystallographic change and the shape change simultaneously when applied to austenite; it
does not directly concern itself with the mechanism by which the transformation takes place. This is
why it is a phenomenological theory. Let us consider some elements of this theory.
The first thing that the strain must produce is the conversion of the FCC unit cell into the
BCT unit cell. This is usually referred to as the lattice strain. We have already met a strain that will
accomplish this. It is the Bain strain introduced on page 20. It is obtained directly from the lattice
parameters of the corresponding cells. The numerical values of the components of the Bain strain
vary with carbon concentration because of the variation in the c/a ratio of the martensite. First we
consider an origin of an orthogonal coordinate system located on a corner of the tetragonal cell
drawn in the FCC lattice on page 20 such that the x, y and z axes lie along the edges of the unit cell.
The Bain strain causes strains of e
1
, e
2
and e
3
along these axes but leaves the angles between them
unchanged. One can describe the coordinates of any other point by x, y and z. Then if the lattice is
deformed so that the coordinates become x’, y’ and z’ then
x’ = (1 + e
1
)x = n
1x
y’ = (1 + e
2
)y = n
2y
z’ = (1 + e
3
)z = n
3
z
Where the n’s are called distortions.
For ferrous martensite n
1
= n
2
are equal and greater than one; n
3
is less than one. The actual values
depend upon carbon content.
The change in shape produced by applying such a strain to a sphere is shown in the
accompanying sketches appended to this text. It is clear that the “before” and “after” shapes now
have surfaces that coincide along two circles. This shows that the Bain strain does not leave any
47 47
THE INVARIANT PLANE IN A MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION
1) Let inner sphere be expanded isotropically by
R · x
2
1 + e ( )
2
+ y
2
1 + e ( )
2
+ z
2
(1+ e)
2
where x,
y, z are the coordinates of a point on the inner
sphere.
2) All straight lines and planes in the inner
sphere become straight lines and planes in the
outer sphere. None are distorted.
3) Now apply the Bain strain to the sphere. Use a
strain e
2
and e
3
. Typical values for Fe-C
martensite (they vary with %C) are 0.12, 0.12
and –0.2 {note: In the martensite BCT cell c>a
but a c and a

/ 2 a}. The strain produces the
ellipsoid shown. There are lines common to both.
One is shown. No plane is invariant or distorted.
4) paper some lines are shortened and some are
lengthened. It turns out that this can be reversed
by a shear strain.
5) Note that shear shortens some vectors and
lengthens others.
6) Hence there is a combination of strains, PB, such
that at least one plane is undistorted. Often this
plane is rotated. In this case R is a rigid body
rotation that puts it back, and T=RPB.
z
x
y
Inner sphere
expands to
outer sphere
z
x
Bain Strain
B
Invariant
line
Lengthens
Shear strain, P
Shortens
48 48
plane in the sphere undistorted or invariant. Thus, whereas it can produce the lattice change it cannot
describe the martensitic shape change. Therefore, it is necessary to seek additional strains which
can change the shape but not the structure of the crystal. Such strains are shears produced by slip
or by twinning. Particular shear strains, P, have been found which when combined with B produces
a total strain, PB, that creates the martensitic crystal structure and leaves at least one plane
undistorted. Usually it is found that when this P is determined the undistorted plane is not invariant
but has been rotated. To take care of this, a rotation R is included to finally produce an invariant
plane strain. The total transformation strain can then be written as
T =RPB
Although the theory is phenomenological, it is interesting to note that when it successfully describes
a transformation, the martensitic crystals are found to be internally twinned by twins that
correspond with the twinning shear used for P. The phenomenological theory has been successful
in ferrous alloys e. g. binary Fe-Pt alloys, but it is only partially successful in carbon steels because
it does not predict the variation of the habit planes observed. This may well be a consequence of the
post transformation strains.
Hypoeutectoid TTT Diagrams
The first difference that arises in diagrams of hypoeutectoid steels compared to that of a
eutectoid steel is the austenite can now transform at temperatures below the A
3
point and a
corresponding horizontal line appears on the diagram. When the austenite is held at temperatures
between the A
3
line and the A
1
line it will eventually transform into a mixture of austenite and
proeutectoid ferrite. Normally only the proeutectoid start-line is presented in published TTT
diagrams; the finish line is omitted. The time-temperature behavior shown by the proeutectoid start
line is controlled by the same nucleation considerations discussed before. The ferrite start line
continues down below the A
1
line. For transformations effected at temperatures not far below the
A
1
, the ferrite start line is followed by the start and finish lines of the ferrite + carbide
transformation. Thus, during such isothermal transformations, ferrite crystals form first and then
pearlite forms. At these temperatures the incubation times for the start of the transformations
decrease as the carbon content of the steel is decreased. Eventually, the incubation times for the
nucleation of the proeutectoid ferrite becomes so small that they cannot be measured with the
resolution of typical experiments and the line ends at the ordinate axis. For compositions that allow
the ferrite start lines to be distinguished, it is found that the ferrite start-line merges with the ferrite
+ carbide start-lines as the temperature is decreased, forming a nose on the diagram. As pointed
out above, for low carbon contents, the transformation begins too rapidly near the nose for its
initiation to be plotted on the diagram. In these cases, the lines simply merge with the ordinate axis
which, typically, corresponds to 0.5 seconds. This is the second difference in the TTT diagrams: the
nose of the “C” curve moves towards shorter times as the carbon content of the steel is decreased.
Another difference in the TTT diagrams is that the M
s
temperature rises as the carbon
content decreases.
In hypereutectoid alloys, the proeutectoid phase is cementite so the diagrams are modified
by the appearance of the cementite start-line. The martensitic transformation temperatures continue
to be depressed as the carbon content is increased. Let us consider these changes in more detail.
49 49
After: Bain & Paxton, p13
Austenite
Austenite
+ Melt
Melt
+ Melt
Austenite
+ Ferrite
Austenite
+ carbide
Ferrite + Carbide
Ferrite
2800
2600
2400
2200
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40
Carbon, wt. %
50 50
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
1 MIN
0 1 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY
Time - Seconds
C
I - T Diagram
M
90
A
As
F + C
A

+

F
A

+

F

+

C
M
s
M50
1 WEEK
Type: 1006
Grain size=7
T
austenitize
=913 C
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
1 MIN
0 1 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY 1 WEEK
Time - Seconds
A
A
s
F+C
C
I - T Diagram
M
s
A
+
F
+
C
A+F
A
f
90%
85 RB
90 RB
14
22
34
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
-
R
C
Type: 1021
Grain size=8-9
Taustenitize=927 C
51 51
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
1 MIN
0.51 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY 1 WEEK
Time - Seconds
A
As
A
F + C
11
32
38
40
40
41
43
50
55
57
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
-
R
C
C
I - T Diagram
A
M
s
M
50
M
90
50%
A
+
F
+
C
Type: 1080
Grain size=6
T
austenitize
=899 C
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
1 MIN
0 1 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY 1 WEEK
Time - Seconds
A
A
s
A
F + C
C
I - T Diagram
A
Ms
M
50
M90
50%
A
f
A+F
A+F+C
18
23
28
32
36
42
48
52
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
-
R
C
Type: 1050
Grain size=7-8
Taustenitize=910 C
52 52
After: Atlas of Time-Temperature Diagrams for Irons & Steels
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
1 MIN
0
1 2 5 10 10
2
10
3
1 HOUR
10
4
10
5
10
6
1 DAY 1 WEEK
Time - Seconds
A
A
s
F + C
C
I - T Diagram
A
M
50
M
90
50%
M
s
A+F+C
33
40
42
42
42
47
52
57
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
-
R
C
58
Type: 1086 / 1095
Grain size=6
T
austenitize
=899 C
53 53
The nucleation of ferrite in hypoeutectoid steels.
Suppose that samples have been austenitized and rapidly quenched to and held at
temperatures below the A
3
point and above the A
1
line. At these temperatures the steel will tend to
transform to a mixture of austenite and ferrite because it is supersaturated with respect to the ferrite
which means that the free energy change for forming a unit volume of ferrite from the austenite
becomes negative (this refers to the bulk or chemical free energy). When the magnitude of this free
energy change is large enough to compensate for other positive terms, such as the energy of
creating new surfaces, the nucleation flux of ferrite crystals becomes significant. The start of the
transformation is controlled by nucleation because the transformation is controlled by nucleation
and growth. The nucleation flux depends on the free energy of formation of a critically sized
nucleus. Experimental observations show that the ferrite nucleates heterogeneously on austenite
grain boundaries. Let us suppose that lens shaped embryos form and each one eliminates an area
of the grain boundary. Let the volume be V, the grain boundary area eliminated be A
b
, the surface
area of the particle be A
n
, the surface energy of the ferrite/austenite interface be γ per unit area, γ
b
be the specific grain boundary energy and suppose that there is no strain energy involved. Then, the
free energy of formation of the embryo is:
∆G · V. ∆G
v
+ A
n
. − A
b
.
b
and the critical value is the maximum value for a given shape.
Note , now , that the critical value decreases as the magnitude of the (negative) free energy of
formation of ferrite increases. This quantity is proportional to the under cooling below the A
3
line.
Inspection of the phase diagram shows that for a particular temperature of transformation, the under
cooling increases as the carbon content decreases because of the slope of the A
3
line. Hence, the
nucleation flux is enhanced and the ferrite forms earlier as the carbon content is reduced in steels
transformed at the same temperature.
The incubation time for the formation of proeutectoid ferrite continues to decrease for a
given steel as the transformation temperature decreases below the A
1
line. Also, at the lower
temperatures, morphological changes such as the formation of Widmanstatten side plates of ferrite
occur. Furthermore, nucleation of ferrite plates begins to take place within the austenite grains.
Some time after the ferrite begins forming the pearlite transformation starts. The magnitude of the
time interval between the ferrite start curve and the pearlite start line decreases as the temperature is
lowered until either the two lines meet the ordinate axis or they merge at the nose of the diagram.
The curves approach each other more and more closely as the temperature decreases because
nucleation of pearlite becomes easier due to the increased driving force at the lower temperatures
and also because of the carbon concentration immediately in front of the growing ferrite . Once a
pearlite colony is nucleated it can grow more rapidly than the ferrite because the growth rate of the
latter is controlled by long range diffusion. A consequence of this is that the final microstructure of
the steel can often contain a smaller volume fraction of proeutectoid ferrite than that which would be
predicted by applying the lever rule to the phase diagram.
The martensitic transformation attempts to convert the FCC iron to the BCC allotrope. The
product is BCT because of the carbon incorporated in the crystals. The martensitic phase can then
logically be regarded as an extension of the ferrite and therefore the driving force for its formation
derives from the undercooling below the A
3
line. Because the martensite is a metastable phase, the
undercooling required for its formation is larger than that required for the formation of ferrite. The
54 54
real
true
b
Q
T
log (t)
T
o
M
s
temperature is determined by the degree of super cooling necessary to provide an adequate
driving force. In order to attain the high undercooling, the cooling rate must be fast enough so that a
transformation that takes place by diffusion controlled mechanisms doesn’t have time to occur.
When this is so, the transformation begins when the M
s
point is passed. Thus the first reason for
an increase in the M
s
temperature as the carbon content decreases, is because the A
3
point moves to
higher temperatures thereby increasing the amount of undercooling for a given transformation
temperature. Also, the degree of supersaturation of the martensite with respect to carbon decreases
as the total carbon content decreases. The reduction in the amount of carbon in the martensite
reduces the strain energy associated with the misfit of the carbon atoms with the interstitial sites.
This reduces the required driving force and hence the necessary undercooling. For these reasons
the M
s
temperature increases as the carbon content falls.
In the case of hypereutectoid steels, similar comments can be made with respect to the
proeutectoid cementite phase. However, the martensite can still be regarded as an extension of the
ferrite, and the austenite undercooling is determined by the extrapolation of the ferrite plus
austenite/austenite phase boundary below the A
1
line. Thus, the magnitude of the undercooling at a
particular transformation temperature decreases as the carbon content rises. Simultaneously, there is
an increase in strain energy within the martensite due to the increasing carbon conten. These two
effects combine to depress the M
s
point further.

Continuous Transformation Diagrams.
Isothermal transformation diagrams provide valuable information about the kinetics of the
transformation of austenite and are useful tools for considering heat-treatments. In practical heat-
treatments, however, where the size of the part being treated is usually significant, the temperature
and its rate of change vary with position within the part being heat treated. Also, there are heat
treatments in which the austenite is cooled continuously. The real TTT diagram (i.e. the diagram
that describes transformations in samples which cannot be quenched extremely rapidly) is not the
same as the true isothermal diagram.
This is indicated in the sketch. A true isothermal
start line or “C” curve is shown as well as a
cooling path( dotted line ) down to an isothermal
transformation temperature. This cooling curve
can be approximated by a series of isothermal
steps linked by vertical, instantaneous temperature
changes as is shown by the stepped line. Inspection
of this sketch shows that as the temperature falls
through the
transformation range below T
0
, each of the
horizontal steps represents a fraction of the incubation period
corresponding to that temperature. In the 1930’s, Scheil proposed that these “fractional incubation
times” could reduce the time required for the transformation to begin during the final isothermal
stage. This has been considered further by I.A. Wierszykkowski in Met. Trans. 22A, 993, (1991).
During a truly isothermal transformation that takes place at a temperature T
i
the transformation
begins when the time t = t
i
i. e. when t/t
i
= 1. All of the isothermal steps from a to b in the series
drawn on the sketch, are too short for the transformation to have begun at any of the temperatures
55 55
concerned. Thus at point ,b, the austenite is still austenite. If the isothermal stage begins at b, then
the transformation will begin after an additional time of ∆t
x
We see that the real TTT curves will be
displaced to the right on the diagram. ∆t
x
is smaller than the true isothermal transformation time
for that temperature because some of the “pre-precipitation” microstructural changes will have
already occurred. We are forced to conclude that even though a particular steel will possess a
particular true TTT diagram, it has a variety of real diagrams in practice because of the influence of
different rates of cooling which are themselves dependent on the sieze of the piece of steel and the
nature of the quenchant used.
This has led to the creation of diagrams that predict the modes of transformation that take place
during cooling. There are two main types of continuous cooling diagrams. The first type uses axes
that show the temperature of the steel on the ordinate axis and the logarithm of time in seconds
along the abscissa. Then lines are drawn on the diagram to show the cooling path in terms of the
variation of temperature with time. If we consider one such cooling path and travel along it ,
downwards from the austenite, we encounter the start of a transformation. The location of this point
is marked on the diagram and joined to similar points on other cooling paths to create curved lines
that denote the initiation of the decomposition of the austenite. Similar lines which show the
progress of the transformation in terms of the % completed are often appended between the start
and finish curves. Then the diagram is divided into areas according to the nature of the product of
the transformation. Diagrams of this type are determined experimentally by means of dilatometry.
When a steel part is austenitized and cooled, the heat is extracted from the free surface. In
order for the center of the part to cool, heat has to be conducted to the free surface. The actual rates
of cooling depend upon shape, size, thermal conductivity and the rate of extraction of the heat. For
example, if a cylindrical bar is quenched in a bath of cold water, the surface cools the most rapidly
and the center the most slowly. Thus, different parts of the steel will cool at different rates. To use a
continuous diagram of the kind we are discussing requires a knowledge of the cooling rates at
various positions.
The second type of diagram retains temperature as the ordinate axis but calibrates the
abscissa in terms of diameters of steel bars cooled in air, oil and water respectively. These
quenching media extract heat from the surface of a bar at different rates with the water quench being
the most rapid. They are methods of cooling that are commonly used in practice. This statement is
not intended to imply that all quenching oils extract heat at the same rates, so the diagrams provide
guidelines but should not be regarded as quantitatively applicable. There are also variations in
chemical composition among steels of the same designation which can change details of the
transformation. With those caveats, the diagrams show the progress of the transformation at the
center of bars of various diameters when they are cooled at those rates. It should be noted that this
microstructure will not necessarily be found throughout the bar.
56 56
NOTE: THIS ALLOY STEEL HAS SEPARATE PEARLITE AND BAINITE CURVES.
Austenitizing temperature
Martensite
Martensite
bainite
Martensite
ferrite
bainite
Martensite
perrite
pearlite
bainite
Ferrite
pearlit
e
Austenite to bainite
Austenite to martensite
A
u
s
t
e
n
it
e
t
o
f
e
r
r
it
e
A
u
s
t
e
n
i
t
e

t
o

2
1
0
0


F
/
h
r
2
1
0
0


F
/
h
r
5
4
0
0
0

F
/
h
r
1
5
0

F
/
h
r
4
0

F
/
h
r
.
AC3
AC1
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,


F
1600
1400
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0
5
1
0
2
*
1
0
5
*
1
0
1
*
1
0
2
2
*
1
0
2
5
*
1
0
2
1
*
1
0
3
2
*
1
0
3
5
*
1
0
3
1
*
1
0
4
2
*
1
0
4
5
*
1
0
4
1
*
1
0
5
2
*
1
0
5
5
*
1
0
5
Transformation time--seconds
p
e
a
r
l
i
t
e
57 57
B
A
P
START
FINISH
M
F
Ac
3
Ac
1
10 %
50 %
90 %
0.1 0.2 0.5 2
5
10
20
50
100
200
500 1000 2000 1 5
10
10
20
20
50
50
500
500
200
200
100
100
150 300
150 300
BAR
DIAMETER mm OIL
mm WATER
CONTINUOUS COOLING TRANSFORMATION DIADRAM
Austenitized at 850 C
Previous treatment rolled
Analysis Wt % (See note on page 8)

C Si Mn P S Cr Mo Ni Al Nb V
0.40 0.20 0.70 0.020 0.020 -- -- -- -- -- --
40 C
1038--1040
COOLING RATE AT 750 C C PER MIN
1000 500 200 100 50 20 10 5
2 1
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
C
58 58
H-coefficients of quenching media
Cooling medium
Agit at ion Oil Wat er Br ine
None 0.25-0.30 1.0 2.0
Moderat e 0.35-0.40 1.2-1.3
Violent 0.8-1.1 4.0 5.0
After: Honeycombe, p.126,130
0
10
20
30
40
50
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70
D
0

(
m
m
)
D
i
(mm)
10 5 2 1 0.8
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.01
8
Distance from quenched end (cm)
0 1 2 3 4 5
H = 1.5 Strongly circulated water
H = 1.0 Still water
H = 0.4 Well circulated oil
H = 0.3 Still oil
H = 0.25 Still oil
Ideal or severest possible quench
59 59
After: R.W.K. Honeycombe, Steels – Microstructures & Properties, p.131
1 0
1 4
1 8
2 2
2 6
0 0 . 2 0 . 4 0 . 6 0 . 8 1
Car b o n c o nt ent ( %)
B
a
s
e

h
a
r
d
e
n
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
,

D
i
C

(
m
m
)
4 ( 0 . 1 0 mm)
8 ( 0 . 0 2 5 )
7 ( 0 . 0 3 6 )
6 ( 0 . 0 5 )
5 ( 0 . 0 7 )
Gr ai n s i z e
60 60
Comments on Mechanical Properties of Plain Carbon Steels.
Ferrite Pearlite steels.
Plain carbon steel is very often used when it consists of a mixture of ferrite and pearlite. The
yield and ultimate strengths of these steels are controlled by the mechanical properties of the ferrite
and cementite and microstructural details concerning how they are mixed together. We have already
reviewed the behavior of iron when it is deformed in a tensile test. We have also noted the effects of
solutes dissolved in iron. In particular, when the interstitial solutes, C and N, are allowed to diffuse
they segregate at and around the dislocation lines. At room temperature this segregation can prevent
most dislocations from moving under applied stresses so that yield requires the activation of
sources at the sites of stress concentrations or the creation of new dislocation line. This gives rise to
the yield point phenomenon in which the iron shows an upper and lower yield point and a Luders
extension. At higher temperatures, serrated yield can occur. Another consequence of the interactions
between the interstitial solutes and dislocations is the increase in strength and the corresponding
reduction in ductility arising from strain aging. Ferrite is a BCC iron solid solution and it can
behave as described above.
The flow stress in polycrystalline ferrite ( this is the lower yield strength if a yield point
phenomenon occurs) is dependent on dislocation density and grain size. Taking these
contributions to be additive, we can write the yield stress as:
y
·
1
2
+ md
−1
2
where α and m are material constants, d is the grain diameter, ρ is the dislocation density and µ is
the elastic shear modulus. The grain size dependence arises because the grain boundaries act as
obstacles to the gliding dislocations.
Cementite is a hard and brittle phase. It tends not to deform plastically at ambient
temperatures. It can crack. Hence, yield in a pearlitic microstructure is associated with the movement
of dislocations in the ferrite. When dislocation sources are activated in the ferrite plates the glide
paths of the dislocations are limited by the cementite plates because they cannot slip in the carbide.
Instead they are forced to pile up at or near the ferrite/cementite interfaces. The first consequence
of the lamellar microstructure of alternating ductile and hard, brittle plates is an increase in the yield
stress of the material compared to that of the ferritic matrix because the inter-lamellar spacing is
usually much smaller than the proeutectoid ferrite grain size. We expect that the increase in the
yield stress due to the restriction of dislocation glide paths in the ferrite lamellae should be larger
the finer the spacing in the pearlite. This expectation turns out to be true.
Stress concentrations are created at the ends of pile ups where the dislocations meet the
ferrite carbide interfaces and eventually the carbides can be broken. This occurs more rapidly when
the ferrite plates are thicker because more dislocations can participate in an individual pile-up for a
given applied stress. The generation of cracks in the cementite plates can initiate general fracture
which implies that coarse pearlite should fail before fine pearlite because the cementite plates are
expected to crack sooner when the ferrite lamellae are thicker and, also, the cracks will be longer and
therefore more able to propagate. This prediction is also true; fine pearlite is both stronger and
more ductile than coarse pearlite.
61 61
A large tonnage of low carbon steel, containing 0.15 wt.% C and below is used in sheet
form. Slow cooling from hot rolling processes or annealing heat treatments leaves these steels in the
form of mixtures of ferrite and pearlite but the ferrite dominates the mechanical properties because
it comprises most of the steel and is the most continuous phase. These hot rolled steels can have
yield strengths of 25 to 45 K.S.I (172-310 MPa) and ultimate tensile strengths of 40 to 65 K.S.I
(276-448 MPa). The yield strength can rise to 100 K.S.I. (690 MPa) as the carbon content of the
steel is increased because the properties of pearlite eventually become dominant. When the carbon
level becomes high enough for the pearlitic microstructure to influence the properties, the
morphological details such as pearlite spacing also affects the yield and ultimate strength levels as
shown in the sketches provided with this text.
Impact Properties of Ferrite Pearlite Mixtures.
The mechanical properties discussed above are those measured during standard low strain
rate tensile or compression tests. The response of materials to high strain rates is also important.
This is particularly true for BCC metals which, unlike FCC metals, can have a ductile to brittle
transition temperature under impact loading. An indication of the response to impact loading is
provided by the Charpy impact test in which a notched, square-section bar is broken by a swinging
pendulum. Measuring the height of the pendulum at the beginning of the test and that to which it
rises after breaking the sample, enables the energy consumed in breaking the bar to be calculated.
When the bar breaks in a brittle mode the energy consumed is small. In this case the bar breaks into
two pieces and the pendulum swings onwards and upwards. When the fracture occurs in a ductile
fashion, a large amount of energy is consumed by the deformation processes that precede fracture
as well as those that accompany fracture. Then the distance traveled by the pendulum after the
fracture is smaller. Very ductile samples do not break and the pendulum is stopped. A crafty trick
often done by certain professors I know, while teaching a lab course in which Charpy impact tests
are being performed, is to sneak a sample of annealed, austenitic stainless steel into a group of
brittle samples that break easily, then to watch them being tested and to chuckle like mad at the
surprise of the person performing the tests, when the pendulum comes to a sudden halt with a loud
clunk.
The nature of the fracture and the amount of energy consumed in an individual test depends
upon the temperature of the specimen at the time it was tested. It is standard practice to perform
Charpy tests over a range of temperatures. When considering the results of these kinds of tests, it is
wise to bear in mind that microstructural features other than the those of the ferrite and pearlite can
affect them. For example, a common ingredient in a carbon steel is MnS which is formed when the
alloying element, Mn, combines with the residual impurity, S. The MnS is present in the form of
inclusions in the steel and the morphology of these inclusions depends upon prior history. When
the steel has been processed by hot rolling, the inclusions can be elongated and strung out in the
rolling direction and are called, therefore, inclusion stringers. The important point is that the
interface between the MnS and the steel is not strong. If the steel being tested happens to have
stringers that lie parallel to and near to the notch, the fracture will not be representative of the steel
itself, but of the interfaces between the inclusions and the steel. Burns and Pickering (JISI 202, 899,
1964) studied the effects of the volume fraction of pearlite on the impact properties of carbon steel
62 62
%

E
L
O
N
G
A
T
I
O
N
1100 1300
I.T. TRANS F
Temperate at which
austenite transformed
F
15
5
80
100
120
140
160
180
0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9
Fine
Coarse
alpha+pearlite
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
100 120 140 160 180 200
u
KSI
% re
or
%R
<=D
N
in area
I.T. 1300 F
I.T.
Isothermally
transformed
I.T. 1200 F
Reduction in area
% Elongation
u
= Ultimate strength
-80 -40 0 40 80
Impact
energy
ft/ lbs
200 0.11 C
0.2 C
0.31 C
0.41 C
0.8 % C
C
Charpy impact energy ft. lbs
VS
Temperature of impact as a
function of % C in
ferrite/pearlite steels with
low inclusion content.
63 63
After: Honeycombe, p.167
0
5 0
1 0 0
1 5 0
2 0 0
- 1 5 0 - 5 0 5 0 1 5 0
Te s t Te mp e r at u r e ( C)
I
m
p
a
c
t

E
n
e
r
g
y

(
J
)
0 . 1 1 % C
0 . 2 % C
0 . 3 1 % C
0 . 4 1 % C
0 . 4 9 % C
0 . 6 % C
0 . 6 9 % C
0 . 8 % C
1 j o u l e = 0 . 7 4 f t - l b
64 64
After: Callister, p.323,324
0 3 6 9 12 15
350
300
250
200
150
100
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
M
P
a
p
s
i

x

1
0
3
Percent Fe
3
C
Y
i
e
l
d

a
n
d

t
e
n
s
i
l
e

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h
Composition (wt.% C)
B
r
i
n
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s

n
u
m
b
e
r
Tensile
strength
Brinell
hardness
Yield strength
Pearlite
+ ferrite
Pearlite
+ Fe
3
C
(a)
0 3 6 9 12 15
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
Percent Fe
3
C
Composition (wt.% C)
Pearlite
+ ferrite
Pearlite
+Fe
3
C
(b)
80
60
40
20
0
120
100
80
60
40
20
0
D
u
c
t
i
l
i
t
y

(
%
)
I
z
o
d

i
m
p
a
c
t

e
n
e
r
g
y

(
f
t
-
l
b
f
)
Izod
impact
energy
Area
reduction
Elongation
0 3 6 9 12 15
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
Percent Fe
3
C
Composition (wt.% C)
(a)
280
240
200
160
120
80
320
B
r
i
n
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s

n
u
m
b
e
r
HRC
35
30
25
20
100
90
80
70
60
HRB
R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
Fine
pearlite
Coarse
pearlite
Spheroidite
0 3 6 9 12 15
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
Percent Fe
3
C
Composition (wt.% C)
(b)
80
70
60
50
40
30
90
D
u
c
t
i
l
i
t
y

(
%
A
R
)
20
10
Spheroidite
Coarse
pearlite
Fine
pearlite
65 65
in which the amount of the MnS present and its morphology was controlled in order to minimize its
influence on the results. They found that 0.11 wt.% carbon steel had a flat upper shelf ( i.e. the
energy vs. temperature plot was horizontal and at a high energy value) where the fracture was
ductile and a large amount of energy was consumed. As the temperature of the test was decreased
this steel showed a transition from a ductile to a brittle fracture that occurred rapidly near -40°C. At
lower temperatures the plot of energy consumed vs. the temperature of the test became horizontal
again, forming the lower shelf. As the carbon content was increased, the energy associated with the
upper shelf decreased and the transition from ductile to brittle fracture took place at higher
temperatures. The temperature range occupied by the ductile to brittle transition increased. The
eutectoid steel, which is entirely pearlitic, shows a gradual transition of the energy consumed as a
function of temperature. Presumably, the gradual transition at the high pearlite levels occurs because
even though the cementite plates crack, the total fracture path is tortuous in comparison to cleavage
in the ferrite. Cleavage fracture in ferrite is a brittle fracture process in which the fracture path
follows particular crystallographic planes in each grain, forming large, relatively flat facets.
Until approximately 20 years ago, pearlitic steels were commonly chosen as structural steels
because of the useful strength levels that can be attained in them. Unfortunately, the use of medium
to high carbon steels in structures such as bridges and grain elevators created the practical
difficulties encountered in joining components made from these steels which were therefore
commonly bolted and riveted together. Their use in such structures is not really desirable because
the low toughness and high ductile to brittle transition temperatures can cause any failures that
occur to be catastrophic. These days, alternative ways are used to get high strength while
maintaining good toughness and a low ductile to brittle transition temperature, e.g. through the
development of weldable, high strength low alloy steels.
In hypereutectoid steels the proeutectoid constituent is cementite. In steels cooled at rates
which permit the formation of pearlitic microstructures, the proeutectoid phase has time to nucleate
on and grow along the austenite grain boundaries. When this occurs the steel becomes less tough
because the thin continuous film of cementite on the prior austenite grain boundaries becomes the
most continuous phase and dominates the properties. The makers of Damascus swords in the
middle ages, used steels with over 1 wt.% carbon but produced hard, tough blades by working the
steel below the A
cm
line. This destroyed the continuous films of cementite. Apparently European
blacksmiths didn't know about that and couldn't use such high carbon steel. In modern times the
undesirable effects of continuous cementite films along prior austenite grain boundaries can be
important in case hardening treatments in which high carbon levels are created near the surfaces of
parts that are then quenched and tempered. When such parts are broken it is common to find a
region of the fracture which appears to be intergranular because the crack propagated along the
proeutectoid cementite films.
Bainite and Martensite.
The lamellar microstructure of pearlite has a strong effect upon its toughness, with the
toughness increasing as the spacing decreases. In bainite there is no lamellar structure. Instead, it is
an array of sheaves of very fine laths, needles or platelets in hypoeutectoid steels and the fine
carbides therein, are discrete particles. As a consequence, bainitic microstructures are generally
tougher than pearlitic microstructures. Because of the fine scale of its microstructure bainite is also
harder than pearlite in steels of the same carbon contents.
66 66
Martensite is a supersaturated solid solution in which the interstitial solutes interact strongly
with dislocations. It is also composed of very fine crystals with many intercrystalline boundaries; it
can be highly dislocated or twinned. For these reasons, it is the strongest form of a carbon steel.
For example, the 0.2% proof stress is 120 K.S.I. (828 MPa) for martensite containing 0.1% C and
240 K.S.I. (1.65 GPa)for 0.4% carbon. Correspondingly, the Rockwell C hardness number
increases from about 30 to 65 with a change in the carbon level from 0.1 to 0.6%. There is little
change in the hardness for further increases in the carbon content. The hardness of freshly formed
martensite is directly dependent upon its hardness content. This is shown in the appended figure.
Also shown on this figure are the data for air cooled austenite(curiously labeled pearlitic) and
spheroidized steels. Such steels consist of a polycrystalline array of ferrite crystals in which
discrete globules of cementite particles are embedded. This microstructure represents the softest
state of a carbon steel. A martensitic, plain carbon steel can be very hard and very strong.
Unfortunately, freshly formed martensite ( i.e. as-quenched) lacks toughness and is intolerant of
small flaws which can initiate brittle fracture. For this reason, freshly quenched martensite is not
knowingly used in practical applications. It is heat treated further in order to impart to it with some
toughness. These heat treatments are generally compromising treatments because to gain toughness
one has to sacrifice some strength. These additional heat treatments are called tempering treatments
and are the subject of the next discussion.
Tempering Reactions in Carbon Steel
The heat treating process that is applied to martensite in order to endow it with better
toughness is called tempering. A tempering treatment consists of heating the steel to a selected
temperature below the A
1
line, holding it there for a certain time and then cooling it back down to
ambient temperature. The transformations that occur and the property changes that are produced,
depend upon the tempering time and temperature. The general aim is to raise the toughness of the
steel. Because this is achieved at the cost of a reduction in hardness and strength, the process is
always a compromise and is selected according to the intended application. A great deal of research
has enabled us to understand much of what goes on, but there are still some uncertainties with
respect to transition carbides.
On the basis of the research into the tempering process, it has become customary to divide
the process into stages that occur in different temperature regimes. It should be recognized that this
division is a convenient way of describing tempering reactions; the particular temperature ranges
should be considered as guide lines and , obviously, neighboring stages overlap.
Stage 1 occurs at temperatures below 200 °C. Here, carbon atoms diffuse throughout the
martensite and segregate at dislocations and intercrystalline boundaries. Because the M
s
temperature for carbon steels is higher than room temperature, it is possible for these segregation
processes to begin when the martensite is first formed, especially if the cooling rate below the M
s
point is slow. In this case, one refers to the changes as being produced by auto tempering . For
steels of less than about 0.2 wt.% C no carbides form in this stage. When the carbon content is
greater than 0.2 wt. %, very fine particles of a transition carbide nucleate and grow within the
martensite. This carbide is richer in carbon than cementite and is described by the formula Fe
2.6
C.
It is metastable. It has a hexagonal structure and is referred to as epsilon carbide. Several
67 67
After: Bain & Paxton, Alloying Elements in Steels, 2
nd
edition, p.37
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0.20
0.40
0.60 0.80
1.00 1.20
10
20
30
40
50
60
65
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

C
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

V
i
c
k
e
r
s
Martensitic structure (quenched)
Pearlite structure (air cooled)
Spheroidized carbide structure
Carbon, %
68 68
researchers have claimed to have observed the presence of another metastable carbide in high
carbon steel. This one has been christened eta carbide. It is orthorhombic Fe
2
C. There is, however,
still uncertainty because the experimental confirmation of these claims is not easy. It is generally
accepted that epsilon carbide definitely forms. When it does, the martensite retains some degree of
tetragonality because it still contains more carbon in solid solution than would ferrite; there are no
changes in the morphology of the martensite crystals. Thus the first stage of tempering involves the
segregation of carbon to various defects in the microstructure and the conversion of the martensite
to low carbon martensite plus epsilon carbide when the total carbon content is high enough.
During stage 1 tempering, there are changes in the physical properties such as electrical
resistivity which can be used to monitor the progress of the changes. However, there is not much of
a reduction in the hardness; indeed, it can increase slightly for steels of medium to high carbon
levels. Obviously, these changes involve diffusion and are therefore time dependent. A common
practice is to use tempering times of one hour so much of what follows will refer to the changes
produced by tempering treatments one hour long .
The second stage of tempering occurs between 200 and 300°C. It is not very important in
plain carbon steels because it refers directly to the conversion of retained austenite to bainite. The
quantities of retained austenite in carbon steels are not large. However, they can be large in alloy
steels especially those for which the M
f
temperature is below 0°C; stage 2 is important when there
are significant quantities of retained austenite included within the martensite.
Cementite begins to precipitate out from solid solution at about 300°C. This is the
beginning of stage three. The precipitates nucleate on heterogeneous sites such as intercrystalline
boundaries. Because the martensitic crystals form with specific orientation relationships with the
austenite crystal in which they grow, they do not grow across austenite grain boundaries. In effect,
the prior austenite grain boundaries are retained as surface defects. At the beginning of stage three,
the heterogeneous nucleation process at the sites of the prior austenite grain boundaries tends to
produce sheets of cementite particles. The matrix loses tetragonality and becomes BCC ferrite as its
carbon content drops because of the diffusion of carbon to these growing carbides . If the steel is
sufficiently rapidly heated to the tempering temperature then no transition carbides form. If
transition carbides were present due to a previous tempering treatment or because they formed
during a slow heat-up, then they dissolve during stage three. The phases present become ferrite and
cementite. When tempering is carried out at temperatures near 300 °C, the ferrite crystals remain
acicular during the times usually used. Because the diffusion coefficient of carbon increases with an
increase in the temperature, the cementite particles are able to grow more rapidly and to decrease in
number per unit volume, as higher tempering temperatures are used. The hardness after tempering
becomes increasingly smaller; an effect which becomes more and more significant as the tempering
temperature becomes higher. Eventually the temperature becomes high enough to cause the
dislocation content to decrease in a similar manner to the changes in the dislocation content of cold-
worked metals during recovery processes. At about 600°C, the ferrite grains are able to grow and
become equiaxed. These morphological changes in the ferrite grains are similar to those that occur
during recrystallization in cold worked ferrite. Because of this, these later processes have been said
to comprise a fourth stage of tempering, but that name has also been assigned to secondary
69 69
70
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
30
10
1
10
2
10
3
10
4
10
5
300
400
500
600
700
1 min 1 h 1 day
Tempering time (s)
R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
B
r
i
n
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s

n
u
m
b
e
r
205
o
C
(400
o
F)
315
o
C
(600
o
F
)
4
2
5
o
C
(8
0
0
o
F
)
5
3
5
o
C
(1
0
0
0
o
F
)
Q
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
200
400
600
800 1000
1200
Tempering temperature, C
100
200
300 400 500 600 700
Tempering temperature, F
1.2% C steel
0.80 % C steel
0.35 % C
steel
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

C
After: Bain & Paxton, p.38
After: Callister--page329
70 70
After: Krauss: Steel: Heat Treatment and processing principles, p205,206
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
100 200 300 400 500 600 700
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

C
Tempering temperature, F
Compiled from data of
Luerssen and Greene (108)
Engel (112)
Fletcher and Cohen (100)
Bain (113)
Lindsey and Roff (114)
Crafts and Lamont (115)
Wellauer (116)
And Own Data
Tempering temperature, C
As-
quenched
10-20C
20-30C
30-40C
40-50C
50-70C
70-110C
71 71
0
20
40
60
80
100
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
I
z
o
d

o
r

V
-
n
o
t
c
h

C
h
a
r
p
y

a
t

r
o
o
m

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

f
t
-
l
b
Tempering temperature, F
0.40 % C
V-notch Charpy
0.50 % C
Izod
72 72
A
f
t
e
r

A
S
M

M
e
t
a
l
s

H
a
n
d
b
o
o
k
,

v
o
l
.
4
,

9
t
h

e
d
i
t
i
o
n
,

p
.
7
2
73 73
hardening processes that can occur during the tempering of alloy steels so to avoid confusion we
won't use it for carbon steels. Instead, we will consider all of processes that occur above three
hundred degrees Celsius as belonging to stage three.
These various stages offer a convenient way of regarding the tempering reactions. However,
it is important to recognize that the temperatures that have been quoted to delineate the stages are
merely guidelines. Obviously the stages overlap because the dominant type of change and the rate
thereof depends upon temperature and time and does not change discontinuously. It is also
worthwhile pointing out a common error made by students new to this subject when they describe
tempering reactions in small samples that have been rapidly up-quenched to high tempering
temperatures such as 600 °C. The error is to describe the transformations that take place as those of
stages 1,2 and 3 occurring sequentially. Unless the heat-up time is slow enough, epsilon carbide
will not form at this temperature and pearlite not bainite can form from retained austenite because
the tempering temperature is above the position of the nose of the TTT diagram.
Effects of Tempering on the Mechanical Properties of Martensite in Carbon Steels.
During stage one, the hardness change after an hour of tempering is not great. But as the
temperature is increased the hardness begins to fall rapidly and continues to do so as the
temperature increases. Examples of this behavior are presented. It is tempting to believe that as the
hardness falls the toughness rises. In general this is true, but in detail it is not. When carbon steels
are tempered at temperatures near the beginning of the onset of stage 3, say 350°C or 500°F, there
is often a reduction in the Charpy impact energy. This is traditionally known as 500 degree
embrittlement. The drop in toughness seems to be associated with the formation of sheets of plate-
like cementite particles along boundaries and can be aggravated by the segregation of elements such
as As, Sb, and P. Tempering at this temperature is normally avoided. Similar phenomena also occur
in low alloy steels, as we will see later. The tensile strength of a carbon steel is related to hardness
and falls as the hardness is reduced. Clearly, the choice of tempering conditions depends on the
importance of the relevant properties.
The advantages gained by heat treatments that use austenitization, quenching to martensite
and then tempering the martensite are that the desired microstructure can be obtained either
throughout the part or at selected locations. Obtaining the desired microstructure means that the
proper mechanical properties can be obtained where required. All of this is true provided that the
part being heat treated can indeed be converted to martensite when the austenite is cooled. If it can
not be so transformed then the required microstructure cannot be produced. This brings us to the
concept of hardenability which concerns the question of how much of a steel bar can be converted
into martensite by a specific quench. This question is of central importance in quench
hardening heat treating processes. The TTT diagrams of plain carbon steels show us clearly that
the production of martensite requires very rapid cooling rates. These cooling rates are so fast that it
is not possible to transform large parts into martensite. Thus, the excellent properties provided by
tempered martensite cannot be obtained in thick components made of carbon steel simply because
they cannot be cooled fast enough. The reason is that plain carbon steels have low hardenability.
We define the hardenability of a steel as that property that enables it to avoid transformations that
occur by diffusion and, instead, to transform to martensite when cooled from the austenite phase
field. A steel with a low hardenability must be cooled very rapidly. As the hardenability increases,
the necessary cooling rate decreases. Note that the hardenability refers to the ability of the steel to
transform to martensite; it does not refer to the magnitude of the hardness of the martensite.
74 74
Because of the very useful and desirable properties that can be achieved with tempered
martensitic microstructures, research into methods of increasing the hardenability of carbon steels
became an important endeavor many years ago. It was found that profound effects can be obtained
by adding alloying elements to steel. This is the first reason for the existence of low alloy steels.
Often the alloying elements that are added to control the hardenability of the steel do not markedly
improve the mechanical properties obtainable in the tempered martensite in comparison with those
of similarly tempered martensite in plain carbon steel; they do, however, increase the hardenability
so that the martensite can be produced in the first place. Before we consider the roles of alloying
elements in steel, we will complete this description of heat treating processes by summarizing some
heat treating practices.
Heat Treating Practices.
The microstructure of a steel depends upon its prior thermo-mechanical history. For
example, a hot rolled plain carbon steel can consist of equiaxed ferrite grains and pearlite nodules.
If the steel does not have the microstructure desired for its application or for the next process that is
to be performed on it, then the microstructure is changed by heat treating. A number of standard
processes exist. These will be briefly described before we return to the story of martensite.
Normalization
This heat treatment is performed to refine grain size and to obtain a carbide size and
distribution that provides a favorable starting point for subsequent heat treatments; it is usually
done to hypoeutectoid steels. It comprises austenitization at 100 to 150 °F above the A
c3
line
followed by an air cool. A standard rule of thumb is to austenitize the steel for 1 hour per inch of
thickness. This rule of thumb has been used for many years. However, because computing has
become easier, empirical and semi-empirical studies are being made to determine soak times more
accurately. It is important to recognize that the microstructural details produced by normalization
will depend on the size of the part; a thin part cools more rapidly in still air than does a thick part.
Full Anneal
This process is used to make the steel relatively soft and to endow it with good
machinability. The microstructure is large-grained ferrite and coarse pearlite. Austenitization is
conducted at a high temperature to produce a large grained austenite and to dissolve all the carbides.
The steel is then cooled slowly enough to allow the desired microstructure to form by the
transformation of the austenite at temperatures near to the A
1
line.
Isothermal Annealing.
This has essentially the same aim as the full anneal. It is more efficient for small parts
because furnace cooling can be replaced by transferring the parts between constant temperature
baths containing molten salts. The steel is then usually protected from scaling and oxidation by the
molten material into which it is placed. These salts are various mixtures of compounds such as
alkali metal hydroxides and nitrates that are chosen for particular temperature ranges. Baths of
molten lead were used effectively for this purpose before concerns about the dangers of lead to
human health became influential.
Spheroidization
75 75
In the spheroidized microstructure the carbides are discrete globules embedded within the
ferritic matrix and also resident on grain boundaries. Steels with this microstructure are in their
softest state and are most easily mechanically formed. It is often part of overall treatments given to
high carbon tool steels that are formed into particular shapes before being hardened. It can be
produced by cooling very slowly from 100°F above the eutectoid isotherm or by a long isothermal
treatment just below it. Spheroidization can also be obtained by cyclic processing in which the
temperature of the steel is cycled above and below the A
1
line.
Process Annealing and Stress Relieving
This terms normally mean some form of treatment in which the steel is heated to and held at
a temperature below the A
1
line. Recovery processes occur which removes or diminishes residual
stresses that might be present from previous treatments. Recrystallization can also be produced in
cold worked parts.
Quench and Temper.
The purpose of these heat treatments is to produce parts in which a desired hardness is
obtained, either throughout the part or in the vicinity of its surface. It involves austenitization,
quenching to room temperature or below and reheating to and holding at a tempering temperature
below the A
1
line. The first part of the process is intended to form martensite. The tempering
temperature and time are selected to produce the required hardness.
Excellent properties can be obtained by this procedure. However, there are serious
limitations for plain carbon steels. This is because the transformations that occur by diffusional
processes are not easily avoided during cooling. Consequentially, very severe quenching rates are
necessary and even then only small samples can be converted to martensite throughout. The rapid
quench rates are undesirable because there is no opportunity for stress relief during cooling;
warping and distortion are more likely to occur during rapid quenching. These stresses
superimposed on the transformation stresses due to the volume expansion that occurs when
martensite forms, can help to cause quench-cracking. The situation is that carbon steels of the
correct microstructure could perform adequately in many applications, but it is often not possible to
produce the microstructure because the part cannot be cooled fast enough. This is the first reason
for the development of low alloy steels in which one of the roles of the alloying elements is to slow
down diffusional transformations to enable martensite to be produced during slower cooling rates.
Martempering.
A modification of the quench process that relieves the thermally induced stresses initially
generated by thermal contraction is called martempering. In this process, the part is first quenched
rapidly until its temperature has fallen below that of the nose of the TTT diagram but is still above
the M
s
point. It is held at that temperature to relieve stresses by becoming of a uniform temperature
and then finally cooled through the M
s
point. This process is possible when the bainitic
transformation takes much longer to begin than the changes associated with the nose of the
diagram. Note, also, that the steel can be relatively slowly cooled from the isothermal hold and still
form martensite which serves to minimize distortion further.
76 76
Austempering.
As we discussed earlier, bainite can have useful hardness and toughness values . When they
are adequate for the application, the formation of bainite can be chosen instead of martensite. To
allow this, the steel is quenched to a temperature below the nose and held there until the bainitic
transformation is completed. This avoids the problems associated with the rapid volume changes
during the martensitic transformation. The process is termed austempering.
Martemper Austemper
S
F
log t
T
77 77
The Effects of Alloying Elements in Steel.
Alloy steels are those steels that contain minimum specified amounts of alloying elements in
addition to those found in plain carbon steels. The list of elements that are important in alloy steels,
in addition to those that we have already considered in plain carbon steels, includes Cr, Ni, Mo, Nb,
Ti, W, Co, Cu, V, Si, Al and B. These elements produce a variety of changes in the behavior and
properties of steel. Because the equilibrium condition of the steel is now described by phase
diagrams applicable to the Fe-C-x (etc.) systems, the alloying elements have important effects on
the details of phase transformations in steel. These effects concern both the kinetics of the
transformations and, because additional phases not present in plain carbon steels can be created, the
type of transformation. Alloying elements also have pronounced effects on phenomena such as
recovery, recrystallization and grain growth.
Classification of Alloying Elements
The purpose of this section is to attempt to divide the long list of alloying elements into
groups that have similar effects. The properties of carbon steels depend upon the properties of the
individual phases that comprise the steel, the volume fractions of these phases and the manner in
which they are arranged within the total microstructure. Two very important phases that can exist in
steel are the FCC and BCC solid solutions that are called austenite and ferrite. The first method of
classifying alloying elements is based on the effect of the alloying element on the austenite and
ferrite phase fields on binary phase diagrams of iron and the alloying element. This classification
divides the alloying elements into two main groups called austenite stabilizers and ferrite stabilizers.
a) Austenite Stabilizers.
If we examine the metastable iron carbon binary phase diagram we see that adding carbon to
iron favors the existence of austenite over ferrite. This is so because it decreases the temperature of
the austenite to alpha ferrite transition ( the A
3
point ) and also increases the temperature of the
austenite to delta ferrite transition. Thus carbon expands the gamma field and is therefore called an
austenite stabilizer. Those elements that behave similarly are also called austenite stabilizers. When
the binary phase diagrams with iron of these elements are examined (examples are included in the
appended figures) it is found that they can be sub divided into two groups. In one group the
addition of the alloying element depresses the FCC to BCC transition temperature towards room
temperature before other phases appear. Examples of such elements are nickel and manganese. In
contrast, in the iron carbon system the austenite phase field is limited by the appearance of
cementite. Nitrogen and copper act similarly in that they expand the gamma field. Nitrogen forms a
nitride phase that limits the austenite phase field whereas the phases in the iron copper system are
solid solutions.
Other austenite stabilizing elements are Pt, Ir, Os, and Ru.
b) Ferrite Stabilizers.
The second main group consists of those elements that favor ferrite over austenite. Again,
these can be divided into two sub-groups. In one, the FCC field is restricted and separated from the
BCC field, in which alpha and delta ferrite fields merge together, by a two phase area. The FCC area
is called a gamma loop . Examples are Cr, Ti, V, Mo, Si and Al.
78 78
MP
A
4
+ M
Melt
+ M
A
3
Ni, Mn

-

s
t
a
b
i
l
i
z
e
r
s
MP
A
4
A
3
+ M
+ C
+ C
M + C
Melt
C, N, Cu
MP
A
4
A
3
Melt
+ M
Si, Cr, Ti, V, Mo, Al

-

s
t
a
b
i
l
i
z
e
r
MP
A
4
A
3
+ C
+ C
M + C
Melt
+ M
+ M
Nb, Zr, Ta
79 79
The second sub-group restricts the gamma field by lowering the delta ferrite transition
temperature and raising that of alpha ferrite while also producing other phases. Examples are B, Nb,
Zr and Ta.
When the quantities of alloying elements present in a steel are small of the order of a few
weight percent or less, it is usually possible to consider the equilibrium states of the alloy steel by
means of the Fe-C binary phase diagram while, of course, recognizing the diagram is an
approximation. This becomes unreliable as the alloy content increases. Then ternary diagrams or
pseudo-binary diagrams are employed for Fe-C-X systems. These difficulties increase as the
number of different alloying elements added to the steel increases. Therefore, parameters that are
important in heat treating processes such as austenitization temperatures and the eutectoid
composition etc. are determined directly by experiments.
Alloying elements can also cause additional phases to appear within the steels. These phases
include alloy carbides and intermetallic compounds. Because cementite is a very important phase in
carbon steels it follows that effects of alloying elements on cementite are also important. With this
in mind, it is customary, also, to divide the alloying elements into groups according to their
propensity to form carbides.
Carbide Formers.
These elements either do not object to the presence of cementite, e.g. Mn dissolves in
cementite, or they form carbides themselves, e.g. Ti. They are ranked according to the stability of
their carbides in the iron matrix.
Moderate carbide formers....Cr, Mo
Strong carbide formers...W, Ta, Nb
Very strong carbide formers... V, Ti, Zr
When significant amounts of these elements are present, the situation with respect to
microstructural constituents can become complicated. Steels can possess cementite, mixed carbides
i. e. cementite containing dissolved alloying elements, and a variety of alloy carbides in which there
is little iron. Nitrogen tends to prefer to reside in the carbides giving rise to carbonitride
compounds. It can also combine with some alloying elements such as aluminum to form nitride
precipitates.
Graphite Stabilizers.
Some alloying elements dissolve in ferrite and thermodynamically oppose the formation of
cementite. This encourages the formation of graphite and so these elements are called graphite
stabilizers. Examples are Ni, and Si. In fact, silicon is so effective that it enables the formation of
graphite from the melt in cast irons and is, therefore, a particularly important alloying element in
those materials.
Effects of Alloying Elements on Hardenability.
There are many applications for which the properties of tempered martensite are particularly
suitable and, indeed, often necessary for the application to be successful. Unfortunately, these
desirable properties can only be obtained in components that can first be converted to martensite.
80 80
This imposes severe restrictions on the use of plain carbon steels because of the generally low
hardenability of these steels. When it is desired that martensite forms throughout the part (this is
usually called through hardening), rapid quenching throughout is necessary which restricts the sizes
of parts that can be successfully treated. Very high quench rates bring about the risk of distortion
and cracking and this can pose serious practical problems. Carbon steels are generally of low
hardenability because the diffusion controlled reactions by which austenite can transform can occur
rapidly in them. Hardenability can be increased if the rates at which these transformations take place
can be reduced. Research has shown that this can be achieved by adding appropriate alloying
elements. With the exception of cobalt, which has a negative effect, all alloying elements that are
added to steel, raise the hardenability provided that they are dissolved in the austenite. This is an
important condition. The effects alloying elements have on the hardenability of steels are the
primary reason for the development of the AISI/SAE standard low alloy steels
The AISI/SAE standard low alloy steels are listed in ASM handbooks and in numerous
texts and journals. These steels are identified according to a numerical code in which the final pair
(trio if there are five digits) of digits describes the carbon content as is so for plain carbon steels
and the first two numbers indicate the principal alloying elements . The standard steels are
manganese steels with code numbers 13xx; molybdenum steels described by 40xx numbers;
molybdenum and chromium steels which use 41xx numbers; molybdenum, chromium and nickel
steels assigned 43xx numbers and chromium steels which use 51xx numbers. Other variations of
compositions have 6xxx and 7xxx etc. The series 2xxx and 3xxx refer to steels which contain
nickel as the principal alloying element. Some of the other combinations of alloying elements,
however, are more effective at raising the hardenability than is nickel alone and provide a given
increase at a lower cost. Hence, nickel steels are not used as much as they used to be. Indeed, these
days they are often omitted from some tables of standard low alloy steels. When the hardenability
is of prime importance for the application of an alloy steel, it is possible to obtain steels which are
manufactured with closely controlled compositions so as to ensure that a specified hardenability is
obtained. Such steels are identified by adding the letter H to the numerical code.
Other elements that are added to standard alloy steels are V, B and Pb. Vanadium is a very
strong carbide former and forms fine carbides that along with the aluminum compounds in killed
steels, inhibit grain growth during austenitization. This is effective because its carbides can persist at
temperatures close to 2000°F which is much higher than typical austenitization temperatures used
for standard low alloy steels. When present, lead resides in steel in the form of small globules of
lead; its solubility in ferrite is very small. It is added because it improves the machinability of the
steel. Boron is added to increase the hardenability. This is the only reason that it is added. When
boron is present in a standard alloy steel, the code designation is amended by inserting the letter B
between the second and third digit e. g. 50B44.
In order to consider the effects of alloying elements on the hardenability of steels it is
necessary to consider the effects that they have on phase transformations in steel. The first of these
concerns the effects on austenitization; then there are the effects upon the formation of proeutectoid
ferrite, pearlite and bainite; then lastly, of course, are the effects on the martensitic transformation
itself.
81 81
SUMMARY OF THE AISI-SAE DESIGNATIONS FOR COMMON CARBON AND LOW
ALLOY STEELS.
Designation
1
Approx. Alloy Content, % Designation Approx. Alloy
Content, %
Carbon Steels
Nickel-
molybdenum
steels
10XX Plain carbon 46XX Ni 0.85 or 1.82; Mo
0.25
11XX Resulfurized 48XX Ni 3.50; Mo 0.25
12XX Resulfurized and
rephosphorized
15XX Mn 1.00 to 1.65 Chromium steels
50XX(X) Cr 0.27 to 0.65
Manganese steels 51XX(X) Cr 0.80 to 1.05
13XX Mn 1.75 52XXX Cr 1.45
Molybdenum steels
40XX Mo 0.25 Chromium-
vanadium steels
44XX Mo 0.40 or 0.52 61XX Cr 0.6 to 0.95; V
0.15
Chromium-molybdenum
steels
41XX Cr 0.50 to 0.95; Silicon-
manganese steels
Mo 0.12 to 0.30 92XX Si 1.40 or 2.00;
Mn 0.70 to 0.87;
Nickel-chromium-molydenum
steels
Cr 0 or 0.70
43XX Ni 1.82; Cr 0.50
or 0.80; Mo 0.25
47XX Ni 1.45; Cr 0.45; Boron steels
2
Mo 0.20 or 0.35 YYBXX B 0.0005 to 0.003
81XX Ni 0.30; Cr 0.40; Mo 0.12
86XX Ni 0.55; Cr 0.50; Mo 0.20
87XX Ni 0.55; Cr 0.50; Mo 0.25
94XX Ni 0.45; Cr 0.40; Mo 0.12
Notes:
1
Replace “XX” or “XXX” with carbon content in hundredths of a percent, such as AISI 1045 having
0.45% C, or 52100 having 1.00% C.
2
Replace “YY” with any two digits from earlier in table to indicate the
additional alloy content.
From: N.E. Dowling, “Mechanical Behavior of Materials,” 2
nd
edition, Prentice Hall, 1999.
82 82
D
i
= D
iC
x 2.21(%Mn) x 1.40(%Si) x 2.13(%Cr) x 3.275(%Mo) x 1.47(%Ni)
(weight percentages)
where D
iC
= ideal critical diameter for given grain size and carbon content.
After: Honeycombe, p.131,132
1
1 . 5
2
2 . 5
3
3 . 5
4
4 . 5
5
0 0 . 4 0 . 8 1 . 2 1 . 6 2
Al l o y Co nt ent ( %)
H
a
r
d
e
n
a
b
i
l
i
t
y

M
u
l
t
i
p
l
y
i
n
g

F
a
c
t
o
r
Mo Mn
Cr
Ni
Si
83 83
Austenitization.
Let us now define the "eutectoid temperature" as the lowest temperature at which austenite
can be formed. For ternary Fe-C-X alloys, in which the alloying element is X, both the eutectoid
temperature and the eutectoid composition can vary from the values that apply to the binary Fe-C
system. For small quantities of the element referred to as X, the changes are usually small, except
for elements (like vanadium) that are very strong carbide formers and very strong ferrite stabilizers.
Some examples, shown in the appended sketches, demonstrate the modifications to the austenite
phase field caused by selected alloy additions.
There are three main consequences of these effects upon austenitization.
1) When the steel contains alloying elements that are both ferrite stabilizers and moderate to
strong carbide formers, the austenitizing temperatures may have to be higher than those used for
treating plain carbon steels of similar carbon contents.
2) If the starting microstructure contains alloy or mixed carbides, longer austenitizing times
can be required to produce homogeneous austenite Consider the dissolution of cementite. When
the FCC phase forms in contact with the cementite, carbon can diffuse into it and the carbide begins
to dissolve. Continued dissolution is paced by the rate at which carbon can diffuse away from the
carbide/austenite interface. Then, when the carbide has just dissolved, there will be a local, carbon-
rich volume of austenite where the carbide had existed. Continued diffusion of the carbon in the
austenite is necessary to obtain homogeneity. The rate of diffusion of the interstitial solute, carbon,
is much greater than those of substitutional elements. Carbon diffuses rapidly even at temperatures
just above the Fe-C eutectoid temperature of 727°C (1333°F) so homogeneity is obtained in short
times. In contrast to the case of the dissolution of cementite, the dissolution of an alloy carbide, e.g.
a molybdenum or tungsten carbide, both the dissolution process and attaining solute inhomogeneity
will take much longer because tungsten and molybdenum diffuse much more slowly than does
carbon. Indeed, this can directly affect the quantity of austenite in the steel. As an example of this
effect, let us suppose that the steel contains a few wt. % of tungsten in the form of tungsten
carbides. As the carbides dissolve, the adjacent austenite becomes enriched with tungsten while
much of the carbon diffuses away. Because tungsten is a ferrite stabilizer and restricts the range of
austenite stability it is possible for ferrite to form again in the tungsten rich volume. Thus complete
austenitization is paced by the diffusion of the tungsten. This can be important in steels with high
tungsten and molybdenum contents because such steels must be austenitized at high temperatures.
Examples occur in tool steels.
3)When very strong carbide formers are present, a similar story would be told if homogeneous
austenite were required. However, the alloying elements (Nb, V, Ti) which form carbides that are
stable at temperatures well above the normal A
1
line of a carbon steel, are not added to low alloy
steels with the intent of increasing the hardenability. They are added because of the effects due to
their carbides. Indeed, if a steel that contains fine vanadium carbides is austenitized at temperatures
at which the carbides do not dissolve, the effect of the vanadium is to reduce the hardenability. This
is due to two reasons. First of all, carbon increases the hardenability when it is dissolved in
austenite . Thus, if some of the carbon is not in solution because it is combined with the vanadium,
then a decrease in the hardenability is produced by the addition of the vanadium. Second, during the
84 84
2800
2600
2400
2300
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8
Carbon, %
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Carbon steel, 0% Mo
4% Mo
2% Mo
7% Mo
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
2800
2600
2400
2300
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8
Carbon, %
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Carbon steel, 0% Ti
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
0.3%
Ti
0.5%
Ti
0.6%
Ti
0.7%
Ti
0.8%
Ti
1%
85 85
2600
2400
2300
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8
Carbon, %
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Carbon steel
0.35% Mn
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
2.5%
9%
4%
6.5%
0.35% Mn
2.5% Mn
4% Mn
6.5% Mn 9% Mn
2600
2400
2300
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8
Carbon, %
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
Carbon steel
0% Cr
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
600
19%
Cr
15%
Cr
12%
Cr
5%
Cr
86 86
austenitizing process the migration of the austenite grain boundaries is resisted by the carbides.
This produces a finer grain size than for the case of a homogeneous austenite formed in similar
austenitizing treatments. Thus, when the steel is cooled again, the rate of heterogeneous nucleation
on grain boundaries is enhanced which shortens the time required to initiate the decomposition of
austenite and the hardenability is reduced accordingly. This example demonstrates that if one is
considering the effects of alloying elements on the hardenability of a steel, it is imperative to
consider how the element is incorporated in the steel. If it is not dissolved within the austenite then
it cannot directly raise the hardenability, but it might, indirectly, lower it.
The elements that are present in standard low alloy steels primarily for increasing the
hardenability are:- Cr, Mo, Ni, Mn and B. Mo and Cr are also carbide formers. Thus they can
retard the rates of tempering reactions and cause alloy carbides to form during tempering of
martensite. Another important role of Mn in general is to scavenge sulfur by forming MnS so as to
reduce the likelihood of iron sulfide forming at grain boundaries . This is particularly important
when the steel does not have a very low sulfur content as was generally so before the advent of
modern steel-making technology. Although the presence of manganese sulfides in steel can
adversely effect the toughness of the steel, its effects are not usually as serious as those due to the
presence of iron sulfides on grain boundaries. Boron is added only for hardenability control. The
standard low alloy steels are usually completely austenitized during hardening heat treatments
except when a very strong carbide former, such as V, has been added so that its carbides can inhibit
grain growth and thereby refine the austenitic grain size.
The formation of proeutectoid ferrite.
The SAE/AISI standard low alloy steels are hypoeutectoid steels. Even though many are
intended for use at high strength levels in the tempered martensitic condition, high carbon contents
are usually unnecessary because the increase in the martensitic hardness produced by carbon
occurs most rapidly in the hypoeutectoid range. Therefore, proeutectoid ferrite is the first phase to
form when austenite is transformed at temperatures above the "nose" on the TTT diagram. The
kinetics of the transformation of austenite to proeutectoid ferrite is retarded, in general, by the
presence of both austenite stabilizers and ferrite stabilizers. This is probably due to effects such as
solute drag on migrating interphase boundaries and the rate of diffusion of carbon.
An example of the effect of Mo on the growth of proeutectoid ferrite is provided by results
that have been obtained by thermo-ionic microscopy. In this technique, the growth of ferrite is
observable in-situ within the microscope while the sample is undergoing the transformation. It is
possible to photograph the process. Observations on the rates of thickening of lens shaped grain
boundary allotriomorphs of ferrite growing in Fe-0.11 wt. % C and Fe-0.11 wt. % C-1 wt.% Mo
have shown that the half-thickness of the ferrite lens increases linearly as a function of the square
root of time (Kinsman and Aaronson, transformation and hardenability in steels, Climax
Molybdenum, p. 39, 1967). This is consistent with a process that is controlled by long range
diffusion of carbon and, indeed is quantitatively so for the iron carbon alloy. The slopes of the lines
decrease when Mo is added, showing that the growth rate is slower. Clearly Mo retards the
transformation and the fact that there is still a linear dependence on the square root of time suggest
that the Mo interacts with carbon and reduces the rate at which it can diffuse away into the austenite.
Another possible contribution could be segregation of the molybdenum to the ferrite/austenite
interfaces which could reduce the migration rates of those interfaces.
87 87
The beneficial effects due to boron occur when the boron is in solid solution in the
austenite. The solubility is very low. Consequently, numerical values describing it have been
difficult to determine with good precision. It has been estimated to lie between 0.001 and 0.005 wt.
%. Boron is chemically reactive with other alloying elements in steel, particularly carbon and
nitrogen. When compounds are formed with other alloying elements the amount dissolved can be
reduced. The usual practice is to add boron within the range of 0.0005 to 0.003 wt. %. Also, the
steels are fully killed with aluminum. In addition, small quantities of titanium and zirconium, which
react strongly with nitrogen, are added to help to scavenge the nitrogen and to keep more of the
boron in solution. One might question this practice and ask why one shouldn’t just add more
boron. Unfortunately, this is not a solution. If more than 0.003 wt. % boron is added, the
hardenability begins to decrease again and, at about 0.004 wt. %, iron boride precipitates on the
austenite grain boundaries and causes a reduction in the final toughness.
Boron increases the hardenability primarily by delaying the start of the transformations to
ferrite and pearlite. It does not seem to affect the time to complete these transformations. This has
led to explanations of the boron effect in terms of the interaction of boron with austenite grain
boundaries. It has been suggested that boron segregates at the grain boundaries because it is able to
reduce the grain boundary energy and that this reduction in energy makes the boundaries less
effective as heterogeneous nucleation sites. An alternative explanation suggests that borocarbides,
{Fe
23
(C,B)}
6
, precipitate at the grain boundaries and inhibit the nucleation of ferrite and cementite
thereon. Perhaps both phenomena participate. It is generally accepted that the austenite grain
boundaries are affected in some manner because the transformations begin at the boundaries and
the effect of boron is greater in fine grained austenite than it is in coarse grained austenite.
The increase in the hardenability due to additions of boron is greatest for steels of low
carbon contents. There is no effect at the eutectoid composition; the hardenability of hypereutectoid
steels is decreased by boron additions. A valuable characteristic of boron is that it increases the
hardenability without lowering the M
s
temperature. This is valuable because lowering the M
s
temperature causes martensite to form at lower temperatures which increases the likelihood of
quench cracking occurring and can increase the amount of retained austenite.
Pearlite formation
When pearlite forms during the transformation of austenite in standard low alloy steels, the
carbide in the pearlite is essentially cementite. The cementite can contain some dissolved carbide
forming alloying elements which replace iron but it forms preferentially to the alloy element
carbides, e. g. chromium carbide, even though the formation of the latter would provide a greater
reduction in the free energy of the system. This is because it can grow much more rapidly due to
the much greater rate of diffusion of carbon compared to the rates of diffusion of substitutionally
dissolved elements. Nevertheless, the rates of nucleation and growth of pearlite in the alloy steels
are smaller than those in plain carbon steels. When graphite stabilizers, e. g. Ni and Si are dissolved
within the austenite it is energetically favorable for them to remain in solution. This means that they
have to diffuse away from the carbide as it grows and they do so slowly because they are
substitutionally dissolved. One expects both the start and finish lines of the pearlite transformation
to be affected. Mn partitions to the cementite but it also slows down the reaction. Cr and Mo, when
present alone, interact more strongly with pearlite formation than the elements mentioned
previously. They cause significant shape changes to the start and finish lines on isothermal
transformation diagrams. These changes are probably mainly due to the reduction in the rate of
diffusion of carbon caused by interactions with the dissolved Cr and Mo, but solute drag may also
88 88
effect interphase mobilty. When Mn, Ni, Mo, and Cr are all present together in the same steel, their
combined effects are dramatic. In some steels, the effects on proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite
formation are so strong that the start and finish curves for these transformations are separated from
those of the bainite transformation by a region in which the austenite remains in metastable
equilibrium for long times. In these cases the TTT diagrams show the two types of transformation
separated by a "bay". This confirms earlier statements herein that the nose in plain carbon steel TTT
diagrams happens to be where transformations taking place by different mechanisms merge.
An interesting example of thermo-mechanical processing can be carried out with steels that
possess bays in their TTT diagrams. They can be austenitized and cooled to a temperature within
the bay and then deformed by rolling or forging while still austenitic. This increases the dislocation
density present in the austenite prior to the formation of martensite or bainite when the steel is
finally cooled. The combination of the effects due to the additional dislocation line introduced
during the plastic deformation with those due to the formation of martensite can produce significant
improvements in mechanical properties. This type thermo-mechanical treatment is referred to as
ausforming. Steels that have useful properties when ausformed are often called ausforming steels.
Bainite formation
In general, the kinetics of the reactions that form bainite are retarded by alloying elements.
Presumably, the effects arise for reasons similar to those mentioned for the transformations that
occur at higher temperatures. The bainitic transformation in steels that have a bay in the TTT
diagram, however, takes place more rapidly than the transformations that occur at higher
temperatures. This suggests that the larger driving force associated with the greater degree of
undercooling at which the bainite forms negates the retarding effects somewhat, because, in these
steels, bainite can form more rapidly than pearlite.
Examples of the effects of alloying elements on TTT diagrams are shown in the
accompanying sketches. Appropriate changes are also found in continuous cooling diagrams.
Martensite formation.
In a few instances, it is possible for alloying elements to cause the martensitic
transformation to take place isothermally. In such a transformation, no martensite forms while the
austenite is cooled to the temperature chosen, but it begins to form after an incubation time while
held at that temperature. In this case, the kinetics of the transformation can be described by “C”
shaped curves on a temperature-time plot. An example of an isothermal martensitic transformation
has been observed in an Fe-0.6 wt. % C -6 wt. % Mn alloy, in which austenite can be retained after
quenching and then, while the temperature is held constant, martensite begins to form. Each of the
martensitic crystals grows rapidly; it is the initiation process that is time dependent. Isothermal
martensitic transformations are rare and do not occur in standard low alloy steels, where the
transformation is athermal. Therefore the M
s
temperature remains an important parameter. Because
austenite stabilizing alloying elements expand the realm of austenite and, in particular, reduce the
minimum temperature at which the austenite is stable, they are expected to lower the start and finish
temperatures for the martensitic transformation in order to attain the necessary degree of
undercooling. This is so in practice and C, Ni and Mn have strong effects. The carbide formers, Mo
and Cr, also lower the M
s
temperatures even though they are ferrite stabilizers and would be
expected to enhance the driving force for the transformation. Presumably, these alloying elements
cause changes make the transformation more difficult. It is not obvious what these changes are. It is
89 89
possible that the initiation sites are affected. Solid solution strengthening of the austenite and
changes to its shear modulus which might resist the necessary shape change may contribute.
Nevertheless, all five elements lower the martensitic start temperature.
Numerous amounts of experimental data have been accumulated for particular families of alloy
steels in order to assess the effects of composition on the start of the transformation. Using such
data, a number of empirical equations have been published which relate the M
s
temperature to the
percentages of C, Mo, Cr, Mn, and Ni in the steel by means of multiplication factors. Several
different ones have been published. Such empirical equations can be of practical use in material
selection but they provide little help towards elucidating the fundamental reasons for the particular
effects.
While we are on the subject of the martensitic start temperature, we should now recognize
that steels with significant concentrations of alloying elements that depress the temperatures at
which martensite forms, can retain large amounts of austenite when quenched to room temperature.
If more martensite is desired, the steel must be cooled below room temperature. If this is not done
before the tempering treatment then the decomposition of the retained austenite which will occur
during tempering, can have significant effects on the final microstructure and properties.
This is a suitable time to introduce the M
d
temperature. It has been observed that the M
s
temperature can be raised by the application of stress to the steel sample. This is because a crystal
that forms during a martensitic transformation has a different shape than the volume of steel from
which it formed. Therefore, if there is help available to achieve this shape change, the transformation
will be accomplished more easily. If it can occur more easily, then it will require less
thermodynamic driving force for it to occur which means that the necessary degree of undercooling
below the A
3
line will be smaller. Hence, we deduce that if an applied stress is locally oriented so
that it helps the transformation to produce the shape change it will allow martensite to form at a
higher temperature than that which pertains to the unstressed condition. In general, tensile stresses
are found to be more effective than compressive stresses, but rolling can have appreciable effects.
The highest temperature to which the M
s
temperature can be raised by applied stresses is defined as
the M
d
temperature. When this temperature lies above room temperature and the M
s
is below room
temperature, it is possible to retain the austenite at room temperature and then to form some
martensite by working the metastable austenite at room temperature. This can be important in highly
alloyed steels such as stainless steels.
90 90
A.I.S.I 4340 m
o
=0.33 %, Cr = 0.80 %
N i = 1.79 % Mn = 0.78 %
M
s

o
C = 539-423 (%C) -
30.4 (%Mn)- 17.7(%Ni)
- 12.1 (% Cr) - 7.5(%Mo)
Example of empirical relation
T
Logt
10 secs
10
4 secs
1 week
“BAY”
Bs
Bf
+Fe
3
C
+Fe
3
C mixed
pearlite
R
3
R
1
M
s
T
Logt
plain C Steel Hypoeutectiod.
e.g. 1040
T
Logt
Nickel
added.
Curves
moved.
Shapes
not
affected
much.
T
Logt
Mn added
Curves --->
pearlite finish
curve changed
T
Logt
Cr added
Curves-->
Both pearlite
startand finish
curves
changed
Changes occur
to R3,R1 and Ms.
Roted in the text
but not considered
in these sketches
91 91
1000
800
600
400
200
0
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8
0
30
60
90
120
150
10
-3
/s
301
201
304L
301
201
304L
Engineering strain
E
n
g
i
n
e
e
r
i
n
g

s
t
r
e
s
s

(
M
P
a
)
%

M
a
r
t
e
n
s
i
t
e
Type 301
Temperature
10
-1
/s
10
-2
/s
10
-3
/s
10
-3
/s
10
-2
/s
% Martensite
10
-1
/s
Engineering strain
%

M
a
r
t
e
n
s
i
t
e
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e

(
C
)
60
40
20
0
-20
-40
-60
0 0.2 0.4 0.6
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
After: V. Talyan, R.H. Wagoner, and J.K. Lee: Formability of Stainless Steel,
Mater. Trans. A, 1998, Vol.29A, pp.2161-2171.
92 92
The Hardenability of Steels.
Basic concepts for selecting steels for hardenability
Earlier in this article, we introduced that property of steel which determines how rapidly the
steel must be cooled in order for transformations that occur by mechanisms that require diffusion to
be suppressed and which is called hardenability. This property is very important in engineering
design with respect to selecting particular steels and heat treatments for manufacturing a very wide
range of components. In this section we will explore this property in more detail.
When hardenability is important in the material selection process, it is self evident that it
would be useful to have a method of quantitatively comparing the hardenability of steels. How can
this be done?

Possible method #1; The depth of hardening.
Consider a cylindrical bar of steel that has a radius R and a length that is several times larger
than R so that end-effects can be eliminated from consideration when examining the microstructure
and properties of the material inside the bar. Now suppose that this bar is austenitized at T
a
and
quenched in a particular quenching medium, say water at 20°C. After the quench, the bar is
sectioned perpendicularly to its length and hardness measurements are made on the cross section at
locations that span the diameter of the bar. The hardness value at a particular location reflects the
nature of the microstructure at that location: for the steels that we are considering, the hardest
microstructure produced by continuously cooling austenite is that corresponding to 100%
martensite, the softest microstructure is equiaxed ferrite grains and colonies of coarse pearlite, (the
spheroidized microstructure doesn’t form in these treatments). The hardness varies from the softest
to the hardest condition as the microstructure varies between these two extremes. It is important to
recognize that the value of a single, particular hardness measurement in this experiment has no
direct significance with respect to hardenability. It is the variation of the hardness with position that
is significant because this provides information about the variations of microstructure. Similar
microstructures in different steels(e.g. 100% martensite) can have quite different hardness. The data
obtained are used to create a graph of hardness versus position in the bar. Now, provided the radius
R and the hardenability of the steel are both appropriate, the microstructure near the surface can
contain the maximum amount of martensite that can form in the steel when it is quenched to 20°C.
The microstructure at the center of the bar can contain ferrite plus pearlite. Therefore, the variation
of the hardness with position shown on the graph reveals the variation of microstructure. When this
experiment is carried out for a variety of steels using bars of the same size, the same heat treatments
and the same quenching medium, a collection of graphs are obtained. Then we define a “depth of
hardening” as the magnitude of the distance from the outside surface to the position where the
hardness is less than that very near the surface by a specified percentage. When the specified
percentage is chosen, the graphs can be used to rank the steels in an order corresponding to their
depths of hardening. A depth of hardening to the depth at which a particular microstructure was
formed. The smaller the specified decrease in hardness, the larger will be the % of martensite in the
microstructure. In any case, greater the depth of hardening the greater the hardenability.
If one is to use the depth of hardening approach one must choose the “specified hardness
percentage decrease”. Should it be 15%, 40%, or what? Let us consider the microstructures. When
a bar of steel is austenitized and quenched so that it is cooled below the M
f
temperature, it is
possible for it to be almost entirely transformed to martensite or to have a rim of martensite at its
93 93
surface and various mixtures of martensite, cementite and ferrite within. Typically, the
microstructure varies from almost fully martensitic through various mixtures that include bainite
and pearlite The thickness of the martensitic rim can be measured by quantitative metallography.
But in order for that to be done it is necessary to define what is meant by the thickness, because the
variation of the % martensite in the microstructure is gradual. This is the same dilemma that we met
when considering how to specify the depth of hardening. Many experiments have shown that for
the standard etchants, such as nital that attacks intercrystalline and interphase boundaries, the 50 %
martensite is the most easily recognized microstructural mixture. Furthermore, it so happens that the
rate of variation of the hardness as the microstructure changes, is most rapid where the 50 %
martensite mixture is located. For these reasons, this microstructural mixture is most readily located
experimentally and, therefore, the thickness of the martensitic rim usually refers to the location at
which the microstructure contains 50 % martensite. Similarly the depth of hardening is the depth at
which the hardness corresponding to 50 % martensite is located on a cross section; this is the place
where the rate of decrease in hardness with position is the greatest. Hence, if two steels are
quenched in the same medium and so examined, the steel with the larger depth of hardening is the
steel with the greater hardenability.
N.B. The term “depth of hardening” under discussion here should not be confused with the term
“case depth” in carburized parts such as axles and gear teeth. The case depth is usually specified
in terms of a specific hardness value such as that depth at which the hardness is RC 50.
Method #2. The critical diameter
When bars of the same steel but with different diameters are quenched in the same
quenchant, it is found that there is one particular diameter for which a microstructure of 50 %
martensite is found at the center of the bar. This diameter is called the critical diameter. It is the
diameter of a bar that has a depth of hardness equal to its radius. Thus, if several steels are
compared, the steel with the greatest hardenability will possess the largest critical diameter.
Method #3; The critical cooling rate
The nature of the microstructure of a given steel at any location within a quenched bar is
mainly dependent upon the rate at which that location cooled. If we make the approximation that
any effects due to stresses generated by thermal contraction are negligible, then we can expect all
locations that had the same rates of cooling to have the same microstructures. On this basis, we can
refer to a critical cooling rate as that cooling rate that will produce the 50 % martensitic
microstructure. The critical cooling rate decreases as the hardenability of the steel increases.
Whereas these kinds of observations clearly allow different steels to be ranked in order of
their hardenability, they do not provide a quantitative measure of the property. A knowledge of the
critical diameters in different quenchants is of practical use but, because the performance
characteristics of nominally similar quenching media can vary with time and place, they do not
provide an absolute value for the hardenability. This problem was investigated by Grossman and his
colleagues 50 years ago with the objective of describing the hardenability by a parameter that is
independent of the quench bath (“Elements of Hardenability, M.A. Grossman, ASM, 1952). There
94 94
has been a great deal of work done since, but the early work established the basic concepts and the
terminology.
The quenching process
Let us consider the quenching process more closely. When a hot bar of steel is immersed
within the quenching fluid, heat is extracted from the surface of the bar and the temperature of the
surface is decreased. This creates a temperature gradient in the bar. The rate of flow of heat from
the interior of the bar, down the temperature gradient, depends upon the conductivity of the steel.
The combined effects of the rate at which heat is extracted and the rate at which it is conducted to
the surface from within, determines the rates of cooling at various locations within the bar. The
cooling rates at the surface of the sample being quenched vary with time during the quench and thus
with the actual temperature of the surface. For example, in experiments ( see “The Hardenability of
Steels, by C.A. Siebert, D.V. Doane and D.H. Breen, ASM 1977) in which half inch diameter bars
of nickel-5%Si, containing embedded thermocouples, were heated to 850°C and immersed in water,
the surfaces of the bars almost immediately became separated from the water by a blanket of steam.
While this separation existed, the temperature at the centers dropped to about 650°C at a relatively
slow cooling rate. Experimentally determined values ranged up to 50 degrees per second. In the
next phase, liquid water made contact with the sample and steam bubbles formed rapidly. These
bubbles rose from the surface due to gravity and convection turbulence. During this stage the
cooling rate rose to over 300 degrees per second as the temperature dropped to about 450°C at the
center of the bar. At this stage the nucleation and growth of steam bubbles ended and the rate of
cooling became dominated by convection in the coolant. This caused a rapid decrease in the cooling
rate which decreased to less than 50 degrees per second during the time taken for the temperature to
drop another 100 degrees. Evidently, the heat transfer process during quenching in water is not a
simple one. It is interesting to note that it is fortuitous that the greatest cooling rates for water
happen to occur at temperatures corresponding to the nose of TTT diagrams for low to medium
carbon steels. This is fortuitous because these temperature ranges are those through which the steel
must usually be cooled fastest in order to avoid diffusion controlled phase transformations. Should
it have happened in practice that the cooling rate was small in these temperature ranges, quench
hardening of steels and the martensitic transformation in steels might never have been discovered!
The greatest possible rate at which heat could be removed from the surface of a quenched
bar, for a given thermal conductivity, would occur if the quenchant was able to immediately lower
the temperature at the surface of the bar to that of the bath and hold it there during the cooling
process. The quenching power of a quenching medium is described by a coefficient H. Its value
for the case above is ∞. Of course, such a quenching process is unobtainable practically and is
defined as an ideal quench. Although this quench is unobtainable it is quite closely approached by
quenching into vigorously agitated, iced brine.
Newton’s law of cooling relates the rate of loss of heat through a unit area of a solid surface
in contact with a coolant fluid to the temperature difference between the surface and the adjacent
fluid by a heat transfer coefficient, f. The value of the coefficient depends on the materials
concerned and the state of the system as well as on the units used. An example of units is
calories/cm
2
.sec. degree Celsius. Obviously, f can vary widely being much smaller for an object
cooling in still air than for one cooling in rapidly flowing cold water. In order for the heat to be
transferred to the quenching medium it has to get to the surface of the bar. The rate at which it can
do this depends upon the thermal conductivity, k, which has units of similar kind i.e. calories/cm.
95 95
sec. degree Celsius. The early workers took the ratio of H ·
f
2k
to describe the severity of a
quench.
( the factor of two arises because the experimental results were related to the diameters of the
quenched bars not the radii). It has units of length
-1
. For the ideal quench, H is infinity because f
would be infinite.
The ideal diameter
Grossman introduced a term called the ideal diameter which he defined as that diameter of a
bar that would just harden through when quenched in an ideal quench. It is written as D
i
. Hence D
i
is equal to D
c
for an ideal quench.
If it were possible to list the ideal diameters of various steels, the list would provide an
absolute indication of the hardenability of each steel. Consider the results of experiments in which
the effects of bar diameter and different quench baths are investigated. When a quenched bar is
sectioned and examined either microstructurally or by a hardness survey, and it is found that its
diameter exceeds the critical value, then one can define the diameter of the material that contains
less than 50 % martensite as D
u
. This is illustrated in the appended sketches.
When a series of different diameter bars are quenched into the same bath, the form of the
variation of the untransformed diameter caused by variations of the bar diameter, D, is as shown in
the graph of D
u
/D versus D. The intercept of that curve on the abscissa, reveals the critical diameter
for that steel and quenching medium. Now, if two steels of different hardenability are quenched in
two different baths, then it is possible to find a combination such that the two critical diameters are
equal, but the two curves differ at other diameters. This is shown in the sketch, where H1 and H2
are the quenching powers of the two baths, and h1 and h2 denote the hardenability of the two steels.
On the basis of experimental observations and computations assuming a constant thermal
conductivity, constant H, no effects due to stress and that the microstructure was a function only of
the local cooling rate, Grossman predicted that the curve of H.D
u
versus H.D would have the same
form for all those steels for which H.D
c
is the same. This means that two such curves would
superimpose on one another when an appropriate scale is chosen. Such a scale is obtained when
D
u
/D is plotted against H.D. These curves are called characteristic curves. Sets of them have been
produced, which allow the quenching power of any bath to be estimated. The procedure is as
follows.
96 96
Plot of Du/D vs D
yields D
c
and the
data to fit to the
chacteristic curves
Dc
Du
---
D
1
0
EXP DATA GIVES Du vs D
D
i
D
c
1
0
H
=
H = 5
DECREASING H
Calculated Dc, Di, H relations
H, D
Du
----
D
1
0
Some characteristic curves
gives H, Dc
Thus,
H & Dc
gives
Di
INCH DIVISIONS ON SCALE
HRC
65
0
35
1th/ 16
JOMINY TEST RESULTS
S.A.E. 4068 STEEL
97 97
By experiment, the values of D
u
and D are determined for a given steel in a given bath. The
results provide D
c
. Then, the results are compared to the set of characteristic curves to find the
particular curve with the best fit. Knowing D
c
the value of H is determined. The final step is then to
consult calculated graphical relations among D
c
, D
i
and H to obtain D
i
.
It turns out that when steels are quenched in violently agitated iced brine, an H value of 5
can be attained. This value produces results that are close to those predicted for an infinite value of
H. Other examples of H are: 2 for still brine, 0.9 to 1 for still water and 0.25-0.3 for still oil.
These graphs have practical use. However, results obtained from bars that have diameters
that are much bigger than the depths of hardening cannot be made to match the characteristic
curves. Presumably, this is due to the approximations used. For example, the assumption that H is
constant is invalid. Experiments have shown that the value of H assigned to a quenching bath is not
constant throughout the quench and can vary with the size of the bar. This is to be expected from
the temperature versus time behavior described earlier for quenched cylinders. Nevertheless, the D
i
values provide a useful guide to hardenability, provided that the effect of the size of the bar on H is
taken into account.
The Jominy End-Quench Test.
The most widely-used test for measuring hardenability is the Jominy end-quench test. This
test involves quenching the end of a bar of particular dimensions in a specified manner. Typically,
the test bar is one inch in diameter and four inches long. It is austenitized and placed in a jig that
suspends it vertically above a half-inch diameter water pipe which points upwards. The water
pressure in the pipe is set (prior to the test) such that when a fast-opening valve is activated, the jet
of water emitted from the pipe rises to a height of 2.5 inches above the end of the pipe. When the
test bar is put in place, its lower end is 0.5 inches above the end of the pipe. The valve is opened
immediately and the water sprays onto the end of the bar. When everything is correct, the water
only contacts the end of the bar and then sprays outward and downward resembling an umbrella.
Meanwhile, the end of the bar becomes dark and the boundary between the dark and red-hot steel
can be observed to move upwards. It is kind of entertaining to watch.
When the end-quench is complete, a flat surface, 0.15 inches deep is ground along the
length of the bar. This has to be done with care lest any microstructural changes are induced by the
heat generated in the grinding process. Then Rockwell C hardness measurements are made at
intervals of one sixteenth of an inch along the bar. The results are plotted as hardness versus
distance from the quenched end.
Numerous investigations have been carried out to correlate the results of a Jominy test with
other measures of the hardenability. An example is shown later, from Siebert et al (page 11). In this
diagram, the diameters of bars that have the same cooling rates at their centers as those at particular
distances along a Jominy bar are plotted against the Jominy distance. Curves for two different
quench severity’s are presented. The graph enables the determination of the distance along a
Jominy bar of the location at which the cooling rate would be the same as at the center of the bar.
The hardness at the center of the bar can now be obtained from the results of the Jominy test.
The Jominy distances involved are called Jominy equivalent cooling rates or Jominy
equivalent conditions, J
ec
. Lets consider another example of their use. Suppose a particular part is
98 98
to be manufactured and heat treated in a currently available process that uses a particular quenching
medium and the hardness value for particular locations within the part are specified. An appropriate
steel is to be chosen. One procedure is to manufacture a number of the parts using a relatively
shallow hardening steel such as 8620 or 1040 and also make Jominy test bars of the same heat of
steel. These parts along with the Jominy bars are heat treated in the production facilities. Following
the heat treatment, selected parts are sectioned and the hardness at the critical locations is measured.
Meanwhile the Jominy bars are tested to determine the end-quench data. Then by comparing the
hardness values measured on the parts with the end quench data, the Jominy distances
corresponding to these hardnesses can be found. These are the J
ec
’s for the particular locations; i.e.
these locations cooled similarly to the corresponding positions on the Jominy bars. It is important
that the test bars and parts are exposed to the same thermal history. Finally, end quench data
available for various steels produced for selection on the basis of hardenability can be examined to
choose one which will produce the specified hardnesses at the measured J
ec
’s. This procedure
requires the test steel and those of the members of the group from which the selection is to be made
to have similar thermal conductivity so that the cooling rates are similar at similar Jominy distances.
When steels of suitable hardenability are identified the final choice is made taking into account
other factors. For example, it is usual to choose a steel with the lowest satisfactory carbon content
and of the minimum hardenability necessary for the job. This reduces the risk of problems that
might arise with respect to quench cracking and distortion if the quenching process is vigorous.
99 99
The Effects of Alloying Elements on Tempering Reactions
J
Dx
J
Dy
JOMINY DISTANCE
Dx
Dy
D
H=5
H=1
x
x
JEC’s
J
HRC Two examples
The jominy distance is
that distance along
a jominy bar at which
the hardness is that
obtained at the center
of a bar quenched in
a mediam of H
X locations
have required
specified minimum
hardnesses
Fabricate from, say 1040 or 8620.
Heat treat in currently available
process. Also heat treat with the
componets, jominy test bars of
the same steel.
Measure hardness at X.
Perform jominy tests.
Compare to obtain JEC.
Consider the results for
the smaller hardness #
that defines the JEC at X.
Now a steel can be chosen
That will produce the
specified hardness
at that JEC.
100 100
Q
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
200 400 600 800 1000 1200
Tempering temperature, C
100 200 300 400 500 600 700
Tempering temperature, F
1.2% C steel
0.80 % C steel
0.35 % C steel
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

R
o
c
k
w
e
l
l

C
101 101
The Effects of Alloying Elements on Tempering Reactions
The reactions that take place when martensite is tempered involve solute segregation and
clustering at crystal defects, precipitation from solid solution, particle coarsening and grain growth.
In general, alloying elements dissolved in the martensite reduce the rates at which these processes
occur. Also, alloying can decrease the M
s
temperature and give rise to significant quantities of
retained austenite when the quenchant is at or near room temperature Accordingly, the
decomposition of this austenite during tempering can have important effects and therefore stage two
tempering processes can become important unlike the case for hypoeutectoid plain carbon steels.
As quenched, the steel will have a smaller hardness than would be predicted from the carbon
concentration of the steel because of the crystals of retained austenite distributed within the
martensite. Then, when the austenite transforms to bainite during tempering in the appropriate
temperature range, the net hardness can increase. The austenite stabilizers, Mn and Ni, are effective
elements for lowering the martensitic start temperature. In the following discussion of the effects of
alloying elements upon tempering reactions in martensite we will neglect effects due to retained
austenite. Obviously, this is being done so that we can focus on martensitic reactions.
a) Graphite formers and Mn.
Si and Ni partition to ferrite and avoid being incorporated in cementite. This means that the
rate of growth of the carbide particles depends on the rate at which these elements can diffuse out
of the way. They do so by substitutional diffusion with the result that the growth rates of the
cementite particles are retarded in comparison to the case of rate control by the diffusion of carbon.
Mn can be incorporated into the carbides and does not need to diffuse away. However, it
still retards the growth rate, possibly by reducing the diffusion rate of carbon. At high tempering
temperatures where the growth of ferrite crystals becomes important, the solutes can impede the
migration rate of the ferrite/ferrite interface by solute drag. Solute drag refers to an effect that can
arise due to the tendency of solutes to segregate at or away from intercrystalline boundaries.
Segregation lowers the effective surface energy and hence the driving force for boundary migration.
b) Carbide Formers.
These elements retard the rates of the transformations that occur during tempering.
Equivalent effects require smaller amounts of solute the greater the affinity of the solute for carbon.
For example, 1 wt. % Cr, 0.5 wt. % Mo and 0.15 wt. % V have similar effects. At these alloying
levels, tempering times of 0.5 to 1 hour produce carbides that consist primarily of cementite due to
the comparatively high carbon content and also because the rate of diffusion of the carbon is so
much faster than those of the alloy elements. The retardation in the carbide growth rate suggests
that the solutes diminish the rate at which carbon can diffuse in the steel. Alloy carbides that are rich
in alloying elements can form instead of cementite in more concentrated alloy steels at high
tempering temperatures. When this happens their growth rates are controlled directly by the
diffusion rates of the (substitutional) solutes.
102 102
S
c
m
n
1200 F
R
c
1200 F
R
c
1200 F
1200 F
Rc
Carbipe formers retard
in small amounts
1% Cr=
0.5%Mo=0.15%V
Larger amounts
cause secondary
hardening
Austenite
stabilizers
and graphite
formers
Retard softening
effect of Si >Mn
>Ni
Strong C.F’s move peak to high T
12% Cr
2
0.5
0
800 600
600
800
103 103
1
0
2
0
3
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
0
.
3
5

%
C
0
.
5
0

%
C
r
5
%

M
o
2
%

M
o
0
.
5
%

M
o
0
%

M
o
S
o
f
t
e
n
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

o
f

q
u
e
n
c
h
e
d

0
.
3
5
%

C
,

0
.
5
%

C
r

s
t
e
e
l
s

a
s

i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d

b
y

m
o
l
y
b
d
e
n
u
m
Q
1
0
2
0
3
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
Q
5
%

M
o
2
%

M
o
0
.
5
%

M
o
0
%

M
o
0
.
3
5
%

C
2
%

C
r
S
o
f
t
e
n
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

o
f

q
u
e
n
c
h
e
d

0
.
3
5
%

C
,

2
.
0
%

C
r

s
t
e
e
l
s

a
s

i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d

b
y

m
o
l
y
b
d
e
n
u
m

c
o
n
t
e
n
t
e
n
t
104 104
S
o
f
t
e
n
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

o
f

q
u
e
n
c
h
e
d

0
.
4
0
%

C
,

0
.
4
5
%

C

s
t
e
e
l
s

a
s

i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d

b
y

a
n

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
e

o
f

m
a
n
g
a
n
e
s
e

f
r
o
m

a
b
o
u
t

0
.
7
5

t
o

1
.
7
5
%
.
1
5
2
0
2
5
3
0
3
5
4
0
4
5
5
0
5
5
6
0
2
0
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
1
0
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
Q
0
.
4
0

t
o

0
.
4
5
%

C
S
A
E

T
1
3
4
0

(
1
.
7
5
%

M
n
)
S
A
E

1
0
4
0

(
0
.
7
5
%

M
n
)
1
0
2
0
3
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
1
2
%

C
r
4
%

C
r
2
%

C
r
0
.
5
%

C
r
C
a
r
b
o
n

s
t
e
e
l
S
o
f
t
e
n
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

o
f

q
u
e
n
c
h
e
d

0
.
3
5
%

C

s
t
e
e
l
s

a
s

i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d

b
y

c
h
r
o
m
i
u
m

c
o
n
t
e
n
t
Q
105 105
2
0
2
5
3
0
3
5
4
0
4
5
5
0
5
5
6
0
6
5
2
0
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
1
0
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
Q
1

H
r
.
0
.
5
0

t
o

0
.
5
5

%
C
3
.
8
%

S
i
2
.
3
%

S
i
1
.
3
%

S
i
0
.
5
%

S
i
1
5
2
0
2
5
3
0
3
5
4
0
4
5
5
0
5
5
6
0
2
0
0
4
0
0
6
0
0
8
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
1
0
0
2
0
0
3
0
0
4
0
0
5
0
0
6
0
0
7
0
0
T
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
Hardness, Rockwell C
Q
0
.
4
0

t
o

0
.
4
5
%

C
S
A

2
3
4
0

(
3
.
5
%

N
i
)
S
A
E

1
0
4
0
S
o
f
t
e
n
i
n
g

w
i
t
h

i
n
c
r
e
a
s
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
i
n
g

t
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

o
f

q
u
e
n
c
h
e
d

0
.
4
0
%

C
,

0
.
4
5
%

C

s
t
e
e
l
s

a
s

i
n
f
l
u
e
n
c
e
d

b
y

a
b
o
u
t

3
.
5
%

N
i
106 106
Hardness measurements provide a convenient method of following the progress of
tempering reactions because these reactions change the hardness of the steel. The hardness in
hypoeutectoid steels is usually gradually reduced by tempering because the carbon initially
dissolved in the martensite forms precipitates of carbides causing the martensite to become softer
and to lose its tetragonality. Eventually, when the precipitation of cementite is complete, continued
tempering causes the average size of the carbides to increase in order to reduce the total area of the
ferrite/carbide interphase boundary. This process reduces the number of carbides per unit volume
which causes the spacing between them to increase. It is the spacing between these carbides that
determines how effective they are at hindering the glide of dislocations. Therefore, the steel softens
continuously. At the high tempering temperatures of 800°F and above, plain carbon, and many low
alloy steels continue to soften because of the coarsening of the carbide population and, also,
because of ferrite grain growth. However, in alloy steels in which significant amounts of alloy
carbides can form, the new carbides replace the coarsening cementite-rich carbides with a new, fine
array of alloy carbides. Note that the rapidly diffusing carbon enables relatively pure cementite to
form first because the nucleation and growth of the alloy carbides is paced by substitutional
diffusion. When the dense array of fine alloy carbides forms, the gliding dislocations meet a higher
density of obstacles to slip and the hardness of the steel is increased. This phenomenon is called
secondary hardening and is clearly of practical importance because it provides another method of
obtaining a microstructure of high hardness and toughness. The particular temperatures at which
secondary hardening occurs depends on the species of carbide that forms and increase as the
stability of the carbide increases.
It is important to recognize that this discussion of the effects of alloying elements applies to
situations in which the alloying elements were initially in solution in the austenite. When this is not
so, important changes can arise. Let us consider an example to predict the kind of changes that can
occur. We select an AISI 1050 steel to which 1 wt.% V has been added and which has a
microstructure that contains vanadium carbides. First, let us austenitize the steel at a temperature that
is high enough to transform the steel into homogeneous austenite. Then suppose that the steel is
successfully transformed to martensite during quenching. Because the vanadium and the carbon are
dissolved in the martensite, the events described earlier take place during tempering.
Now suppose we repeat the experiment but this time the steel is held at a temperature that is not far
above the A
3
point during the austenitization treatment. At this temperature the ferrite is converted
to austenite but the vanadium carbides are not dissolved so the austenite contains them when it is
quenched. The first effect that we predict is a change in the hardenability of the steel. The
hardenability will be decreased in comparison to that of the previous case because the vanadium is
not dissolved in the austenite and, also, there is less carbon in the austenite because some resides in
the undissolved carbides. The hardenability will also be reduced because the grain size of the
austenite will be smaller than in the previous case due to the lower temperature of austenitization
and because the vanadium carbides inhibit grain growth. In fact, the hardenability could now be so
low that we may fail to produce a uniformly martensitic sample. That could certainly cause
problems if a fully martensitic component was a required result of the heat treatment. However, let
us suppose that we are fortunate and that the sample is successfully transformed into martensite.
What then? The hardness of the as-quenched martensite will be lower than that of the martensite
produced in the first experiment because it has less carbon dissolved in it. Also, it is possible for a
reduction in the hardness to arise due to auto-tempering that could occur because of the increase in
the M
s
temperature due to the absence of Vanadium and the reduction of carbon in the austenite.
When such samples are tempered, the transformations that occur will be very similar to those that
would occur in a plain carbon steel that contains less carbon than a 1050 steel. Secondary
hardening would not take place.
107 107
Embrittlement During Tempering
The aim of a quench and temper treatment is to produce a microstructure that has a
particular set of mechanical properties. The microstructural changes that take place in low alloy
steels during tempering usually cause a reduction in the hardness of the steel unless, of course,
secondary hardening occurs. The decrease in hardness is usually accompanied by an increase in the
toughness as shown by the results obtained during impact tests. However, there are occasions when
this is not so and, instead, the toughness falls. This reduction in the toughness raises the ductile to
brittle transition temperature and can reduce the energy absorbed during fracture at and above room
temperature. There are two types of embrittlement. One is called tempered martensite embrittlement.
It is also referred to as 500°F embrittlement and one step embrittlement. The other is simply called
temper embrittlement or, perhaps preferably, two step embrittlement. The one step and two step
terminology is less confusing.
Let us review some pertinent aspects of fracture in metals. First, from the macroscopic point
of view, a very ductile fracture is obviously associated with extensive plastic deformation. Most of
this plastic deformation precedes the fracture itself, and creates distortion such as elongation,
bending and reduction in thickness. The work done during the gross deformation accounts for the
high values of the energy absorption in the total failure. In contrast, a very brittle fracture takes place
without the production of any obvious distortion and smaller amounts of energy are absorbed
during the failure.
In the preceding paragraph, ductile and brittle failures were described from the macroscopic
point of view. On the microscopic scale the ductile failure mode produces characteristic
fractographic features visible at magnifications above a few hundred times. These features are called
dimples. They are small craters or holes bounded by raised ligaments and their presence
demonstrates that the crack propagated by a process that involved a ductile failure mechanism.
Studies of the ductile fracture process under a tensile stress, has shown that micro voids nucleate
and grow in the metal ahead of the crack. The crack advances through this array of micro voids by
tearing the metal ligaments that separate neighboring voids, leaving behind the tell-tale dimples on
the fracture surfaces. The nucleation of the micro voids is frequently easier at small included
particles in steels; then it is common to observe the particle sitting in the dimple when the fracture is
examined with a large enough resolution. The process of micro void coalescence is a ductile
process and the fracture is therefore a ductile fracture. However, it is not necessarily true that a
fracture that proceeds by micro void coalescence, will be associated with extensive, macroscopic
plastic deformation. It could be initiated at a reduction in section or some other stress concentrator.
In these cases, there that can be little indication from the macroscopic view, that the failure took
place mechanistically by a ductile mode.
Fractures which occur by cracks that do not propagate by micro void coalescence can
occur in metals. BCC and CPH metals can break by cleavage. The initiation of a crack in a cleavage
fracture may involve some localized plastic flow but the crack is sharp and advances by material
separation at its end. If plastic deformation does occur ahead of the crack then the crack can become
blunt and stop. Here we have an inherently brittle process on the microscopic and macroscopic
scales. Cleavage cracks tend to follow particular crystallographic planes, typically {100}in BCC
crystals. Adjacent parts of the crack can advance along different, but parallel planes. These adjacent
parts then become connected on the final fracture surface by steps that are called cleavage steps.
108 108
Fractures that occur by cleavage and by micro void coalescence usually produce distinctive
characteristic topographic features on the fracture surfaces that enable them to be distinguished and
readily identified. A cleavage failure usually takes place rapidly and consumes less energy than
does a ductile failure.
Because cleavage cracks follow particular crystallographic planes, the fracture paths pass
through grains and the fracture is called transgranular. Intergranular fractures during which the
cracks follow the grain boundaries within the material can also take place. These fracture surfaces
are characteristically smooth and comprise curved and flat facets that clearly reveal the
intercrystalline boundary path followed by the cracks. Again, there is usually little or no micro void
coalescence involved. The energy consumed during the fracture is small because the crack follows a
path across which there is weak cohesion. This mode of failure is brittle on both microscopic and
macroscopic scales and can occur in FCC metals as well as BCC and CPH metals.
We have described three modes of fracture that can occur when metals are broken. It is
important to realize that a metallic component can fracture by more than a single mode. Fracture
surfaces can show regions of micro void coalescence and regions of cleavage. As the percentage of
the former decreases so does the energy consumed during the failure and the metal becomes less
tough.
The toughness of steels is of great practical importance. It is to be expected that some
components that are made of steel will contain small cracks or similar flaws. The tolerance of the
material to defects decreases as the toughness goes down and catastrophic failure can occur under
“normal loading conditions”. If a material that would normally be expected to have adequate
toughness under certain conditions develops a microstructure that permits crack propagation in a
brittle mode, it is said to have become embrittled. As we said earlier, this can happen during
tempering.
One Step Embrittlement.
This form of embrittlement can occur in standard low alloy steels that are heat treated for
high strength levels, e.g. quench and tempered 4140. It can also occur in plain carbon steels that
contain phosphorus. A typical treatment that produces it is austenitization, quenching to martensite
and tempering in the region of 450°F to 550°F. ( Hence the old name of 500 degree embrittlement.)
The embrittlement manifests itself by raising the ductile to brittle transition temperature and by
reducing the amount of energy absorbed during the impact in comparison to those pertaining to
samples tempered immediately above and below this range.
This range of tempering temperatures corresponds to the beginning of stage three tempering
in which sheets of cementite needles and platelets precipitate heterogeneously on interlath
boundaries. Sheets of cementite particles can also be deposited from retained austenite when this
austenite transforms during the tempering treatment. In general terms, invoking the principle that the
properties of the whole sample are dominated by those of the most continuous phase, one might
109 109
F
T
Cool very
slowly
past
350 C
Temper 600 C
Austenitize
Temper
450-550 F
DBTT
Impact temperature
Impact
energy
T
C
600 C Temper
Reheated TO 350 C
ONE STEP
TWO STEP
OR
TWO STEP
Q
u
e
n
c
h
Austenitize
Austenitize
110 110
expect a deterioration of toughness with these microstructural changes. This seems to be true when
the steels are relatively free of P and N because the fracture paths follow the sheets of cementite.
Furthermore, the embrittlement is effected during the tempering time required to produce these
microstructures. These times are typically about an hour. The fracture paths are transgranular and
the failure mode is often a mixture of cleavage and microvoid coalescence. However, when the steel
contains high amounts ( say 0.03 wt. %) of P, the embrittlement is associated with intergranular
failure along prior austenite grain boundaries. This suggests that the embrittlement is also
associated with a diminution of cohesive strength across prior austenite grain boundaries due to the
segregation thereon of impurities within the steel as well as with precipitates of cementite.
Two Step Embrittlement.
This is a loss of toughness because of the occurrence of intergranular failure along prior
austenite grain boundaries. At first sight, it is very similar to the intergranular mode of failure in one
step embrittlement, but it does not afflict plain carbon steels. It arises in alloy steels containing Ni,
Cr and Mo that are converted to martensite, tempered at 600°C (note the switch to Celsius) and then
slowly cooled past 350°C. The cooling rate must be very slow, as is unfortunately the case in
practice when heat treating very large turbines made from steels containing Ni, Cr, Mo and V. If the
steel can be cooled rapidly from the tempering temperature then it is not embrittled. Indeed, this
form of embrittlement is reversible by reheating to 600°C and then cooling rapidly. Unfortunately,
that cannot be done with very large components. Even when it is possible to cool fast enough to
avoid the problem, the embrittlement demon lies in wait. If the susceptible steel is heated into the
375 to 500°C range subsequently and held there, it will become brittle. Hence the term two step
embrittlement. The kinetics of the embrittlement process exhibits “C” curve behavior during
isothermal aging at various temperatures. The nose of the curve, where the rate of embrittlement is
most rapid, occurs typically at about 550°C. At this temperature significant embrittlement can occur
in times of the order of an hour. At 375°C several hundred hours are required. This is particularly
unfortunate because this temperature range is often encountered in practical applications and,
eventually, flaws in the steel can become super critical as the toughness gradually falls with time.
A great deal of research has been devoted to understanding two step embrittlement. Much of
this work has employed Auger spectroscopy to analyze the composition of fracture surfaces
immediately after breaking the sample, in situ, within the apparatus. As a result of this work, there is
general agreement that the loss of toughness is due to the segregation of tramp elements in the alloy
steels. Elements that are known to cause embrittlement are P, Sb, Sn and As. In addition, the
alloying elements Ni, Mn, Si and Cr seem to exacerbate the problem. It appears that these elements,
particularly Ni, encourage the segregation. Molybdenum is beneficial. It retards the embrittlement.
Surface Hardening Treatments in Steel Components
Most of our discussion about quench hardening and tempering heat treatments has so far
been concerned with through hardening components. There are many applications of steel for
which through hardening is unnecessary, but for which a high hardness at and near the exterior
surface is important. Obvious examples are those in which wear resistance and dent resistance is
important, e.g. gears and bearing shafts. Other examples include power transmission shafts subject
to bending and torsion actions that create much higher mechanical stresses at the surface regions
than in the interior. In such instances it is desirable to produce the hard strong microstructures at
and near the exterior surfaces. Such microstructures can be unnecessary in the interiors. Indeed,
they are often undesirable. For example, although hard, wear resistant surfaces can be required for
111 111
a shaft it can be also important that the less severely loaded interior be tough and resistant to crack
propagation. These requirements have led to the development of a variety of commercial practices
aimed at surface hardening components.
Flame and Induction Hardening.
One way to produce a microstructure at the surface of a component that is different from the
microstructure in the interior, is first to produce the interior microstructure by a uniform heat
treatment applied to the whole part and then to selectively heat treat the surface only. In these
treatments the composition of the steel is uniform; the heating and cooling is not uniform. The
removal of heat from a quenched bar is partially controlled by the rate at which it is conducted
through the steel to the cooled surface. The relatively low thermal conductivity of steel is an enemy
when one is trying to through harden bulk pieces. It becomes an ally, however, when one only
wishes to austenitize a region near the surface because it enables surface regions to be austenitized
using high rates of energy input without the interiors being significantly affected.
Probably the oldest technique for surface hardening is flame hardening in which heat is
applied directly to the surface concerned using torches that burn gases such as oxygen-acetylene
mixtures. In passing, it should be noted that steel plate is often cut by means of flame torches which
can alter the microstructure and properties of the steel near the cut surface. The objective of the
flame hardening process is to austenitize the steel at and near the surface and then to remove the
flame and rapidly quench the work to produce martensite and, finally, to use the flame to temper the
martensite. Many variations on the theme can be envisioned ranging from hand held torches
wielded by workers of various skill levels and experience to automated ignition, burn and quench
assemblies, e.g. a rotating shaft within a surrounding, stationary array of burners.
The use of high frequency, oscillating, magnetic fields induced in the surface layers of steel
parts is an important method of surface hardening. This is achieved by using appropriately shaped
induction coils made from hollow, water-cooled copper tubing that are placed near the surface ( or
even selectively near parts of a surface). The oscillating field produced by the induction coils
induces electrical eddy currents in the steel. These eddy currents are produced within a certain depth
of the outer surface called the skin depth. This depth decreases as the oscillating frequency is
increased. The eddy currents cause Joule resistance heating in the skin depth which rapidly raises
the temperature of the steel at the surface. Then, after the appropriate time, the power is interrupted
and the part is quenched. The process is readily automated. It is more adaptable than flame heating
because a wide variety of coil configurations are possible; for example, the interior wall surface of
cylindrical tubes can be induction hardened. Usually, surface hardening by localized heat treatment
techniques is applied to steel components that have uniform compositions. The selection of the steel
must be made with this in mind so that the appropriate carbon content for the required hardness is
chosen; often medium to high carbon steels are used.
The use of induction heating is not restricted to producing changes close to the surface. For
example, the mechanical engineering analysis of an axle might specify a particular minimum tensile
yield strength at the 3/4 radius position from the center of the shaft. This translates into a certain
hardness that is to be produced there in the tempered condition and thereby specifies the minimum
carbon content for the steel. The 3/4 radius position mentioned in this example can be relatively
distant from the outer surface e.g. in a 3 inch diameter axle. In this case, the choice of the steel will
also include hardenability considerations. Induction heating for longer times and in the lower
frequency ranges enables the appropriate austenitization to be achieved. However, in many cases
112 112
when the needed depth of hardening is quite shallow, the induction heating time is completed
within a few seconds (lengthy heating cycles allow time for heat conduction into the
workpiece).This means that the austenitization time is very short which can have significant effects
on the microstructural changes. We note first that coarse microstructures such as massive carbides
widely dispersed in large grained ferrite are not suitable as a starting microstructure because the
time required to produce relatively homogeneous austenite is too long. A high temperature
excursion can compensate by raising the diffusion rates but this increases the risk of obtaining a
large austenitic grain size. Refinement of the initial microstructure such as by normalization is
helpful. An interesting observation that has been made is that the hardness of martensite
manufactured in treatments using rapid heating and short austenitization times exceeds that obtained
in the same steel by conventional through hardening heat treatments. The increases can be about 5
points on the Rockwell scale. This has not been completely explained, but is probably related to
refinements in the comparative scales of the microstructures.
In short time induction heating processes, the depth to which the steel is austenitized is
small. Shape changes due to thermal expansion and transformation of structure are accommodated
by plastic flow in the hot metal. Then, when the rim transforms to martensite during cooling it tries
to expand but the core on which it sits is relatively cool and resists plastic flow. The result, often, is
that the surface is in compression. This can endow the part with an increased resistance to fatigue
because fatigue usually requires tensile stresses. During treatments in which the heating depth is
greater, the situation can be reversed and the surface can be put into tension which is not good when
fatigue resistance is important.
Case Hardening
In the methods described above, locally different heating and cooling rates are used to
produce different microstructures in particular locations in the steel components of uniform
compositions. It is possible to produce similar kinds of effects by means of through heating
treatments given to steels in which the composition varies locally, i.e. from the surface to the
interior. Surface hardening refers to all treatments that are intended to make the surface of articles
harder than the material in their interiors. If this is done then the article is encased ( completely or
partially in selected places) in a hardened layer. Case hardening would appear then, to be another
term for surface hardening. This is true, but I have separated it here because it has been my
experience that when the term case hardened is used, much more often than not it refers to a surface
hardening process that depends on modifying the composition near the surface. In these processes
the case depths are relatively shallow, unlike the case of an induction hardened automobile axle. The
method employs solid state diffusion to enrich the surface with carbon, nitrogen or both.
113 113
Carburizing.
Because the factor that has the greatest effect on the hardness of martensite is its carbon
content, increasing the concentration of carbon at the surface of a component provides a means of
endowing the surface with a greater hardness than the interior. The process by which this is done is
called carburizing. It is possible because austenite can accept up to 2 wt. % carbon in solution. It is
done by exposing austenite to an appropriate environment that maintains the concentration of
carbon at the surface of the steel at a chosen high value while carbon diffuses into the steel. The
eventual case depth will then be a function of the surface concentration, temperature and time. When
the carburization is completed, the steel is quenched to render the case martensitic and is then
tempered. The quenching process can be done at the end of the carburization time or the part can be
cooled down and then re-heat treated for case hardening. We will consider a gas carburizing
process to illustrate some of the principles.
An important reaction is
2CO = CO
2
+ C
If we consider a particular mixture of the gases and a piece of austenite at equilibrium at a
given temperature and a total pressure of one atmosphere, then the carbon would be dissolved in the
austenite so that the C in the equation would correspond to the carbon concentration in the austenite
that is in equilibrium with the particular mixture of gases. If the CO content is increased, the
reaction will move to the right increasing the components on the right hand side, and, in particular
the carbon concentration in the austenite. Similarly, if the austenite was put in oxygen it would be
decarburized as CO and CO
2
are created. The variation of carbon concentration in austenite as a
function of the partial pressures of CO and CO
2
is shown on page 404 of Darken and Gurry’s
Physical Chemistry of Metals.
When a piece of low carbon austenite is placed in a gas mixture for which a greater carbon
content in the austenite corresponds to equilibrium, the reaction will proceed to the right until the
required carbon concentration is established at the surface of the steel. This happens rapidly
provided there are adequate quantities of the gas mixture available and it is continually being mixed.
The result is that a chosen carbon concentration can be established and maintained at the surface.
Meanwhile carbon diffuses down the concentration gradient into the steel. The diffusional flux into
the steel is slow enough under the usual conditions for the chemical reaction at the surface to
maintain the composition there.
Practically, carburization is not carried out using pure CO and CO
2
mixtures. Typical
commercial atmospheres use mixtures of natural gas, which provides methane, and nitrogen which
acts as a diluent. Active gases in the mixtures are CO, CO
2
, H
2
, H
2
O, O
2
and CH
4
. The
appropriate mixtures generate and maintain chosen carbon levels. Carburization temperatures are
usually in the range of 850 to 950 Celsius. Carburization times depend upon the desired case depth.
A common definition of the case depth is that depth below the surface at which the hardness is RC
50 in the final quenched and tempered part . Thus, hardnesses a few points higher are required in
the as-quenched part which enables the carbon level at that location to be predicted. Typical case
depths are less than a tenth of an inch and are often fractions of that. I have seen specifications
calling for case depths of 0.002-0.006 inches: this is simply a statement that implies neither
approval or disapproval.
The time required for the carburization treatment can be estimated from the appropriate solution of
Fick’s second law.
114 114
C
x
− C
s
C
0
− C
s
· erf
x
2 Dt
|
.
`
,
Where the subscript s refers to the surface of the austenite, x refers to distance into the austenite
and the suffix 0 refers to the initial base steel being carburized. Other symbols have their usual
meanings.
Such solutions have been cast in the form of: case depth = K(t)
1/2
and tabulated results published.
The microstructures in the carburized case depend upon the details of the temperature -time
history. Examples can be found in the metal handbooks and in Krauss’ book. A major difference
exists in samples that were quenched directly from the carburizing furnace compared to samples
that were first cooled and then re-austenitized and quenched. In the latter case, the re-austenitization
of the ferrite produced on cooling from the carburization furnace produces a fine grained austenite
in contrast to that which exists after prolonged carburization because the re-austenitization
temperature is lower, usually below the A
cm
line. In this case, the steel matrix is austenitized and the
proeutectoid cementite forms into globular particles that are retained as such, dispersed in the
martensite, when the samples are quenched. The microstructure so formed comprises fine crystals
of martensite that is about a hard as it can be and a dispersion of proeutectoid particles that is
beneficial for wear resistance. In contrast, the austenitic grain size at the end of the carburization
time is large. Often the part is cooled below the A
cm
before it is quenched. This reduces the thermal
shock by decreasing the temperature difference between the sample and the quenching medium.
However, proeutectoid films can grow along the austenite grain boundaries during this stage and
these films are retained along the prior austenite grain boundaries during quenching. Many of the
martensitic plates are bigger because the grains in which they form are large and, also, the retained
austenite is less finely dispersed.
In some applications the steel that is carburized has a relatively low bulk carbon content.
Many have about 0.2 wt.%. This usually means that the microstructure within the core is a mixture
of ferrite and pearlite with ferrite being the dominant phase. As an extreme example, the metal parts
which have raised letters on their end faces and used to be used in typewriters to print letters by
striking a dyed ribbon were often made of carburized (shallow case depth) AISI/SAE 1010. On the
other hand, there are many applications for which strong cores are necessary as well as hard cases.
Thus, the steel chosen will have a hardenability large enough for the core to become martensitic or
bainitic during the quench. Krauss gives the examples of carburizing steels shown in the
accompanying figure. Others appear in the handbooks.
Nitriding Steels.
The carburizing process requires that the parts be quenched. The quenching action and
martensitic transformations always create the risk of distortion, warping and cracking. Case
hardening can also be done via the formation of numerous precipitates of nitrides near the surface
115 115
From: Krauss PP290,291
Distance, 0.001 in.
0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2
0 1 2 3 4 5
Distance, mm
C
a
r
b
o
n

c
o
n
c
e
n
t
r
a
t
i
o
n
,

w
t
%
0 40
80 120
160
1700 F
D=Const.
925 C
t = 2 hrs
t = 4 hrs
t = 8 hrs
t = 16
hrs
Distance, 0.001 in.
0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2
0 1 2 3 4 5
Distance, mm
C
a
r
b
o
n

c
o
n
c
e
n
t
r
a
t
i
o
n
,

w
t
%
0 40 80 120 160
1800 F
1700 F
1600
F
116 116
Case Dep t h Cal c ul at ed b y t he Har r i s Eq uat i o n
Case dept h ( in.)
Time, t af t er carburizing at ( a) :
( h) 1600 F 1650 F 1700 F
2……………… 0.025 0.030 0.035
4……………… 0.035 0.042 0.050
8……………… 0.050 0.060 0.071
12…………….. 0.061 0.073 0.087
16…………….. 0.071 0.084 0.100
20…………….. 0.079 0.094 0.112
24…………….. 0.086 0.103 0.122
30…………….. 0.097 0.116 0.137
36…………….. 0.108 0.126 0.150
1. Case dept h = 0.025 t f or 927
0
C ( 1700
0
F) ; 0.021 t f or 899
0
C ( 1650
0
F) ;
0.018 t f or 871
0
C( 1600
0
F) . For normal carburizing ( sat urat ed aust enit e at t he
st eel surf ace while at t emperat ure) .
From: Krauss, pp292,299
Double reheat
Single
reheat
Direct quench
8620 steel
4-pt bend
M
a
x
i
m
u
m

s
t
r
e
s
s
,

k
s
i
Cycles to failure
10
3
10
4
10
5
10
6
10
7
100
200
300
117 117
of the steel. This process is called nitriding and, in contrast to carburizing, is performed while the
steel is largely ferritic not austenitic. Thus, the process does not involve rapid temperature changes
and allows excellent dimensional control.
Typically, the steel to be nitrided is a medium carbon steel that is initially quenched and
tempered at temperatures from 540°C to 700°C. The high tempering temperature is intended to
minimize microstructural changes that might occur during the subsequent nitriding processes that
are carried out at lower temperatures. These temperatures are typically 500 to 525°C. Nitriding is
conducted in controlled atmospheres that use the decomposition of ammonia to generate nascent
nitrogen on the surface of the steel. This nitrogen diffuses into the steel and also combines with the
iron at the surface to form iron nitride. The reaction is NH
3
= N + 3H
Nitriding steels contain alloying elements that form nitrides so that the nitrogen that
diffuses in forms numerous very fine precipitates. Aluminum is used for this purpose; e.g. 1.3
wt.% Al. The case depth, in this case the depth of the precipitate band, is shallow, usually less than
half a millimeter, even though nitriding times can exceed a 100 hours. During single stage, nitriding
treatments in which a single nitriding atmospheric composition is maintained, a “white layer” is
formed. (So-called because in standard etchants for steels it is unattacked.) This layer is iron nitride
and is hard but it can crack and spall. When this is unacceptable the layer is removed by surface
grinding. Alternatively a two stage nitriding process is used in which, after the first stage, the
atmospheric conditions are changed so that iron nitride no longer forms at the surface and the
existing layer is removed because its nitrogen content dissolves into the steel. Because the two
processes described are successful, combined processes have been developed in which both carbon
and nitrogen are simultaneously diffused into the surface These are carbonitriding and
nitrocarburizing and are done to both austenite and to ferrite.
118 118
Ultrahigh Strength Steel
As a general guide, yield strengths of 690 -1380 MPa (100 -200 KSI) are considered to be
high, and those above 200 KSI and up to 300 KSI are very high. Steels with strengths near and
above the upper end of the latter range are called ultrahigh strength steels. 100 KSI ≈ 689.5 MPa.
To obtain high strengths it is usually necessary to heat treat the steel to convert it to tempered
martensite. Some standard low alloy steels such as 4130, 4140, 4330 and 4340 in the tempered
martensitic condition can have yield strengths above 200 KSI. Greater strengths are obtainable by
modifying the compositions of the standard steels. High strengths can also be produced by
combining plastic deformation processes with heat treatment in what are called thermo-mechanical
treatments. Examples of applications which ask for very high yield strengths are aircraft landing
gear, submarine hulls and high pressure chambers.

Because high and ultrahigh strength steels have very poor toughness when converted to
martensite it is necessary to temper them. Temperatures as high as 300°C can be required. This is
necessary in spite of the fact that the tempering reduces the yield strength: the objective is a
compromise that gives acceptable strength and toughness and, hopefully, high enough values of
both for successful application. While it is true that harmful residual stresses can be reduced during
such tempering treatments and the toughness can be improved, practical problems arise because one
step tempered martensite embrittlement lurks dangerously nearby. The search for ways by which
these standard alloy steels might be modified in order to reduce the risk of one step tempered
martensite embrittlement has been the subject of much research in the past few decades.
Modified standard alloy steels.
It is generally accepted that one step tempered martensite embrittlement is associated with
the formation of sheets of carbides at the beginning of stage 3 tempering and, also, the segregation
of some solute elements such as phosphorus at prior austenite boundary sites. The carbides form
by nucleation and growth processes and thus the time required for their appearance within the
microstructure can be increased if the kinetics of the transformation can be retarded. When
appropriate alloying elements that might accomplish this are considered, graphite stabilizers come
immediately to mind because they retard the rates of nucleation and growth of cementite. Additions
of Si have been found to be effective for this purpose. It is able to delay these reactions sufficiently
for useful residual stress relief and concomitant toughness improvement to be obtained during
tempering at 300°C before harmful quantities of carbides form. In general, the toughness of the
decomposition products of austenite is always improved by refining the austenitic grain size. Also,
in the present case there is an added advantage to having a small austenite grain size. When the
grain size of the austenite is reduced, the area of the prior austenite grain boundaries is increased.
Thus contributions to embrittlement from solute segregation at these interfaces should be reduced.
Following this reasoning, vanadium is often added in order for it to form carbides and nitrides
which restrict grain growth during austenitizing.
Many of the modified alloy steels have trade names e.g. INCO 300M, which is
0.35-0.45 % C, 0.65-0.9 Mn, 1.45-1.8 % Si, 0.7-0.95 % Cr, 1.65-2 % Ni, 0.3-0.45 % Mo, 0.05 %
V with P and S less than 0.025 %.
119 119
850
T
C
Austenitization
MAR M 300
heat treatment
3 Hrs
Time
Age
Fabricate
480 C
10 Ni---2Cr
1Mo, 8 Co, 0.19 C
Tempering curve
Secondary
hardening
steels
200 400 600
Tempering temperature C
1.Hour
H
A
R
D
N
E
S
S
C
H
A
R
P
Y

E
N
E
R
G
Y
80
40
160 180 200
y
(0.2% offset) KSI
Test at 27 C
Same alloy
480 C tempering
treatment
Arrows show
results of
increasing
temering time
120 120
Here we have V to lower the austenite grain size and thereby improve toughness in the final
product; Mn, Mo, Si, Ni and Cr to increase hardenability; Si to strongly retard cementite formation
which enables tempering to be done while minimizing the risk of embrittlement; Mo helps to
defend against the segregation, of tramp elements at grain boundaries. Ni is not a desirable element
with respect to intergranular failure by temper embrittlement because it tends to promote
segregation. If, however, this form of tempered martensite embrittlement is indeed avoided, then the
Ni that is dissolved in the matrix has a strong, favorable effect on toughness during transgranular
fracture. Minimizing P and S reduces segregation. Modern steel making techniques produce
cleaner steels than those made earlier and this also improves the fracture toughness.
Even when very high strength steels are successfully treated to take advantage of the
strength of tempered martensite while remaining free from one step tempered martensite
embrittlement, they are still not very tough and they do not tolerate flaws. Generally, it is to be
expected that large structures will contain flaws such as pre-existing cracks or sites at which cracks
can form more easily than elsewhere. The fracture toughness of a material that contains such a flaw
determines the critical applied stress at which the flaw will propagate. The lower the toughness the
lower the stress for a given flaw to propagate. Typically, cracks propagate by cleavage below the
DBTT and by micro void coalescence above it. For the ductile failure mechanism, scanning
electron microscopic studies have demonstrated that inclusions in steels are often involved in the
formation of the voids. When the fracture surfaces are studied, small inclusions are found inside
many of the dimples. This indicates that the interface between the inclusion and the matrix is one
across which there is weak bonding so that it is a site at which a void can more easily nucleate.
When a steel contains inclusions they can often dominate the impact toughness even when other
favorable microstructural changes are made. Thus as the yield strengths of the steels are increased
to higher and higher levels it becomes increasingly important to control the inclusion content and
shape. S and O must be reduced. Additions of rare earth elements such as Ce are beneficial for
making very small spherical oxide inclusions.
Precipitation Hardened Steels
The strengthening mechanisms used in the modified standard alloy steels described above
are those provided by the martensitic transformation. It is unfortunate that the tempering process is
necessary because it tends to reduce the strengths initially achieved. This led people to consider
whether or not secondary hardening processes during tempering could be effective enough to
produce ultrahigh strength steels. One example is a group of steels called maraging steels which
were so named because the martensitic transformation was used to obtain a saturated solid solution
in which precipitation hardening was subsequently obtained by aging the steel at a suitable
temperature.
These steels were first developed in the 1960's and have been used in aircraft landing gear.
They contain a rather high content of Ni which makes them expensive. This partially explains why
they have not been as widely used as their properties would imply that they should be.
A typical example is Mar M 300 for which the yield stress can reach 350 KSI (2.4 GPa).
.03 % C max., 0.1 % Mn max., 0.1 % Si max., 18 % Ni, 5 % Mo, 9 % Co, 0.6 % Ti, 0.1% Al.
A typical heat treatment is as follows:- austenitization at 850°C, cool to room temperature
and age for 3 hours at 480°C. Yield strengths can be as high as 350 KSI with 6 % elongation in
tension. During austenitization essentially all the alloying elements are dissolved. Hence the steel
has a high hardenability, and is air-hardenable in thick sections. Note that because the steel contains
less than 0.03 % C, the diffusion controlled transformations that have to be avoided in order to
form martensite those that form ferrite and those that involve precipitation of intermetallic
121 121
compounds among the iron and the alloying elements. These compounds grow by means of
substitutional diffusion which is a sluggish process compared to interstitial diffusion. Because the
martensite has a low carbon content it is relatively soft, typically in the range of about RC 25-30.
This means that it is machinable so that parts can be easily manufactured after the martensitic
transformation has occurred. The martensite has the low-carbon, lath type of microstructure and
contains many dislocations and interfaces. These become important during aging process because
they are catalytic sites for heterogeneous nucleation of the intermetallic compounds. During aging,
many small precipitates of Ni
3
Mo and FeTi form. These precipitates provide the barriers to
dislocation glide that are necessary for the high strength. Also, because they nucleate
heterogeneously on dislocations, they pin much of the dislocation density present initially which
prevents recovery from taking place during the aging process. Recovery, of course, would reduce
the yield stress. The cobalt provides some solution strengthening and it has been suggested that the
cobalt-rich matrix undergoes short range ordering which would also contribute to strengthening.

Vacuum melting techniques are used to minimize P, O, S and N; this is necessary to ensure
that the toughness is acceptable. Finally, it is interesting to note that these steels have been found to
have good resistance to stress corrosion cracking.
The maraging steels contain very little carbon and the precipitation reactions described
above involve substitutional elements that form intermetallic compounds; carbides are unimportant.
In contrast, the phenomenon of secondary hardening that can occur during tempering of martensite
in appropriate steels is associated with the precipitation of fine carbides that are rich in alloying
elements such as Mo and Cr. Because the tempering treatments that cause secondary hardening are
carried out at higher temperatures than those used in the heat treatments of low alloy and modified
low alloy steels, improved toughness can be expected. This can be advantageous provided the
secondary hardening precipitation processes are able to produce ultrahigh strengths. Much research
has been devoted towards this objective and a class of steels containing Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo has
been developed during the last 25 years, in which secondary hardening yields very high strengths
and good toughness. At this stage, in this document, we are familiar with the general roles and
effects due the Ni, Cr, Mo and carbon but what about the cobalt? The principal effects discovered
during this research are: cobalt additions cause an increase in the M
s
temperature in contrast to the
reductions caused by the other elements; it dissolves mainly in the matrix and provides some
solution strengthening and, importantly, it accelerates the kinetics of the nucleation and growth of
the alloy carbides responsible for secondary hardening. Let us consider some examples.
Speich et al. in Met Trans., 4, 303 (1973), describes an investigation in which they studied
19 steels that had compositions that were variations around a basic mixture of 10 wt. % Ni, 2 wt. %
Cr, 1 wt. % Mo, 8 wt. % Co and 0.12 wt. %C and which contained small amounts of Si and Mn
and trace amounts of Al, N, S and P. The highest carbon content was 0.19 %. This is rather smaller
than the carbon levels in some of the modified xx40 standard steels because low carbon content
promotes weldability. Typical heat treatments were austenitization at 845°C and quenching into
water after which samples were tempered at temperatures that spanned the range from 100-700°C
for various times. Based on the results obtained in these experiments, detailed experiments were
conducted by tempering in the range of 480-510°C which spanned the secondary hardening peak.
It is important to remember that the microstructural changes produced during tempering are
functions of time and temperature. First, we consider the effects of temperature at fixed tempering
times of one hour. The investigation showed that initially, as the tempering temperature was
122 122
increased, either there was little variation in the hardness or some softening occurred due to the
precipitation of cementite during tempering below the secondary hardening range. Then when the
temperature became high enough, typically in the 420-480°C range, the cementite dissolved and the
precipitation of numerous very fine particles of (Mo,Cr)
2
C alloy carbides began. These
microstructural changes caused secondary hardening to begin and, as the tempering temperature
was increased further, the hardness rose to a peak and then declined again. A notable aspect of these
results is that the rate at which the hardness decreased as the temperature increased, when the
temperature was above the value that gave peak hardness, was rapid, more rapid than its rate of
increase with temperature for temperatures that were below. We will refer to this again when we
consider the reasons for overaging later. The height of the peak in the hardness versus tempering
temperature, increased with increasing carbon content because the volume fraction of the carbide
phase increased accordingly. It also increased with an increase in the molybdenum content, reaching
a maximum at 1%. Chromium additions shifted the tempering curve to slightly lower temperatures
but this effect saturated out at about 2 %. Cobalt did not partition to the alloy carbides yet its
presence in the alloy raised considerably the peak hardness and also the yield strength that could be
obtained in a given tempering time. Presumably, this is due primarily to the fact that Co enhances
the kinetics of the transformation. Yield strengths of over 180 KSI ( 1240 MPa) were obtained.
The observations described above, showed that a hardness peak is obtained when tempering
is carried out for fixed times of one hour at different temperatures. This is, in general, similar to the
usual behavior of precipitation hardenable alloys, for which aging at a constant temperature causes a
gradual increase in hardness with time until a peak is reached. Then the hardness decreases from
the peak value as time elapses while aging is continued. Ordinarily during this process in
precipitation hardenable alloys the toughness decreases as the hardness rises and then increases
again as the hardness decreases. An interesting observation made in the work being described here
for secondary hardening was that when the Charpy impact energy and yield strength of the samples
were both determined as a function of tempering time, the curve obtained by plotting impact energy
values against the yield strength values was an inverse “C” shaped, as shown in the appended
figures. This curve shows that as tempering in the secondary hardening range begins, both the
strength and toughness initially increase. This is in contrast with the usual behavior of materials in
which the toughness generally decreases as the material becomes stronger. Eventually, as the
tempering time grows longer, overaging begins and the strength begins to fall while the toughness
continues to increase, as in the usual behavior. Consequently, a tempering treatment can be chosen
to obtain an optimal combination of strength and toughness. The authors concluded that nickel was
beneficial with respect to the toughness. This work led to many subsequent investigations of similar
steels which has resulted in the commercial development of steels such as:
AF1410...0.16 % C, 10 % Ni, 13.8 % Co, 2 % Cr, 1 % Mo, 0.16 % Mn and trace amounts of Ti, Al,
S, P with O and N in parts per million,
and AerMet 100 which was developed in the early 1990’s and has compositions near 0.16 % C, 11
% Ni, 3 % Cr, 1.2 % Mo, 14% Co, and small amounts of Mn and Si.
These steels are vacuum melted and manufactured with careful attention to cleanliness so
that they contain low amounts of impurities. Recent publications describing the microstructural
phenomena in these steels are by Raghavan and Machmeier in Met Trans. 24A, Sept. 1993, page
1943 and in Met Trans. 27A, Sept. 1996, page 2511.
123 123
The strength of these steels is controlled by the inherent flow stress of the matrix, the
dislocation density and sub cell size, the grain size and the effects due to the precipitate population.
The initial microstructures of the martensites are controlled by the particular heat treatments and the
M
s
temperature of the steel. It is generally true that the tendency for martensite to adopt a twinned
plate morphology, increases as the M
s
temperature decreases. Conversely, the tendency for the
formation of dislocated lath martensite increases as the M
s
temperature increases. Autotempering
reactions occur more readily the higher the M
s
temperature is. Lath martensite predominates in AF
1410 while partially twinned plate martensite predominates in the Aermet 100. Secondary hardening
is produced in the martensite of both types of steel by the precipitation of a high density of M
2
C
carbides during tempering. Here the M stands for metallic elements. The ratio of metal atoms to
carbon atoms is 2: 1 but the metal atoms in the carbides include Mo, Cr and Fe; the precise
composition of the carbides depends on the total composition. For example, if the molybdenum
composition in the alloy is raised, then the molybdenum content of the carbides is increased.
The austenitizing treatments used in the investigations referred to above did not produce
completely homogeneous austenite. Instead, the austenite contained some MC and M
23
C carbides
that were retained in the martensite after quenching but they did not participate in the tempering
reactions. When these steels are quenched to room temperature it is usual for them to contain a
small amount (1-2 %) of retained austenite. Refrigeration eliminates the retained austenite.
Combinations of tempering times and temperatures that allowed cementite to form but which did
not produce secondary hardening e.g. for temperatures below about 427°C, produced plates of
cementite on plate, lath and twin boundaries in the martensite. Then in the temperature range of 450-
485°C secondary hardening occurred. Samples tempered at 510°C rapidly overaged. There seems
to be general agreement that the secondary hardening peak occurs when the optimum population of
M
2
C is generated. Here optimum refers to the particle size and spacing. Furthermore, the more
recent investigations show that at peak hardness, the carbides are needle-shaped and coherent with
the matrix and that the sudden, rapid softening at the higher temperatures is caused by a transition
from coherency to incoherency, rather than carbide coarsening due to Ostwald ripening. This
description is based on details of the TEM observations in which characteristic contrast effects
indicated that for the peak hardness the particles were surrounded by coherency strain fields. This
contrast was absent around carbides that formed at 510°C.
It appears to be agreed that the passage of dislocations through the precipitate array is by
Orowan looping of dislocations around the particles. When looping occurs in the absence of strain
fields around precipitate particles, the dominant microstructural parameter that effects the stress
required to force a dislocation to glide through the array is the inter-particle spacing. The
observation that overaging sets in rapidly when coherency is lost and before there is any significant
change in this spacing suggests that the interactions between the strain fields of the carbides with
those of the dislocations are an important contribution to the strengthening effects of the carbides.
This allows us to begin to understand the effects due to the variations in the composition of the steel
on the secondary hardening curves. For example, increasing the molybdenum content to 1 %
increases the molybdenum content of the carbides. This changes the lattice parameters of the
carbides because of the different atomic sizes of its constituents. Because the magnitude of the
coherency strain depends upon the differences in the lattice parameters of the two phases it will
change and therefore so will the magnitude of the resistance to the glide of dislocations due to the
coherency strain fields.
124 124
High Strength Low Alloy Steels (HSLA).
There are many applications of steel for which the steel is not heat treated to produce
hardening via the martensitic transformation. Instead, it is used directly as supplied. Naturally, the
successful use of the “as manufactured” steel depends on how well the manufacturing process
produces material in the appropriate form and with the desired properties. Examples of the form of
the steel are plates, sheets and bars. Plain carbon steel sheet and plate is easily produced by hot
rolling wherein the steel is rolled while austenitic and then cooled. After natural cooling these steels
have microstructures that consist of mixtures of proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite. The mechanical
properties depend upon details of the microstructure as has already been described. For many
applications e.g. ships, gas and oil pipe lines and oil-drilling platforms, it is essential that the steel
has good formability and good weldability as well as reasonably high strength and toughness.
Increasing the carbon content of the steel increases the strength but decreases the weldability
because it raises the hardenability, changes the properties of the transformation products in the heat
affected zones and enhances residual stresses in the vicinity of the weld. For good weldability it is
desirable to keep the carbon contents low. This is also desirable for good toughness. Unfortunately,
reducing the carbon content in the interests of improving weldability and toughness decreases the
volume fraction of pearlite in the steel; this reduces the yield strength.
What can be done to solve this dilemma?
Contemplation of the relevant factors reveals that both the yield stress and the toughness of
low carbon steels can be increased by refining the ferrite grain size. The final grain size of the
proeutectoid ferrite in hot rolled products depends upon the grain size of the austenite when it
transforms during cooling and, also, on the rate of cooling after the final rolling pass.
Recrystallization takes place in the austenite during hot rolling. Recrystallization can occur in semi-
killed, low carbon, unalloyed steel at temperatures as low as 760°C. It is not possible to hot roll the
standard low carbon steels in the range of 900-1000°C and also produce fine grained austenite
because dynamic recrystallization takes place during rolling. This means that unless the cooling
process is accelerated by, say, water cooling, the final product of such treatments has coarse ferrite
grains which lowers the strength and toughness.
Because of these limitations on plain carbon steel, a new class of low carbon steels has been
developed in the last few decades. The objective has been to produce a material with good strength,
toughness, formability and weldability. The carbon content is kept at or below
0.25 wt. %. These steel are called high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels. Sometimes they are
referred to as microalloyed steels because they do not contain large amounts of alloying elements.
Before we see what kind of steels these are, let us ask how we would go about designing a
steel which will have these properties when manufactured in the physical form ( e.g. rolled sheet or
plate) in which it is intended to be used? The first thing that must be recognized is that the
properties of the ferrite are the important properties because the ferrite dominates the contributions
from the small volume fraction of pearlite that might be present. Thus we must consider the factors
that control the properties of ferrite. These are:
grain size; fine grain size raises toughness and yield stress,
dislocation content; a high density of dislocations raises the flow stress,
precipitates; a distribution of finely spaced precipitates provides precipitation hardening,
solutes, elements dissolved in the ferrite provide solution strengthening.
125 125
1) How do we produce a fine grain size in the ferrite and still use high rolling temperatures to form
the austenite?
First we must find a way of inhibiting dynamic recrystallization and grain growth in the
austenite because fine-grained austenite provides many more heterogeneous nucleation sites for the
proeutectoid ferrite than does coarse grained austenite. Then, provided grain growth can be
controlled, the transformation during cooling should yield a fine-grained ferrite. It is well known
that refinement of the austenitic grain size can be done by putting particles of second phases into
the austenite, so we need to arrange that suitable particles are in the steel during the hot working
process. If these particles are also inherited by the ferrite then they will also impede ferrite grain
growth. O.K. Has this been done? Yes.
It was recognized that the logical candidates for these second phase particles are carbides
and nitrides. Ti, Nb, and V form carbides and nitrides in steel; Al forms nitrides. Also, any excess
amounts of these elements that are left in solution in the ferrite, will contribute to solution
strengthening. In practice, the highest temperatures experienced by steel during the rolling process
are those existing at the beginning of the process. At these temperatures, above 1000°C, the
austenite containing small quantities of the alloying elements mentioned is mostly a solid solution
in which the alloying elements are dissolved. Then, as the temperature drops, precipitation of
carbides and nitrides occurs and the progress of recrystallization and grain growth is impeded.
These elements are very effective for this purpose and only small additions are required. As an
example of the effect, we note that a 30 % reduction in thickness at 815°C in a semi-killed, low
carbon steel is accompanied by 10 % recrystallization, while for the same amount of
recrystallization to occur when 0.03 wt. % Nb has been added, a 50 % reduction is required at
925°C.
These HSLA steels are produced to mechanical property specifications, e.g. 950A sheet and
strip has specifications of a yield strength of 50 KSI(345 MPa) and a tensile strength of 70 KSI
(483 MPa). The actual contents of Nb etc. are not specified. The yield and ultimate strengths of the
high strength low alloy steels range from 40 to 80 KSI and 60 to 95 KSI respectively. Typically the
steels contain 0.25 wt. % or less of carbon and 1 to 1.65 wt. % Mn. The Mn helps to controls any
sulfur and provides solid solution strengthening.
Leslie points out an interesting fact in his book. The use of small additions of Nb to carbon
steel in order to strengthen the ferrite was patented in 1936. But it was just a scientific curiosity then
because of the cost of Nb and, more importantly, because there was no real commercial demand for
such steels. 20 or so years later the price of Nb dropped and also the need for pipe line steel
appeared. Economics drove the renewal of interest. The buck demands respect!
2) In method 1) described above we concentrated on producing grain refinement in the final rolled
product.
What other microstructural characteristics could contribute? An additional way of
strengthening ferrite is to increase its dislocation density. How might we accomplish that without
cold work? Previously, when we considered the microstructural characteristics of ferrite we noted
that equiaxed ferrite forms in slowly cooled austenite. This morphology indicates that the ferrite
forms at relatively high temperatures while the steel is being cooled. When this occurs, the
dislocation density within the grains is of the order of 10
8
cms/cm
-3
, which is not particularly high
from the point of view of strengthening. However, if we contrive to make the ferrite form at low
126 126
temperatures, then the ferrite morphology changes from equiaxed grains to acicular grains and,
because the ferrite is not exposed to the higher temperatures during cooling, recovery processes are
suppressed. Such acicular ferrite can contain a dislocation density as high as 10
10
cms per cm
3
.
Acicular ferrite can be made to form by cooling the steel rapidly. However, it is more desirable to
avoid this necessity and to arrange for the acicular ferrite to form during air cooling.
For this to happen, the ferrite formation has to be retarded. This can be done economically
by adding Mn and Mo. An example is : C 0.08 %, Mn 2.18 %, Si .1 %, Mo 0.38 %, Nb 0.07 %, Al
0.02 % and N 0.007 % (this composition is in wt. %0. These alloy additions refine the austenitic
grain size and also cause the beginning of the transformation to be retarded because the ferrite start
curve on the TTT diagram is displaced to longer times. Therefore, the austenite decomposes at
lower temperatures as it cools, yielding fine grained, acicular ferrite and a greater dislocation
density. It turns out that the ferrite is often then supersaturated with respect to Nb so that
precipitation can occur if the steel is reheated. An interesting discovery that was made when these
dislocated acicular ferrites were produced, was that the yield point phenomenon disappeared.
Instead, the steel began to yield gradually with a rounded stress strain curve and then work
hardened rapidly. This suggests that the microstructure produced in this manner, contains a
significant population of mobile dislocations. For steels of the composition above, yield can occur
at 70 KSI in samples in the hot rolled, air cooled, condition. For comparison, the lower flow stress
in a 0.08 % C plain carbon steel is about 25 to 30 KSI.
A logical extension of the acicular ferrite case is to arrange to produce low carbon bainite.
To do so, Mo and B are introduced to form a bay in the TTT diagram; the carbon level is raised to
increase the strength and Nb is added to control the austenitic grain size. The result is to separate
the ferrite and pearlite curves from the bainite curves so that the transformation to bainite is easily
achieved, as is clear from the TTT diagram sketched below. Such steels can yield in the range 65-
120 KSI.
+ Fe
3
C
Bainite
log t
A
1
B
s
M
s
T
127 127
In summary, HSLA steels are low carbon steels with various combinations of small (micro-
alloying) additions of Nb, V, Ti, Mo, and B. They have increased in popularity during the last
quarter of a century. However, versions of such steels existed before, where the strength was
provided by solution strengthening and solute clustering. USS Corten steel has the composition:
2. % C, 0.35 % Mn, 0.5 % Si, 0.4 % Cu, 0.1 % P and 0.8 % Cr. One of the principal reasons that
it has been used is that it is an example of a weathering steel in which the combination of the Cu
and P affects the rusting process so as to produce a tightly adherent, reddish patina that protects the
steel and, so some people claim, looks pretty.
3) Precipitation Hardening.
Grain refinement is a very desirable way of strengthening these types of steel because this
also improves toughness. Often precipitation hardening is used in addition. In order for precipitates
to be effective obstacles to dislocation motion, they must be closely spaced. This means that the
precipitates used for refining the ferrite grain size are of little use for precipitation strengthening,
because they are large and their spacing scales with the grain size. This is fine for anti-
recrystallization purposes because the scale of the microstructure is larger but finer spacings are
necessary for additional strengthening due to precipitation hardening. How can we bring this about?
One obvious approach is to seek additional alloying elements that will be retained initially in solid
solution in the ferrite and then enable a distribution of fine precipitates to be produced by aging.
Copper additions such as those in Corten steel can do this. We will consider another type of
reaction first, however, because it turns out that the solubility of the niobium and vanadium carbides
are greater in austenite than in ferrite. Thus if the matrix composition of the austenite in which the
grain refining precipitates have formed is inherited by the ferrite, then the ferrite is supersaturated
and another population of fine precipitates can occur as ferrite forms or as it is aged. This occurs
more readily for vanadium additions than for niobium.
An interesting mode of precipitation occurs in these alloys. It has been observed in other
alloy systems since its was discovered in HSLA steels. It is called interphase precipitation. Its major
characteristics are that the precipitation occurs on the interface between the ferrite and the austenite
and the final morphology is regularly spaced sheets of small particles within the ferrite. Very small
particles, of the order of 5 NM, can form in closely, spaced arrays that are effective strengtheners.
The precipitation mechanism begins after a ferrite grain has nucleated in the steel as it is
cooling from the rolling process. Heterogeneous nucleation of the carbide phase then occurs along
the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. The particles of carbide e.g. VC, pin the boundary which
stops migrating, and then the carbides grow. As they grow they deplete the carbon concentration in
the austenite at the interface. When the concentration drops as indicated in the sketches, the driving
force for forming ferrite is increased. Eventually it becomes large enough to overcome the restraint
of the precipitates on austenite/ferrite interface and allow the ferrite to grow.. Then, as the interface
advances, the carbon gradient ahead of it builds up again until nucleation of the carbides can occur
again and the process repeats itself. The observations of the phenomenon suggest that the boundary
"un-zips" from the sheets of precipitates so that its forward migration is actually accomplished by
the sideways movement of boundary ledges.
128 128
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129 129
The fact that copper rich precipitates can form in copper bearing steels was mentioned at the
beginning of this section. In the early Seventies there was a great deal of interest in the nature of the
precipitation of copper from iron and low carbon steel primarily because of fundamental aspects of
phase transformations. There has been continued interest, however, as copper bearing HSLA steels
have been further refined. Alloys have been developed which have very low carbon content, over 1
wt. % Cu for precipitation hardening, additions of substitutional elements such as Mn, Ni, Mo and
Cr for hardenability along with Nb, Al and N for grain size control. An example is A710 which is
described in the 1995 ASTM book of standards. A particular example of this group is HSLA-80
which is so designated by the US navy for ship building. It is appropriate to end the section by
returning to this topic to consult recent work.
An example of HSLA-80 is: 0.05 wt. % C, 0.5 wt. % Mn, 0.009 wt. % P, 0.002 wt.% S,
0.28 wt. % Si, 1.12 wt. % Cu, 0.88 wt. % Ni, 0.71 wt. % Cr, 0.2 wt. % Mo, 0.035 wt. % Nb, 0.02
wt.% Al, 0.009 wt. % N. A typical A710 is very similar. Detailed studies of the phase
transformations in these alloys both during continuous cooling and during isothermal aging have
been described recently by S. W. Thompson, D. J. Colvin and G.Krauss, Met. & Mat. Trans. 27 A,
1557 (1996) and S. W. Thompson and G. Krauss ibid. page 1573.
Inspection of the compositions of the steels shows that austenitic grain size control is
effected by the niobium, aluminum, nitrogen and carbon. The S and P contents are low to minimize
undesirable effects due to inclusions and segregation. Leaving aside consideration of the copper for
the moment, inspection of the remainder of the composition leads one to conclude that these
alloying elements will be in solid solution. It would be reasonable to predict that if the austenite is
cooled sufficiently slowly, the austenite to ferrite transformation should produce predominantly
relatively equiaxed grains with normal dislocation content. This is so in practice. These authors
refer to this microstructure as polygonal ferrite. However, they also observe that even with this low a
carbon content, small pockets of austenite become enriched in carbon and transform to upper and
lower bainite and martensite. More rapid cooling reduces the amount of polygonal ferrite and
increases the amounts of Widmanstatten ferrite side-plates and acicular ferrite. These authors also
observe small equiaxed ferrite crystals which they call granular ferrite. Some martensite associated
with a little retained austenite can form although the bainitic transformation is suppressed. Their
results enabled them to present a continuous cooling diagram. The complexities of the
microstructural characteristics are impressive, but the ingredients for good properties are there; fine
ferrite grain size, acicular, dislocated ferrite etc. Let us now turn to the precipitation reactions.
It was discovered many years ago that supersaturated binary alloys of Cu in BCC Fe could
be obtained by solution treating and quenching. Isothermal aging of the metastable solid solutions
caused precipitation of copper. Initially, metastable BCC copper precipitates appear within the
ferrite, presumably because they match the ferrite structurally and can form coherently which is
favorable for nucleation. These precipitates grow to about 4 NM and transform in-situ to the FCC
structure. In the HSLA alloys under discussion, the copper is in solution when the steel is
austenitic. If the austenite is rapidly quenched so as to form martensite, the degree of tetragonality is
small because of the small amount of carbon in solution and the copper is essentially in solution in
a BCC host. Thompson and Krauss show that when the quenched steel is aged at 455, 565 and
675°C FCC copper precipitates form. They also show, as previous work had indicated, that copper
precipitation can also take place during slower cooling treatments. Previous work had indicated that
130 130
HEAT TREATMENTS TO PRODUCE PERRITE AND PEARLITE
Fig. 5.24. Yield strength as a function of grain size in low-carbon steels. Contributions of
various other strengthening mechanisms are indicated. (Ref 5.30)
From: Krauss, p.137
ASTM Grain Size Number
Y
i
e
l
d

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

(
M
P
a
)
d
-1/2
(mm
-1/2
)
Mild steels
HSLA
steels
Ferritic
grain-size Solid
solution
Matrix strength
k
s
i
Y
d (microns)
0 4 8 10 12
600
400
200
0
0 5 10 15
0
25
50
75
5 10 25 100 250
131 131
the copper precipitation in appropriately cooled austenite began near 675°C. Accordingly
Thompson and Krauss compared the morphology of the copper precipitates produced during
isothermal aging at 675°C with their morphologies when formed during continuous cooling
experiments. The results showed that the precipitates produced in the isothermal aging experiments
were predominantly located at dislocations, indicating that in these materials, precipitation from a
supersaturated single phase at this temperature was nucleated heterogeneously. In contrast, detailed
transmission microscopic studies established that when the copper precipitated during continuous
cooling of the austenite, the dominant mode of precipitation was interphase precipitation at
interphase boundaries between ferrite and austenite. There is a useful consequence of this. The
precipitates are not restricted to be located at dislocations in the ferrite and may form in successive
finely spaced lines of precipitates that are effective at precipitation strengthening.
Interstitial Free Steel
Now that we have discussed HSLA steels which have low carbon contents, it is an
appropriate time to mention interstitial free steel. These are steels in which the concentrations of
interstitially dissolved solute elements are very small. This is accomplished by the dual processes of
taking care to reduce the carbon and nitrogen levels during the manufacture of the steel and by
scavenging these elements from solid solution by adding small quantities of niobium, aluminum
and titanium. One of the original reasons for producing such steel was that it was discovered that
reducing the carbon concentration improved the quality of enamel coatings. The formability is also
improved. Today, interstitial free (IF) steels represent the state of the artfor sheet steels which have
exceptionally good deep drawing properties. The properties of the final product are determined by
the chemistry of the steel and the particular thermo mechanical history. These two determine the
nature of the ferrite and the nature of the second phase particles present. An example of such a steel
is discussed by Rauf and Boyd in “Microstructural Evolution During Thermo Mechanical
Processing of a Ti-Nb Interstitial-Free Steel Just Below the A
r3
Temperature” Met. Trans.
28A,1437, 1997.
The steel that they describe had the following composition in wt. %: C 0.0038, N 0.003, S
0.006, P 0.006, Mn 0.17, Si 0.008, Ti 0.018, Ni 0.019, Al 0.043. Note that it is very rich in iron but
is still called a steel. Perhaps now is a good time to re-read the section from the fist page that
followed the question “What, then, is a steel?” The final microstructures comprised ferrite grains
in which there was a dispersion of a variety of fine particles of nitrides, sulfides and carbides. The
nature of the ferrite matrix depends upon the characteristics of the austenite at the end of the hot
rolling process and the manner in which it is cooled. As we should expect, the basic behavior is
essentially that which was described for iron on pages 8 and 9. Equiaxed ferrite forms when the
cooling rates permit the ferrite to form at high temperatures. In the language of IF steel such ferrite
is called polygonal ferrite. Increasing the cooling rate eventually suppresses the polygonal ferrite
because the austenite then transforms by the massive transformation that creates the characteristic
blocky, massive grains.
132 132
Dual Phase Steels
Reference-Raschid in Ann. Rev. Mat. Sci. 1981
This is another example of a class of steels that has been developed with the object of tailor-
making certain desirable properties for particular applications. Steel sheet is commonly formed into
complicated shapes for use in a variety of applications, as in the automobile industry for example.
Good formability and high strength are desirable for production reasons and for weight reduction
so as to economize on fuel use by the final product. A summary of desirable properties is:
high ultimate tensile strength for a good strength to weight ratio;
no yield point phenomenon because that can cause non-uniform strains during the forming
process;
a low initial yield strength, a rapid work hardening rate and a high ratio of the ultimate
tensile strength to the initial yield strength.
These properties give rise to uniform straining, eliminate or minimize the occurrence of
plastic instabilities and produce high yield strength in the deformed regions of the final part
because of strain hardening.
If we consider these properties with respect to the behavior of plain carbon ferrite /pearlite
sheet we note that this material has some short comings. Slowly cooled, hot rolled, low carbon, plain
carbon steel sheet usually deforms via upper and lower yield points followed by Luders band
propagation. This causes non uniform straining and localized thinning during forming. Because the
Luders extension is localized, the plastic strain rate within the band is high which causes the flow
stress to be relatively high. This reduces the magnitude of the ratio of the ultimate tensile strength to
the lower yield stress. When the necessary strength levels of the steel sheet require the presence of
significant volume fractions of pearlite colonies, difficulties arise because of local failure
mechanisms associated with the formation of cracks and pores in and adjacent to carbide lamellae.
What can be done then?
Question 1. How do we eliminate the yield point phenomenon?
a) Temper rolling. This is a process wherein the steel sheet is passed through rolls that bend
it and re-flatten it in order to introduce fresh, unpinned dislocations which can then glide during
forming and thus eliminate the upper yield point . This process has been used for years. The
problem with it is that it uses up some of the available ductility before the forming process can
properly begin and it tends to reduce the practical UTS/YS ratio.
b) Because the yield point phenomenon is caused by carbon and nitrogen interstitial solutes,
removing these elements from the steel would eliminate the problem. However, this would lower the
strength and would not be a useful solution unless other modifications can be found to raise the
flow stress and we’ve already considered high strength low alloy steels.
c) When the dislocations in ferrite are pinned by the interstitial solutes, the pinning forces
are so strong that the dislocations cannot break away unless the local stress is very high. Thus we
need some way to produce local stress concentrations within the steel. In essence, we need to be
able to modify its microstructure so that either some clean dislocations exist in the as-produced
material or to generate residual stress concentrations that can be superimposed upon the applied
stresses so that slip is activated. These stress concentrations will have to be distributed throughout
133 133
the steel in order for them to cause macroscopically uniform plastic flow. This would be a fine
solution if we can find a way to do it.
Question 2
Assuming that we will be able to solve question one we now have to ask question 2. How do
we create a low yield stress, a rapid work hardening rate and a high tensile strength?
The first thought that comes to mind is that the dominant matrix phase should be
ferrite because it is ductile above the DBTT. To obtain a high rate of work hardening during plastic
deformation it is necessary to arrange for a rapid rate of increase in the dislocation density within
the deforming grains. One way to lower the yield stress is to increase the grain size but that would
adversely affect the ductility and lower the tensile strength. Fine grained ferrite is still desirable. A
low applied stress for yield will arise if we can introduce residual stress concentrations that help to
initiate slip. Thus we find that we find a single way to answer both questions. Because we want to
accomplish all this during the production of the steel it makes sense to ask what can be done via the
phase transformations that occur during heat treatments.
The production of ferrite/pearlite mixtures has already been ruled out. This leaves ferrite,
bainite and martensite. Consider martensite. When some martensite forms in a steel which has a
significant carbon content, it is hard and it generates localized strains around it due to its change in
shape and volume. Such incompatibilities are generally disadvantageous in heat treatments
designed to fully transform the steel because of the risk of the occurrence of distortion and
quench-cracking. Now, however, we are searching for a way to produce residual stresses. If we can
find a way to generate numerous small, separated, volumes of martensite dispersed throughout a
ferritic microstructure we might have a solution our problem. The way to produce such a
microstructure is first to produce a mixture of fine ferrite and austenite grains and then to quench it
to convert the austenite to martensite. Thus the steel must be held in the alpha/gamma two phase
field and then cooled such that the austenite transforms to martensite. If some more proeutectoid
ferrite forms during the cooling it should have no particularly adverse effects; the formation of
pearlite is undesirable. The final microstructure should then comprise a mixture of ferrite and
martensite.
The general procedures described above have been successfully carried out. Because the
product is a mixture of martensite and ferrite, the steels have been dubbed Dual Phase steels. A
purist might complain that ferrite/pearlite steels also contain two phases- ferrite and cementite- and
that a better name might be ferrimart or some such concoction. However, there we are.
Desired
Behavior
Not wanted
134 134
In order to ensure that the martensitic or lower bainitic transformation does occur during
natural cooling it is necessary to augment the hardenability. This can be done by adding Mn and Si.
An example is 0.1 % C, 0.5 % -0.9% Si and 1 to 3 % Mn. In a typical process the sheet is passed
through a continuous annealing furnace where it is heated into the alpha/ gamma range and then
cooled again. Sometimes it is reheated to temper the martensite, but normally this is not done
because it tends to anchor clean dislocations, reduce stress concentrations and lower the UTS which
defeats the whole purpose. In some processes, the continuous annealing is preceded by cold rolling.
In this case, the deformed ferrite recrystallizes during heating. With appropriate control of the rate
of heating and the degree of cold work, a fine grained mixture of ferrite and austenite can be
obtained. The time at the high temperature has to be short to retain these fine grains, so the austenite
is inhomogeneous. Typically the aim is to produce about 15 to 20 % austenite.
Another production method is to finish the hot rolling stage so that 80 to 90 % ferrite forms
and to allow the remaining austenite to transform later while the steel is being formed into a coil.
For this to be successful, the steel must have suitable continuous cooling transformation
characteristics. Alloying to produce a bay in the TTT diagram, creates a window so that the
metastable austenite can be coiled before the martensite or bainite begins to form e.g. 0.06 % C, 0.9
% Si, 1.2 % Mn, 0.6 % Cr and 0.4 % Mo. Note that these compositions are similar to some of
those of HSLA steels so the properties of both are being combined.
Deformation Behavior and Microstructure
The general microstructural constituents that can be present in dual phase steel after
production are: a fine-grained ferrite matrix in which there is a relatively low dislocation content
because of the high temperature excursion; some proeutectoid ferrite that formed from the austenite
during cooling and is therefore more dislocated than the other ferrite; martensite or lower bainite
whose microstructures depend upon the carbon content and the M
s
temperature. These martensitic
and bainitic volumes are associated with residual stresses be cause of the transformation shape
T
RT
Fe x Wt %C Time
M
s
T
Rc
3
Rc
1
BAY
log t
T
135 135
changes. Typically, the steels also contain some retained austenite and finally, when V or Nb are
present there can be carbonitride particles embedded within the matrix.
When these kinds of steels are deformed at room temperature, the precise behavior will
depend on the microstructural details. Here, we consider the general types of behavior. The first
objective to be satisfied by these steels is for them to yield smoothly and at low stresses. This is
successfully achieved by the processing that has been described. Because the Ms temperatures for
these steels are high, auto tempering should lock many of the dislocations generated during the
transformation. The relative importance of residual stresses, stress concentrations and clean
dislocations is not clear. It is clear, however, that the yield point phenomenon is absent.
Consequently, the steel yields at relatively low stresses and work hardens rapidly. Initially, the
plastic strain occurs in the ferrite that existed before cooling began because this is the softer ferrite
due to its low dislocation content. When that ferrite has work hardened so that its flow stress is the
same as the yield strength of the ferrite that formed during cooling, all the ferrite deforms. The
retained austenite usually transforms to martensite early during the deformation. The associated
shape change contributes to the dimensional strain ocurring during the deformation and the
transformation produces more of the hard phase. Electron microscopic studies have shown that
eventually the martensite begins to deform and fracture. Voids open up at the martensite/ferrite
interfaces and general failure ensues if the deformation is continued. The tensile strength varies
approximately linearly with the % martensite or lower bainite. Typical results are 80 KSI for 10 %
by volume rising to 110 KSI at 30 %. Elongations of about 20 % are obtained.
During the tensile deformation of ferrite/pearlite steels, the lower yield strength is typically
2/3 to 3/4 of the tensile strength. In contrast, the ratio in dual steels is 0.5-0.6. After the Luders
extension is completed the stress strain curve for ferrite/pearlite steels can be quite well described
by the equation
· K
n
where K is a constant and n is called the strain exponent. The equation relates the true stress to the
true strain. By taking logarithms of both sides, we see that this equation predicts a linear relation
between logσ and logε with a slope n. This linear relationship is frequently, well obeyed as is
shown by the curves marked alpha/P in the following sketches. Dual phase steels do not obey this
kind of equation. Examples of the behavior that has been observed are shown, schematically in the
sketches by the unlabeled lines.
136 136
-2 -1
log
5
4.6
log
d(log )
d(log )
n
0.1 0.3
vol. fraction mart
of lower bfff
u
80
110
137 137
Wrought Stainless Steels
Iron is not mined in its elemental form. It is extracted from ores in which it exists mainly
combined with oxygen in oxides. After being extracted it is then used to manufacture steels. All the
steels that we have considered so far are generally subject to degradation by forming oxides and
hydroxides, either by oxidation when heated or by corrosion unless protected from environments
that contain water and oxygen. Hence, once made and put into use in steels, iron attempts to return
to its former state by forming rust or scale. Usually, with the occasional exception such as
weathering steels, the corrosion product is not effective protection for the steel below it.
Consequently the steel continues to rust as time passes. Oxidation occurs readily when carbon
steel is heated. The oxide scale spalls off and oxidation continues as long as the steel is hot. This
behavior along with other corrosion processes such as dissolution in dilute acids, imposes obvious
limitations on the use of carbon and low alloy steels.
Many methods of combating rusting and corrosion have been and are still being used.
These include protective coatings such as paint, plastic and tin that are intended to isolate the steel
from the corrosive agent, sacrificial coatings such as zinc that corrodes preferentially, and the
application of electrical potentials designed to provide protection by inhibiting the electrochemical
reactions. Alloying elements such as silicon, molybdenum and copper are helpful for increasing
lifetimes at ambient temperatures; weathering steels have already been mentioned. As the effects of
alloying additions on the properties of steels became increasingly understood, it was discovered that
Cr dramatically improves the corrosion and oxidation resistance of steel. Cr oxidizes and forms a
thin, transparent, tightly adherent layer of oxide on the surface of the steel that prevents or
minimizes further corrosion. Steels to which sufficient Cr has been added for this purpose, form the
family of steels called stainless steels. The tonnage of stainless steels used annually is only a small
fraction of that of carbon and low alloy steels. Its range of specialized uses, however, is very wide,
spanning from knives and forks through brewing to aerospace applications.
According to the US steel Co. handbook, the AISI has defined a steel to be stainless if it
contains more than 4 wt. % Cr. Most standard types, however, contain rather more chromium than
four % so, for our purposes, we will consider stainless steels to be steels that contain at least 11.5
wt. % Cr. They are further classified by being divided into four main groups, viz. martensitic,
ferritic, austenitic and precipitation-hardening stainless steels. The fourth group contains stainless
steels in which strengthening is provided by precipitates of a second phase. There are minor
classifications such as duplex stainless steels which contain significant quantities of both austenite
and ferrite. The four main types of stainless steel are
further identified by a mixture of numerical and letter
codes, see for example the ASM handbook, edition 9,
volume 3.
Because the most important alloying element in
stainless steel is Cr, it is logical to begin a discussion
of the physical metallurgy of these materials with a
consideration of the binary Fe-Cr system.
As the binary phase diagram shows, the
introduction of the ferrite stabilizing Cr forms a
gamma loop in which resides those combinations of
temperature and composition for which austenite is
the stable phase.
ferrite
12 50
1390
910
T
C
σ
138 138
2000
1800
1600
1400
1200
1000
600
Fe 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
Chromium (wt %)
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C
1800 C
L
820 C
910 C
1505 C
1539 C
L
L
850 C
C
Ni
Mn
Cr
W
Mo Si
V
Al
C
Mn
Ni
3000
2600
2200
1800
1400
1000
0 2 4 6 8 10 12
Alloy addition, weight percent
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

F
After: Honeycombe, p251
After: Krauss, p353
( Gamma loops formed in various binary systems of iron. )
139 139
This phase field is separated from the ferrite phase field by the two phase field. When the Cr
content exceeds 12%, it is possible for ferrite to exist at all temperatures at which the binary alloys
are solid. The binary system also contains the intermetallic, Fe-Cr, sigma phase. This is tetragonal
and has a unit cell that contains 30 atoms. This phase diagram shows that for some compositions,
the solid solutions of the alloy can be transformed into austenite by heating them into the gamma
loop. It also shows that when the austenite is cooled it must transform to ferrite to attain
equilibrium. We infer from this that if the cooling process is conducted in a manner that precludes
this transformation from occurring by diffusion controlled nucleation and growth processes then a
martensitic transformation is possible. Hence, the existence of martensitic stainless steels.
Martensitic Stainless Steels.
Martensitic stainless steels are used in the quenched and tempered condition. The term
quenched is somewhat of a misnomer because with such large alloying element contents parts made
from these steels are often air-hardenable, i.e. the martensite forms when the part is removed from
the austenitizing furnace and simply allowed to cool down in still air. Quenching in oil is sometimes
used for thick sections. In either case, tempering is performed soon after the martensite has formed,
especially when there is significant carbon present, in order to avoid delayed cracking. The binary
Fe-Cr diagram indicates the compositional limits of those alloys that can be rendered into
martensite. Because the Cr is to be kept as high as possible for anti-corrosion purposes, austenite
stabilizers such as carbon, manganese and also nickel are added to expand the austenite phase field.
These additions enable martensite to be produced in 11.5 wt. % Cr steels. As was true for the
martensitic steels considered previously, the carbon dissolved in the martensite has a significant
effect on its hardness.
When the carbon content becomes significant, the formation of chromium carbides becomes
possible and the pertinent phase diagram becomes the ternary Fe-Cr-C diagram. An example of a
section at 0.1 wt. % C is shown below. The complexity is obvious. Two important additional things
can be recognized. First, a variety of chromium carbides can form. Also, certain heat treatments can
form mixtures of ferrite and austenite in which cooling could convert the austenite to martensite.
Thus we can have fully martensitic microstructures and ferrite/martensite microstructures. This
implies that the classification of a particular steel as martensitic or ferritic cannot be done solely on
composition but must also recognize the microstructure existing during use.
C
c
= Fe
3
C
C
1 =
(Fe,Cr)
23
C
6
C
2
= (Fe,Cr)
7
C
3
C
L+α
α+γ+C
1
α+C
c
α+
C
2 α+C
1
+C
2
α+C
1
α+C
1
wt. %C
Fe+11%C
γ
α+γ
α+γ
140 140
After: Honeycombe, p252
Co mp o si t i o ns o f AI SI Ty p e 4 0 0 Mar t ensi t i c St ai nl ess St eel s.
AISI - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - No mi nal c o mp o si t i o n, %- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
t ype no. C Mn Cr Ni Ot hers
403 0.15 max 1.0 11.5-13
410 0.15 max 1.0 11.5-13
416 0.15 max 1.2 12-14 … 0.15S min
420 0.15 min 1.0 12-14
431 0.20 max 1.0 15-17 1.2-2.5
440A 0.60-0.75 1.0 16-18 … 0.75 Mo max
440B 0.75-0.95 1.0 16-18 … 0.75 Mo max
440C 0.95-1.20 1.0 16-18 … 0.75 Mo max
Body-cent ered cubic, magnet ic, heat t reat able
After: Krauss: p381
1600
1500
1400
1300
1200
1100
1000
900
800
700
0 10 20 30
L
L +
+ K
1
K
0
=M
3
C
K
1
=M
23
C
6
K
2
=M
7
C
3
Chromium (%)
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e

(
C
)
+ K
0
+ K
2
+ K
1
+ K
2
141 141
-200 0 200 400 600
125
100
75
50
25
0
400 200 0 -200
0
50
100
150
200
Type 410
A
B
C
Temperature, F
I
m
p
a
c
t

e
n
e
r
g
y
,

f
t
-
l
b
f
Temperature, C
C
h
a
r
p
y

I
m
p
a
c
t

e
n
e
r
g
y
,

J
T
=
7
9
0

C
RB
=
9
5
T
=
6
6
5

C
R
C
=24
T
=
5
9
5

C
RC
=
3
0 Temper:
1 10 100 10
3
10
4
10
5
10
6
45 HRC
A + F + C
F + C
A + F
A
A
M
s
M
50
M
90
Approximate
A
start
1 min 1 h 1 day
1
week
75HRB
81 HRB
87 HRB
90 HRB
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
Time, s
900
(1650)
800
(1470)
700
(1290)
600
(1110)
500
(930)
400
(750)
300
(570)
200
(390)
100
(210)
0
(30)
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e
,

C

(
F
)
50%
(0.5)
t
After: ASM-stainless steels, p17,39
142 142
Brinell hardness Brinell hardness
Tensile strength
0.2% yield strength
Proportional limit
Reduction of area
Elongation in 2 in.
Izod Izod
El in 2 in.
RA
PL
0.2% YS
TS
0
(-15)
400
(205)
800
(425)
1200
(650)
Tempering temperature, F
(C)
at 1010 C
0
(-15)
400
(205)
800
(425)
1200
(650)
Tempering temperature, F
(C)
at 925 C
600
500
400
300
200
280
(1930)
240
(1655)
200
(1380)
160
(1105)
120
(830)
80
(550)
40
(275)
80
60
40
20
0
120
(160)
80
(110)
40
(55)
0
B
r
i
n
e
l
l

h
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
k
s
i

(
M
P
a
)
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
E
n
e
r
g
y
,

f
t
-
l
b

(
J
)
Type 410
After: ASM--Stainless steels, p18
143 143
The martensitic steels are given 4xx numbers in the AISI numbering system. An example is
410 which has 0.15 % C, 1% Mn, 1 % Si, 11.5-13.5 % Cr. However, the ferritic steels which as we
will soon see are mainly ferrite, are also described with 4xx numbers. 430 designates a ferritic steel
while 431 refers to a martensitic steel. It is not, therefore, immediately obvious that a 4xx steel is
martensitic or ferritic.
Let us consider the main roles of alloying elements in martensitic stainless steels with
respect to properties other than corrosion resistance.
a) The extent of the austenite phase field is usually controlled by the competition between the
austenite stabilizers, Mn, C, N and Ni and the ferrite stabilizer Cr.
b) During the decomposition of the austenite by diffusion controlled processes, the high
concentration of Cr strongly retards the transformations and moves the nose of the TTT diagram to
the right, increasing the time for the start of the transformations to over 300 seconds. This endows
the steels with high hardenability. Indeed, many sections are air-hardenable. Another consequence
of the sluggish rates of the diffusion controlled transformations is that martempering processes are
readily conducted.
c) The carbon endows the martensite with hardness and strength. The Cr contributes additional
hardening.
d) In a similar manner to its effects on the diffusion controlled reactions involved in the
transformation of austenite, Cr strongly retards the rates of the processes that occur during
tempering. One consequence of this is that stress relief can occur and residual stresses can be
removed during tempering, before serious softening takes place. This is obviously of practical use.
The tensile yield stress and the tensile ultimate stress for samples of a 12 % Cr 0.1% C steel
are depicted as a function of tempering temperature in one of the following sketches. It shows that
secondary hardening due to the precipitation of chromium carbides can occur. The tempering
temperatures were one hour in each case. These are fine properties and some enhancement is
possible through additional alloying. Unfortunately, tempering in the vicinity of 885 °F (475°C),
which corresponds to the initiation of the mild secondary hardening peak, produces hardening but
reduces the impact toughness severely as is shown in the corresponding sketch. This embrittlement
appears to be related to the beginning of the secondary hardening process in which sheets of
carbides precipitate on boundaries. Besides this embrittlement problem, the DBTT's of these steels
are around or barely below room temperature which means that they are not useful in cryogenic
applications.
144 144
logt
T
300 secs
y
u
210
190
130
600 1200
F
12% C
r
0.13% C
Tests at
room T
Charpy I vs T
impact
475
C
I
145 145
Ferritic Stainless Steels
In the classical sense, ferritic stainless steels have been considered to be those that possess
Cr contents that would place them to the right of the gamma loop on the binary Fe Cr phase
diagram. The binary alloys of that composition would, indeed, be ferritic to the melting point.
However, this ignores the effects of carbon and, as the Fe Cr 0.1 C diagram shows, mixtures of
austenite and ferrite can form in these steels at high temperatures. Because of the high hardenability,
the austenite can transform to martensite during cooling. Most of the commonly designated ferritic
steels can behave in this manner, particularly those containing 17-18 % Cr. From the practical point
of view, a better definition of a ferritic stainless steel is a steel that contains more than 12 % Cr and
is used in a state in which its microstructure is mainly ferrite plus carbides.
Ferritic stainless steels have very good corrosion resistance in many environments.
However, their mechanical properties are not very good. Being BCC they have a DBTT. In the
common cases where the steel contains N, P, S and C, the DBTT can be higher than room
temperature. AISI 446 (27 % Cr ) has a DBTT around 150°C. Very pure steels have much better
toughness but most normal, commercial alloys have a transition temperature near room temperature.
Furthermore, because the grain size cannot be refined by heat treatment, large grains produced in
the heat affected zones at welds can reduce the local strength. For these reasons, ferritic stainless
steels have not been very popular for structural applications. An exception is 405 (11.5-14.5 % Cr,
0.08 % C, 1 % Mn, 1 % Si, 0,04 % P 0,03 % S, 0.1-0.3 % Al) has been used in the petroleum
industry.
The inherent problems of the BCC structure and irreversible grain coarsening are exacerbated by
the existence of three forms of embrittlement that can arise during particular heat treatments.

Sigma phase embrittlement
When ferritic stainless steels are aged for very long times between 540-750°C the
sigma intermetallic phase is precipitated and the steel becomes brittle. The embrittlement is removed
by heating the steel above 800 °C where the sigma phase is dissolved. This remedy is of little use if
the heat treatment cannot be done. Fortunately, the kinetics of the precipitation process is very slow;
several hundred hours are necessary for the embrittlement to occur. Hence it doesn't happen during
the usual times of cooling or welding. It is important if the component is intended to operate in the
relevant temperature range.
475 °C or 885 °F embrittlement
This is a loss of impact toughness that can be caused by holding the steel at
temperatures between 400°C and 540 °C . The embrittlement is associated with the precipitation of
a coherent chromium-rich phase throughout the grains. It can be cured by reheating the steel above
800 °C and cooling. Quenching is unnecessary because this form of embrittlement requires long
times to form.

High temperature embrittlement
When ferritic steels containing the usual contents of C, N, P and S are heated above 1000
°C and then cooled naturally as for example during welding, they can become severely embrittled
and also lose their corrosion resistance near grain boundaries. The phenomenon is similar to
sensitization in austenitic steels( to be considered later) and is considered to be caused by
precipitation of Cr carbides and nitrides on grain boundaries.
146 146
Co mp o s i t i o n s o f A I SI Ty p e 4 0 0 Fe r r i t i c St ai n l e s s St e e l s .
AISI Nominal Composit ion, %
t ype no. C Mn Cr Ot hers
430……………. 0.08 max 1 16.0-18.0
430F………….. 0.12 max 1.25 16.0-18.0 0.6Mo max
430F Se……… 0.12 max 1.25 16.0-18.0 0.15Se min
446……………. 0.20 max 1.5 23.0-27.0 0.25N max
Body-cent ered cubic, magnet ic, not heat t reat able
Co mp o s i t i o n s o f A I SI Ty p e 2 0 0 A u s t en i t i c St ai n l es s St eel s .
AISI Nominal Composit ion, %
t ype no. C Mn Cr Ot hers
201……………. 0.15 max 7.5 16-18
202.………….. 0.15 max 10.0 17-19 0.6Mo max
Face-cent ered cubic, nonmagnet ic, not heat t reat able
Co mp o s i t i o n s o f Sel ec t ed A I SI Ty p e 3 0 0 A u s t en i t i c St ai n l es s St eel s .
AISI Nominal Composit ion, %
t ype no. C Mn Cr Ni Ot hers
301 0.15 max 2.0 16-18 6.0-8.0
302 0.15 max 2.0 17-19 8.0-10
304 0.08 max 2.0 18-20 8.0-12
304L 0.03 max 2.0 18-20 8.0-12
309 0.20 max 2.0 22-24 12-15
310 0.25 max 2.0 24-26 19-22
316 0.08 max 2.0 16-18 10-14 2-3 Mo
316L 0.03 max 2.0 16-18 10-14 2-3 Mo
321 0.08 max 2.0 17-19 9-12 ( 5x%C) Ti min
347 0.08 max 2.0 17-19 9-13 ( 10x%C) Nb - Ta min
Face-cent ered cubic, nonmagnet ic, not heat t reat able
After Krauss, p374,372,359
147 147
The first two forms of embrittlement are of no great concern unless the steel can experience
them during use. They do not arise otherwise and do not occur during welding because of the very
sluggish rates at which the transformations occur. In contrast, however, the high temperature
embrittlement has been a very serious problem for years. It has been of particular concern with
respect to welding. In this case we already have the problem that there is no way to refine the grain
size if it becomes large in the heat affected zone. This, combined with the embrittlement and the
localized loss of corrosion resistance, has been very troublesome.
There have been three main methods used to combat this problem. The first is to pay
stringent attention to the steel making process in order to ensure a very low interstitial solute
content. The second is to add small amounts of very strong carbide and nitride formers e.g. V, Nb
and Ti to scavenge these elements. These two methods can be successful . However, as the Cr
content increases so does the minimum acceptable level of interstitial solutes. At 35 % Cr, the
interstitial level can not be reduced low enough by these methods. In these cases the third method is
via the addition of other substitutional solutes. It has been found that small additions of Al, Cu, Pt,
Pd, Ag, V in the range of 0.1 -1.3 % can improve the as-welded ductility and corrosion even in the
presence of relatively high quantities of interstitial solutes.
Austenitic stainless steels
This group of steels are iron chromium alloys to which enough Ni and Mn have been added
to prevent the formation of significant amounts of ferrite. Because this is achieved by the austenite
stabilization effects of the alloying elements (superimposed on those due to C and N) it is important
to realize that different alloys comprise austenites of different stability’s as reflected by them
having different M
s
temperatures. Accordingly, they can be subdivided into two groups depending
on whether or not the austenite can be induced to transform martensitically when deformed at room
temperature, i.e. when the M
d
temperature is above room temperature. In these groups we have
stable austenite which does not transform and metastable austenite which does form some
martensite.
Consider the room temperature tensile stress-strain curves that are typical for tests on the
two austenitic steels, 301 and 304. That of 304 shows the "normal" behavior of an FCC
polycrystal while that of the 301 has an increased work hardening rate caused by the impedance to
slip provided by the formation of martensite on the active slip planes.
301 16-18 % Cr 6-8 % Ni 0.15 % C 2 % Mn 1 % Si
304 18-20 % Cr 8-10 % Ni 0.08 % C 2 % Mn 1 % Si
304
301
148 148
The M
d
temperature for a 304 steel is usually just below room temperature. This means that if the
steel is refrigerated and then deformed, martensite can form in 304 and change the stress-strain
curve accordingly.
A major reason for alloying so as to create an austenitic steel is to eliminate the DBTT and
obtain good impact toughness over a wide range of temperatures. These steels are generally of good
toughness and good corrosion resistance. Their tensile strengths can be varied by varying the grain
size and the dislocation density. There are a couple of negative aspects that must be recognized.
Sensitization
When held at high temperatures and then slowly cooled through 600 °C these alloys can
lose their corrosion resistance in the near vicinity of grain boundaries and become less tough.
Because the loss of corrosion resistance is restricted to narrow strips at the grain boundaries, deep
grooves are formed. Whole grains can "fall out ". A similar phenomenon can occur in ferritic steels
but it appears to have been more troublesome for austenitic steels. The treatment is said to have
sensitized the steel. It has been established that the loss of corrosion resistance is associated with
the precipitation of chromium carbides on the grain boundaries. As the temperature falls past 600
°C , these carbides nucleate heterogeneously on grain boundaries and grow for a while as the steel
cools further. The chromium required for this growth must be supplied by substitutional diffusion
which occurs slowly and more slowly as the temperature decreases. As a result, the chromium
concentration near the boundaries on which the carbides grow is severely depleted. This has been
confirmed by modern electron micro-analytical techniques. Hence a grain boundary has, on either
side of it, a thin layer of steel in which the chromium content is not high enough to provide
protection. Severe localized corrosion is the result.
Attempts to cure this problem when it is not easily possible to avoid the heat treatment that
causes it, involve compositional modifications. The required modification is obvious. Eliminate the
carbon and no carbides will precipitate. Elimination is not presently feasible but a reduction is. For
example, modified 304 called 304L has 0.03 % C max. specified. An alternative approach is to try
to combine the carbon into precipitates that do not easily dissolve at high (>950 °C) temperatures.
For this purpose small additions of Nb, V and Ti are added to sequester the carbon. Obviously
these two approaches can be combined. These modifications are similar to those employed in the
case of ferritic steel.
Stress corrosion cracking
Stress corrosion cracking is a process in which cracks form and grow into a material
that is simultaneously experiencing a stress and is in an appropriate corrosive environment. The
stress need not be applied externally; residual stresses due to prior processes can be effective. The
corrosive media are generally specific for the particular material. They are not necessarily
particularly aggressive from the point of view of general dissolution and corrosion. Austenitic
stainless steel is particularly susceptible to aqueous media that contain chlorine ions. In general, the
process can take place at ambient temperatures and will occur more rapidly as the temperatures are
raised. The cracks tend to branch frequently and propagate through the grains. Eventually sheets
can be cracked completely through. Stress corrosion cracking is a serious problem for austenitic
steels but ferritic stainless steels are immune to it.
To avoid this problem when it is desirable to use austenitic stainless steel, it is necessary to
minimize residual stresses and to ensure that the environment does not contain those species such
as chlorine that are known to be particularly potent for stress corrosion cracking. Often this is not
149 149
easy to do. Although the phenomenon has been known for many years, austenitic steel components
(as well those made from numerous other alloys) continue to fail in the field from stress corrosion
cracking.
Precipitation Hardenable Stainless Steels
Under appropriate conditions it is possible to produce precipitation of intermetallic
compounds that can cause precipitation hardening in stainless steels. The precipitates involve the
alloying elements Mo, Ni, Ti and Al. There are three main classes of precipitation hardenable alloys
: austenitic PH steels, martensitic PH steels and semi-austenitic PH steels.
Members of the first group have compositions that produce very stable austenite with
respect to martensite. An example is Allegheny-Ludlum ‘s A-286: 14.75 % Cr, 25.25 % Ni, 0.05
% C, 1.45 % Mn, 1.3 % Mo, 0.15 % Al, 0.3 % V, 2.15 % Ti . The heat treatment is relatively
simple: solution treat for 1 hour at 1000 Celsius, water quench and age at 730 Celsius. Yield
strengths of 190 KSI can be obtained but these type of steels are not widely used.
The martensitic precipitation hardenable stainless steels are similar to maraging steels. An
example is the PH 13-8 Mo type. Here the PH indicates precipitation hardenable, the 13 denotes the
chromium content (12.7 %), the 8 the nickel content (8 % ) and the Mo indicates that it contains
molybdenum (2.2 %). The alloy has a low carbon content and contains some aluminum. In this
case the solution treatment produces homogeneous austenite that transforms to martensite on
cooling. Precipitation occurs when the martensite is aged at 450-650 Celsius.
The semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steels are so named because in the
annealed or solution treated condition they generally contain 5-20 % delta ferrite which persists.
The metallurgy and heat treatment schedules for these steels are quite complex. The general
procedure is as follows. After production the steel annealed at the Mill (called the Mill anneal)
which puts the steel into its semi-austenitic state. It is then shipped to the customer who fabricates it
into particular products. These products are then given a heat treatment known as conditioning.
Conditioning involves heating to a particular temperature and maintaining the temperature for a
specified time and air -cooling. The object of the conditioning treatment is to remove the
microstructural effects of the fabrication process e.g. forming deformation and to adjust the
composition of the matrix solid solution so that its M
s
temperature is raised to close to room
temperature from its earlier lower value. This is typically achieved by precipitating chromium and
carbon from solid solution. Conditioning enables the steel to be transformed into martensite by
refrigeration. Finally, the martensite can be precipitation hardened by an aging treatment.
The chemistry of these steels is chosen with the aim of balancing the ferrite and austenite
stabilizing elements so as to control the M
s
temperature. The steel must not be too stable as
austenite because then the M
s
temperature will be too low for convenience. On the other hand, if the
M
s
temperature in the steel after the mill anneal is too high, martensite might be produced during
transit, specially during winter. An example of such a steel is Armco 17-7 PH, 17 % Cr, 7% Ni, 1.2
% Al, 0.5 % Mn, 0.04 % N, 0.3 % Si and 0.07 % C for which a mill anneal is, using Celsius, 1053
+ or - 15; conditioning is at 953 + or - 8 for 10 minutes and an air-cool. The martensite is
produced by refrigeration to -73 and precipitation occurs during an hour at 510°C.
150 150
Co mp o s i t i o n s o f Se l e c t e d Pr e c i p i t at i o n - Har d e n i n g St ai n l e s s
AISI Nominal Composit ion, %
t ype no. Trade name / producer C Cr Ni Mo Cu Al Ti Ot her
Mar t e n s i t i c g r ad e s
635 St ainless W
( U.S. St eel) 0.06 16.75 6.25 0.2 0.8
630 17.4 PH
( Armco St eel) 0.04 16 4.2 3.4 0.25Cb
….. PH 13-8 Mo
( Armco St eel) 0.04 12.7 8.2 2.2 1.1
Semi au s t en i t i c g r ad es
631 17.7 PH
( Armco St eel) 0.07 17 7.1 1.2
633 AM 350
( Allegheny Ludlum) 0.05 16.5 4.25 2.75 0.10N
A u s t en i t i c g r ad es
600 A-286
( Allegheny Ludlum) 0.05 14.75 25.25 1.3 0.15 2.15 0.30V, 0.005B
After: Krauss, p386
151 151
Schaeffler diagram. Effect of alloying elements on the basic structure of Cr-Ni stainless
steels (Schneider and Climax Molybdenum Co., Foundry Trade J. 108,562,1960).
Cr equivalent = (Cr) + 2(Si) + 1.5(Mo) + 5(V) + 5.5(Al) + 1.75(Nb) +1.5(Ti) + 0.75(W)
Ni equivalent = (Ni) + (Co) + 0.5(Mn) + 0.3(Cu) + 25(N) + 30(C)
25
20
15
10
5
0
0 5 10 15 20
25 30 35
40
Chromium equivalent (%)
N
i
c
k
e
l

e
q
u
i
v
a
l
e
n
t

(
%
)
Austenite
Austenite
+
- ferrite
-ferrite
Austenite
+martensite
+ ferrite
Martensite
+ ferrite
Martensite
Austenite
+
martensite
152 152
From ASM Stainless Steels, p259
153 153
Tool Steels
Tool steels are obviously those steels from which tools are made. There are many such
steels ranging from relatively simple plain carbon steels to complex, highly alloyed steels. This is a
reflection of the enormous variety of operations that are performed by tools. To begin a survey of
tool steels, let us first consider the range of operations in which tools are used. We begin with
procedures in which items or other material are moved. For these, we require tools such as screw
drivers, wrenches, pliers, spades, post-hole diggers, bull-dozer blades etc.. Then there are numerous
operations in which materials are cut or fractured; for these we require knives, axes, saws, scissors,
mower blades, farming implements, chisels, razor blades and jack-hammers and tools for drilling,
broaching, reaming, milling and lathes. Then there are the processes in which materials are formed
into different shapes by deformation in hot or cold working operations such as stamping, forging,
rolling and extrusion. These processes involve the forming machines themselves and various cold
and hot work dies that interact directly with the work pieces. And, lest we forget, we need tools with
which to make tools.
It is clear that there is an enormous range of applications for tool steels. For some tools,
such as a chisel, a simple plain carbon steel can be perfectly adequate. In other cases such as high
speed machining, during which the cutting tool can become red hot, a much more sophisticated steel
is necessary. A factor that is common to tools is that they are used on some type of work piece.
Usually the shape or form of the work-piece is changed by plastic deformation, material removal or
fracture. Therefore, there is a common requirement for tools. The work-piece should have a
minimum effect on the form of the tool in order for the tool to do its job successfully and for it to
have a reasonable lifetime. With this background in mind let us list those properties of materials
that should be important with respect to selecting or designing a material for a tool.
(1) Strength. In general the tool should be stronger and harder than the work piece.
(2) Edge retention. In many applications the tool material must be capable of being sharpened and
then be able to resist becoming blunt rapidly.
(3) Wear resistance. Wear removes material from tools and thereby changes their shapes. This
property often determines the useful lifetime of the tool.
(4) Shock resistance. In many operations tools are loaded rapidly and must therefore be capable of
sustaining stresses created during shock loading.
(5) High temperature stability. During operations conducted at elevated temperatures such as hot
forming and high speed cutting it is important that the tool material retain its properties at those
temperatures rather than rapidly undergoing microstructural changes that cause undesirable
changes in its properties.
Now let suppose that we have materials that possess some or all of these properties. It is
then necessary that tools can be manufactured from them. Obviously, tools made of a material with
superior properties can be used to make tools from materials of inferior properties (referring, of
course, to relevant properties), but how are the first kind of tools made? Diamond is an example of a
material that has excellent properties from the view point of a variety of tools. For example, it is
extremely hard. It is used in a number of abrasive tool applications but it does not lend itself easily
to being manufactured into monolithic tools. In contemplating this situation, the value of the fact
that the properties of steels can be changed by heat treatments becomes evident. This enables tools
to be fabricated into shapes close to their final physical form from steels that are initially easily
formed and/or machined. Then when they have been made, they can be heat treated in order to
endow them with the properties required for operation as a tool. It is this versatility that accounts for
154 154
the wide use of steel to make tools. There are many different kinds of tool steel. This is partly
because of the many different applications of tools. For any particular application, the steel chosen
should have adequate properties to perform properly and also be an economical choice. Usually the
steel is delivered in the annealed or spheroidized condition; the customer is responsible for
subsequent heat treatments.
Inspection of the list of desirable properties leads us to conclude that in many cases the heat
treatment will involve austenitization, cooling rapidly enough to form martensite and then a
tempering treatment. Often, then, the tool or the working parts of it will consist of tempered
martensite. When the desired properties can be obtained by using plain carbon steels then they are
the most economical choice. Otherwise alloy steels are required. Let us consider the main alloying
elements that we might predict to be important in tool steels.
a) Hardenability is an important consideration because it controls the sizes that can be heat
treated throughout or the depth of case hardening. The hardenability also dictates the necessary
quench rates. This is particularly important because the incidence of quench cracking, distortion and
dimensional change can be minimized by reducing the rate of cooling required to produce
martensite. This suggests the use of Mo, Cr and Mn.
b) A high carbon concentration dissolved in the austenite is required to obtain tempered
martensite that has a high hardness. Furthermore, wear resistance at the surface of the tool is
enhanced by the presence of hard particles of second phases. The obvious second phase is a
carbide. The stable alloy carbides coarsen more slowly than does cementite and are therefore more
effective than cementite at higher temperatures. We predict the use of carbide formers such as Cr,
Mo, W and V and sufficient carbon to provide these alloy carbides while also endowing the
martensite with enough hardness. When the most important role of the alloy carbides require that
they be finely distributed within the steel, then they should precipitate during tempering as opposed
to being inherited from the austenite. Therefore, it is to be expected that heat treatments involving
high austenitization temperatures and long times will be required to form austenite in which the
appropriate amount of the relevant alloying elements is dissolved. This creates the risk of excessive
grain growth during austenitization. As always, a favorite hedge against that problem is grain
boundary pinning by very strong carbides such as vanadium carbide.
c) Very often it is the properties of the material at the surface of the tool that determine the
performance of the tool. These can deteriorate rapidly unless the material resists oxidation and
decarburization. In this respect, we predict that Cr should be an effective alloying element.
We conclude that Cr, Mo, W, V, C and Mn should be important alloying elements in tool
steels.
There is a large number of different tool steels. At first, one might attempt to organize them
by classifying them chemistry or by their intended application. Unfortunately, there does not seem
to be an easy method whereby they can neatly classified. Often many different steels can be used
for the same application, so a classification in terms of use is not clear. Although, some steels can
be grouped together according to their compositions, many steels contain the same alloying
elements and, again, it is often possible for a major element in one steel to be partially or entirely
155 155
AISI classification and nominal compositions of major tool steels
Identifying elements, %
UNS
AISI No. C Mn Si Cr V W Mo Co Ni
Water-hardening tool steels
W1 T72301 0.60-1.40(a) … … … … … … … …
W2 T72302 0.60-1.40(a) … … … 0.25 … … … …
W5 T72305 1.10 … … 0.50 … … … … …
Shock-resisting tool steels
S1 T41901 0.50 … … 1.50 … 2.50 … … …
S2 T41902 0.50 … 1.00 … … … 0.50 … …
S5 T41905 0.55 0.80 2.00 … … … 0.40 … …
S6 T41906 0.45 1.40 2.25 1.50 … … 0.40 … …
S7 T41907 0.50 … … 3.25 … … 1.40 … …
Oil-hardening cold-work tool steels
O1 T31501 0.90 1.00 … 0.50 … 0.50 … … …
O2 T31502 0.90 1.60 … … … … … … …
O6(b) T31506 1.45 0.80 1.00 … … … 0.25 … …
O7 T31507 1.20 … … 0.75 … 1.75 … … …
Air-hardening, medium alloy cold-work tool steels
A2 T30102 1.00 … … 5.00 … … 1.00 … …
A3 T30103 1.25 … … 5.00 1.00 … 1.00 … …
A4 T30104 1.00 2.00 … 1.00 … … 1.00 … …
A6 T30106 0.70 2.00 … 1.00 … … 1.25 … …
A7 T30107 2.25 … … 5.25 4.75 1.00 (c) 1.00 … …
A8 T30108 0.55 … … 5.00 … 1.25 1.25 … …
A9 T30109 0.50 … … 5.00 1.00 … 1.40 … 1.50
A10(b) T30110 1.35 1.80 1.25 … … … 1.50 … 1.80
High-carbon, high-chromium cold-work steels
D2 T30402 1.50 … … 12.00 1.00 … 1.00 … …
D3 T30403 2.25 … … 12.00 … … … … …
D4 T30404 2.25 … … 12.00 … … 1.00 … …
D5 T30405 1.50 … … 12.00 … … 1.00 3.00 …
D7 T30407 2.35 … … 12.00 4.00 … 1.00 … …
Low-alloy special-purpose tool steels
L2 T61202 0.5-1.10 (a) … … 1.00 0.20 … … … …
L6 T61206 0.70 … … 0.75 … … 0.25 (c) … 1.50
Mold steels
P2 T51602 0.07 … … 2.00 … … 0.20 … 0.50
P3 T51603 0.10 … … 0.60 … … … … 1.25
P4 T51604 0.07 … … 5.00 … … 0.75 … …
P5 T51605 0.10 … … 2.25 … … … … …
P6 T51606 0.10 … … 1.50 … … … … 3.50
P20 T51620 0.35 … … 1.70 … … 0.40 … …
P21 T51621 0.20 1.20 (Al) … … … … … … 4.00
Chromium hot-work tool steels
H10 T20810 0.40 … … 3.25 0.40 … 2.50 … …
H11 T20811 0.35 … … 5.00 0.40 … 1.50 … …
H12 T20812 0.35 … … 5.00 0.40 1.50 1.50 … …
H13 T20813 0.35 … … 5.00 1.00 … 1.50 … …
H14 T20814 0.40 … … 5.00 … 5.00 … … …
H19 T20819 0.40 … … 4.25 2.00 4.25 … 4.25 …
Tungsten hot-work tool steels
H21 T20821 0.35 … … 3.50 … 9.00 … … …
H22 T20822 0.35 … … 2.00 … 11.00 … … …
H23 T20823 0.30 … … 12.00 … 12.00 … … …
H24 T20824 0.45 … … 3.00 … 15.00 … … …
( cont inued)
( a) Available wit h dif f erent carbon cont ent s. ( b) Cont ains graphit e. ( c) Opt ional
156 156
AISI classification and nominal compositions of major tool steels
Identifying elements, %
UNS
AISI No. C Mn Si Cr V W Mo Co Ni
Tungsten hot-work tool steels (continued)
H25 T20825 0.25 … … 4.00 … 15.00 … … …
H26 T20826 0.50 … … 4.00 1.00 18.00 … … …
Molybdenum hot-work tool steels
H42 T20842 0.60 … … 4.00 2.00 6.00 5.00 … …
Tungsten high-speed tool steels
T1 T12001 0.75(a) … … 4.00 1.00 18.00 … … …
T2 T12002 0.80 … … 4.00 2.00 18.00 … … …
T4 T12004 0.75 … … 4.00 1.00 18.00 … 5.00 …
T5 T12005 0.80 … … 4.00 2.00 18.00 … 8.00 …
T6 T12006 0.80 … … 4.50 1.50 20.00 … 12.00 …
T8 T12008 0.75 … … 4.00 2.00 14.00 … 5.00 …
T15 T12015 1.50 … … 4.00 5.00 12.00 … 5.00 …
Molybdenum high-speed tool steels
M1 T11301 0.80(a) … … 4.00 1.00 1.50 8.00 … …
M2 T11302 0.85-1.00(a) … … 4.00 2.00 6.00 5.00 … …
M3, class 1 T11313 1.05 … … 4.00 2.40 6.00 5.00 … …
M3, class 2 T11323 1.20 … … 4.00 3.00 6.00 5.00 … …
M4 T11304 1.30 … … 4.00 4.00 5.50 4.50 … …
M6 T11306 0.80 … … 4.00 2.00 4.00 5.00 12.00 …
M7 T11307 1.00 … … 4.00 2.00 1.75 8.75 … …
M10 T11310 0.85-1.00(a) … … 4.00 2.00 … 8.00 … …
M30 T11330 0.8 … … 4.00 1.25 2.00 8.00 5.00 …
M33 T11333 0.90 … … 4.00 1.15 1.50 9.50 8.00 …
M34 T11334 0.90 … … 4.00 2.00 2.00 8.00 8.00 …
M36 T11336 0.80 … … 4.00 2.00 6.00 5.00 8.00 …
Ultrahard high-speed tool steels
M41 T11341 1.10 … … 4.25 2.00 6.75 3.75 5.00 …
M42 T11342 1.10 … … 3.75 1.15 1.50 9.50 8.00 …
M43 T11343 1.20 … … 3.75 1.60 2.75 8.00 8.25 …
M44 T11344 1.15 … … 4.25 2.00 5.25 6.25 12.00 …
M46 T11346 1.25 … … 4.00 3.20 2.00 8.25 8.25 …
M47 T11347 1.10 … … 3.75 1.25 1.50 9.50 5.00 …
(a) Available with different carbon contents. (b) Contains grapite. (c) Optional
After: "Tool Steels" by G. Roberts, G. Krauss, and R. Kennedy, ASM International, 5
t h
edition, pp8-9, 1998
157 157
replaced by another element without creating much of a change in the properties of the steel. The
AISI classifies tool steels into seven major categories. These are: water-hardening tool steels, cold
work tool steels, hot work tool steels, high speed tool steels, shock-resisting tool steels, mold tool
steels and special purpose tool steels. Here we see a classification by a mixture of use and heat
treatment. These seven major classes are then subdivided into numbered classes ranging from the
100 class to the 600 class. I can see no simple way deducing the details of the classification. For
selecting and identifying tool steels one should consult manuals on the subject. A fine reference is
the ASM’s publication “Tool Steels”, 4
th
edition, by George A. Roberts and Robert A. Cary.
What I propose to do here is to select a number of particular tool steels and consider their
compositions, treatments and properties in the light of the fundamental relations between
composition and phase transformations that we have examined hitherto.
Water hardening tool steels.
These steels are so named because they have relatively low hardenability so that they are
hardened by being austenitized and quenched in water. They are basically plain carbon steels and
are also called carbon tool steels, They contain from 0.6 wt. % to 1.4 wt. % carbon with a
manganese content of usually 0.25 wt. %. Some of them contain small amounts of chromium or
vanadium and a few contain both vanadium and chromium and, therefore, the group is sub-divided
according to such details. The additional alloying elements, however, always comprise a fraction of
a wt. %. Examples are:
W 1...0.6% to 1.6 % C, 0.25 % Mn and 0.25 % Si
W 5...1 % C, 0.25 % Mn and Si and 0.5 % Cr
W7....Same as W 5 except that the Cr level is 0.35 % and 0.2 % V is present.
There are some applications of carbon tool steels for which they are used when having a
pearlitic microstructure. Most commonly, however, the intended microstructure in the tools made
from these steels is tempered martensite where it is needed and softer, tougher microstructures
elsewhere. Indeed, it is probably true to say that this class of tool steels is widely used because the
relatively low hardenability of the steels enables water-quenching to produce tools as cores of fine
pearlite encased within hard martensite. Typically, the working hardness in the case is in the range
of HRC 58-65 and the core hardness is in the range of HRC 38-43. The hardness of the tempered
martensite is primarily controlled by the carbon dissolved in the austenite prior to the quench. As
we have seen, the hardness increases approximately linearly with carbon content in freshly formed
martensite until about 0.6 wt. % C; thereafter it varies slowly and is essentially constant by 0.8 %.
Because of this, we recognize that hypereutectoid tool steels are not selected for use because their
high carbon contents endow the martensite with additional hardness but because the volume
fraction of carbides in them is greater and this provides increased wear resistance. Therefore, it is
unnecessary for all of the carbon to be dissolved in the austenite during austenitization.
The full story of the heat treatment of carbon tool steels begins with the forging process that
produces the desired stock e.g. bars. Forging is carried out at temperatures well in the austenite
phase field but below those which would cause dissolution of the vanadium carbides present in
some steels. The steel is air cooled after forging. Then it is annealed, sometimes after a
normalization treatment, to produce a suitable microstructure for delivery to the customer. The
purpose of the annealing treatment is to enhance the machinability of the steel, eliminate any
residual stresses and to provide a microstructure that will respond uniformly to subsequent
hardening heat treatments. The desirable type of microstructure that achieves this purpose is either a
158 158
finely spheroidized microstructure or a mixture of fine spheroidite and pearlite. It is important to
avoid the formation of films of cementite along austenite grain boundaries or a coarse spheroidal
microstructure. These microstructures are produced by heating to and holding at temperatures
within the austenite/cementite two phase field followed by slow cooling
( maximum rate 50°F per hour) to 1000°F. The steel is protected from excessive scaling and
decarburization during annealing, often by being embedded in inert substances such as sand.
For hardening, these steels are austenitized above the A
1
line but below the A
cm
line. The
microstructure before the quench comprises austenite grains in which proeutectoid cementite
particles and possibly vanadium carbides are embedded. These carbides restrict grain growth during
austenitization and are retained within the martensite when quenching is complete. The
austenitization temperatures are high enough for the Cr be dissolved. This is desirable partly
because it then is helpful in resisting oxidation and decarburization. However, these degradation
processes should also be minimized by using protective atmospheres or baths during heat treating.
Another important contribution of the dissolved chromium is that it retards the rate of tempering
reactions which enables some residual stress relief to be accomplished without too much softening.
Finally, the chromium that becomes incorporated in the cementite improves the wear resistance
provided by the carbides.
The microstructure in the case of carbon tool steels austenitized as above and then water-
quenched to room temperature is not 100 % martensite even very near the surface. Retained
austenite is usually present because the M
s
temperature drops below room temperature as the
carbon content rises. For example, samples of W1 steel austenitized at 1450°F begin to transform
to martensite at approximately 400°F and will continue to transform, if continuously cooled, until
the temperature is about -250°F where there is typically 1 % retained austenite present. If the
quench is to room temperature the hardness of the mixture of martensite and retained austenite is
typically above HRC 65 and roughly 90 % of the microstructure is martensite.
It is time now to elaborate on the martensitic transformation in these steels. When we first
broached the subject of the martensitic transformation in plain carbon and the standard low alloy
steels, I defined it as usually being an athermal transformation during which the quantity of
martensite produced was dependent on the temperature to which the steel was cooled and not on the
time spent at that temperature. This was to emphasize the difference between its kinetics and those
of diffusion controlled nucleation and growth transformations. For hypoeutectoid plain carbon and
low alloy steels this definition is fine because it is close to the truth and, also, for practical purposes,
quenching to room temperature generally means continuously cooling to below the M
f
temperature.
It is, however, a definition that is not exactly true. Let us consider the behavior of W1 in greater
detail. If a sample is quenched to room temperature, the transformation to martensite is incomplete
with typically 12 % of the sample being retained austenite. If the sample is immediately cooled
further, the transformation continues as if the cooling was continuous. If, however, the sample is
held at room temperature for significant times, some of the austenite does transform. For example,
Cohen in “Retained Austenite”, Trans. ASM, Vol. 41, 35, (1949), shows that another 1% or so of
martensite forms in an hour and about 2 or 3 % in 50 hours. During this isothermal hold, the
remaining austenite also becomes more resistant to the athermal transformation because when
cooling is resumed martensite does not form until the temperature has decreased on the order of a
hundred degrees and much less of it forms. These subtleties become important now. If it is desired
to transform as much austenite as possible then cooling should not be interrupted for significant
delays. It is well known that tool steel articles can suffer delayed cracking if stored for periods of
time after being quenched. Very likely, the volume changes produced by the continuation of the
159 159
transformation during storage contributes to this delayed cracking phenomenon. It is particularly
important that such steels be tempered immediately after being quenched.
The phenomenon of delayed cracking was mentioned in the foregoing paragraph. This is
related to quench cracking which refers to cracking that occurs during the quenching process. The
risk of quench cracking increases as the carbon content of the austenite increases and as the severity
of the quench increases. It is also true that quench cracking becomes more likely to occur as the
austenitic grain size increases. This is another reason that vanadium is added to the higher carbon
steels to refine the austenitic grain size.
Cold Work Die Steels
This is a very important family of tool steels. The steels are used in a wide variety of
applications involving tool and die work. Of these, the compositions that require quenching in oil
are probably the most commonly used but when larger parts are used or when smaller dimensional
changes are desirable during heat treatment, compositions that enable air hardening to occur are
used.
As was summarized by Roberts and Cary, the major properties of these steels are:
1) small dimensional changes ( called movement) during hardening, hence small finishing
work required;
2) high as-quenched hardness, due primarily to carbon dissolved in the austenite;
3) high hardenability when austenitized at low austenitization temperatures;
4) reasonably good resistance to quench-cracking in intricate shapes;
5) good retention of a keen cutting edge during use.
These are good properties, however, the steels are limited to cold work because they soften
when heated and have no “red-hardness” i.e. they do not retain hardness when red-hot.
Examples are:
01 0.95 % C 1.2 % Mn 0.25 % Si 0.5 % Cr 0.2 % V 0.5 % W
07 1.2 % C 0.25 % Mn 0.25 % Si 0.6 % Cr 0.2 % V 1.6 % W 0.25 % Mo
+Fe
3
C
wt. % C Fe
T
Tough core
Low hardenability
Tempered
martensite
Austenitization temperatures
why intercritical at %C > .8 ?
γ
160 160
We see that the amounts of alloying elements are not high and that most of them are carbide
formers and, if dissolved in the austenite, will raise the hardenability. These steels typically undergo
forging processes that are conducted around 1000 to 1100 degrees Celsius and are then annealed
around 850 before being austenitized. Austenitization temperatures are in the range of 840 degrees
where some of the alloy carbides except the vanadium carbides dissolve. The vanadium carbides
and the low austenitization temperatures resist grain growth. When the Mn content is high, the
permissible austenitization temperature is at the lower end of the range because Mn is an austenite
stabilizer. The ability to austenitize the tool at relatively low temperatures reduces the dimensional
changes that occur subsequently. Any elastic shape changes that occur because of differential
expansion/contraction while the temperature is changing, are eliminated when the temperature of the
tool is uniform. If the stresses associated with these changes are large enough to cause plastic
deformation before the temperature becomes uniform then the shape changes are not recovered and
are superimposed on those due to the phase transformations. Reducing the austenitization
temperature is helpful for retaining prior dimensions. One should note that because of the high
carbon content and the effects of the dissolved alloying elements, quenching to room temperature
usually leaves a significant quantity of retained austenite in the steel, typically around 10 % by
volume.
Tempering is typically carried out below 300 Celsius, so the principal role of dissolved
alloying elements is then to retard softening while residual stresses are relieved.
When even greater dimensional stability than that which can be obtained in intricate parts
during quenching in oil is desirable, the logical thing to try is to increase the hardenability so that
the martensitic transformation will occur during very slow cooling rates that eliminate serious
temperature gradients in the work piece. This leads us to air hardenable tool and die steels in which
greater amounts of Mo and Cr are present. The increased amount of Cr also adds the benefit of
increased resistance to oxidation and decarburization. An example is A2 which contains:
1 % C 0.6 % Mn 0.25 % Si 5 % Cr 0.25 % V and 1 % Mo
Now, in order to raise the hardenability by means of the increased alloy content it is
necessary to dissolve more of the alloying elements into the austenite. These steels are thus
austenitized at higher temperatures than are the oil hardening types. Typically they are austenitized
at about 1000 Celsius, air cooled and tempered. Heating to the austenitization temperature is carried
out in stages to minimize distortion. It is common to heat to 750 - 800, hold at that temperature and
then to continue up to the final temperature. The intermediate hold allows some of the phase
transformations to be performed which reduces the time required at the highest temperature. This is
beneficial because the effects due to decarburization etc. are more serious the longer the steel is at
the elevated temperature, even though it is usually packed in protective materials. Another reason for
the intermediate hold is that it provides a means of bringing the times spent at the maximum
temperature by the surface and the interior closer together so that their microstructures are more
similar.
With the increase in the dissolved alloy content comes an increase in the volume fraction of
retained austenite because of the reduction in the M
s
temperature. 18 % is typical. This retained
austenite can transform during tempering. Indeed chromium carbides can form within it thereby
reducing its carbon and chromium content such that its M
s
temperature is raised above its former
value causing martensite to form during cooling after tempering ( similar to conditioning in
stainless steels). Double tempering might then be necessary. Sometimes A2 is refrigerated to
reduce the amount of retained austenite within it.
161 161
High chromium, high carbon, cold-work tool and die steels.
So far we have considered cold work tool steels that are of relatively low alloy content.
Because chromium and chromium carbides give these steels good properties it follows that the
effects of increasing the amounts of these two elements are worth examining. This results in the
high chromium, high carbon, cold work steels. An example is D2:
1.5 % C 12 % Cr 0.8 % Mo 0.6 % V 0.3 % Mn 0.25 % Si.
It is clear from this composition that the steel will be rich in alloy carbides and have good
resistance to oxidation. In fact the alloy content is so great that there are very significant departures
from the behavior of carbon steels that are important to note. The as-cast microstructure of the steel
following its manufacture, consists of primary grains surrounded by a eutectic mixture. As
solidification begins, marked coring occurs as Cr and C are rejected from the solid. It is irrelevant
whether the primary nuclei are delta ferrite or austenite; the eutectic constituents that solidify are
austenite and carbides. Austenite transforms to ferrite as the casting cools and it is possible for
martensite to form. Forging serves not only to produce the steel in suitable forms but also modifies
the microstructure creating a more uniform mixture of matrix and carbides which, in turn, endows
the material with more uniform properties. There is, however, a tendency for artifacts such as
carbide stringers to arise. Forging is carried out from about 1000°C to 1100°C. Higher
temperatures are not used because the eutectic constituent can melt. These steels have lower thermal
conductivity than low alloy steels so that a pre-heat soak and slow heating rates are necessary. Also,
very slow cooling rates are needed to avoid the formation of martensite.
The forged steel is annealed before it is machined into tools. A typical annealing process is
to heat to about 875°C in a controlled atmosphere, hold for two hours and then to slowly cool to
775°C, hold there for 2-4 hours and air-cool. The final microstructure is a mixture of large and
small alloy carbides in a ferrite matrix.
Again the tools are hardened after they have been machined to shape. To ensure minimum
dimensional changes and to avoid scaling, heating is done slowly in baths or protective
atmospheres. Typically the tools are preheated to and soaked at an intermediate temperature and
then heated to about 980°C. Some of the steels are oil-quenched but the molybdenum in D2 makes
it air-hardenable in large sizes. The actual final “austenitization” temperature is quite important
because, of course, complete austenitization does not occur . The steel will be austenite plus alloy
carbides and the volume fractions of these phases will vary with the temperature. More of the
carbides dissolve the higher the temperature that is used. This increases the concentration of solute
162 162
dissolved in the austenite which lowers the M
s
temperature. This, in turn, causes an increase in the
volume fraction of retained austenite which reduces the as-quenched hardness.
The variation of hardness during tempering is also dependent upon the austenitization
temperature because of the effects of the composition of the austenite. In general, the rate of
softening is low because the progress of the tempering reactions is restrained by the high alloy
content. Furthermore when the higher austenitization temperatures are used, secondary hardening
can arise due to carbide precipitation and the formation of martensite in the “conditioned” retained
austenite. The “conditioning refers to the rise in the martensitic start temperature of the retained
austenite caused by the precipitation of carbides therein during tempering.
We have considered the main types of cold work tool steels but there are variations of these.
For example, special wear resistant cold work die steels. What do we need for improved wear
resistance? The answer is: hard, wear resistant carbides and lots of them. Vanadium and tungsten
carbides are harder than chromium and iron carbides, so the an improvement should be obtained by
replacing some of the chromium carbides with these. Hence D7:
2.3 % C 0.5 % Mn 0.5 % Si 5.25 % Cr 4.75 % V 1.1 % W 1.1 % Mo
Hot work die steels.
There are many applications in which the work piece is hot. For example, many of the parts
that are made from aluminum alloys are made by hot working operations. During hot working
operations the dies are often cooled by water or air blasts but the tool still becomes hot, particularly
at its surface in contact with the work-piece. Commonly temperatures can range above 1000°F. The
following are some of the important properties that should be possessed by hot-work tools steels.
1) They should resist being deformed at the working temperatures. The main reason that
high carbon, low alloy tool, steels are unsuitable for hot working processes is that although they can
be produced to have high hardness and strength at room temperature, they soften rapidly at elevated
temperatures. It is true that the hot work steels that are used also soften when heated, but they do so
slowly and retain enough strength to have a significant working life. For this to be so, the steels
have medium to high contents of alloy element.
2) They should be shock resistant. This implies a resistance to mechanical and thermal
shocks, both of which are encountered in service. Good notch toughness is desirable to avoid
catastrophic crack propagation. To satisfy this requirement most hot work tool steels have low to
aust 2050 F
aust 1850 F
65
60
55
50
45
40
35
400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
R
c
F
163 163
medium carbon contents e. g. 0.25-0.6 wt.%. The increase in toughness has to be a compromise of
course because it is necessary to maintain adequate hardness and strength and also to avoid rapid
wear or erosion. Wear rates tend to increase as toughness increases.
3) As is usually the case for tools, it is desirable that dimensional changes and warping are
minimized when they are heat treated. This is particularly true when the tool is intended to produce
a part as close as possible to its required net shape as is the case for dies. An obvious reason is that
this will reduce the need for subsequent machining and thereby the cost of the tool. Hot work steels
can develop a protective surface film during heat treatment. If, however, this film is removed during
grinding processes required to adjust dimensions after heat treatment then the useful life of the tool
will be less. The most common method of minimizing dimensional changes during heat treating is
to use high alloy contents that raise the hardenability so that rapid temperature changes are
unnecessary. This is beneficial with respect to undesirable effect caused by thermal shocks and
thermal gradients.
4) Tools used in hot work operations experience cyclic variations in the surface temperature
as they heat up and cool down. These temperature excursions generate cyclic stresses with the
result that thermally induced fatigue is very common. This phenomenon generally manifests itself
by the development of a network of fine cracks on the surface of the tool. The cracks are usually
along the traces of grain boundaries and grains can even be pulled out of the surface. The
phenomenon is known as “heat checking” or “craze cracking”. This is a common practical
problem and its occurrence is often the limiting factor in the life of a die.
The hot-work tool steels can be divided into three broad classes: those in which Cr is the
principal alloying element, those which contain W or Mo as the principal alloying element and
those which contain about equal quantities of Cr and W. Most of them contain V which is
combined with carbon and is not taken into solution during the normal heat treatments.
Examples
S7 0.5 % C 0.7 % Mn 0.3 % Si 3.25 % Cr 1.4 % Mo
H11 0.4 % C 0.92 % Si 5.1 % Cr 1.5 % Mo 0.4 % V
H14 0.4 % C 0.3 % Mn 1 % Si 5 % Cr 0.25 % V 5 % W
An interesting aspect of the metallurgy of hot work die steels is the use of master tempering
curves. An example is shown below and refers to an H11 steel that was austenitized at 1850°F, air-
cooled and tempered at various temperatures and times. The diagram was constructed from the
experimental data as a plot of hardness ( HRC) versus the parameter T(20 + logt ) where T is °F +
460 and t is the tempering time in hours. The hardness measurements were, of course made at room
temperature; typical hardness values of 44-50 are used for working tools. The curve is used to
estimate the combination of temperatures and times for which the tool can be used before it
becomes too soft. For example, for a hardness of HRC 50 a horizontal line drawn across the
diagram at that hardness intersects the curve at a particular value of the abscissa parameter. Then
knowing the value of T( 20 + logt) it is possible to determine the various combinations of t and °F
for which the hardness will be at least HRC 50.
164 164
High Speed tool steels
Cold and hot work dies are tools that are designed to form the work piece into a desired
shape and size. In contrast, the basic function served by the tool during many machining processes
is to change the form of the work piece by cutting pieces (chips or swarf) from its surface. The tool
is in contact with the work piece and the two move relatively. The cutting process generates heat
which can raise the temperature of the working part of the tool. Accordingly, liquid coolant streams
are commonly used in machining processes to lengthen the tool life by minimizing heat induced
deterioration of its properties. Heat is created at greater rates the faster the machining is carried out
and this imposes a limit on production rates. An increase in the rate at which a particular machining
process can be performed is economically desirable. Faster machining rates are possible if the
cutting tools can be made of a material that resists softening when heated. Tool steels which
possess this property are called high speed, tool steels. Their major function is cutting and their
major property is hot hardness, i.e. they retain a high hardness when heated to a red heat. Typically
a HRC of 52 at 1000°F and HRC 48 at 1100°F can be achieved.
The first thing that comes to mind when contemplating making a steel hard is the martensitic
transformation. So the steel should contain carbon and be of such a composition that it can be
converted largely to martensite by a heat treatment. In order for it to have good wear resistance and
to maintain a good cutting edge it should contain a high volume fraction of alloy carbides. Then for
it to have “red hardness” undesirable changes in the microstructure should not occur or should
occur slowly when the tool is hot. This means that the rates of tempering reactions and carbide
coarsening processes should be small at the temperatures concerned. Indeed, some secondary
hardening during use would be useful provided overaging is not rapid. The alloying elements that
are suggested by these requirements are moderate to strong carbide formers that have low rates of
diffusion in ferrite. This suggests elements like W, Mo and V. These elements along with cobalt are
the important alloying elements in high speed tool steel. Tungsten was the first major element
explored for this class of steel and the classic 18-4-1 high speed steel emerged around 1910. This
steel is capable of cutting while at a visible red heat. Its composition is:
0.75 % C 0.3 % Mn 0.3 % Si 18 % W 4 % Cr 1 % V 0.7 % Mo
In general, high speed tool steels can be grouped as tungsten based, molybdenum based,
and molybdenum-tungsten based. Vanadium and cobalt are the other important alloying elements.
Although the original tool steels were tungsten based, each now has a molybdenum counterpart
Rc
T ( 20 + log(t) )
28,000 36,000
55
50
165 165
which has come to be more widely used in this country as a result of strategic materials limitations
during wars. We may simply note that the steels are rich in these elements and the metallurgy of the
various alloys is quite similar. One should note that tungsten is roughly twice as heavy as
molybdenum when comparing weight percentage compositions. Some other examples are;
T4 The 18-4-1+5 % Co
M2 0.8 % C 5 % Mo 6 % W 2 % V 4 % Cr
M10 0.9 % C 0.3 % Mn 0.3 $ Si 4 % Cr 2 % V 8 % Mo
In general, these steels have high levels of carbide formers which produce excess carbides in
the tempered martensite; i.e. the martensitic transformation occurs in austenite that contains alloy
carbides so that these carbides are inherited by the martensite. Because of the high content of ferrite
stabilizers, austenite isn’t formed after holding at temperatures suitable for low alloy steels. For
example heating to 1650°F and quenching doesn’t produce martensite because austenite doesn’t
form. When the steel is heated to within 150°F of its melting point, austenite forms and dissolves
sufficient carbon and other alloying elements so that it can then be hardened to HRC 63 or higher
by cooling in air in thick sections. Secondary hardening by the precipitation of fine alloy carbides
occurs during tempering and during use.

Microstructural constituents and treatments

The cast steel is extremely cored due to the segregation that occurs during solidification. It
is irrelevant whether or not delta ferrite or austenite is the nature of the initial nuclei because the first
portion to solidify is relatively lean with respect to its alloy content and is ferrite at room
temperature. Embedded within it are some carbides and usually an amount of lamellar pearlitic-like
constituent. During the solidification process, the enrichment of the liquid results in the formation
of a skeleton-like, eutectic constituent in the final volumes to freeze. The first step after casting is to
break down the eutectic network and to produce an array of ferritic grains containing alloy carbides.
This is accomplished by hot forging or rolling and annealing at 1650°F. Typically these steels
contain 0.25 -0.3 volume fraction of carbides.
The carbides have been extracted (i.e. the ferrite has been dissolved away using appropriate
chemical reagents) and identified (e. g. by electron diffraction) as follows:
M
6
C...................Fe
3
W
3
; Fe
4
W
2
C. Cr, V and Co dissolves in the former and Mo
replaces the tungsten in the latter in Mo steels.
M
23
C
6
................Chromium rich, dissolves Fe, V, Mo and W
MC.......................Vanadium rich
M
2
C.......................Tungsten or molybdenum rich carbide
The matrix contains some of the alloying elements in solid solution and very little carbon.
Roughly half of the chromium content is in solution which is beneficial for corrosion resistance. It
is possible for intermetallic compounds to form when the total carbon is low e.g. Fe
3
W
2
.
The heat treatment used to harden these steels first produces a mixture of austenite and alloy
carbides. Initially the microstructure is an array of ferrite grains and alloy carbides. When the
austenite begins to form the microstructure contains austenite, ferrite and carbides. Both the ferrite
grains and the carbide particles restrict the grain growth in the austenite. Then M
23
C
6
begins to
dissolve and the dissolution is complete when 2000°F is reached during slow heating. Then partial
166 166
solution of the other carbides occurs until the austenite typically contains about 7-12 % alloy
carbides of the types MC and M
6
C. On cooling there is an immediate tendency for the carbides to
re-precipitate. Some precipitation occurs, especially on austenite grain boundaries. However, the
rates of diffusion of W and Mo are very low and it requires very slow cooling for significant
carbide precipitation to occur on the grain boundaries and within the grains. More rapid cooling
yields bainite and then martensite plus carbides plus retained austenite.A typical tempering response
is indicated in the sketch.
The starting material is 60-80% BCT martensite, 15-30 % FCC austenite and 5-12 % MC
and M
6
C. It is very hard and also very brittle with much residual internal stress. The usual
tempering range is 950 to 1100°F but for the sake of completeness we will note that three stages of
tempering have been observed.
1) Up to 270°C, BCT martensite transforms to BCC plus epsilon carbide.
2) In the range 300-400°C BCC plus epsilon carbide goes to BCC plus cementite.
3) From 400- 560°C, BCC plus cementite changes to BCC with less cementite and the formation of
alloy carbides occurs.
While these transformations are taking place at the higher temperatures in the martensite,
precipitation of alloy carbides also occurs in the retained austenite which is also supersaturated.
This reduces the concentration of dissolved alloying elements in the austenite which raises the M
s
temperature. This causes more martensite to form when the tool is cooled after being tempered.
Often double or even multiple tempering is necessary to eliminate the retained austenite. The red
hardness is due to the reluctance of the carbides to coarsen because of the slow rates of diffusion
and also because secondary hardening can occur while the tool is hot.
Once a high speed tool steel has been hardened by such a heat treatment they cannot be re-
hardened by a straight forward repetition of the same heat treatment because discontinuous grain
growth occurs. During the heating process used to austenitize the steel, the small acicular BCC
crystals transform to austenite but their intercrystalline boundaries are pinned by fine carbides.
These carbides restrict grain growth until high temperatures are reached whereupon , as the carbides
dissolve, some crystal boundaries become unpinned before the others. Then a few grains are able to
grow rapidly at the high temperatures and consume their neighbors. This process leads to
exaggerated grain growth in which a few grains become very large. The effect is inherited in the
tempered martensite that is formed subsequently causing very poor toughness. The elimination of
this tendency requires special treatments such as long term cyclic heat treatments.
This completes our dash through part of the kingdom of tool steels.
65
1000 1200
o
F
R
c
167 167
Additional Pictures:
Water spray (24
o
C)
Jominy specimen
Mounting fixture
1”/2
1”/2
4”
1”
Flat ground
along bar
Rockwell C
hardness
tests
168 168
Cooling transformation diagram
0
200
400
600
800
10
-1
10
0
10
1
10
2
10
3
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e

(


o
C
)
Time (s)
T
e
m
p
e
r
a
t
u
r
e

(
o
F
)
70
60
50
10
30
20
0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5
Distance from quenched end (in.)
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
Distance from quenched end
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
Typical hardenability plot
of Rockwell C hardness as
a functin of distance from
the quenched end.
Austenite to Martensite
A
u
s
te
n
ite
to
p
e
a
rlite
M (start)
(a)
Martensite
(b)
Martensite and
pearlite
(c)
Fine
Pearlite
(d)
Pearlite
Coolng curves
Transformation during cooling
(d) (c)
(b)
(a)
Correlation of hardenability and continuous cooling information
for an iron-carbon alloy of eutectoid composition. (Adapted from
H.Boyer, Editor, Atlas of Isothermal Transformation and Cooling
Transformation Diagrams, American Society for Metals, 1977, p376
169 169
270 170 70 31 18 9 5.6 3.9 2.8 2
o
C/s
490 305 125 56 33 16.3 10 7 5.1 3.5
o
F/s
in.
0 10 20 30 40 50 mm
Distance from quenched end
Cooling rate at 700
o
C (1300
o
F)
in.
60
50
40
30
20
0 0.25 0.5 0.75
1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
4340
4140
8640
5140
1040
100
80
50
P
e
r
c
e
n
t

M
a
r
t
e
n
s
i
t
e
170 170
270 170 70 31 18 9 5.6 3.9 2.8 2
o
C/s
490 305 125 56 33 16.3 10 7 5.1 3.5
o
F/s
in.
0 10 20 30 40 50 mm
Distance from quenched end
8660
(0.6 wt% C)
8660
(0.4 wt% C)
8660
(0.3 wt% C)
8660
(0.2 wt% C)
Cooling rate at 700
o
C (1300
o
F)
in.
60
50
40
30
20
0 0.25 0.5 0.75
1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
171 171
270 170 70 31 18 9 5.6 3.9 2.8 2
o
C/s
490 305 125 56 33 16.3 10 7 5.1 3.5
o
F/s
in.
0 10 20 30 40 50 mm
Distance from quenched end
60
50
40
30
20
0 0.25 0.5 0.75
1 1.25 1.5 1.75 2
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
172 172
170 70 31 18 9 5.6 3.9
o
C/s
305 125 56 33 16.3 10 7
o
F/s
0 10 20 30 mm
Distance from quenched end
Cooling rate at 700
o
C (1300
o
F)
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

b
a
r

(
m
m
)
3/4 R Center
1/2 R
Surface
Center 1/2 R
3/4 R
Surface
(a)
170 70 31 18 9 5.6 3.9
o
C/s
305 125 56 33 16.3 10 7
o
F/s
0 10 20 30 mm
Distance from quenched end
Cooling rate at 700
o
C (1300
o
F)
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

b
a
r

(
m
m
)
Center
1/2 R
3/4 R
Surface
in.
(a)
4
3
2
1
0
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25 in.
100
75
50
25
0
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

b
a
r

(
i
n
.
)
4
3
2
1
0
0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25 in.
100
75
50
25
0
D
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

o
f

b
a
r

(
i
n
.
)
173 173
20
30
40
50
60
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
A
4140
1040
2 in. (50mm)
40
45
50
55
60
H
a
r
d
n
e
s
s
,

H
R
C
2 in. (50mm)
4 in. (100mm)

STEEL
Foreword This document is intended to augment formal lectures on the general topic of the physical metallurgy of steels, presented within the MSE Department during the Fall Quarter, 1998. It is based on a variety of texts and published articles and also on personal experience. Specific references to sources are made within the document. However, the material is often in the form of knowledge that has been accumulated by the work of many people and is "well-known" by experts in the field. A detailed acknowledgment of the work of each contributor to the field is not attempted because that would be an awesome task. This document is not intended for publication and is restricted for use in MSE 651.01. Texts: Steels; Microstructures and Properties by R.W.K. Honeycombe (Edward Arnold) Principles of the Heat Treatment of Steel by G. Krauss (ASM) The Physical Metallurgy of Steel by W.C. Leslie (McGraw Hill) The ASM Metal Handbooks. Handbook of Stainless Steels, Peckner and Bernstein (eds.) McGraw Hill 1977 Tool Steels Roberts and Cary, Edition 4, ASM, 1980 Ferrous Physical Metallurgy A. K. Sinha, Butterworths 1989. Introduction Steel is a family of materials that is derived from ores that are rich in iron, abundant in the Earth’s crust and which are easily reduced by hot carbon to yield iron. Steels are very versatile; they can be formed into desired shapes by plastic deformation produced by processes such as rolling and forging; they can be treated to give them a wide range of mechanical properties which enable them to be used for an enormous number of applications. Indeed, steel is ubiquitous in applications that directly affect the quality of our lives. Steel and cement constitute about 90% of the structural materials that are manufactured ( Westwood, Met and Mat Trans, Vol. 27 A, June 1996, 1413). What, then, is steel? A precise and concise definition of steel is not an easy thing to present because of the very large variety of alloys that bear the name. All of them, however, contain iron. We might reasonably begin by describing a steel as an alloy which contains iron as the major component. This is only a beginning because there are alloys in which iron is the major constituent, that are not called steels; for example, cast irons and some superalloys. The major difference between a cast iron and a steel is that their carbon contents lie in two different ranges. These ranges are determined by the maximum amount of carbon that can be dissolved into solid iron. This is approximately 2% by weight (in FCC iron at 1146 °C). Steels are alloys that contain less than 2% carbon. Cast irons contain more than 2 % carbon. Many steels contain specified minimum amounts of carbon. This does not mean that all steels must contain substantial quantities of carbon; in some steels the carbon content is deliberately made very small and, also, the amount actually in solution is reduced further by the addition of alloying elements that have a strong tendency to combine with the carbon to form carbides. Steels can be divided into two main groups; plain carbon steels and alloy steels. The latter can then be subdivided into many groups according to chemistry ( e.g. standard low alloy steels), applications (e.g. tool steels ) or particular properties (e.g. stainless steels) etc. Let us begin with

1 1

plain carbon steels; this group is the simplest to understand and it comprises steels that are used in the greatest tonnage. Plain carbon steels A plain carbon steel is essentially an alloy of iron and carbon which also contains manganese and a variety of residual elements. These residual elements were either present within the raw materials used in the production process e.g. iron ore and scrap steel additions, or they were added in the production process for a specific purpose, e.g. deoxidization by means of silicon or aluminum. Hence they are called residual elements to distinguish them from alloying elements that are deliberately added according to specified minimum amounts. The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has defined a plain carbon steel to be an alloy of iron and carbon which contains specified amounts of Mn below a maximum amount of 1.65 wt. %, less than 0.6 wt. % Si, less than 0.6 wt. % Cu and which does not have any specified minimum content of any other deliberately added alloying element. It is usual for maximum amounts (e.g. 0.05 wt. %) of S and P to be specified. ( see The Making, Shaping and Treating of Steel, USS 1970) The manufacture of steel is a subject that is well beyond the ambit of these notes. But we should be aware that various manufacturing practices can affect the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur content and hence the cleanliness of the product. The term “cleanliness” usually refers to the amounts of various phases such as oxides, sulfides and silicates that can be present in steel. The smaller the amount of these phases, the cleaner is the steel. These phases are in the form of particles called inclusions and they can have significant effects on the properties of steel and are normally undesirable. Thus, variations in the manufacturing process can have significant effects on the properties of the steel, so some brief comments are in order. For many years steels have been produced by casting the molten steel into molds and allowing it to solidify into ingots which were then processed by rolling etc. Steel produced by ingot metallurgy is subdivided into four categories according to the deoxidization process used. These categories are rimmed, capped, semi-killed and killed steel. When an undeoxidized steel is cast into an ingot, carbon monoxide is evolved during solidification because the solubility of oxygen decreases as the temperature decreases. By adding enough ferrosilicon and aluminum, much of the oxygen can be removed from solution and also iron oxide is reduced by the formation of silicon and aluminum oxides so that no gas bubbles form and the steel is quiescent as it solidifies. The result is a fully killed steel. Plain carbon steels containing more than 0.3% C , produced by ingot metallurgy, are usually fully killed. Semi-killed steels are those which are partially deoxidized. Ingots for which the evolution of bubbles of carbon oxide gas is permitted during solidification produce rimmed steel, while capping means the interruption of the rimming process by freezing the top of the ingot by putting a cast iron cap on it. The different practices produce ingots that differ with respect to segregation, inclusion content and as-cast microstructure. There have been major advances in the production of steel during the last 20 years and continuous casting, in which great attention is being paid to the cleanliness of the steel, has become the dominant production method. According to R. D. Pehlke in Metallurgical Treatises, published by the Metallurgical Society of the AIME and reprinted in 1983, most steel produced by continuous casting is fully killed. Vacuum deoxidization is also being used to eliminate the oxygen, and the steel is protected by argon atmospheres in covered tundishes thereby yielding a cleaner steel with respect to its inclusion content. This is beneficial with respect to the mechanical properties and uniformity of the final product. Continuous casting also produces a product that is much closer to the final shape that is required for the application of the steel.

2 2

control the composition. melt the charge. this is so. Shaping and Refining of steel" put out by the old U. put in alloying elements and finally to select some particular classes of steel for examination. A306 which specifies the mode of manufacture. but alloy steels are also classified on the basis of some important property ( e. there is a group of low-alloy steels for which the compositions are specified in this country according to schemes originally recommended by the AISI and the Society of Automotive Engineers(SAE). and. e. of course.More and more steel sheet is now being produced in what are called mini-mills. published by the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers. Mostly we will concentrate on mechanical properties. and as its concentration increases. It has been discovered that additions of rare earth elements can produce high-melting point. ( One of the important roles of manganese is to combine with sulfur to prevent the formation of iron sulfides which can embrittle the steel. To add to the confusion. stainless steels) or on the basis of use (e. A306 grade 50 specifies a tensile strength of 50 to 60 KSI. handbooks and the book "Making. This slab is immediately fed through a long furnace in which it is heat treated and from which it emerges at the temperature desired to begin hot-rolling and passes directly into a series of hot rolls. These mills charge electric arc furnaces with scrap steel and iron. Alloy steels It follows from the definition of a plain carbon steel. how particular microstructures are produced and what effects are produced by the alloying elements. I propose to begin with pure iron. S. The picture appears to be quite confusing. In order to do this. complex sulfides and oxysulfides that are smaller and less harmful to the mechanical properties of steels than manganese sulfides can sometimes be. present many details of properties and production processing.g. In general. This phenomenon arises because when the hot steel is exposed to air the iron is oxidized to form scale. Copper is particularly undesirable because it is not easily removed from liquid steel. and in a revised tenth edition in 1985 by W.g. Jr.g. The ASM. there are steels that have particular names coined by the manufacturer and also steels that are characterized by an American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) specification. proceed to Fe-C. maraging steel).. that if one or more additional elements are deliberately added to produce specified minimum contents then the product is an alloy steel. T. 3 3 . et al. Our purpose is to develop a fundamental understanding.Lankford. Our objective is to eliminate the confusion by understanding how the properties of steel are related to their microstructures. Problems can arise in controlling the residual element contribution to the composition of the product because of variations in the quality of the scrap steel charged into the electric furnaces. nice little subdivision scheme to describe all steels is not easily produced. but we should also note that small additions of rare earth elements such as cerium can be made to a plain carbon steel for inclusion control. a wide range of properties.g. it can produce cracks due to hot-shortness. The copper penetrates the steel along grain boundaries and causes grain boundary cracking to occur during rolling. The tensile properties determine the grade of steel. The definition given is a very broad one and it indicates that a clear. concise. As we shall see. tool steels) or even as a consequence of a particular heat-treatment (e. There is. consider plain carbon steels.g. permissible amounts of S and P but leaves the manufacturer to choose the carbon levels necessary to achieve specified tensile properties.) The steel would not then be referred to as an alloy steel. Steel Co. much of which spalls off but the copper is not oxidized and accumulates beneath the scale at the surface of the steel. via a tundish continuously cast it into slabs several inches thick and a few feet wide. e.

the ductility decreases. These are symmetric sites.Iron and its Solid Solutions At normal atmospheric pressure. Leslie. is BCC below 910°C. ASM.27 Angstroms. dislocation glide is replaced by twin formation and brittle fracture by cleavage can occur. in equilibrium. It has. Met. Using 2. ( For example. therefore been “got” by the titanium which explains why the verb “to getter” was coined. in the hard sphere-central force model for metallic crystals. The tetrahedral sites are at 0. Its mechanical properties.8 angstroms 4 4 .04 angstroms is the diameter of a sphere that will just fit in the octahedral site. Interstitial solutes in iron See also Chapter 2 in Leslie's book and chapter 1 in "Principles of Heat Treatment of Steel by G. The yield strength is also temperature dependent. Trans.5. the variation of the macroscopic yield stress with temperature increases linearly and much more rapidly than the variation above room temperature. where DF e is the diameter of an iron atom that is assumed to behave as a hard sphere. FCC between 910°C and 1390°C and then BCC up to its melting point of 1536°C. 9. Hence. iron is BCC. This is also equal to 2DF e . 0.25.) These results were obtained with iron to which Ti had been added to getter the interstitial elements. 1980. We do this by noting that if the lattice parameter is “a” then the length of the diagonal of a face of the unit cell is a 2 . the centers of these sites are equidistant from the centers of the nearest neighboring atoms.5. grain size and dislocation content. see figure 2.DF e ). for which we find the diameter of the hole to be 0. as determined by testing in tension at room temperature and at typical strain rates of 10-3 to 10 -4 sec-1. 0. the carbon that combines with titanium is removed from solid solution.2 K when the strain rate is small.25.5 and the equivalent 0. Thus we can evaluate “a” and then the diameter of the octahedral hole which is equal to ( a . Krauss. at normal ambient temperatures and below. From 250 K downwards. 0. 1972. iron.25.e.C. The temperature where brittle behavior replaces ductile behavior depends upon the strain rate. and.0 positions in the unit cell. The rapid increase in the flow stress at low temperatures appears to occur because the atomic displacements involved in the movement of individual dislocations by glide becomes difficult very rapidly.) Above 300 K. increasing with a reduction in temperature as shown in figure 1 (W.0.52 angstroms for the diameter of FCC iron atoms ( 1 angstrom = 1010 meters) we find that 1. are functions of purity. the interstitial solutes C and N ( of which C has a radius of about 0. dislocation glide can occur relatively easily so that the magnitude of the macroscopic yield stress is controlled by the effects of long range internal stress fields on dislocation motion. if the strain rate is also increased. Dislocation glide can still occur at temperatures as low as 4. As the yield stress increases. i. 3.5. the temperature dependence of the yield stress in this temperature realm is due to the temperature dependence of the shear modulus of iron which decreases gradually as the temperature is increased and vice versa. 0. Therefore. FCC crystals have octahedral interstitial sites at coordinates 0. Because of this difference in size.

ksi C 300 400 500 600 700 -100 0 100 200 Fe-0.Temperature. Met.C. 5 5 . K After W. Trans. -200 110 100 90 80 True stree.. 3:9 (1972).15%T Peierls dominated behavior (hard ) Thermal activation dominant (soft ) ˙ ≅2.5 ×10 −4 / s GS=ASTM 5-6 700 600 70 60 50 40 30 20 500 MPa 400 300 200 100 10 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 0 Temperature. Leslie.

a/2 a/ 2 a 32 a 32 a a 54 BCC OCTAHEDRAL (a) Metal Atoms TETRAHEDRAL (b) Metal Atoms a/2 a/ 2 a 34 a/ 2 FCC (a) Metal Atoms (b) Metal Atoms 6 6 .

the interstitial solutes are able to diffuse to and occupy. In tensile tests conducted at higher temperatures. by aging at temperatures that permit the solutes to diffuse. the sample is forced to extend at the strain rate imposed by the testing machine so these dislocations must glide rapidly and this requires a high stress. This enables strong interactions with the shear strain fields of screw components as well as with the strain fields due to the edge components of dislocations. When BCC iron is annealed and slowly cooled. Consequences (see MSE 565) The first consequence is that the solubility of C and N is greater in FCC iron than in BCC iron because the interstitial holes are larger in the FCC structure. ( Leslie used Ti gettered iron in an attempt to minimize the influence of interstitial solutes upon the yield stress) Consequentially. C and N. The result is a yield point phenomenon of an upper and lower yield stress and localized yield that causes Luders bands to form and spread along the sample. Thus the solute is not randomly dispersed throughout the iron but is segregated at preferred sites around the dislocations and along dislocation cores. dislocations are pinned and many become immobile because moving the dislocation away from the segregated solute requires a very large stress. 0 (and the equivalent 0. 0. preferentially. even though the hard sphere model predicts the FCC structure to be the more close-packed. The sites are at the coordinates 0.5.g. because the interstitial solutes. Frank-Read sources and double cross slip sources) are activated they generate new dislocation line and the density of mobile dislocations increases rapidly. When plastic deformation begins it does so only at a few particular places within the steel where there are localized stress concentrations that are able to activate or create dislocation sources.25. When the material is treated so that segregation takes place as. Using the same diameter as before for an iron atom we find interstitial hole radii of about 0. serrated yielding occurs because the solute elements are able to diffuse fast enough to “catch up” dislocations and pin them again.5. for example.19 and 0. those sites that they prefer in the elastic strain fields.0 ) and 0. We will see that this is a very major consequence that has far reaching effects in ferrous metallurgy.and N one near 0. Consequently. but the octahedral site is not symmetric because two of the neighboring atoms are closer to the center of the site than the others. Even though the octahedral holes are smaller than the tetrahedral holes the interstitial solutes reside in the octahedral holes because then they only have two nearest neighbors to displace markedly. This means that the rate of glide necessary to maintain the strain rate drops and the applied stress needed to produce that rate also drops. When the dislocation sources (e.0. 0.5. 7 7 . When a tensile test is conducted on a sample of such material at room temperature. The interactions between interstitial solute elements and dislocations in BCC iron at ambient temperatures are powerful. at yield there is a low density of mobile dislocations.5.7 angstroms) fit much more easily into the octahedral sites in the FCC structure than in the tetrahedral sites. BCC sites are also octahedral and tetrahedral. this is true for dislocations of any character because the octahedral sites in the BCC structure are non symmetric so that the solutes cause tetragonal distortions by displacing two nearest neighbors more than the other four. most of the existing dislocations do not glide at yield. are larger than the interstitial sites within the crystalline matrix they prefer to occupy sites along the dislocation cores and also those matrix sites that are located in places where the elastic strain field of the dislocation helps to overcome the size misfit. 0.36 Angstroms. respectively. Dislocations create elastic strain fields in the crystal around them and generate major atomic displacements at and near their cores where the displacements cannot be described elastically. However. Furthermore.

Strain aging can be detrimental because of the loss of ductility that occurs as a consequence. hence the term “blue brittleness”. so that diffusion can be more rapid in BCC iron than in FCC iron even though the latter is at a higher temperature. % maximum) and depends on what phase is formed when the solubility limit is exceeded.81-5550/T for equilibrium with cementite. as interstitial strengthening.38-4040/T where T is in degrees Kelvin and c is in part parts million by weight. which reduces the dissolved 8 8 . page 7. Strain aging refers to a process in which the dislocation density is first increased by plastic strain during a cold work operation and then the material is held (aged) at temperatures high enough for carbon and nitrogen to diffuse but not high enough for extensive recovery to take place.) Steel so treated can acquire a bluish oxide. These are symmetric sites so that substitutional solute strengthening is not as effective. another transition phase has been observed ( Honeycombe. that is called cementite. The precipitate that forms above 150 to 200°C is an orthorhombic.. The equilibrium precipitate is graphite but the kinetics of the nucleation and growth processes of forming graphite is very sluggish. Co and Cr are not effective while P and Pt have strong effects. It is important to note that the diffusion coefficients vary exponentially with -1/T and that the activation energy for diffusion (of substitutional solutes also) is smaller in BCC iron than in FCC iron. This is due to their small sizes and also because the diffusion process does not involve vacancies so that each solute atom usually has an empty site next to it into which it can jump.. The majority of solutes in iron occupy substitutional sites. ( Nitrogen diffuses more rapidly than does carbon at room temperature and it has a greater solubility in iron at this temperature. The material is subject to strain aging and blue brittleness. The interstitial solutes diffuse very rapidly in BCC iron so that static and dynamic strain aging can occur at temperatures as low as 60°C. for similar concentrations. The solubility of carbon in BCC iron is small ( about 0. Steels-Microstructure and Properties.. Honeycombe presents some diffusion coefficients for solutes in iron in his book. Effects due to carbon arise when the temperature is in the range of 100-200 Celsius. It is not clear what controls the degree of strengthening. and above. Ni . The resulting combination of pinned dislocations and the greater density of forest dislocations raises the flow stress significantly. Metastable carbides are formed first when supersaturated solid solutions of Fe-C are aged. Substitutional Solutes. Si and Mn have significant effects. Expressions for the solubility are: (from Leslie's book) for equilibrium with graphite.Consequently the stress required to maintain the strain rate fluctuates up and down like a series of mini yield point phenomena.log(c) = 7. From room temperature to 200°C.. Fe3C. but both size misfit and electronic differences appear to contribute.02 wt. strain aging and loss of ductility can arise after prolonged aging at room temperature. metastable carbide.. ( Dynamic strain aging refers to strain aging that occurs while the sample is being deformed). This is an hexagonal carbide that contains less carbon than is in cementite and is called epsilon carbide. If the nitrogen content is high enough.log (c) = 6. Nevertheless. When the iron is free of interstitial solutes (either because of purification or because the solutes are scavenged by alloying additions such as Ti. substitutional strengthening at. room temperature can be significant and of practical use. page 8). because greater concentrations can be dissolved.

enameled products like refrigerator doors. Iron is therefore ductile and formable at room temperature and above. When dislocations glide in BCC iron during and after general yield at ambient temperatures. Iron is used for many applications because it is cheap and formable. Iron and low carbon steels have been shown to obey the Hall-Petch relationship with a proportionality constant near 1. in combination with Burgers vectors parallel to <111>.05% P. gives rise to 48 slip systems. As the temperature is lowered. This is particularly so for High Strength Low Alloy steels. Slightly more impure iron can be produced in quantity. D. See MSE 565. adverse effects upon ductility. A material that has a ductile to brittle transition temperature has obvious limitations for use below that temperature. 0. {112} and {123} families of planes which. but it is only slightly harder and stronger than copper. Armco iron ( see below) behaves similarly.012% C.31 mega Newtons M-3/2). 9 9 . then the aging effects due the interstitial solutes are dominant.9 kg mm -3/2 ( 0.999% purity can be produced in small quantities but it has no commercial use. Hence grain size refinement is an important method of controlling strength in ferrous alloys. Because these solutes diffuse much more slowly than do interstitial solutes. The fracture process is transgranular cleavage on {100} planes.g. Slip in BCC iron and the Hall Petch relation.02% Mn. Further increases in the yield stresses can be achieved by increasing the dislocation density by cold work but this usually reduces the ductility.solute concentration by combining with solute atoms to form second phases) the effects of substitutional elements are more clearly seen. Annealed samples of zone refined iron have been found to have yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 7000 psi (48 MPa) and 24000 psi (165 MPa) with 40% elongation compared to Armco iron's 20000 psi . Interestingly. Note that these figures represent “ball-park” amounts because of the effects of grain size. as is most commonly the case. Cross-slip is evidently easy. The transition from ductile to brittle fracture is associated with a marked reduction in the amount of energy expended. The wavy slip bands and prolific cross slip indicates that the plastic deformation of iron is dominated by screw dislocations because dislocations of other character cannot cross slip.000 psi and 28%. Armco iron has typically: 0. hence nearly all commercial iron is moderately impure. These modest amounts of impurities provide significant strengthening without serious. The softness of iron of high purity is not useful. and 0. Elsevier. 1971). For example. the aging temperatures are higher and recovery processes occur also. Zone refined iron of 99.( see J.025% S. 0. A brief review. when interstitial solutes are present in solution. Embury in Strengthening Methods in Crystals. This transition is commonly identified by impact tests wherein notched bars are broken by impact and the energy expended in breaking the samples is measured. However. Slip has been identified on the {110}. The Hall Petch relation relates the yield stress ( the lower yield stress for samples that show a yield point phenomenon) linearly to the inverse of the square root of the average grain diameter. the stress required to make the dislocations glide becomes very large and the material shows a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when deformed at high strain rates. experiments with these materials have shown that it is also possible for substitutional solutes to cause static and dynamic aging. ( General yield refers to plastic deformation that occurs across the cross section of the sample not to localized micro yield processes that correspond to strains of the order of 10-6 ) The dislocations are narrow and are not pairs of well separated partial dislocations because the stacking fault energies are high. they produce wavy slip bands. 45. e.

Trans. Hansen: Polycrystalline Strengthening. 9 – Yield stress – grain size relationship at room temperature for aluminum.7 0 70:30 brass. A. 7 1 and iron. Al.(Grain Size)-1/2 (mm-1/2) Fig.Hall-Petch Relationship for Fe. pp. 2167-2190 300 RT Fe True Stress (MPa) 200 70/30 Brass 100 Cu Al 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 d-1/2 . 70/30 Brass. 16A. 1985. 6 9 copper.7 2 10 . and Cu After: N. Vol. Metall.

the temperatures corresponding to the intersection points with these lines of a vertical line drawn through the composition of the alloy are called the A1 point etc.. as this type of formation of graphite is called. Ac1. If the sulfur and phosphorus content are very low. is a very valuable tool when one is considering the nature of steels. the effects of heating and cooling are indicated by using c for chauffage and r for refroidissement i.The Iron Carbon System. The most important of these carbides is Fe 3 C. The iron carbon metastable phase diagram is particularly important with respect to ferrous metallurgy. Then. for any particular alloy. the boundary between the austenite and austenite/ferrite phase fields as the A3 line and the boundary between the austenite and austenite/cementite phase fields as the Acm line. Earlier we observed that epsilon carbide can precipitate from supersaturated ferrite. austenite is the FCC solid solution. it is usually understood that it is the low temperature phase otherwise the ferrite is qualified with the appellation delta. is undesirable because it has an adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the steel. These are related to the kinetics of the phase transformations that occur during heating and cooling whereas the points on the diagram refer to equilibrium. this metastable phase is not shown in figure 3 which is really the iron cementite phase diagram. This is because there exists metastable carbide phases that can nucleate and grow much more rapidly than can graphite when supersaturated Fe-C solid solutions are aged. Cementite is found in steel artifacts that are many hundreds of years old. It should be consulted so frequently that it becomes burned into one’s memory. graphite does not ordinarily form in commercial steels unless the steel is seriously overheated. Many of the phase transformations in alloy steels can also be considered using the binary diagram. it can be applied readily for considering plain carbon steels. metastable phase diagram shown in figure 3. (See MSE 542. which is called cementite. However. The equilibrium binary Fe-C phase diagram depicts the phase fields that involve graphite and the solid solutions of the allotropes of iron. Graphitization.e. Ar1. 1) The equilibrium and metastable phase diagrams. Fortunately. Provided it is borne in mind that the details e. 2) Phases: alpha ferrite is the BCC solid solution of carbon in iron that exists in the low temperature range. 3) It is customary in the USA to refer to the eutectoid isotherm as the A1 line. Fe3 C can decompose into graphite and iron in about 8 hours at 700°C. Because the temperatures at which the corresponding transformations begin during heating and cooling depend upon the rates of heating and cooling.01) Review of nomenclature. graphite does not form during the treatments normally given to steels. cementite is the carbide and delta ferrite is the BCC solid solution that can exist at high temperatures. However. the exact carbon composition at the eutectoid point and the exact temperature of the eutectoid isotherm can be changed by the presence of manganese and residual elements. Hence the relevant diagram for practical purposes is the metastable diagram on which cementite replaces graphite. The iron-carbon. 11 . When the term ferrite is used alone. but then it is important to evaluate the effects due to the alloying elements in more detail as their concentrations are increased because these effects can be pronounced and important.g.

16 % 1499 C Liquid Liquid Graphite + Liquid Temperature. % 4 5 12 .52 % 0. wt.68 % 738 C 0.1537 C 0.27 % 1000 910 C 0.76 % 600 0 0.11 1400 1390 C Liquid 0. C 1200 2.020% Graphite (Cementite) 2 3 Carbon.021 % 1 727 C Graphite (Stable Phase) Cementite (Metastable Phase) 800 0.04 % 1152 C 1146 C 4.01 % 2.

45 and 46.5 wt.35 S and . In these codes the 10 indicates that the steel is a plain carbon steel while the xxx's indicate a range for the carbon content .% C as the specified range.I. The xx' s are now 44. unified numbering system uses G 10xxx etc. Hence we have the 11xx and 12xx series for which the first is resulfurized and the second is enhanced in both S and P. a hypereutectoid steel has more carbon than a eutectoid steel and a hypoeutectoid has less.S. so the binary diagram can be used as a reasonable guide to the constitution of these steels.04 to 0. e. This is 13xx and its members. the lead content lies between 0. depend upon the fact that when austenite is cooled it can become supersaturated and therefore undergo phase transformations as it seeks equilibrium. S and P are deliberately added because they endow the steel with good machinability properties . 12L14.25 wt.I. are not great. Note the three steels 1044.00 wt. It follows that many functions now performed by steel would not be performed and world would be a rather different place. Typically compositions run from 1005 to 1095 but 10125 would have 1. 15xx.g. / A.7 to 1. the wealth of microstructures that can be produced by heat-treating steel would be severely curtailed.43 to 0.e. Each has 0. For the sake of completeness we should note that carbon steels with more than 1.4) Note the extent of the gamma austenite field compared to that of the alpha ferrite field and reflect on the importance of this with respect to the existence of steel.9 and 0. rather than to attempt to memorize many details. This is still true for low alloy steels. As we will see. Si etc. it is possible for one steel to satisfy the specifications for more than one standard steel. some steels also have Pb (also for improving machinability) additions whereupon an L is included e. 0. 6) The S. The first two systems are very similar and use a numerical code of 10xx and 10xxx.00 % Mn are identified by replacing the first 0 with 5 i.08 to 0. and therefore many of the properties that can be tailor-made. %. % Mn and also have a minimum range of Si specified as between 0.15 and 0. Finally.S. Also. it would appear that the steels are indistinguishable.I.E. the higher Mn limit corresponds to the larger xx. The more modern. strictly speaking.3 to 0.35%. the ranges for Mn differ being 0. 5) When other alloying elements are added to Fe-C alloys the details of the phase diagram change. Many of the microstructures that can be produced in steels. 1146 has 0.35 wt.g. Here the first two digits inform us that the steels are all plain carbon steels. system. Steels can be classified with respect to the eutectoid composition : a eutectoid steel has the eutectoid composition. the numerical code gives you a fair idea of what the steel is. for plain carbon steels the changes due to the relatively low quantities of Mn. In fact . these changes can be quite large. there are occasions when ductility is not a major concern and machinability is more important. With respect to the carbon content this is true. Generally speaking.09 P. However. Typically. whereas it is usual to keep the sulfur and phosphorus contents low to avoid embrittlement problems that they can cause. 13 . however.6. The point to note is that when the carbon ranges are the same. Were this not so. but it is important to remember always that there will be differences from the binary diagram.% C.13 S and 1215 has 0.A. There is a group of steels that possess more than 1 wt. 1045 and 1046 in the A.6 to 0.%. and unified numbering system for plain carbon steels. Because these digits are used to indicate the carbon content within a range of a few points.26 to 0. In these cases. Then it is sensible to have access to tabulated compositions in Metal Handbooks.15% and 0.I. are alloy steels.

04 0.50 0.44 0.90 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.90-1.70-1.70-1.60-0.60-0.40-0.00 0.22-0.04 0.90 0.90 0.85 0.70-1.88 0.05 0.04 0.60 0.05 0.90 0.28 0.34 0.04 0.04 0.60 0.60 0.50 0.60-0.05 0.05 0.15 0.30-0.93 0.04 0.15-0.05 0.75 0.43-0.04 0.04 0.90 0.04 S.42 0.04 0.60-0.60-0.04 0.10 max.38 0.04 0.25-0.23 0.50-0.04 0. 0.05 0.18-0.05 0.85-0.08 max.93 0.20-0.04 0.50-0.04 0.37-0.93 0.18 0.30-0.65 0.04 0.50 0.60 0. 0.30-0.50 0.05 0.40-0.05 0.15-0.05 0.60-0.55-0.80 0.30-0.80 0.60-0.48-0.05 0.05 0.04 0.13-0.04 0.16 0.05 0.04 0.04 0.46-0.04 0.06 max.30-0.04 0.30-0.70 0.04 0.60 0.90 0.05 Corresponding AISI Number 1006 1008 1010 1012 1015 1016 1017 1018 1019 1020 1021 1022 1023 1025 1026 1030 1035 1037 1038 1039 1040 1042 1043 1045 1046 1049 1050 1055 1060 1064 1065 1070 1074 1078 1080 1084 1086 1090 1095 NOTE: LEAD.05 0.60 0.11-0.50-0. 0.04 0.15 to 14 .60-0.80 0.04 0.00 0.70 0.32-0.05 0.Chemical Composition Limits (Ladle Analysis).35 max.72-0.48-0.53 0.50 0.37-0.08-0.60-0.05 0.55 0.28 0.10-0.70-1.35-0. 0.90 0.04 0.38 0.80-0.50 P.60-0.04 0.60-0.05 0.60-0.90 0.60 0.90 0.80-0.90 0.05 0.04 0.05 0.04 0.60-0.47 0.90 0.44 0.05 0. When lead is required as an added element to a standard steel.70-0.90 0. max.80 0.70-1.70-0.05 0.04 0.70 0.70-1.22-0.05 0.15-0.04 0.05 0. 0.05 0.90 0.40-0.30-0.00 0.90 0.13 0.18-0.04 0.05 0.32-0.70 0.04 0.20 0.05 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.65-0.05 0.30-0.70-1.04 0.90 0.30-0.43-0.13-0.90 0.05 0.90 0.04 0.60 0.60-0.40 0.90 0.60 0. 0.60 0.25 0.05 0. Per Cent (3) SAE Number 1005 1006 1008 1010 1011 1012 1013 1015 1016 1017 1018 1019 1020 1021 1022 1023 1025 1026 1029 1030 1035 1037 1038 1039 1040 1042 1043 1044 1045 1046 1049 1050 1053 1055 1060 1064 1065 1069 1070 1074 1075 1078 1080 1084 1085 1086 1090 1095 C 0.23 0.05 0.05 0.00 0.04 0.60-0.04 0.55 0.60-0.60-0.75-0.05 0.80-0.90 0.60-0.00 0.05 0.90 0.05 0.05 0.80 0.40-0.60-0.13 0.05 0.25-0.05 0.05 0.00 0.90 0.65-0.04 0.04 0.50-0.60-0.00 0.30-0.60-0.18-0.30-0.70-0. a range of 0.75 0.04 0.05 0.60-0.04 0.04 0.18 0.20 0.98 0.90 0.05 0.23 0.05 0.04 0.30-0.47 0.08-0.04 0.20 0.04 0.43-0.31 0.05 0.04 0.28-0.05 0. max.03 Mn 0.60-0.

N.5 1.3 (Nb+Ta) 18 W AISI T1 T12001 0. valves.15 0.2 0.05 0. dies Tool steel Heat treatable to high hardness and wear resistance TABLE 3. turbine blades Cutters.2 0.75 3. F32800 G10200 G10450 G10950 G43400 K11430 S40300 S31000 S17400 C 3. otherwise quenching and tempering Quenching and tempering if <15% Cr and low Ni. gears. Prentice-Hall. does not rust Corrosion resistant piping and nuts and bolts.15 0.1 ASTM A538-C K93120 0. quenching and tempering if medium to high carbon Grain refinement.25 1.0 0.8 0.40 0.2 0. pp.E.3 Cu 4 Cu 0.50 0. Plain-carbon steel Low-alloy steel Metallic elements totaling up to 5% High strength structural and machine parts Stainless steel At least 10% Cr.3 1.5 1. and solid solution if low carbon.6 20 4 0.After: Mechanical Behavior of Materials.3 COMMONLY ENCOUNTERED CLASSES OF IRONS AND STEELS Class Cast Iron Distinguishing Features More than 2% C and 1 to 3% Si Principal alloying element is carbon up to 1% Typical Uses Pipes. engine blocks Structural and machine parts Source of Strengthening Ferrite-pearlite structure as affected by free graphite Ferrite-pearlite structure if low carbon.4 SOME TYPICAL IRONS AND STEELS Description Ductile cast iron Low-carbon steel Medium-carbon steel High-carbon steel Low-alloy steel HSLA steel Martensitic stainless steel Austenitic stainless steel Precipitation hardening stainless steel Tungsten high-speed tool steel 18 Ni maraging steel Identification ASTM A395 AISI 1020 AISI 1045 AISI 1095 AISI 4340 ASTM A588-A AISI 403 AISI 310 17-4 PH UNS No. 1999.45 0.1 1.25 0.95 0. 0.7 Ti 15 . etc.45 0.01 - - 5 18 - - 9 Co.4 0.0 0. otherwise cold work or precipitation Quenching and tempering.25 - 0. precipitation.0 1. drill bits. Typical % by Weight Cr Mn Mo Ni Si V Other 2 0.2 0.55.2 0.2 0.8 0. 56 TABLE 3.5 12 25 17 0.Dowling.2 0.75 0.7 1.07 Principal Alloying Elements.0 2.8 0.

The transformation that begins at this plateau is still from FCC to BCC but it now occurs so rapidly that it is not effected by diffusion. At this fourth plateau that occurs at about 700 K the transformation is again FCC to BCC but the product consists of twinned plates. Met and Mat. hence the phase is sometimes identified as Widmanstatten ferrite. 1501. of the order of a few degrees per second. Nucleation is heterogeneous on grain boundaries and at grain boundary triple junctions. Then BCC crystals nucleate and grow when the degree of super cooling is sufficient to provide the necessary driving force .Phase Transformations in Iron An important phase transformation in pure iron and its dilute solid solutions is the allotropic transformation between the BCC and FCC phases that occurs when the temperature is varied about 910 Celsius. In each case the transformation begins when the plateau is reached but the amount of the sample which transforms depends on the temperature to which the sample is cooled not on time at that temperature. Lenticular martensite has not been observed to form in very pure iron and no one has succeeded in cooling FCC iron to below the lath martensitic start plateau without 16 . unlike diffusion controlled nucleation and growth transformations. increases initially as the rate at which the FCC iron is cooled is increased but then remains constant at a plateau value. This behavior has been observed to occur in iron with a few parts per million of dissolved carbon and also in iron containing 0. 1996. At the same time the intercrystalline boundaries of the BCC phase become blocky and faceted and the composition remains uniform. % C.01 wt. another plateau is observed at a lower temperature that the one described previously. A number of investigators have studied this transformation as a function of the rate of cooling from the high temperature at which the iron was initially FCC. Trans. The actual temperature of the plateau varies with the grain size of the FCC phase. % carbon. It has been reported that yet another plateau occurs in the latter material at even higher rates of cooling. In the latter the massive ferrite plateau begins near 800 degrees at a cooling rate of several thousand degrees Celsius per second. (See MSE 543) The beginning of the transformation can be detected experimentally by observing the rates of change in the temperature of the iron because of the effects due to the evolution of heat as the transformation occurs. Such a morphology is usually called Widmanstatten. For small cooling rates the degree of undercooling attained at the onset of the transformation is small and the total transformation is completed at high temperatures by diffusion controlled nucleation and growth processes that produce an equiaxed array of grains separated in general by high angle grain boundaries. These are characteristics of the massive transformation and the BCC phase is called massive ferrite. It is generally agreed that the equiaxed and acicular ferrite forms by diffusion controlled processes. The products of the transformations in these cases are called lath martensite and lenticular or plate martensite. When the cooling rates are small.. The ferrite produced comprises bundles of narrow. Their work has been recently reviewed by Borgenstam and Hillert. At still higher cooling rates above 104 K/sec. At this plateau. 27A.01 wt. The diffusionless processes by which these transformations are produced are called martensitic which is the general name given to a transformation that produces a change in crystal structure in a displacive manner and does not require diffusion. the ferrite begins to form as acicular plates which emanate from original grain boundary positions and also form within grains. the temperature of the iron falls below 910 degrees and the iron becomes super cooled. Cooling rates greater than 105 K/sec avoids these transformations and then another plateau occurs at a lower temperature still. lath shaped crystals in which the dislocation density is high. being smaller the larger the grain size. These three plateaus have been observed in iron with a few parts per million of carbon and also in Fe-0. Let us consider the transformation from FCC to BCC during cooling. The degree of undercooling at which the transformation begins.

We recognize that the steel is initially at ambient temperature and has a microstructure that depends upon its past history. i.forming martensite. recrystallization. When some austenite forms it 17 .) Furthermore. mechanical treatment alone or combinations of the two. This history can involve heat-treatments alone. This occurs by a nucleation and growth process. The heating rate is an important part of the overall practical process. Austenitization Austenitization converts a steel into the FCC solid solution called austenite when the steel is heated into the austenitic phase field and held there long enough. discrete particles of the carbide embedded in ferrite grains and there could be regions of pearlite in which the two phases exist as a lamellar mixture. if the austenitization heat -up time is long. the microstructure could change somewhat before austenitization begins. the time has then to be selected. the most important changes that occur during austenitization do so above the A1 line and in the austenite phase field. Heat-treatments can change the microstructures of steels by processes such as recovery. First. grain growth and phase transformations. Hence the first part of the transformation has to be the formation of some austenite. it will comprise a mixture of cementite and ferrite. It is the first step in the majority of heat treating processes and the nature of the austenite that is obtained is important because it has a direct effect upon the microstructures produced during subsequent treatments in which the austenite is transformed into other phases and the steel is returned eventually to ambient temperature. Inspection of the metastable Fe-C phase diagram. however. When the temperature is chosen. When the temperature exceeds the eutectoid isotherm. Phase Transformations in Plain Carbon Steels. These temperatures lie in the austenite phase field. There could be free ferrite grains. Austenitization also precedes many hot working processes used to form steel products because it occurs when the steel is heated to the hot-working temperatures. The final microstructure of a steel depends upon its composition and its thermo-mechanical history. the carbides wish to dissolve but the ferrite cannot accept the carbon residing in the carbides. pearlite is not a phase it is the name of a microstructure. ( It is important to understand that cementite and ferrite are phases. The nucleation events are heterogeneous and take place on ferrite grain boundaries and on ferrite/cementite interfaces. This is accomplished by choosing appropriate chemical compositions and thermo-mechanical treatments. suppose we have a hypoeutectoid steel. Commonly. a 100 % FCC phase cannot be retained by rapid cooling to room temperature. In order to appreciate these effects let us begin with the subject of phase transformations in steel. The mechanical properties of steel are controlled by controlling its microstructure and the nature of the phases within that microstructure. enables us to estimate the range of temperatures from which one could be selected for the austenitization process. This is not necessarily so in the case of steels because the starting material is usually a mixture of phases of different compositions which means that long range diffusion is necessary to attain homogeneity. In our discussion of the allotropic transformation of FCC iron to BCC iron we paid very little attention to producing the FCC phase because in pure iron and dilute solid solutions a homogeneous polycrystalline aggregate is easily and rapidly formed when a sample is heated above 910 °C. The optimum combination of temperature and time depends on the objectives of the total heat treatment process and upon the microstructure of the steel before austenitization.e.

At this point it is important to recognize that the purpose of an austenitization treatment is usually to produce austenite so that it can then be transformed into something else such as a mixture of ferrite and pearlite. diffuses substitutionally and therefore much more slowly than does the carbon. the finer the scale of the initial microstructure then the finer the austenitic grain size will be when the carbides have just all dissolved. We note that the range of diffusion is proportional to the square root of the product of time and the diffusion coefficient. fine grained ferrite and finely spaced lamellae in pearlite cause the transformation to occur more rapidly than it would in a coarse microstructure. Some austenite grains continue to grow and. Manganese. and. This can be used as a guide for the selection of the time required for the composition to approach homogeneity when the scale of the initial compositional fluctuations is known.. of course. We have noted that an important microstructural change to be considered during austenitization is grain growth. Until these transformations are completed. the average grain size increases with temperature at a rate that is proportional to the square root of the 18 . necessarily. hot rolling or hot forging is being done. Compositional variations (segregation) of manganese in an ingot can persist within the steel and cause microstructural effects such as banding ( i. Because the nucleation process is heterogeneous.g. The diffusion rate of carbon determines this time in a plain carbon steel. Typically. When austenitization is complete. Further time is required for the austenite to homogenize. when the temperature exceeds the A3 line. For producing the most desirable mechanical properties in the final product it is usually necessary that the austenite be fine-grained. its composition is inhomogeneous because the carbon concentration at and near the positions originally occupied by the carbides exceeds the concentration elsewhere. grain growth can take place and will do so at rates that are greater the higher the austenitization temperature. a cyclic variation in the local volume fractions of pearlite and ferrite with position) in subsequent heat treatments.e. Thus it is generally desirable that the austenite be transformed as soon as possible unless. molybdenum carbides) because substitutional diffusion is much slower than interstitial diffusion. It follows from the previous comments that the kinetics of producing homogeneous austenite can be retarded considerably in steels that contain alloy carbides (e. Its grain size will depend upon the nucleation rate which will in turn depend upon the availability of nucleation sites and also upon the temperature at which the nuclei form. however.provides a sink for the carbon in the adjacent carbides and the simultaneous growth of austenite and dissolution of carbides takes place. the rate controlling parameters are the nucleation kinetics and the rates of diffusion of solutes in austenite. Furthermore. the austenite devours any remaining ferrite. The end of a typical austenitization process does not usually correspond to the time at which the carbides have just dissolved because. although the steel is austenite. others shrink and disappear causing a decrease in the number of grains per unit volume.

sec Austenitizing rate-temperature curves for commercial plain carbon eutectoid steel. F Austenite and residual carbide 1400 Austenite with carbon inhomogeneities 780 760 Pearlite and austenite and residual carbide Pearlite 740 1350 Ae1 720 1300 1 10 100 1000 10.000 Time. fourth curve. final disappearance of carbon concentration gradients.5 % Austenite 840 Homogeneous austenite 820 0. 19 Temperature. C 1450 .1550 99. second curve. final disappearance of carbide. fine pearlite. final disappearance of pearlite. initial structure.5 % Austenite 800 1500 Temperature. Prior treatment was normalizing from 1610 F (875 C). third curve.

this is imperative if one wishes to further develop and improve steels. Air cooling means simply that the steel is allowed to cool naturally in still air. If a piece of a plain carbon steel is austenitized and then cooled it will attempt to transform into a mixture of ferrite and cementite according to the phase fields indicated on the phase diagram. "furnace cooling". These processes can be accompanied by recovery. the lack of coarse grains makes the steel more refined in the same way that young ladies are presumed to be more refined than young men. Quite different microstructures can be produced in different forms of the same steel e. The Decomposition of Austenite The array of microstructures (and thus mechanical properties) that are obtainable in steels by various heat-treatments. Aluminum forms fine particles of nitrides and oxides which impede grain boundary migration below 2000°F and thereby helps to keep the austenitic grain size small. and will usually vary from place to place within the sample. It is customary. Usually a large austenitic grain size is undesirable because it leads to a coarse microstructure when the austenite is transformed back into the microstructure in which it will be used. The mode of cooling from the austenitization temperature is a very important parameter to consider when discussing the transformation of austenite. Sometimes the austenitization heat treatment is performed only to create austenite and is immediately followed by the rest of the heat treatment . the extension to eutectoid and hypereutectoid steels should be apparent. Indeed.time at the temperature. On other occasions mechanical work such as forging or rolling is carried out while the steel is austenitic. the cooling rate at any particular site within a sample will vary as the temperature at that site changes unless special precautions are taken to ensure that the rate is constant. Also. They impede grain growth and resist grain coarsening. Presumably. A particularly important variable is the rate of cooling. a half inch round bar versus a four foot diameter coil of rolled sheet. the dimensions of the piece of steel. Such descriptions are not very precise because the actual cooling rate that a piece of steel undergoes will depend on particular conditions: it can depend upon its environment. recrystallization and grain growth. Thus it is said to be a grain refiner (This is an example of metallurgical English. for obvious reasons of convenience.g. "air-cooling". In order to appreciate how these microstructures are produced it is important to understand the various modes by which austenite can decompose. A valuable effect derived from using aluminum to kill steels is relevant here. Transformations in Steel of the Eutectoid Composition. depends on the manner in which austenite transforms when it is cooled to ambient temperatures.) After this description of the austenitization process in hypoeutectoid steels. "water-quenching" etc. The aluminum-rich particles certainly do not free the steel of impurities. to describe cooling rates as "slow". see figure 4. The kinetics of such a transformation is 20 . Inspection of the equilibrium compositions of these phases at the temperature of the eutectoid isotherm leads to the conclusion that a transformation to ferrite and cementite must require atomic diffusion and that the growth rates of the new phases will depend primarily on the rate of diffusion of carbon which has to undergo long range diffusion.

1550 99. fourth curve.5 % Austenite 800 1500 Temperature. final disappearance of carbide.000 Time. sec Austenitizing rate-temperature curves for commercial plain carbon eutectoid steel. third curve. second curve. Prior treatment was normalizing from 1610 F (875 C). 21 Temperature. fine pearlite. F Austenite and residual carbide 1400 Austenite with carbon inhomogeneities 780 760 Pearlite and austenite and residual carbide Pearlite 740 1350 Ae1 720 1300 1 10 100 1000 10. C 1450 .5 % Austenite 840 Homogeneous austenite 820 0. final disappearance of carbon concentration gradients. initial structure. final disappearance of pearlite.

During the rapid quench to the transformation temperature. Strictly speaking. especially when the transformation is rapid and the sample of steel is large. From a practical point of view. As the cooling rates are increased. the steel is close to its equilibrium state as its temperature drops. the magnitude of the incubation period that is determined experimentally. It is large near the A1 line and decreases rapidly as the transformation temperature is reduced. also. a 1080 steel ) were austenitized in the same manner. that the microstructural changes that occurred within them were monitored. the term isothermal transformation of austenite implies that the transformation takes place at a constant temperature and. Under these conditions the lever rule and the phase diagram provide reasonable estimates of the volume fractions of various phases to be expected in the final microstructures. 22 . first. The transformation begins at grain boundaries where particles of cementite and ferrite form adjacent to each other. the transformation is completed at high temperatures and occurs over a small range of temperature. The time taken for this to happen is called the incubation period. Initially. and held for various times at. each sample remains a polycrystal of austenite. the transformation to ferrite and cementite begins and ends at lower and lower temperatures and the steel is no longer close to equilibrium as it cools. What are the results of such an experiment? 1) Transformation temperatures within a hundred degrees Celsius of the eutectoid isotherm. While the sample is at the transformation temperature. various parts of the sample transform at different times and hence at different temperatures. The incubation period is temperature dependent. This is because the magnitude of the thermodynamic driving force for the transformation increases as the degree of undercooling below the A1 line increases. Let us suppose also. At this stage we shall not concern ourselves with how the changes are monitored. This supposition is made now to enable us to concentrate on the nature of the transformations and to defer until later considerations of changes that might occur while the samples are being cooled to the isothermal transformation temperature. depends on the resolution of the technique used to monitor the process because the minimum size of a particle of a new phase that can be detected becomes smaller as the resolution increases. selected temperatures below the eutectoid isotherm. it is sensible to consider. Quantitative predictions from the phase diagram such as the volume fraction of free ferrite to be present in the final microstructure are no longer possible. instantaneously cooled to.5%. processes occur which eventually produce recognizable crystals of ferrite and cementite. One might similarly define the end of the transformation as a transformed volume fraction of 99. that none (or negligible amounts) of the transformation take place before the austenite arrives at this temperature. we will suppose that the samples that we are considering are so small that the temperature is always essentially uniform throughout them and that temperature changes can be made instantaneously. This is the situation to which “furnace cooling” and “slow cooling” refer. let us arbitrarily define the end of the incubation period as corresponding to a volume fraction transformed of 0. we simply suppose that they are.therefore a function of time and temperature. During continuous cooling.5%. Because of these complications. This is generally difficult to achieve in practice. When the cooling rates are slow enough to allow diffusion to occur readily. Let us suppose that an experiment has been conducted in which many samples of a plain carbon steel of the eutectoid composition (e.g. what happens during isothermal transformations. These particles grow and the boundary advances into one of the grains. Because of this.

Magnification. p. Krauss: Steels: Heat Treatment and Processing Principles.Pearlite in a furnace-cooled Fe-0.75C alloy. 500x. 23 . ASM International. 1990. 20. From: G.

The lamellar microstructure is called pearlite. decreasing with a decrease in the transformation temperature. The iron tries to 24 . the nucleation process becomes so rapid that all of the grain boundaries are consumed very early in the transformation and the pearlite nodules are in contact along the areas where the boundaries existed. instead parts of the microstructure comprise non lamellar aggregates of small crystals of ferrite and cementite. and pearlite is no longer formed. Instead.1 micrometers. These events occur at various places on the grain boundaries and at triple junctions. the free energy can be reduced by transforming the iron solvent from the FCC structure. At lower temperatures. differently oriented (in space). near 550 °C. The average inter-lamellar spacing in the colonies depends upon the temperature at which the pearlite was formed. As the samples are quenched below this critical temperature. These microstructures are called bainite and will be considered in more detail later. The transformation that produces this new phase is called a martensitic transformation. 3) Transformations during quenching. Then. As the interface moves. both the incubation time and the inter-lamellar spacing decrease. fine crystals of a BCT phase appear. Eventually. the sample does not transform entirely to pearlite. the amount of the new phase that is formed depends on the temperature to which the sample is cooled rather than the time it spends at that temperature. This is entertaining considering that the incubation time for forming bainite had been increasing as the temperature fell and it was getting easier and easier to preserve the austenite phase. The spacings can vary over the approximate range of 1 micrometer to 0. It is customary to refer to this by using terms such as "fine" or "coarse" pearlite. The temperature at which the martensitic transformation starts is called the Ms temperature. the lamellae are mostly parallel and are frequently curved. The spatial orientations of lamellae from colony to colony are not the same. In each colony of pearlite. 2) Transformations at lower temperatures As the temperature at which the transformation occurs is decreased further. they impinge on one another and finally the samples are converted into an assembly of pearlite colonies. We recall that the martensitic transformation occurs in relatively pure iron which contains very little carbon.acting as a boundary between the untransformed austenite ahead of it and the region that has transformed behind it. Pearlite is the name of the microstructural constituent that consists of alternating lamellae of the two phases. the phases in it are ferrite and cementite. The next important observation made in this experiment is that when samples are quenched to below a particular temperature (about 220°C in the present instance) it is no longer possible to retain all of the original austenite. It is an athermal transformation in plain carbon steels because it occurs during cooling and begins when the sample is cooled below a particular temperature. the incubation period begins to increase again. When the transformation occurs at low degrees of undercooling such groups of colonies become bounded from the austenite by an approximately spherically curved boundary and are called pearlite nodules. When rapid quenching suppresses the diffusion processes necessary for the formation of cementite in the steel and the temperature continues to fall. the particles of ferrite and cementite develop into plates so that the transformed volume comprises a lamellar array of alternating plates of these two phases. Later. It is important to note that pearlite is not a phase. join together and continue to advance into the austenite. neighboring colonies of lamellae. as the nodules continue to grow. As the temperature at which the transformation is occurring is decreased. the microstructure is made up entirely of fine aggregates of ferrite and cementite.

In plain carbon steels. increases as the temperature to which the samples are quenched decreases. We will follow this custom. provided the cooling rate is not too rapid. When the rate of cooling is slow enough for the transformation to begin and end just below the eutectoid isotherm the product will be coarse pearlite. further microstructural changes can occur. As these steels are cooled from the austenitizing temperature they pass through the alpha + gamma phase field before the A1 line is passed. that the BCT martensite is a phase that does not appear on the phase diagram. is the proeutectoid alpha phase. where the samples of eutectoid steel are mostly martensite with a small amount of untransformed austenite dispersed within them. finer and finer pearlite will appear and the spacings throughout the sample become more variable reflecting the fact that different colonies form at different temperatures. water or oil at room temperature. Hence. However. This statement will be elaborated upon in the future. This untransformed austenite is called retained austenite. The amount of martensite that is formed during quenching. it is appropriate to note. continuously cooled at various rates. bainite and martensite in the same piece of steel. but it is important to note that the martensitic transformation is not limited to steel. titanium alloys.g. the term martensite may not necessarily refer to a phase that occurs in steels. the first decomposition product that forms. Austenite can transform to bainite and the martensite can decompose into ferrite and carbides. Retained austenite is more important in alloy steels because many of the alloy steels have Mf temperatures that are lower than the temperatures of the usual cooling baths. It should now be reasonably easy to recognize the main changes associated with the decomposition of the austenite in larger samples. Hypoeutectoid Compositions. now. e. The amount that is present in a quenched sample depends upon the composition of the steel. In ferrous metallurgy it is customary to identify the phase that is produced in the steel as it is quenched below the Ms point by the name martensite. This is because it is a metastable phase that readily transforms when held at temperatures above a couple of hundred degrees Celsius. stabilized zirconia and cobalt. When the samples are held at the temperatures to which they have been quenched. Mixed microstructures of fine pearlite and bainite then become possible. For large samples in which different parts cool at different rates the microstructures will vary correspondingly and one can expect to find pearlite.become BCC but is distorted to BCT by the supersaturation of carbon that remains in solid solution. e. During slow 25 . As the cooling rate increases. Consequently.g. Transformations during cooling. brasses. The transformation ceases when the temperature falls below the Mf temperature. in materials in general. increasing the carbon content tends to increase the amount of retained austenite but only to a few percent. Details of the latter changes will be discussed later. It is a common mode by which materials can transform their crystal structures.

26 . From: Metals Handbook Ninth Edition. Structure is fine lamellar pearlite (dark) and ferrite (light). Volume 9. p. American Society for Metals.188.1045 steel bar. 1985.

In this case the proeutectoid phase is cementite. The composition of the austenite and its homogeneity will also depend on the cooling rate. as cooling continues. Then. Therefore. As the temperature at which the proeutectoid ferrite forms becomes lower and lower the morphology of the ferrite changes. Eventually. the austenite becomes inhomogeneous in composition and there is more of it present when the A1 temperature is reached than would be indicated by applying the lever rule to the phase diagram because the steel can no longer remain close to its equilibrium state as it cools. Widmanstatten plates of cementite occur but do not grow as easily as the ferrite. Eventually. The growth process now involves the nucleation and side-ways migration of the ledges that separate the flats. Hypereutectoid steels. These microstructural changes involve the diffusion of the carbon ahead of the ferrite/austenite boundaries so that the growth is controlled by long range diffusion in the austenite. when the cooling rates become fast enough. the under-cooling can create a thermodynamic driving force that is large enough to cause ferrite to nucleate within the austenite grains as well as on the boundaries. Growth along the grain boundaries becomes markedly easier than growth normal to them. Very slow cooling rates allow the composition with respect to carbon to be uniform and to approach the eutectoid composition at the A1 line. These nuclei also grow into plates. Proeutectoid ferrite continues to form as the temperature falls below the A 1 line. The microstructure on a polished and etched sample resembles feathers where the spine lies along the prior boundary and the quills project at oblique angles away from the boundary. which allows adequate time for the diffusion processes to occur. No preferred orientation relationships exist between the two phases. bainite and martensite begin to form and. These sideplates are wedge-like in shape and the broad faces comprise flat areas separated by ledges. ferrite side-plates emerge from these films and project into the austenite grains. the microstructure will consist of a mixture of equiaxed ferrite and austenite grains. Then pearlite appears and grows into the austenite. In such a case. all of the diffusion-controlled transformations can be suppressed and only the martensitic transformation occurs. films of ferrite form at the sites of the former austenite boundaries. as the cooling rate increases further. The volume fraction of pearlite present when the austenite has transformed will exceed that predicted by the appropriate tie-line on the phase diagram because the formation of pearlite begins before the equilibrium volume fraction of free ferrite has had time to form. The transformations and the resulting microstructures are very similar to those described above with the cementite replacing the ferrite. if the sample can be cooled fast enough. These side-plates are called Widmanstatten plates. the ferrite nucleates heterogeneously on the austenite grain boundaries and then grows along these boundaries and also into the austenite grain interiors forming equi-axed grains of ferrite embedded in the austenite. the austenite is now a eutectoid steel and it transforms as described previously.cooling. As the cooling rates are increased. When the temperature reaches that of the A1 line. The flat areas are interfaces across which special orientations exist. 27 . The microstructure of a hypoeutectoid steel that is cooled rapidly but at a rate that still permits the austenite to transform into ferrite plus pearlite will contain the Widmanstatten ferrite and fine pearlite. This is an important point to bear in mind if one is trying to estimate the carbon concentration in a plain carbon steel by observing its microstructure after cooling.

2C alloy. 7500*. separated by a grain boundary. Olin Corp.N. have orientations that favor growth into different austenite grains. Grains A and B.Magnification. p40 28 . Krauss. CT From G. Electron micrograph from an extraction replica..Wid manstatten side plate formation in a quenched Fe-0. Caron. New Haven. Courtesy of R.

Cementite in an hypereutectoid steel cementite appears white 29 .Pearlite and G.B.

A typical diagram is produced by the experiment described previously. A eutectoid steel TTT diagram. ferrite and cementite can still form below the MS temperature from the untransformed austenite as aging is continued. We continue our description of the decomposition of austenite by considering reactions that occur at constant temperatures. quenched to a selected temperature. The product of the transformation at temperatures above the nose is pearlite. i. Because the martensitic transformation in plain carbon steels is athermal. the transformation takes a long time to begin. tm and then begins to increase again. the samples are austenitized.e. held at that temperature for various times and then rapidly quenched to room temperature or below. Eventually the incubation time reaches a minimum. Inspection of this diagram reveals that at small degrees of undercooling below the A1 line. A horizontal line marks the Ms temperature which is the temperature at which martensite begins to form during cooling. Bainite is formed below the nose and mixtures of both microstructures are formed at the nose. cooling rates to the isothermal temperatures vary from experiment to experiment and from laboratory to laboratory so that particular diagrams. even if determined on identical steels.Isothermal Transformation Diagrams in Carbon Steels. Usually these curved lines present above the Ms line are not projected below it. can show differences due to microstructural changes that occur during cooling. in which small samples of the steel are austenitized so as to produce samples of austenite of the same grain size. the martensite forms during the cooling process and the amount that forms depends upon the temperature to which the sample is cooled. Then the temperature below which no more martensite forms is sometimes shown as the Mf temperature. The progress of any transformation is then measured by means of quantitative metallography and the data assembled to produce the diagram. Let us suppose that this diagram represents the true TTT diagram for an AISI 1080 steel. Sometimes other horizontal lines are plotted to depict temperatures at which 50 % of the sample is martensite etc. it depicts data from truly isothermal transformations. The samples are small so that the temperature can be varied rapidly and temperature gradients minimized. The diagrams have temperature as the ordinate and the logarithm of time in seconds as the abscissa. it should be noted that unless the Ms temperature is so low that diffusion is suppressed. The times at which transformations begin and end at various temperatures are plotted on the diagram. However. The diffusion controlled transformations that occur above this line are described by a pair of "C" shaped lines that mark the beginning and end of the transformations. In one method of determining a TTT diagram. A typical TTT diagram for a eutectoid plain carbon steel is shown in figure 4. The results have been published in the form of TTT diagrams which depict the Transformations as a function of Time at Temperature. However. The part of the “C” curves at this minimum incubation time is called the nose of the TTT diagram. The products of the transformations are ferrite and cementite. Many experimental investigations of isothermal transformations in steel have been made. 30 . As the degree of undercooling is increased the incubation time decreases rapidly even though the transformation is occurring at lower temperatures where diffusion is less rapid.

T Diagram 1 MIN 0 0.800 As 700 A 600 A Type: 1080 Grain size=6 Taustenitize =899 C 11 32 38 F+C 40 40 F + C 41 43 500 Temperature A + 400 A Ms 200 M50 M90 100 300 50 50% 55 57 I .5 1 2 5 10 102 103 1 HOUR 104 1 DAY 1 WEEK 105 106 Time .Seconds 31 Hardness-RC C .

say a cementite plate. This reduction in the carbon content encourages the nucleation of ferrite next to the nucleus of cementite. a. nucleation becomes possible.Pearlite formation The initiation process in the transformation that produces pearlite is the formation of neighboring nuclei of ferrite and cementite on a grain boundary in the austenite. It will be rich in carbon which it has obtained from its immediate surroundings. Consider the steady state nucleation flux equation: (See MSE 543)  ∆G∗  J = A.Ga for forming one mole of c from a. The 32 . and. This suggests that critically sized nuclei become smaller and smaller as the temperature falls and that the nucleation flux should increase because of the decrease in the magnitude of the free energy of formation of a critically sized nuclei. Suppose that first of all a nucleus of cementite forms on the boundary. Let us relate this quantity to the temperature. and for which ∆Gv is the chemical free energy change for forming a unit volume of the new phase. The nucleation flux is zero because there is no chemical free energy available to provide the energy required to form an interface between a nucleus and the matrix. as the temperature drops.exp −   kT  which relates the nucleation flux of particles of a new phase to the free energy of formation of a critically sized nucleus. the absolute temperature and Boltzmann's constant. The colony can add more plates by additional nucleation or by branching events in which one plate. the nuclei to which we are referring. the absolute magnitude of the free energy change driving the nucleation processes in the transformation increases. If this occurs and the cooperative process continues. There is no critically sized nucleus at the A1 line because all three phases can coexist-exist in equilibrium at that temperature. Using this fact and neglecting any changes in S and H caused by changes in the temperature. Of course. The free energy of formation of the critically sized nucleus is in the exponential term of the equation for the nucleation flux and its changes dominate the pre-exponential term (which contains the diffusion coefficient) in the temperature range above the nose. let us consider a simpler case. c. The chemical free energy of formation of ferrite and cementite from austenite becomes negative at temperatures below the A1 line. This is a plausible process that leads to the lamellar product. Thus we see that as the temperature of the austenite is decreased below the A1 line. one in which a single phase. To illustrate the essence of the process. adjacent nuclei of alternating ferrite and cementite are formed. transforms to another single phase. it is easily shown that ∆G = ∆H(1 . Let Ga and Gc be the molar free energies of the two phases and let H and S refer to the molar enthalpy and entropy respectively. bifurcates into two.TSc. form at heterogeneous sites on the grain boundaries and the grain boundary energy that is thereby released augments ∆G. Then Ga = H a -TSa and Gc = H c .T/Te) so that division by the molar volume of the new phase gives ∆Gv. ∆G = G c . These can then grow by a relatively short range diffusion process in which carbon diffuses parallel to the reaction front from in front of the growing ferrite to the growing cementite and the diffusion distance does not increase with time as would be the case for a continuous precipitation process. Note that when T>Te then ∆H is negative and vice versa. ∆G is zero when T = Te which is the temperature at which a and c coexist in equilibrium.

The change in the free energy. Metallography shows us that the inter-lamellar spacing is largest in pearlite that is formed at the highest temperatures and that it decreases as the temperature at which the transformation takes place is decreased. These effects lead us to predict that the kinetics of the transformation to pearlite would be described by "C" shaped TTT diagram. Hence it.. extends from the centers of two neighboring cementite lamellae. Why? Consider the sketch to represent a portion of pearlite in which the spacing . At temperatures near the eutectoid isotherm the driving force is small and the growth rates are correspondingly small. bainite microstructure. Now we should recognize that the pre exponential factor contains the diffusion coefficient of the rate controlling diffusion process by which the transformation takes place. x S S ferrite austenite 33 . should have kinetics described by “C” curves. the situation is more complicated than implied above because at the nose of the TTT diagram there is a change in the mode of transformation from that which produces pearlite to one which forms ferrite and cementite in the non-lamellar. x + . This gets smaller as the temperature falls and eventually the incubation period should increase again as cooling continues. a “C” curve is observed. If the pearlite reaction continued to take place as the temperature is continually decreased. For simplicity. The “C” curves describing the two reactions merge at the nose. The diffusion distances are of the order of the inter-lamellar spacing. too. Evidently the pearlite reaction is faster above the nose of the TTT diagram while the bainite reaction is faster below it. provides an explanation for the observation that the incubation period for the transformation to pearlite decreases as the temperature falls. In the particular case that we are considering. This diffusion process is required to move the carbon from the volume of austenite that is to become ferrite into the volume that is to become cementite. Usually this means that the new phases have grown considerably larger than the sizes of critical nuclei when they are visible. The growth rate of a pearlite colony depends on the rate of diffusion of carbon. Suppose the transformation interface advances a small distance δx. experimentally. per unit area of the interface. it is necessary that the products of the transformation be large enough to be observed.fact that the driving force for the phase transformation to occur increases as the temperature falls. This is a common observation for a solid state precipitation reaction that occurs by nucleation and growth. However. the decrease in the diffusion rates would become eventually become dominant and slow down the beginning of the transformation. to determine.S. However. The growth rates are influenced by diffusion rates and the driving force derived from the free energy change. This transformation also involves nucleation and growth controlled by diffusion. curvature of interfaces is neglected. that the transformation has begun. is given by: 2 ∆G =∆ Gv . Also. as the temperature is decreased the growth rate first increases and then decreases as the diffusion rates become dominant.

(Zener. due to a concentration gradient we can write the ∆X flux according to Fick’s first law: ∆C J = − D. A number of treatments of this process have been published. It is not a detailed rigorous treatment but it serves well to illustrate the nature of the problem. neglecting differences between the specific volumes of austenite and ferrite. the interfacial area created increases. The compositions refer to volume. = u.a. Pearlite of smaller spacing will not form because it would raise the free energy of the system. Hence. When x = 1. or ahead of the interface. C − C ∆X ( ) ( ) 34 . We will consider one of the original treatments. C − C This is the flux of solute. 167. we have: ∆C D. Experimental studies show that the growth rates of pearlite colonies at fixed temperatures are constant and independent of time. omitting the negative sign which merely indicates that diffusion occurs down the concentration gradient.S. many subsequent analyses have sought to elaborate on Zener’s work. TAIMME Vol.a. the carbon composition in the volume that becomes ferrite. per sec. As the interface moves. the total free energy change varies with the spacing of the lamellae. The width of the ferrite lamella is some fraction of the spacing S. 550. 2 Let the critical spacing be given by Smin .a. Let us make it S. There is a critical spacing at which the free energy change becomes zero.A. At a particular temperature. changes from Cγ ( the original composition of the austenite) to Cα . This observation tells us that the diffusion process is a steady ∆C state process. As the spacing decreases. 2 2 Hence ∆G = x− x. Then. 1946). ∆X Let us suppose that the rate of growth is such that the interface moves into the austenite at u cms. where a is a number less than one.S. the amount of solute that was transferred during one second of growth is u.where the first term on the right hand side contains the chemical free energy released per unit volume of pearlite formed and the other term contains the interfacial surface energy created.  S Smin  The growth of the pearlite in the direction shown. Then Smin = − ∆Gv ∆Gv is. ∆G refers to a unit volume of the pearlite and S Smin 1 1  then ∆G = 2  − . requires carbon to diffuse laterally at. For diffusion across an area. negative. A. A. of course.

indeed. Zener chose to make this distance approximately equal to S. Hence he wrote: Then because u is proportional to D and inversely to S we find D u ∝ ∆G S 1  1   and substituting we obtain u = K. but it is a reasonable suggestion because the colonies that grew the fastest should make up most of the pearlite at the end of the transformation and experimentally determined spacings should belong to 35 .D . the smaller the spacing becomes.b.2 . Smin − S  where K is  Recalling that ∆G = 2  −  S Smin  S  S. However. In this kind of a situation it is common to search for some extremum principle.a. a result that can be predicted intuitively. However. when D is known. An important aspect of this relationship is that if it had been derived by means of a rigorously correct method it would still be a relation in which u is some function of the variables D and S.b is about a half. What can we chose for A? Who knows? If diffusion does.The true form of the concentration gradient is unclear.S  where b is another number less than unity. ( ) The next problem we face is what to do with the area A.S. C − C  D u≅  ≅ a.S  S. C − C .b. u and S cannot be separately evaluated. or it could be occurring over some distance ahead of this interface. then it seems reasonable that the distance will be smaller.S  If the thickness of a ferrite lamella is much greater than that of a cementite plate. Zener noted that the rate of migration of an interface u ∝ ∆G . we need another equation relating the three variables. is often expressed as the product of a mobility and a driving force. then a. In order to evaluate u and S explicitly. ( ( ) ) This approximate treatment indicates that the growth rate at a given temperature is proportional to D and inversely proportional to S. The point of this remark is that a theoretical description that enables one to evaluate u when S and D are known. Using all these approximations we have:  D. the diffusion flux might be restricted to the boundary between the austenite and the pearlite. We have two extremes. The meaning of this should become clearer as we continue with Zener. if we assume that the concentration is Cα at the interface between the ferrite and cementite. take place in the austenite some distance ahead of the interface. It would be much more useful to be able to predict both u and S when only D is known. and Cγ ahead of the center of the ferrite lamella. then an approximate expression is: ∆C  C − C  =  ∆X  b. Smin  a constant. There is no obvious reason why this should be so. In an attempt to obtain one. Let’s suppose the latter is the case. is not particularly enlightening. Zener proposed that the spacing that would occur would be that which would maximize u.

∆T Although this equation is not quantitatively correct. 36 .them. It has also been the subject of crystallographic orientation studies. In general. a knowledge of specific details is unnecessary for our purposes here. In this region that extends from the nose to the A1 line. 2 Because ∆Gv = − Smin then 4 S= q. Then. These studies are interesting and relevant to the topic of phase transformations. A number of theoretical descriptions of the growth of pearlite have been published since this early treatment. considering curved interfaces and the effects of alloying elements but the difficulty of separating S and u explicitly remains. we have been considering only the upper portion of the TTT diagram for a eutectoid steel. In practice it is wise not to identify the microstructure unequivocally ( particularly from a single photomicrograph) without additional supporting information. we can differentiate u with respect to S and equate the result to zero. the lamellar product is replaced by mixtures of discrete particles of cementite in ferrite. References to these works can be found in Honeycombe’s book. the product formed near the nose is called upper bainite and that near the martensitic start temperature is called lower bainite. Pearlite has been the subject of many investigations in which the characteristics of it’s formation are compared to the predictions of early theories of nucleation and growth kinetics. So far. Assuming this to be so. Now the magnitude of the chemical free energy change for forming a unit volume of pearlite is proportional to the undercooling below the equilibrium temperature. At this stage it is worthwhile for the reader to spend a few hours examining microstructures of plain carbon steel as shown in the optical photomicrographs that are presented in the ASM atlas of microstructures. however. Numerous studies have been conducted by optical microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. It has often been stated that upper bainite looks like feathers in optical micrographs while lower bainite is more acicular. Details of these microstructures vary with the temperature and also vary from steel to steel.g. they attempt to refine Zener’s work by trying to take more parameters into account e. after a little algebra. the product of isothermal transformations is pearlite. Another type of microstructure is formed during isothermal transformations below the nose. Bainite and Martensite. ∆T where q is a constant. eighth and ninth editions. it is of the correct form because the average spacing in pearlite varies inversely with the undercooling. we find that the spacing is twice as big as the minimum possible spacing.Hence we may write: ∆Gv = q. In general. It is not easy to distinguish between them. In this temperature range. As a result. ∆T=(Te-T). the following major characteristics have been identified. In upper bainite.

As the temperature of the austenite being quenched falls below the Ms temperature. elongated grains that resemble laths.e. diffusion creates the carbides and the ferrite forms martensitically. have considered that the surface relief that forms when lower bainite is created is significant. The cementite particles lie on the long boundaries between the individual laths. This marks the beginning of the martensitic transformation. Particles of cementite form both at the boundaries between the grains and within the crystals of ferrite. but it is interesting to consider some generalities of the subject. (1996). Thus. One issue concerns whether or not there is a contribution from a displacive or martensitic mechanism i. surface relief is generated because the flat surface becomes rumpled and tilted during the transformation. if the carbon content at various locations is reduced by the precipitation of cementite then the Ms temperatures for these locations would be raised and the allotropic change accomplished martensitically. Opposing viewpoints have been presented and hotly debated by respected scientists. in Met and Mat Transactions. The Ms point for the initiation of martensite is raised as the carbon content of the austenite is reduced. They interpret their observations as showing that the needles or plates within the sheaves of lower bainite are built up of smaller units. concerns interpretations of topographical observations made using the relatively novel technique of scanning. As more instrumental techniques for studying the bainitic microstructure are created and improved more complexities are revealed. This conclusion. Surface relief is uncommon in transformations that only involve diffusion. Others believe that the transformation is a diffusion controlled nucleation and growth process in which the crystals grow by the lateral propagation of ledges and the sheaves form because of sympathetic nucleation of new crystals at the boundaries of the prior crystals.the ferrite comprises bundles or sheaves of fine. Articles supporting both viewpoints have been published in the technical literature during the past five years so one can hardly say that the situation has been fully resolved to everyone’s agreement but it seems fair to suggest that the nucleation and growth description is most favored. They conclude that the bainite plates consist of subplates which consist of subunits which are made up of sub-subunits which consist of (you guessed it!) sub-sub-subunits. in part. 27A. In contrast. at lower temperatures the ferrite crystals that form the sheaves appear more like needles and plates. 1535. Some examples of these microstructural details have been presented recently by Fang et al. Proponents of the viewpoint that there is such a contribution. Such a mode of transformation has been dubbed a diffusion paced martensitic mode. A martensitic transformation can be defined as a 37 . tunneling microscopy and its validity awaits confirmation. a transformation of structure begins to take place while the temperature is falling. Such details are really beyond the ambit of these notes. It is also observed that when the transformation to lower bainite is conducted in samples that have been previously metallographically polished. An understanding of the mechanism(s) by which the bainitic microstructures form has been actively sought for decades. it occurs generally during martensitic transformations.

eds RWK Honeycombe and HKDH Bhadeshia. From: Steels: Microstructre and Properties. Two surface composite micrograph. 0.34C steel transformed at 400 C. 0. x670.. p. x330.Microstructure of upper bainite: a. 0. Dislocations visible. b. Edward Arnold. 1995. 0. Thin foil EM.116.8C steel transformed 20s at 400 C. c. d. Thin foil EM.8C steel transformed at 450 C. 2n d ed. 38 .8C steel transformed 5s at 450 C.

RWK Honeycombe and HKDH Bhadeshia.Microstructure of lower bainite a. p. x260. 2n d edition. x260.8C steel transformed 6 min at 250 C. Two surface composite micrograph. b. 0. 1995. c. From: Steels: Microstructure and Properties. 0. Edward Arnold. eds. 39 .8C steel transfromed at 300 C. 0.8C steel transformed 30s at 300 C. Thin-foil EM. d.6C steel tranformed at 300 C.119. 0. Thin-foil EM.

if the Mf temperature is below that of the quenching bath and room temperature. Furthermore. the definition of a martensitic transformation does not include the word quenching. not on the length of time spent at that temperature. martensite. the untransformed austenite can decompose to form bainite. We note here that the quench rates that are of practical importance are those obtainable by plunging the steel into liquid baths such as iced brine. inspection of the sketches illustrating the Bain strain shows that the carbon atoms that were previously randomly distributed in the octahedral sites of the austenite now occupy a particular selected set of sites within the martensite. We find that it begins to happen when Te-T becomes large enough. The displacements associated with the transformation in iron are illustrated in the sketches. when we turn to the case of a plain carbon steel and quench its austenite too rapidly for any change to be wrought by diffusion. does it without using diffusion. These show what is called the Bain strain. At these rates there is insufficient time for the structural change to be produced by diffusion. The amount of retained austenite that is found in steels varies with composition tending to be more prevalent in steels containing high contents of carbon and other alloying elements. The transformation is called martensitic. the phase is metastable and is a supersaturated solid solution if its carbon content exceeds the solubility in ferrite. This is a strain proposed by Edgar Bain to describe the distortion of a tetragonal cell in the FCC crystal into the BCC of the martensite. Instead. It is important to recognize that the transformation rarely goes completely to 100%. Eventually. A small amount of the microstructure in a eutectoid plain carbon steel can be retained austenite. when prevented from doing it by means of diffusion.2 wt. The martensite in pure iron is the stable phase. Obviously. the effect of these treatments are under discussion here. In most steels. However. but the martensitic change is available for the iron. When the carbon content exceeds about 0. austenite will be retained. the iron atoms still wish to adopt BCC positions. Hence. This can happen if the free energy released is negative even though the transformation produces an intermediate metastable state.mechanism for changing crystallographic structure that does not require atomic diffusion. i.% the carbon atoms produce a significant tetragonal distortion so that the structure becomes BCT. it does so by means of a displacive transformation by which it is possible to displace the atoms from FCC positions to BCC positions without requiring them to hop from site to site by diffusion. the temperature falls to below the Ms temperature. The possibility arises that the FCC solid solution can change to a BCC solid solution. The c/a ratio of the tetragonal unit cell increases as the carbon content 40 . If a sample of a steel is partially transformed to martensite by being quenched to a temperature above the M f temperature and then held at that temperature. Cementite can only form when diffusion is possible because one out of four atoms in it is C. It is customary to call the phase produced by the martensitic transformation. For the sake of completeness we might as well note also that there are some steels in which it is possible for a martensitic transformation to occur as an isothermal transformation. the samples became BCC. Now. the transformation ceases at the Mf temperature. What is ferrous martensite? Earlier we discussed experiments in which iron and dilute iron carbon binary alloys were quenched at rates above 105 K/sec. Evidently the iron knows another way to change its structure and.e. Because the carbon content is unchanged during the formation of martensite in a plain carbon steel. even though it contains numerous defects such as dislocations and boundaries. this transformation occurs very rapidly during the quench and the fraction transformed depends on the temperature to which the sample is cooled.

80 a-axis c-axis c/a = 1 + 0. A 3. p.2 1.36 3.c-axis a-axis Range of positions for iron atoms Probable positions for carbon atoms From: Bain & Paxton.95 2.00 2.2 0. % From: Leslie.0 1.045 (wt% C) 0 0.8 1.71 41 .6 Carbon. p.4 1.05 Lattice dimension.35.6 0.85 2.4 0.90 2.

[001] [001] ’ [010] ’ [010] [100] [100] ’ ao c ao / 2 a In the above image. 42 . with a lattice parameter ag. Imagine that the BCT cell is removed and distorted so that its sides all become a . A BCT cell is obtained by connecting the 8 FCC sites. This cell has sides a and a / 2. there are two FCC adjacent unit cells. this is the case. In the below image. with a=c.

6 1 Old position New position of scratch Old position of scratch New position Habit Plane M Unconstrained martensitic transformation forming A plane  1  B= 0  0 Old position 0 2 0 0  0  3 Structure change P=structure invariant shear PBaAn undistorted plane T=RPBaIInvariant plane strain 43 .3 c axis 1000 F A 2.85 Ms 600 400 a axis 0.86 2.06 wt % C Free surface 0.

p. thin-foil EM showing twinning in martensite laths. Edward Arnold. From: Steels: Microstructures and Properties.8C alloy quenched from 1100 C: a. 2n d edition. optical micrograph x200. eds. 1995.Fe-0.95 44 . b. RWK Honeycombe and HKDH Bhadeshia.

An important characteristic of the martensitic transformation is that it produces surface relief on a metallographically polished surface. When a portion of the austenite is converted to the other crystal structure. The crystals of martensite vary from fine laths in low carbon steels. Details depend upon the Ms temperature. the plates contain arrays of very fine twins. lath martensite appears to be more orderly than does plate martensite. Excellent examples of martensitic microstructures can be found in chapter 3 of Krauss' book. Although each martensitic crystal could. The habit plane of the plate martensite in carbon steel varies from {225} for steels with 0. Martensitic crystals in low carbon steels are fine laths which contain a high density ( >1011 cms. As the carbon content is increased. This is because the shape and volume change associated with the transformation are resisted by the austenitic matrix. Hence. Lath martensitic crystals contain a dense population of dislocations that are associated both with the transformation itself and with the strains generated by the volume change. crystals shaped like plates appear./cm. with the c value increasing at a greater rate than the rate at which the a parameter decreases. The lath morphology is such that the laths form in packets of nearly parallel units. Plate martensite is much less dislocated. 45 . provide the minimum macroscopic shape change. The cracks can range from small micro cracks that require microscopy to be detected. At high carbon levels these stresses can become so severe that the material cracks as the martensite forms.increases. there are 12 non parallel variants. % C. the individual units are often too small to be resolved in an optical microscope. they occur in groups of three with each group clustered about a (111) with only 16 degrees between members of a group. the transformation creates residual stresses and strains related to the specific volume change in addition to the strains due to the misfit of the interstitial solute atoms. The transformation is also associated with an appreciable volume increase because it replaces the close packed FCC structure with a BCT structure of smaller density. Twins begin to replace the dislocations within the plates so that high-carbon martensite is composed mainly of twinned plates. choose any of these variants there is a tendency for certain variants to occur in groups. in combination. to large cracks easily visible to the unaided eye. portions of the free-surface of the sample become tilted from the previous orientation as the martensite forms.92 wt.78 wt. as the carbon concentration increases. the variations in c and in a are linear. in principle. There are 12 variants for the former and 24 variants for the latter. This resistance encourages the choice of those variants which. instead. The microstructure of martensitic steel is complex and varies in detail from steel to steel. To a good approximation. to plates in high carbon steels. Because there are only 4 non parallel variants for {111}. its physical shape is also changed. Because of this. In general lath martensite forms in the high temperature range and lenticular or plate-like martensite forms at lower temperatures. Because these indices have two identical digits. Experimental studies have shown that the transformation shape change transforms planes into planes and straight lines into straight lines but only special planes remain unrotated. However. The total strain resulting from a martensitic transformation is the result of the shape change produced by the crystallographic change itself combined with post-transformation strains caused by creating the martensitic crystals within the austenite matrix. This is due to the displacive nature of the transformation. For plain carbon steels this translates into a dependence of the microstructure on carbon content because increasing the carbon content lowers the Ms temperature.% C to {259} for 1. The crystals have habit planes that tend to lie close to the {111} planes in the austenite. 3) of dislocation line. Orientations of {557} have been reported.

This conclusion has been reached because planes are tilted but remain planes. straight lines (such as a scratch on the surface of the sample) become kinked but remain made up of straight segments. For ferrous martensite n1 = n2 are equal and greater than one. This is usually referred to as the lattice strain. y and z axes lie along the edges of the unit cell. a crystal of plate martensite in contact with austenite at the habit plane clearly shares the same interface. it does not directly concern itself with the mechanism by which the transformation takes place. y and z. The actual values depend upon carbon content. a strain which does not change the degree of an equation. This shows that the Bain strain does not leave any 46 . The numerical values of the components of the Bain strain vary with carbon concentration because of the variation in the c/a ratio of the martensite. It is obtained directly from the lattice parameters of the corresponding cells. During the transformation. First we consider an origin of an orthogonal coordinate system located on a corner of the tetragonal cell drawn in the FCC lattice on page 20 such that the x. we conclude that if we were to describe the transformation by a homogeneous strain then the strain would have to leave at least one plane (the habit plane) of the austenite unchanged. e2 and e3 along these axes but leaves the angles between them unchanged. i. It is usual to separate the two by calling any strains that do not refer to the transformation of the structure. The objective of this theory is to determine a strain that would produce both the crystallographic change and the shape change simultaneously when applied to austenite. We have already met a strain that will accomplish this. hence. Let us consider some elements of this theory.The total change in the shape caused by a martensitic transformation is the result of the shape change associated with the transformation alone and the strains arising from the interaction between the martensite and the matrix. The first thing that the strain must produce is the conversion of the FCC unit cell into the BCT unit cell. There are distortions but these are attributed to the posttransformation strains. An important result of the shape change is that previously flat surfaces become tilted and rumpled during the transformation. Theoretical attempts to determine the strain have led to the phenomenological theory of the martensitic transformation. The change in shape produced by applying such a strain to a sphere is shown in the accompanying sketches appended to this text. This is why it is a phenomenological theory. Thus the strain that describes the transformation of austenite to martensite is a homogeneous invariant plane strain. post-transformation strains. which are not relevant to the actual phase transformation mechanism. Studies of the formation of plate martensite have shown that the general shape change can be described as being produced by a homogeneous strain. Then if the lattice is deformed so that the coordinates become x’. It is the Bain strain introduced on page 20. y’ and z’ then x’ = (1 + e1 )x = n1x y’ = (1 + e2 )y = n2y z’ = (1 + e3 )z = n3z Where the n’s are called distortions. It is clear that the “before” and “after” shapes now have surfaces that coincide along two circles. One can describe the coordinates of any other point by x. n3 is less than one. The Bain strain causes strains of e1.e.

and T=RPB. z are the coordinates of a point on the inner sphere. One is shown. No plane is invariant or distorted. In this case R is a rigid body rotation that puts it back. Shear strain. 0. None are distorted. Use a strain e2 and e3 .12 and –0. It turns out that this can be reversed by a shear strain.12. Typical values for Fe-C martensite (they vary with %C) are 0.2 {note: In the martensite BCT cell c>a but a c and a / 2 a}. x Inner sphere expands to outer sphere z 3) Now apply the Bain strain to the sphere. such that at least one plane is undistorted. Often this plane is rotated. 2) All straight lines and planes in the inner sphere become straight lines and planes in the outer sphere. x Invariant line Lengthens 6) Hence there is a combination of strains. There are lines common to both. Bain Strain B 5) Note that shear shortens some vectors and lengthens others. PB. y. 4) paper some lines are shortened and some are lengthened. The strain produces the ellipsoid shown. P Shortens 47 .THE INVARIANT PLANE IN A MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION z y 1) Let inner sphere be expanded isotropically by 2 2 R = x 2(1 + e) + y 2 (1 + e ) + z 2(1+ e)2 where x.

plane in the sphere undistorted or invariant. Thus, whereas it can produce the lattice change it cannot describe the martensitic shape change. Therefore, it is necessary to seek additional strains which can change the shape but not the structure of the crystal. Such strains are shears produced by slip or by twinning. Particular shear strains, P, have been found which when combined with B produces a total strain, PB, that creates the martensitic crystal structure and leaves at least one plane undistorted. Usually it is found that when this P is determined the undistorted plane is not invariant but has been rotated. To take care of this, a rotation R is included to finally produce an invariant plane strain. The total transformation strain can then be written as T =RPB Although the theory is phenomenological, it is interesting to note that when it successfully describes a transformation, the martensitic crystals are found to be internally twinned by twins that correspond with the twinning shear used for P. The phenomenological theory has been successful in ferrous alloys e. g. binary Fe-Pt alloys, but it is only partially successful in carbon steels because it does not predict the variation of the habit planes observed. This may well be a consequence of the post transformation strains. Hypoeutectoid TTT Diagrams The first difference that arises in diagrams of hypoeutectoid steels compared to that of a eutectoid steel is the austenite can now transform at temperatures below the A3 point and a corresponding horizontal line appears on the diagram. When the austenite is held at temperatures between the A3 line and the A1 line it will eventually transform into a mixture of austenite and proeutectoid ferrite. Normally only the proeutectoid start-line is presented in published TTT diagrams; the finish line is omitted. The time-temperature behavior shown by the proeutectoid start line is controlled by the same nucleation considerations discussed before. The ferrite start line continues down below the A1 line. For transformations effected at temperatures not far below the A1 , the ferrite start line is followed by the start and finish lines of the ferrite + carbide transformation. Thus, during such isothermal transformations, ferrite crystals form first and then pearlite forms. At these temperatures the incubation times for the start of the transformations decrease as the carbon content of the steel is decreased. Eventually, the incubation times for the nucleation of the proeutectoid ferrite becomes so small that they cannot be measured with the resolution of typical experiments and the line ends at the ordinate axis. For compositions that allow the ferrite start lines to be distinguished, it is found that the ferrite start-line merges with the ferrite + carbide start-lines as the temperature is decreased, forming a nose on the diagram. As pointed out above, for low carbon contents, the transformation begins too rapidly near the nose for its initiation to be plotted on the diagram. In these cases, the lines simply merge with the ordinate axis which, typically, corresponds to 0.5 seconds. This is the second difference in the TTT diagrams: the nose of the “C” curve moves towards shorter times as the carbon content of the steel is decreased. Another difference in the TTT diagrams is that the Ms temperature rises as the carbon content decreases. In hypereutectoid alloys, the proeutectoid phase is cementite so the diagrams are modified by the appearance of the cementite start-line. The martensitic transformation temperatures continue to be depressed as the carbon content is increased. Let us consider these changes in more detail.

48

After: Bain & Paxton, p13 2800 2600 1400 2400 Temperature, F 2200 Austenite + Melt 1300 1200 Austenite 1100 1000 900 Austenite + Ferrite Austenite + carbide 800 700 1200 1000 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 Ferrite Ferrite + Carbide 600 Temperature, C + Melt

Melt

1500

2000 1800 1600 1400

Carbon, wt. %

49

C 800 700 600 500
Temperature

A As

Type: 1006 Grain size=7 Taustenitize =913
A+ F

C

F A+
Ms M50 M90

+C F+C

400 300 200 100
1 MIN 1 HOUR 1 DAY 1 WEEK

I - T Diagram

0 0 1 2 5 10

102

103

104

105

106

Time - Seconds C 800 700 600 500 Ms Af A 90%
C

A+F As

85 RB F+C Type: 1021 Grain size=8-9 Taustenitize =927 C 90 RB 14 22 34

400 300 200

A+

F+

I - T Diagram 100
1 MIN 1 HOUR 1 DAY 1 WEEK

0 0 1 2 5 10

102

103

104

105

106

Time - Seconds

50

Hardness-RC

C 800 700 A 600 500 Temperature Af As A A+F F+C A+F+C 50% Type: 1050 Grain size=7-8 Taustenitize =910 C 18 23 28 32 36 42 Ms 48 52 I .51 2 5 10 102 103 104 105 106 Time .T Diagram 400 300 200 100 A M50 M90 1 MIN 1 HOUR 1 DAY 1 WEEK 0 0 1 2 5 10 102 103 104 105 106 Time .Seconds 51 Hardness-RC .T Diagram 1 MIN 1 HOUR 1 DAY 1 WEEK Ms M50 M90 0.Seconds Hardness-RC C 800 As 700 A 600 F+C Temperature A Type: 1080 Grain size=6 Taustenitize =899 C 11 32 38 40 40 F+ C 41 43 A 50% 500 400 A + 300 200 100 0 50 55 57 I .

T Diagram 1 HOUR 1 DAY 1 WEEK 57 58 0 0 1 2 5 10 102 103 104 105 106 Time .Seconds After: Atlas of Time-Temperature Diagrams for Irons & Steels 52 Hardness-RC .C 800 As 700 600 A+F+C 500 Temperature 400 A 300 Ms 200 100 M50 M90 1 MIN A Type: 1086 / 1095 Grain size=6 Taustenitize =899 C 33 F+C 40 42 42 42 47 52 50% I .

The incubation time for the formation of proeutectoid ferrite continues to decrease for a given steel as the transformation temperature decreases below the A1 line. γb be the specific grain boundary energy and suppose that there is no strain energy involved. the surface energy of the ferrite/austenite interface be γ per unit area. The magnitude of the time interval between the ferrite start curve and the pearlite start line decreases as the temperature is lowered until either the two lines meet the ordinate axis or they merge at the nose of the diagram. Because the martensite is a metastable phase. nucleation of ferrite plates begins to take place within the austenite grains. the under cooling increases as the carbon content decreases because of the slope of the A3 line. such as the energy of creating new surfaces. − Ab . the nucleation flux is enhanced and the ferrite forms earlier as the carbon content is reduced in steels transformed at the same temperature. the surface area of the particle be An. Suppose that samples have been austenitized and rapidly quenched to and held at temperatures below the A3 point and above the A1 line. The nucleation flux depends on the free energy of formation of a critically sized nucleus. The curves approach each other more and more closely as the temperature decreases because nucleation of pearlite becomes easier due to the increased driving force at the lower temperatures and also because of the carbon concentration immediately in front of the growing ferrite . The martensitic transformation attempts to convert the FCC iron to the BCC allotrope. Also. the nucleation flux of ferrite crystals becomes significant. Let the volume be V. morphological changes such as the formation of Widmanstatten side plates of ferrite occur. that the critical value decreases as the magnitude of the (negative) free energy of formation of ferrite increases. When the magnitude of this free energy change is large enough to compensate for other positive terms. Then. Note . Experimental observations show that the ferrite nucleates heterogeneously on austenite grain boundaries. the undercooling required for its formation is larger than that required for the formation of ferrite. The martensitic phase can then logically be regarded as an extension of the ferrite and therefore the driving force for its formation derives from the undercooling below the A3 line. the free energy of formation of the embryo is: ∆G = V. at the lower temperatures. Let us suppose that lens shaped embryos form and each one eliminates an area of the grain boundary. the grain boundary area eliminated be Ab. The product is BCT because of the carbon incorporated in the crystals. Furthermore. Inspection of the phase diagram shows that for a particular temperature of transformation. This quantity is proportional to the under cooling below the A3 line. The 53 . At these temperatures the steel will tend to transform to a mixture of austenite and ferrite because it is supersaturated with respect to the ferrite which means that the free energy change for forming a unit volume of ferrite from the austenite becomes negative (this refers to the bulk or chemical free energy). b and the critical value is the maximum value for a given shape. Some time after the ferrite begins forming the pearlite transformation starts.The nucleation of ferrite in hypoeutectoid steels. The start of the transformation is controlled by nucleation because the transformation is controlled by nucleation and growth. A consequence of this is that the final microstructure of the steel can often contain a smaller volume fraction of proeutectoid ferrite than that which would be predicted by applying the lever rule to the phase diagram. Hence. now .∆Gv + An . Once a pearlite colony is nucleated it can grow more rapidly than the ferrite because the growth rate of the latter is controlled by long range diffusion.

The real TTT diagram (i. Thus. the cooling rate must be fast enough so that a transformation that takes place by diffusion controlled mechanisms doesn’t have time to occur. However. Thus the first reason for an increase in the Ms temperature as the carbon content decreases. 993. This reduces the required driving force and hence the necessary undercooling. Trans. Isothermal transformation diagrams provide valuable information about the kinetics of the transformation of austenite and are useful tools for considering heat-treatments. instantaneous temperature changes as is shown by the stepped line. each of the horizontal steps represents a fraction of the incubation period log (t) corresponding to that temperature. 22A. the diagram that describes transformations in samples which cannot be quenched extremely rapidly) is not the same as the true isothermal diagram. however. Also. In practical heattreatments.e. In order to attain the high undercooling. In the case of hypereutectoid steels. Scheil proposed that these “fractional incubation times” could reduce the time required for the transformation to begin during the final isothermal stage. A true isothermal start line or “ C ” curve is shown as well as a cooling path( dotted line ) down to an isothermal transformation temperature. Continuous Transformation Diagrams. the martensite can still be regarded as an extension of the ferrite. e.Ms temperature is determined by the degree of super cooling necessary to provide an adequate driving force. and the austenite undercooling is determined by the extrapolation of the ferrite plus austenite/austenite phase boundary below the A1 line. Wierszykkowski in Met. the temperature and its rate of change vary with position within the part being heat treated. Simultaneously. For these reasons the Ms temperature increases as the carbon content falls. where the size of the part being treated is usually significant. (1991). the degree of supersaturation of the martensite with respect to carbon decreases as the total carbon content decreases. This is indicated in the sketch. When this is so. The reduction in the amount of carbon in the martensite reduces the strain energy associated with the misfit of the carbon atoms with the interstitial sites. there is an increase in strain energy within the martensite due to the increasing carbon conten. the transformation begins when the Ms point is passed.A. when t/ti = 1. the magnitude of the undercooling at a particular transformation temperature decreases as the carbon content rises. there are heat treatments in which the austenite is cooled continuously. This has been considered further by I. All of the isothermal steps from a to b in the series drawn on the sketch. During a truly isothermal transformation that takes place at a temperature Ti the transformation begins when the time t = ti i. Inspection of this sketch shows that as the temperature falls through the Q b real To true transformation range below T0 . Also. is because the A3 point moves to higher temperatures thereby increasing the amount of undercooling for a given transformation temperature. are too short for the transformation to have begun at any of the temperatures 54 . This cooling curve can be approximated by a series of isothermal T steps linked by vertical. similar comments can be made with respect to the proeutectoid cementite phase. These two effects combine to depress the Ms point further. In the 1930’s.

if a cylindrical bar is quenched in a bath of cold water. Similar lines which show the progress of the transformation in terms of the % completed are often appended between the start and finish curves. In order for the center of the part to cool. it has a variety of real diagrams in practice because of the influence of different rates of cooling which are themselves dependent on the sieze of the piece of steel and the nature of the quenchant used. They are methods of cooling that are commonly used in practice. These quenching media extract heat from the surface of a bar at different rates with the water quench being the most rapid. This statement is not intended to imply that all quenching oils extract heat at the same rates. 55 . the austenite is still austenite.b. It should be noted that this microstructure will not necessarily be found throughout the bar. The actual rates of cooling depend upon shape. the heat is extracted from the free surface. Thus. oil and water respectively. The first type uses axes that show the temperature of the steel on the ordinate axis and the logarithm of time in seconds along the abscissa. Then lines are drawn on the diagram to show the cooling path in terms of the variation of temperature with time. heat has to be conducted to the free surface. For example. To use a continuous diagram of the kind we are discussing requires a knowledge of the cooling rates at various positions. so the diagrams provide guidelines but should not be regarded as quantitatively applicable. Thus at point . thermal conductivity and the rate of extraction of the heat. The location of this point is marked on the diagram and joined to similar points on other cooling paths to create curved lines that denote the initiation of the decomposition of the austenite. If the isothermal stage begins at b. If we consider one such cooling path and travel along it . The second type of diagram retains temperature as the ordinate axis but calibrates the abscissa in terms of diameters of steel bars cooled in air. the surface cools the most rapidly and the center the most slowly. There are also variations in chemical composition among steels of the same designation which can change details of the transformation. downwards from the austenite. we encounter the start of a transformation. With those caveats. the diagrams show the progress of the transformation at the center of bars of various diameters when they are cooled at those rates. This has led to the creation of diagrams that predict the modes of transformation that take place during cooling.concerned. We are forced to conclude that even though a particular steel will possess a particular true TTT diagram. size. Diagrams of this type are determined experimentally by means of dilatometry. then the transformation will begin after an additional time of ∆tx We see that the real TTT curves will be displaced to the right on the diagram. When a steel part is austenitized and cooled. Then the diagram is divided into areas according to the nature of the product of the transformation. ∆tx is smaller than the true isothermal transformation time for that temperature because some of the “pre-precipitation” microstructural changes will have already occurred. different parts of the steel will cool at different rates. There are two main types of continuous cooling diagrams.

1600 Austenitizing temperature 1400 AC3 AC1 21 00 F/ hr t Aus e to enit 1200 54 00 /hr 0F 210 ferr to ite en ite st l Au ear p ite 40 150 F/h 1000 /hr 0 F F/h r r. 800 Temperature.NOTE: THIS ALLOY STEEL HAS SEPARATE PEARLITE AND BAINITE CURVES. F Austenite to bainite 600 Austenite to martensite 400 200 Martensite 0 Martensite bainite Martensite Martensite perrite Ferrite ferrite pearlite pearlit bainite bainite e 1*102 2*102 5*102 1*103 2*103 5*103 1*104 2*104 2*10 5*10 5 10 5*104 1*105 2*105 Transformation time--seconds 56 5*105 .

5 1 20 50 FINISH Ac3 Ac1 Mn 0.CONTINUOUS COOLING TRANSFORMATION DIADRAM 40 C 1038--1040 Austenitized at 850 C Previous treatment rolled Analysis Wt % (See note on page 8) C Si 0.020 0.20 900 800 700 P 600 500 C B 400 300 200 100 0 0.020 -- Mo -- Ni -- Al -- Nb -- V -- A F START 10 % 50 % 90 % M 1000 500 200 100 50 20 10 5 2 1 COOLING RATE AT 750 C 2 5 50 10 20 C PER MIN 500 1000 2000 mm OIL mm WATER 50 100 200 100 150 200 300 500 100 150 200 300 500 57 .2 BAR DIAMETER 5 10 10 20 0.40 0.1 0.70 P S Cr 0.

3 Still oil H = 0.50 10 5 2 1 0.25-0.8-1.8 40 0.30 0.4 Well circulated oil 0 1 2 3 Distance from quenched end (cm) 4 5 After: Honeycombe.40 0.2 20 0. p.0 1.4 D0 (mm) 30 0.01 0 0 10 20 30 40 Di (mm) 50 60 70 H-coefficients of quenching media Cooling medium Oil 0.5 Strongly circulated water H = 1.2-1.3 4.0 Still water 8 H = 0.0 Brine 2.126.35-0.1 Agitation None Moderate Violent Water 1.0 5.25 Still oil H = 0.130 58 .1 10 0.0 Ideal or severest possible quench H = 1.

4 0.07) 6 (0.025) 18 14 10 0 0. Honeycombe. Steels – Microstructures & Properties.8 1 Carbon content (%) After: R.036) 8 (0. p.26 Grain size 4 (0.2 0.W.05) 7 (0.K.10 mm) Base hardenability.131 59 .6 0. DiC (mm) 22 5 (0.

Plain carbon steel is very often used when it consists of a mixture of ferrite and pearlite. The first consequence of the lamellar microstructure of alternating ductile and hard. C and N. Ferrite is a BCC iron solid solution and it can behave as described above. The generation of cracks in the cementite plates can initiate general fracture which implies that coarse pearlite should fail before fine pearlite because the cementite plates are expected to crack sooner when the ferrite lamellae are thicker and. We have already reviewed the behavior of iron when it is deformed in a tensile test. serrated yield can occur. Ferrite Pearlite steels. brittle plates is an increase in the yield stress of the material compared to that of the ferritic matrix because the inter-lamellar spacing is usually much smaller than the proeutectoid ferrite grain size. Taking these contributions to be additive. This gives rise to the yield point phenomenon in which the iron shows an upper and lower yield point and a Luders extension. In particular. fine pearlite is both stronger and more ductile than coarse pearlite. we can write the yield stress as: y = 1 2 + md 2 −1 where α and m are material constants. 60 . This prediction is also true. Hence. Stress concentrations are created at the ends of pile ups where the dislocations meet the ferrite carbide interfaces and eventually the carbides can be broken. The flow stress in polycrystalline ferrite ( this is the lower yield strength if a yield point phenomenon occurs) is dependent on dislocation density and grain size. when the interstitial solutes. This occurs more rapidly when the ferrite plates are thicker because more dislocations can participate in an individual pile-up for a given applied stress. We expect that the increase in the yield stress due to the restriction of dislocation glide paths in the ferrite lamellae should be larger the finer the spacing in the pearlite. ρ is the dislocation density and µ is the elastic shear modulus. The yield and ultimate strengths of these steels are controlled by the mechanical properties of the ferrite and cementite and microstructural details concerning how they are mixed together. This expectation turns out to be true. yield in a pearlitic microstructure is associated with the movement of dislocations in the ferrite. At higher temperatures. Another consequence of the interactions between the interstitial solutes and dislocations is the increase in strength and the corresponding reduction in ductility arising from strain aging. It can crack. When dislocation sources are activated in the ferrite plates the glide paths of the dislocations are limited by the cementite plates because they cannot slip in the carbide. The grain size dependence arises because the grain boundaries act as obstacles to the gliding dislocations. the cracks will be longer and therefore more able to propagate.Comments on Mechanical Properties of Plain Carbon Steels. are allowed to diffuse they segregate at and around the dislocation lines. d is the grain diameter. At room temperature this segregation can prevent most dislocations from moving under applied stresses so that yield requires the activation of sources at the sites of stress concentrations or the creation of new dislocation line. It tends not to deform plastically at ambient temperatures. We have also noted the effects of solutes dissolved in iron. Instead they are forced to pile up at or near the ferrite/cementite interfaces. Cementite is a hard and brittle phase. also.

square-section bar is broken by a swinging pendulum. Impact Properties of Ferrite Pearlite Mixtures. If the steel being tested happens to have stringers that lie parallel to and near to the notch. a large amount of energy is consumed by the deformation processes that precede fracture as well as those that accompany fracture. a common ingredient in a carbon steel is MnS which is formed when the alloying element. S. The response of materials to high strain rates is also important. inclusion stringers. Slow cooling from hot rolling processes or annealing heat treatments leaves these steels in the form of mixtures of ferrite and pearlite but the ferrite dominates the mechanical properties because it comprises most of the steel and is the most continuous phase. The mechanical properties discussed above are those measured during standard low strain rate tensile or compression tests. When the carbon level becomes high enough for the pearlitic microstructure to influence the properties. it is wise to bear in mind that microstructural features other than the those of the ferrite and pearlite can affect them. When the fracture occurs in a ductile fashion.I (172-310 MPa) and ultimate tensile strengths of 40 to 65 K. The MnS is present in the form of inclusions in the steel and the morphology of these inclusions depends upon prior history. The nature of the fracture and the amount of energy consumed in an individual test depends upon the temperature of the specimen at the time it was tested. when the pendulum comes to a sudden halt with a loud clunk. Burns and Pickering (JISI 202. the inclusions can be elongated and strung out in the rolling direction and are called. can have a ductile to brittle transition temperature under impact loading. It is standard practice to perform Charpy tests over a range of temperatures. These hot rolled steels can have yield strengths of 25 to 45 K. A crafty trick often done by certain professors I know.A large tonnage of low carbon steel.% C and below is used in sheet form. The yield strength can rise to 100 K. therefore. The important point is that the interface between the MnS and the steel is not strong. containing 0. Then the distance traveled by the pendulum after the fracture is smaller.I (276-448 MPa). 899. Measuring the height of the pendulum at the beginning of the test and that to which it rises after breaking the sample. while teaching a lab course in which Charpy impact tests are being performed. 1964) studied the effects of the volume fraction of pearlite on the impact properties of carbon steel 61 .S. but of the interfaces between the inclusions and the steel. combines with the residual impurity.S. When the bar breaks in a brittle mode the energy consumed is small. unlike FCC metals. enables the energy consumed in breaking the bar to be calculated.I. then to watch them being tested and to chuckle like mad at the surprise of the person performing the tests. the fracture will not be representative of the steel itself. An indication of the response to impact loading is provided by the Charpy impact test in which a notched. When considering the results of these kinds of tests. Very ductile samples do not break and the pendulum is stopped. This is particularly true for BCC metals which. is to sneak a sample of annealed. For example. austenitic stainless steel into a group of brittle samples that break easily.S.15 wt. (690 MPa) as the carbon content of the steel is increased because the properties of pearlite eventually become dominant. When the steel has been processed by hot rolling. the morphological details such as pearlite spacing also affects the yield and ultimate strength levels as shown in the sketches provided with this text. In this case the bar breaks into two pieces and the pendulum swings onwards and upwards. Mn.

1 0.7 0. 60 % re or %R <=DN in area 50 40 30 20 10 0 100 120 140 160 u I. lbs VS Temperature of impact as a function of % C in ferrite/pearlite steels with low inclusion content. 1200 Reduction in area % Elongation 180 200 KSI u= Ultimate strength 200 0.2 C 0. 1300 F Isothermally transformed F I.6 0.3 0. 0.180 % ELONGATION 160 140 alpha+pearlite 15 Fine 120 100 Coarse 5 Temperate at which austenite transformed F 1100 I.2 0.11 C 0. TRANS 1300 F 80 0.T.41 C Charpy impact energy ft.5 0.T.4 0.8 % C -80 -40 0 40 80 C Impact energy ft/ lbs 62 .T.T.8 0.31 C 0.9 I.

p.69% C 0.49% C 0.74 ft-lb -50 50 150 Test Temperature (C) After: Honeycombe.41% C 50 0.11% C Impact Energy (J) 150 0.31% C 0.2% C 100 0.200 0.167 63 .8% C 0 -150 1 joule = 0.6% C 0.

0 After: Callister.4 0.324 64 Izod impact energy (ft-lb f) .6 0.8 Composition (wt.0 320 3 Percent Fe3 C 6 9 12 15 HRC 35 120 0 3 Percent Fe3 C 6 9 Pearlite + ferrite 12 15 Brinell hardness number 280 Fine pearlite Coarse pearlite 30 25 HRB 100 20 100 Izod impact energy Pearlite +Fe 3 C 80 Rockwell hardness 200 90 Spheroidite 120 80 70 60 Ductility (%) 240 60 80 40 Area reduction 20 60 160 40 0 20 Elongation 80 0 0.% C) (b) 1.0 Composition (wt.2 0.4 0.6 0.% C) (a) 0 0 0.8 1.6 0.8 Composition (wt.6 0.4 0.% C) (b) Percent Fe3 C 3 6 9 1.4 0.8 Composition (wt. p.0 150 0 0.2 0.323.2 0.% C) (a) 100 1.0 psi x 10 3 MPa Percent Fe3 C 3 6 9 12 15 90 Pearlite + ferrite Pearlite + Fe3 C 300 Tensile strength 250 350 80 0 0 12 15 1200 1100 160 Yield and tensile strength 1000 900 Brinell hardness number Spheroidite 800 700 600 120 100 80 60 Ductility (%AR) 140 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Fine pearlite Coarse pearlite Brinell hardness 200 500 400 300 Yield strength 40 0 0.2 0.

Unfortunately. the temperature of the test became horizontal again. the total fracture path is tortuous in comparison to cleavage in the ferrite. relatively flat facets. As the temperature of the test was decreased this steel showed a transition from a ductile to a brittle fracture that occurred rapidly near -40°C. used steels with over 1 wt. Presumably. e.e. The lamellar microstructure of pearlite has a strong effect upon its toughness. the energy associated with the upper shelf decreased and the transition from ductile to brittle fracture took place at higher temperatures. high strength low alloy steels. alternative ways are used to get high strength while maintaining good toughness and a low ductile to brittle transition temperature.% carbon but produced hard. In hypereutectoid steels the proeutectoid constituent is cementite. are discrete particles. needles or platelets in hypoeutectoid steels and the fine carbides therein. forming the lower shelf. Until approximately 20 years ago. bainitic microstructures are generally tougher than pearlitic microstructures. forming large. Because of the fine scale of its microstructure bainite is also harder than pearlite in steels of the same carbon contents.g. the proeutectoid phase has time to nucleate on and grow along the austenite grain boundaries. In bainite there is no lamellar structure. The makers of Damascus swords in the middle ages. pearlitic steels were commonly chosen as structural steels because of the useful strength levels that can be attained in them. tough blades by working the steel below the Acm line. They found that 0. Instead. In modern times the undesirable effects of continuous cementite films along prior austenite grain boundaries can be important in case hardening treatments in which high carbon levels are created near the surfaces of parts that are then quenched and tempered. The eutectoid steel. Their use in such structures is not really desirable because the low toughness and high ductile to brittle transition temperatures can cause any failures that occur to be catastrophic. As the carbon content was increased.11 wt. When such parts are broken it is common to find a region of the fracture which appears to be intergranular because the crack propagated along the proeutectoid cementite films. These days. This destroyed the continuous films of cementite. shows a gradual transition of the energy consumed as a function of temperature. it is an array of sheaves of very fine laths. the energy vs. The temperature range occupied by the ductile to brittle transition increased. Apparently European blacksmiths didn't know about that and couldn't use such high carbon steel. At lower temperatures the plot of energy consumed vs. the gradual transition at the high pearlite levels occurs because even though the cementite plates crack.in which the amount of the MnS present and its morphology was controlled in order to minimize its influence on the results. which is entirely pearlitic. In steels cooled at rates which permit the formation of pearlitic microstructures. 65 . Cleavage fracture in ferrite is a brittle fracture process in which the fracture path follows particular crystallographic planes in each grain. When this occurs the steel becomes less tough because the thin continuous film of cementite on the prior austenite grain boundaries becomes the most continuous phase and dominates the properties. through the development of weldable. with the toughness increasing as the spacing decreases. the use of medium to high carbon steels in structures such as bridges and grain elevators created the practical difficulties encountered in joining components made from these steels which were therefore commonly bolted and riveted together. Bainite and Martensite.% carbon steel had a flat upper shelf ( i. temperature plot was horizontal and at a high energy value) where the fracture was ductile and a large amount of energy was consumed. As a consequence.

(828 MPa) for martensite containing 0.e. carbon atoms diffuse throughout the martensite and segregate at dislocations and intercrystalline boundaries. A tempering treatment consists of heating the steel to a selected temperature below the A1 line.% C no carbides form in this stage. Because this is achieved at the cost of a reduction in hardness and strength. it has become customary to divide the process into stages that occur in different temperature regimes. A martensitic.S. A great deal of research has enabled us to understand much of what goes on.S. but there are still some uncertainties with respect to transition carbides. the particular temperature ranges should be considered as guide lines and . It has a hexagonal structure and is referred to as epsilon carbide. as-quenched) lacks toughness and is intolerant of small flaws which can initiate brittle fracture.1 to 0. Correspondingly. very fine particles of a transition carbide nucleate and grow within the martensite. (1. On the basis of the research into the tempering process. Unfortunately. Tempering Reactions in Carbon Steel The heat treating process that is applied to martensite in order to endow it with better toughness is called tempering.4% carbon.2% proof stress is 120 K. it can be highly dislocated or twinned. For example. the Rockwell C hardness number increases from about 30 to 65 with a change in the carbon level from 0. The general aim is to raise the toughness of the steel. When the carbon content is greater than 0. Stage 1 occurs at temperatures below 200 °C. freshly formed martensite ( i. It is also composed of very fine crystals with many intercrystalline boundaries.6%. This is shown in the appended figure. holding it there for a certain time and then cooling it back down to ambient temperature. freshly quenched martensite is not knowingly used in practical applications. especially if the cooling rate below the Ms point is slow.Martensite is a supersaturated solid solution in which the interstitial solutes interact strongly with dislocations. It is metastable. For this reason. Such steels consist of a polycrystalline array of ferrite crystals in which discrete globules of cementite particles are embedded. Several 66 . Here. These heat treatments are generally compromising treatments because to gain toughness one has to sacrifice some strength.I. There is little change in the hardness for further increases in the carbon content. In this case.6 C. This microstructure represents the softest state of a carbon steel.2 wt. The hardness of freshly formed martensite is directly dependent upon its hardness content. Because the Ms temperature for carbon steels is higher than room temperature.2 wt. the process is always a compromise and is selected according to the intended application.65 GPa)for 0. For these reasons.I. These additional heat treatments are called tempering treatments and are the subject of the next discussion. plain carbon steel can be very hard and very strong. It is heat treated further in order to impart to it with some toughness. it is the strongest form of a carbon steel. depend upon the tempering time and temperature. This carbide is richer in carbon than cementite and is described by the formula Fe2. neighboring stages overlap. Also shown on this figure are the data for air cooled austenite(curiously labeled pearlitic) and spheroidized steels.1% C and 240 K. For steels of less than about 0. obviously. it is possible for these segregation processes to begin when the martensite is first formed. one refers to the changes as being produced by auto tempering . the 0. %. It should be recognized that this division is a convenient way of describing tempering reactions. The transformations that occur and the property changes that are produced.

Vickers 600 50 500 400 300 Pearlite structure (air cooled) 200 100 Spheroidized carbide structure 40 30 20 10 0.60 0.37 67 .40 0.20 After: Bain & Paxton. p. Rockwell C 700 Martensitic structure (quenched) Hardness. 2nd edition.1100 1000 65 900 800 60 Hardness.80 Carbon.20 0. Alloying Elements in Steels.00 1. % 1.

If transition carbides were present due to a previous tempering treatment or because they formed during a slow heat-up. an effect which becomes more and more significant as the tempering temperature becomes higher. Because the diffusion coefficient of carbon increases with an increase in the temperature. Eventually the temperature becomes high enough to cause the dislocation content to decrease in a similar manner to the changes in the dislocation content of coldworked metals during recovery processes. When it does. At the beginning of stage three. It is generally accepted that epsilon carbide definitely forms. indeed. When tempering is carried out at temperatures near 300 °C. It is orthorhombic Fe2C. these changes involve diffusion and are therefore time dependent. It is not very important in plain carbon steels because it refers directly to the conversion of retained austenite to bainite. there are changes in the physical properties such as electrical resistivity which can be used to monitor the progress of the changes. Because of this. there are no changes in the morphology of the martensite crystals. the prior austenite grain boundaries are retained as surface defects. the ferrite grains are able to grow and become equiaxed. A common practice is to use tempering times of one hour so much of what follows will refer to the changes produced by tempering treatments one hour long . The hardness after tempering becomes increasingly smaller. but that name has also been assigned to secondary 68 . However. the ferrite crystals remain acicular during the times usually used. These morphological changes in the ferrite grains are similar to those that occur during recrystallization in cold worked ferrite. still uncertainty because the experimental confirmation of these claims is not easy. the cementite particles are able to grow more rapidly and to decrease in number per unit volume. they can be large in alloy steels especially those for which the Mf temperature is below 0°C.researchers have claimed to have observed the presence of another metastable carbide in high carbon steel. Cementite begins to precipitate out from solid solution at about 300°C. stage 2 is important when there are significant quantities of retained austenite included within the martensite. The matrix loses tetragonality and becomes BCC ferrite as its carbon content drops because of the diffusion of carbon to these growing carbides . The precipitates nucleate on heterogeneous sites such as intercrystalline boundaries. Obviously. This is the beginning of stage three. these later processes have been said to comprise a fourth stage of tempering. then they dissolve during stage three. If the steel is sufficiently rapidly heated to the tempering temperature then no transition carbides form. there is not much of a reduction in the hardness. they do not grow across austenite grain boundaries. the martensite retains some degree of tetragonality because it still contains more carbon in solid solution than would ferrite. Thus the first stage of tempering involves the segregation of carbon to various defects in the microstructure and the conversion of the martensite to low carbon martensite plus epsilon carbide when the total carbon content is high enough. The quantities of retained austenite in carbon steels are not large. In effect. The second stage of tempering occurs between 200 and 300°C. During stage 1 tempering. the heterogeneous nucleation process at the sites of the prior austenite grain boundaries tends to produce sheets of cementite particles. At about 600°C. Because the martensitic crystals form with specific orientation relationships with the austenite crystal in which they grow. however. This one has been christened eta carbide. There is. However. The phases present become ferrite and cementite. it can increase slightly for steels of medium to high carbon levels. as higher tempering temperatures are used.

HRC 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 101 102 1h 1 day 700 600 ) 205oC (4 315 oC 00oF) (600 oF 425 o C (80 o 0 F) 535 o C (1 000 o F) 500 400 103 104 Tempering time (s) 300 105 After: Callister--page329 69 Brinell hardness number . Rockwell C 80 70 60 1. p.80 % C steel 200 300 400 500 600 700 50 40 30 20 10 Q 600 0.Tempering temperature. C 100 Hardness.2% C steel 0.35 % C steel 200 400 800 1000 1200 Tempering temperature.38 1 min 70 Rockwell hardness. F After: Bain & Paxton.

C 100 70 70-110C 60 50-70C 40-50C 30-40C Compiled from data of Luerssen and Greene (108) Engel (112) Fletcher and Cohen (100) Bain (113) Lindsey and Roff (114) Crafts and Lamont (115) Wellauer (116) And Own Data 200 300 400 500 600 700 Hardness. p205.206 Tempering temperature. F 70 . Rockwell C 50 20-30C 10-20C 40 30 20 10 200 Asquenched 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Tempering temperature.After: Krauss: Steel: Heat Treatment and processing principles.

100

Izod or V-notch Charpy at room temperature, ft-lb

80

60

40

0.40 % C V-notch Charpy

20

0.50 % C Izod

0 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400

Tempering temperature, F

71

After ASM Metals Handbook, vol.4, 9th edition, p.72

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hardening processes that can occur during the tempering of alloy steels so to avoid confusion we won't use it for carbon steels. Instead, we will consider all of processes that occur above three hundred degrees Celsius as belonging to stage three. These various stages offer a convenient way of regarding the tempering reactions. However, it is important to recognize that the temperatures that have been quoted to delineate the stages are merely guidelines. Obviously the stages overlap because the dominant type of change and the rate thereof depends upon temperature and time and does not change discontinuously. It is also worthwhile pointing out a common error made by students new to this subject when they describe tempering reactions in small samples that have been rapidly up-quenched to high tempering temperatures such as 600 °C. The error is to describe the transformations that take place as those of stages 1,2 and 3 occurring sequentially. Unless the heat-up time is slow enough, epsilon carbide will not form at this temperature and pearlite not bainite can form from retained austenite because the tempering temperature is above the position of the nose of the TTT diagram. Effects of Tempering on the Mechanical Properties of Martensite in Carbon Steels. During stage one, the hardness change after an hour of tempering is not great. But as the temperature is increased the hardness begins to fall rapidly and continues to do so as the temperature increases. Examples of this behavior are presented. It is tempting to believe that as the hardness falls the toughness rises. In general this is true, but in detail it is not. When carbon steels are tempered at temperatures near the beginning of the onset of stage 3, say 350°C or 500°F, there is often a reduction in the Charpy impact energy. This is traditionally known as 500 degree embrittlement. The drop in toughness seems to be associated with the formation of sheets of platelike cementite particles along boundaries and can be aggravated by the segregation of elements such as As, Sb, and P. Tempering at this temperature is normally avoided. Similar phenomena also occur in low alloy steels, as we will see later. The tensile strength of a carbon steel is related to hardness and falls as the hardness is reduced. Clearly, the choice of tempering conditions depends on the importance of the relevant properties. The advantages gained by heat treatments that use austenitization, quenching to martensite and then tempering the martensite are that the desired microstructure can be obtained either throughout the part or at selected locations. Obtaining the desired microstructure means that the proper mechanical properties can be obtained where required. All of this is true provided that the part being heat treated can indeed be converted to martensite when the austenite is cooled. If it can not be so transformed then the required microstructure cannot be produced. This brings us to the concept of hardenability which concerns the question of how much of a steel bar can be converted into martensite by a specific quench. This question is of central importance in quench hardening heat treating processes. The TTT diagrams of plain carbon steels show us clearly that the production of martensite requires very rapid cooling rates. These cooling rates are so fast that it is not possible to transform large parts into martensite. Thus, the excellent properties provided by tempered martensite cannot be obtained in thick components made of carbon steel simply because they cannot be cooled fast enough. The reason is that plain carbon steels have low hardenability. We define the hardenability of a steel as that property that enables it to avoid transformations that occur by diffusion and, instead, to transform to martensite when cooled from the austenite phase field. A steel with a low hardenability must be cooled very rapidly. As the hardenability increases, the necessary cooling rate decreases. Note that the hardenability refers to the ability of the steel to transform to martensite; it does not refer to the magnitude of the hardness of the martensite.

73

a thin part cools more rapidly in still air than does a thick part. This rule of thumb has been used for many years. For example. Often the alloying elements that are added to control the hardenability of the steel do not markedly improve the mechanical properties obtainable in the tempered martensite in comparison with those of similarly tempered martensite in plain carbon steel. Normalization This heat treatment is performed to refine grain size and to obtain a carbide size and distribution that provides a favorable starting point for subsequent heat treatments. research into methods of increasing the hardenability of carbon steels became an important endeavor many years ago. It comprises austenitization at 100 to 150 °F above the Ac3 line followed by an air cool. then the microstructure is changed by heat treating. This is the first reason for the existence of low alloy steels. This has essentially the same aim as the full anneal. empirical and semi-empirical studies are being made to determine soak times more accurately. The steel is then cooled slowly enough to allow the desired microstructure to form by the transformation of the austenite at temperatures near to the A1 line. increase the hardenability so that the martensite can be produced in the first place. If the steel does not have the microstructure desired for its application or for the next process that is to be performed on it. A number of standard processes exist. A standard rule of thumb is to austenitize the steel for 1 hour per inch of thickness. Baths of molten lead were used effectively for this purpose before concerns about the dangers of lead to human health became influential. These will be briefly described before we return to the story of martensite. Full Anneal This process is used to make the steel relatively soft and to endow it with good machinability. It is more efficient for small parts because furnace cooling can be replaced by transferring the parts between constant temperature baths containing molten salts. Heat Treating Practices. It is important to recognize that the microstructural details produced by normalization will depend on the size of the part. These salts are various mixtures of compounds such as alkali metal hydroxides and nitrates that are chosen for particular temperature ranges. The steel is then usually protected from scaling and oxidation by the molten material into which it is placed. The microstructure of a steel depends upon its prior thermo-mechanical history. However. a hot rolled plain carbon steel can consist of equiaxed ferrite grains and pearlite nodules. however. The microstructure is large-grained ferrite and coarse pearlite.Because of the very useful and desirable properties that can be achieved with tempered martensitic microstructures. Isothermal Annealing. they do. Before we consider the roles of alloying elements in steel. we will complete this description of heat treating processes by summarizing some heat treating practices. because computing has become easier. it is usually done to hypoeutectoid steels. Austenitization is conducted at a high temperature to produce a large grained austenite and to dissolve all the carbides. It was found that profound effects can be obtained by adding alloying elements to steel. Spheroidization 74 .

Steels with this microstructure are in their softest state and are most easily mechanically formed. A modification of the quench process that relieves the thermally induced stresses initially generated by thermal contraction is called martempering. can help to cause quench-cracking. very severe quenching rates are necessary and even then only small samples can be converted to martensite throughout. that the steel can be relatively slowly cooled from the isothermal hold and still form martensite which serves to minimize distortion further. there are serious limitations for plain carbon steels. also. 75 . warping and distortion are more likely to occur during rapid quenching. The situation is that carbon steels of the correct microstructure could perform adequately in many applications. This process is possible when the bainitic transformation takes much longer to begin than the changes associated with the nose of the diagram. It can be produced by cooling very slowly from 100°F above the eutectoid isotherm or by a long isothermal treatment just below it. In this process. Spheroidization can also be obtained by cyclic processing in which the temperature of the steel is cycled above and below the A1 line.In the spheroidized microstructure the carbides are discrete globules embedded within the ferritic matrix and also resident on grain boundaries. It involves austenitization. The purpose of these heat treatments is to produce parts in which a desired hardness is obtained. It is held at that temperature to relieve stresses by becoming of a uniform temperature and then finally cooled through the Ms point. The first part of the process is intended to form martensite. These stresses superimposed on the transformation stresses due to the volume expansion that occurs when martensite forms. Martempering. The tempering temperature and time are selected to produce the required hardness. This is the first reason for the development of low alloy steels in which one of the roles of the alloying elements is to slow down diffusional transformations to enable martensite to be produced during slower cooling rates. It is often part of overall treatments given to high carbon tool steels that are formed into particular shapes before being hardened. either throughout the part or in the vicinity of its surface. quenching to room temperature or below and reheating to and holding at a tempering temperature below the A1 line. Recrystallization can also be produced in cold worked parts. The rapid quench rates are undesirable because there is no opportunity for stress relief during cooling. but it is often not possible to produce the microstructure because the part cannot be cooled fast enough. Consequentially. This is because the transformations that occur by diffusional processes are not easily avoided during cooling. Note. Excellent properties can be obtained by this procedure. Process Annealing and Stress Relieving This terms normally mean some form of treatment in which the steel is heated to and held at a temperature below the A1 line. the part is first quenched rapidly until its temperature has fallen below that of the nose of the TTT diagram but is still above the Ms point. Quench and Temper. Recovery processes occur which removes or diminishes residual stresses that might be present from previous treatments. However.

S F T Martemper log t Austemper 76 . To allow this. bainite can have useful hardness and toughness values . the steel is quenched to a temperature below the nose and held there until the bainitic transformation is completed. When they are adequate for the application.Austempering. the formation of bainite can be chosen instead of martensite. As we discussed earlier. The process is termed austempering. This avoids the problems associated with the rapid volume changes during the martensitic transformation.

Thus carbon expands the gamma field and is therefore called an austenite stabilizer. Nb. Classification of Alloying Elements The purpose of this section is to attempt to divide the long list of alloying elements into groups that have similar effects. and Ru. Nitrogen and copper act similarly in that they expand the gamma field. Al and B. the type of transformation. in addition to those that we have already considered in plain carbon steels. b) Ferrite Stabilizers. Mo. The properties of carbon steels depend upon the properties of the individual phases that comprise the steel. The FCC area is called a gamma loop . Two very important phases that can exist in steel are the FCC and BCC solid solutions that are called austenite and ferrite. Those elements that behave similarly are also called austenite stabilizers. These effects concern both the kinetics of the transformations and. Nitrogen forms a nitride phase that limits the austenite phase field whereas the phases in the iron copper system are solid solutions. in the iron carbon system the austenite phase field is limited by the appearance of cementite. This classification divides the alloying elements into two main groups called austenite stabilizers and ferrite stabilizers. in which alpha and delta ferrite fields merge together. the FCC field is restricted and separated from the BCC field. Alloying elements also have pronounced effects on phenomena such as recovery. In one. Ti. includes Cr. Again. Mo. Ir. V. The list of elements that are important in alloy steels. these can be divided into two sub-groups. Os. In one group the addition of the alloying element depresses the FCC to BCC transition temperature towards room temperature before other phases appear. If we examine the metastable iron carbon binary phase diagram we see that adding carbon to iron favors the existence of austenite over ferrite. Other austenite stabilizing elements are Pt. 77 . the volume fractions of these phases and the manner in which they are arranged within the total microstructure. V. W. a) Austenite Stabilizers. Because the equilibrium condition of the steel is now described by phase diagrams applicable to the Fe-C-x (etc. Ni. This is so because it decreases the temperature of the austenite to alpha ferrite transition ( the A 3 point ) and also increases the temperature of the austenite to delta ferrite transition. Ti. recrystallization and grain growth. Alloy steels are those steels that contain minimum specified amounts of alloying elements in addition to those found in plain carbon steels. Si and Al.The Effects of Alloying Elements in Steel. When the binary phase diagrams with iron of these elements are examined (examples are included in the appended figures) it is found that they can be sub divided into two groups. Examples of such elements are nickel and manganese. Co. Si. the alloying elements have important effects on the details of phase transformations in steel. Examples are Cr. The first method of classifying alloying elements is based on the effect of the alloying element on the austenite and ferrite phase fields on binary phase diagrams of iron and the alloying element.) systems. by a two phase area. In contrast. Cu. The second main group consists of those elements that favor ferrite over austenite. These elements produce a variety of changes in the behavior and properties of steel. because additional phases not present in plain carbon steels can be created.

Mo. Ti. V. Zr. Cu MP A4 Melt MP A4 Melt +M +M +C M+C +M .stabilizer A3 A3 +C Si. N.MP A4 +M Melt MP A4 +M Melt M+C +M . Ta 78 . Al Nb.stabilizers +C A3 A3 +C Ni. Mn C. Cr.

and Si. e. These elements either do not object to the presence of cementite. Moderate carbide formers. This becomes unreliable as the alloy content increases. Nitrogen tends to prefer to reside in the carbides giving rise to carbonitride compounds.. Mo Strong carbide formers. Effects of Alloying Elements on Hardenability. Because cementite is a very important phase in carbon steels it follows that effects of alloying elements on cementite are also important. cementite containing dissolved alloying elements. also.. Ti. Some alloying elements dissolve in ferrite and thermodynamically oppose the formation of cementite. Graphite Stabilizers. Nb Very strong carbide formers. Ta. parameters that are important in heat treating processes such as austenitization temperatures and the eutectoid composition etc. it is customary.W. Examples are Ni. When the quantities of alloying elements present in a steel are small of the order of a few weight percent or less. Unfortunately. the situation with respect to microstructural constituents can become complicated. Examples are B. Therefore. therefore..g. V.. There are many applications for which the properties of tempered martensite are particularly suitable and.. These phases include alloy carbides and intermetallic compounds. Nb. to divide the alloying elements into groups according to their propensity to form carbides. These difficulties increase as the number of different alloying elements added to the steel increases. indeed. of course... Steels can possess cementite. Then ternary diagrams or pseudo-binary diagrams are employed for Fe-C-X systems. Zr When significant amounts of these elements are present. 79 . Zr and Ta. are determined directly by experiments. Alloying elements can also cause additional phases to appear within the steels. Mn dissolves in cementite.The second sub-group restricts the gamma field by lowering the delta ferrite transition temperature and raising that of alpha ferrite while also producing other phases. With this in mind.Cr. They are ranked according to the stability of their carbides in the iron matrix. Carbide Formers. these desirable properties can only be obtained in components that can first be converted to martensite.g. or they form carbides themselves. it is usually possible to consider the equilibrium states of the alloy steel by means of the Fe-C binary phase diagram while. It can also combine with some alloying elements such as aluminum to form nitride precipitates. often necessary for the application to be successful. e. recognizing the diagram is an approximation. Ti. mixed carbides i. In fact. a particularly important alloying element in those materials. silicon is so effective that it enables the formation of graphite from the melt in cast irons and is. and a variety of alloy carbides in which there is little iron. This encourages the formation of graphite and so these elements are called graphite stabilizers. e.

are the effects on the martensitic transformation itself. Indeed. When the hardenability is of prime importance for the application of an alloy steel. the code designation is amended by inserting the letter B between the second and third digit e. Research has shown that this can be achieved by adding appropriate alloying elements. then there are the effects upon the formation of proeutectoid ferrite. raise the hardenability provided that they are dissolved in the austenite. This is effective because its carbides can persist at temperatures close to 2000°F which is much higher than typical austenitization temperatures used for standard low alloy steels. pearlite and bainite.This imposes severe restrictions on the use of plain carbon steels because of the generally low hardenability of these steels. molybdenum. are more effective at raising the hardenability than is nickel alone and provide a given increase at a lower cost. these days they are often omitted from some tables of standard low alloy steels. it is possible to obtain steels which are manufactured with closely controlled compositions so as to ensure that a specified hardenability is obtained. molybdenum and chromium steels which use 41xx numbers. nickel steels are not used as much as they used to be. which has a negative effect. then lastly. Carbon steels are generally of low hardenability because the diffusion controlled reactions by which austenite can transform can occur rapidly in them. however. all alloying elements that are added to steel. The first of these concerns the effects on austenitization. Boron is added to increase the hardenability. The series 2xxx and 3xxx refer to steels which contain nickel as the principal alloying element. Some of the other combinations of alloying elements. g. Vanadium is a very strong carbide former and forms fine carbides that along with the aluminum compounds in killed steels. It is added because it improves the machinability of the steel. rapid quenching throughout is necessary which restricts the sizes of parts that can be successfully treated. its solubility in ferrite is very small. The effects alloying elements have on the hardenability of steels are the primary reason for the development of the AISI/SAE standard low alloy steels The AISI/SAE standard low alloy steels are listed in ASM handbooks and in numerous texts and journals. In order to consider the effects of alloying elements on the hardenability of steels it is necessary to consider the effects that they have on phase transformations in steel. When boron is present in a standard alloy steel. molybdenum steels described by 40xx numbers. With the exception of cobalt. lead resides in steel in the form of small globules of lead. The standard steels are manganese steels with code numbers 13xx. of course. This is the only reason that it is added. chromium and nickel steels assigned 43xx numbers and chromium steels which use 51xx numbers. Very high quench rates bring about the risk of distortion and cracking and this can pose serious practical problems. Hardenability can be increased if the rates at which these transformations take place can be reduced. Such steels are identified by adding the letter H to the numerical code. Hence. Other elements that are added to standard alloy steels are V. 50B44. inhibit grain growth during austenitization. 80 . These steels are identified according to a numerical code in which the final pair (trio if there are five digits) of digits describes the carbon content as is so for plain carbon steels and the first two numbers indicate the principal alloying elements . B and Pb. When it is desired that martensite forms throughout the part (this is usually called through hardening). This is an important condition. When present. Other variations of compositions have 6xxx and 7xxx etc.

82.30. Cr 0.25 Mo 0. such as AISI 1045 having 0. 81 .25 47XX Ni 1.40 or 0.45.55. Mo 0. Cr 0 or 0.45 Cr 0. Boron steels Mo 0.95.50. Mo 0.00 to 1.” 2nd edition.50.95.27 to 0.50 or 0. Mo 0.25 Cr 0.40 or 2.50 to 0.82.87. Dowling.12 to 0. Mo 0.20 87XX Ni 0.12 Siliconmanganese steels 92XX Si 1.75 Mo 0. or 52100 having 1. Mo 0. 1999.003 Notes: 1Replace “XX” or “XXX” with carbon content in hundredths of a percent.25 Ni 3.6 to 0.70 to 0. Mn 0.E. Mo 0. From: N.65 Cr 0.85 or 1. Cr 0. Designation1 Carbon Steels Nickelmolybdenum steels 46XX 48XX Chromium steels 50XX(X) 51XX(X) 52XXX Chromiumvanadium steels 61XX Approx.45. Mo 0. % 10XX 11XX 12XX 15XX Manganese steels 13XX Molybdenum steels 40XX 44XX Chromium-molybdenum steels 41XX Plain carbon Resulfurized Resulfurized and rephosphorized Mn 1.70 2 B 0.35 YYBXX 81XX Ni 0. Cr 0. V 0. Cr 0.45% C. Alloy Content.00% C. Alloy Content.40.SUMMARY OF THE AISI-SAE DESIGNATIONS FOR COMMON CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS.52 Ni 0.12 86XX Ni 0.40.0005 to 0. “Mechanical Behavior of Materials.65 Mn 1. Mo 0.55. Cr 0.00.80 to 1. 2Replace “YY” with any two digits from earlier in table to indicate the additional alloy content.50.25 94XX Ni 0.20 or 0.30 Nickel-chromium-molydenum steels 43XX Ni 1. Cr 0. % Designation Approx.80.05 Cr 1.45.15 Cr 0. Prentice Hall.

5 2 1.8 1.6 2 Alloy Content (%) Ni Si Cr Mo Mn Di = DiC x 2. After: Honeycombe.131.5 3 2.13(%Cr) x 3.40(%Si) x 2.47(%Ni) (weight percentages) where DiC = ideal critical diameter for given grain size and carbon content.132 82 .21(%Mn) x 1.4 0.5 1 0 0.275(%Mo) x 1. p.Hardenability Multiplying Factor 5 4.5 4 3.2 1.

shown in the appended sketches. Let us now define the "eutectoid temperature" as the lowest temperature at which austenite can be formed. Because tungsten is a ferrite stabilizer and restricts the range of austenite stability it is possible for ferrite to form again in the tungsten rich volume. the effect of the vanadium is to reduce the hardenability. However. % of tungsten in the form of tungsten carbides. They are added because of the effects due to their carbides. the adjacent austenite becomes enriched with tungsten while much of the carbon diffuses away. carbonrich volume of austenite where the carbide had existed. Second. during the 83 . are not added to low alloy steels with the intent of increasing the hardenability. For small quantities of the element referred to as X. both the dissolution process and attaining solute inhomogeneity will take much longer because tungsten and molybdenum diffuse much more slowly than does carbon. 1) When the steel contains alloying elements that are both ferrite stabilizers and moderate to strong carbide formers. In contrast to the case of the dissolution of cementite. carbon. the dissolution of an alloy carbide. This can be important in steels with high tungsten and molybdenum contents because such steels must be austenitized at high temperatures. As the carbides dissolve. Indeed. there will be a local. Some examples. 3)When very strong carbide formers are present. The rate of diffusion of the interstitial solute. e. let us suppose that the steel contains a few wt. if a steel that contains fine vanadium carbides is austenitized at temperatures at which the carbides do not dissolve. Ti) which form carbides that are stable at temperatures well above the normal A1 line of a carbon steel. When the FCC phase forms in contact with the cementite. a molybdenum or tungsten carbide. the austenitizing temperatures may have to be higher than those used for treating plain carbon steels of similar carbon contents. First of all. This is due to two reasons. is much greater than those of substitutional elements. carbon can diffuse into it and the carbide begins to dissolve. in which the alloying element is X. For ternary Fe-C-X alloys. when the carbide has just dissolved. V. Thus complete austenitization is paced by the diffusion of the tungsten. demonstrate the modifications to the austenite phase field caused by selected alloy additions. Carbon diffuses rapidly even at temperatures just above the Fe-C eutectoid temperature of 727°C (1333°F) so homogeneity is obtained in short times. carbon increases the hardenability when it is dissolved in austenite . both the eutectoid temperature and the eutectoid composition can vary from the values that apply to the binary Fe-C system. There are three main consequences of these effects upon austenitization. a similar story would be told if homogeneous austenite were required.g.Austenitization. Then. Examples occur in tool steels. this can directly affect the quantity of austenite in the steel. the changes are usually small. the alloying elements (Nb. longer austenitizing times can be required to produce homogeneous austenite Consider the dissolution of cementite. Continued diffusion of the carbon in the austenite is necessary to obtain homogeneity. 2) If the starting microstructure contains alloy or mixed carbides. Thus. except for elements (like vanadium) that are very strong carbide formers and very strong ferrite stabilizers. if some of the carbon is not in solution because it is combined with the vanadium. then a decrease in the hardenability is produced by the addition of the vanadium. Indeed. Continued dissolution is paced by the rate at which carbon can diffuse away from the carbide/austenite interface. As an example of this effect.

0 1.8 1.2 Carbon.0 1.6% Ti 0.6 0. % 1. 0% Ti 600 1. 0% Mo 700 600 1.2800 2600 2400 2300 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 0.6 7% Mo 4% Mo 2% Mo 1500 1400 Temperature.4 0.8 84 .5% Ti 1100 1000 900 800 700 1600 1400 1200 0.4 0. C Temperature. F 1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 Carbon steel.2 0.6 0. % 1.8 2800 2600 2400 2300 2000 1800 0.7% Ti Ti Temperature.2 0. F 1300 1200 0.4 1.8 1.8% 0.6 Carbon steel.2 Carbon.3% Ti 1500 1400 1% 0. C Temperature.4 1.

8 1500 2600 2400 Temperature.5% 0.6 0.4 1. % 1.4 0. C 1300 1200 2.0 1.6 600 1.5% Mn 4% Mn Carbon steel 0.1500 2600 2400 Temperature.4 1.2 Carbon.2 0.8 1. F 1400 1300 19% 15% Cr Cr 12% Cr 5% Cr Carbon steel 0% Cr 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 2300 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 0. C Temperature.6 600 1.8 85 .35% Mn 2. % 1100 1000 900 800 700 2300 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1.35% Mn 9% Mn 6.2 Carbon.8 1.4 0.5% 9% 4% 6.0 1.5% Mn 0.6 0. F 1400 Temperature.2 0.

austenitizing process the migration of the austenite grain boundaries is resisted by the carbides. The formation of proeutectoid ferrite. by the presence of both austenite stabilizers and ferrite stabilizers. has been added so that its carbides can inhibit grain growth and thereby refine the austenitic grain size. showing that the growth rate is slower. Another possible contribution could be segregation of the molybdenum to the ferrite/austenite interfaces which could reduce the migration rates of those interfaces. In this technique. the rate of heterogeneous nucleation on grain boundaries is enhanced which shortens the time required to initiate the decomposition of austenite and the hardenability is reduced accordingly. p. when the steel is cooled again. This is probably due to effects such as solute drag on migrating interphase boundaries and the rate of diffusion of carbon. % C-1 wt.Cr. but it might. its effects are not usually as serious as those due to the presence of iron sulfides on grain boundaries. Thus they can retard the rates of tempering reactions and cause alloy carbides to form during tempering of martensite. such as V. indirectly. The SAE/AISI standard low alloy steels are hypoeutectoid steels. The kinetics of the transformation of austenite to proeutectoid ferrite is retarded. high carbon contents are usually unnecessary because the increase in the martensitic hardness produced by carbon occurs most rapidly in the hypoeutectoid range. Mo. It is possible to photograph the process. it is imperative to consider how the element is incorporated in the steel. % C and Fe-0. Clearly Mo retards the transformation and the fact that there is still a linear dependence on the square root of time suggest that the Mo interacts with carbon and reduces the rate at which it can diffuse away into the austenite. lower it. Observations on the rates of thickening of lens shaped grain boundary allotriomorphs of ferrite growing in Fe-0. An example of the effect of Mo on the growth of proeutectoid ferrite is provided by results that have been obtained by thermo-ionic microscopy. Ni. This example demonstrates that if one is considering the effects of alloying elements on the hardenability of a steel. Although the presence of manganese sulfides in steel can adversely effect the toughness of the steel. Mo and Cr are also carbide formers. The standard low alloy steels are usually completely austenitized during hardening heat treatments except when a very strong carbide former. This is consistent with a process that is controlled by long range diffusion of carbon and. in general. 39. The slopes of the lines decrease when Mo is added. If it is not dissolved within the austenite then it cannot directly raise the hardenability. Mn and B.11 wt. This is particularly important when the steel does not have a very low sulfur content as was generally so before the advent of modern steel-making technology. Therefore. transformation and hardenability in steels. 86 .11 wt. Even though many are intended for use at high strength levels in the tempered martensitic condition.% Mo have shown that the half-thickness of the ferrite lens increases linearly as a function of the square root of time (Kinsman and Aaronson. 1967). Another important role of Mn in general is to scavenge sulfur by forming MnS so as to reduce the likelihood of iron sulfide forming at grain boundaries . Climax Molybdenum. indeed is quantitatively so for the iron carbon alloy. Thus. the growth of ferrite is observable in-situ within the microscope while the sample is undergoing the transformation. The elements that are present in standard low alloy steels primarily for increasing the hardenability are:. proeutectoid ferrite is the first phase to form when austenite is transformed at temperatures above the "nose" on the TTT diagram. This produces a finer grain size than for the case of a homogeneous austenite formed in similar austenitizing treatments. Boron is added only for hardenability control.

Boron is chemically reactive with other alloying elements in steel. small quantities of titanium and zirconium. An alternative explanation suggests that borocarbides. the hardenability begins to decrease again and. Unfortunately. precipitate at the grain boundaries and inhibit the nucleation of ferrite and cementite thereon. when present alone. at about 0. There is no effect at the eutectoid composition.0005 to 0. {Fe23(C. numerical values describing it have been difficult to determine with good precision. interact more strongly with pearlite formation than the elements mentioned previously. It has been suggested that boron segregates at the grain boundaries because it is able to reduce the grain boundary energy and that this reduction in energy makes the boundaries less effective as heterogeneous nucleation sites. the hardenability of hypereutectoid steels is decreased by boron additions. Pearlite formation When pearlite forms during the transformation of austenite in standard low alloy steels. g. One might question this practice and ask why one shouldn’t just add more boron. %. Perhaps both phenomena participate. This means that they have to diffuse away from the carbide as it grows and they do so slowly because they are substitutionally dissolved. Consequently. Mn partitions to the cementite but it also slows down the reaction. When compounds are formed with other alloying elements the amount dissolved can be reduced. but solute drag may also 87 . It does not seem to affect the time to complete these transformations. These changes are probably mainly due to the reduction in the rate of diffusion of carbon caused by interactions with the dissolved Cr and Mo. %. The increase in the hardenability due to additions of boron is greatest for steels of low carbon contents. e. Ni and Si are dissolved within the austenite it is energetically favorable for them to remain in solution. The usual practice is to add boron within the range of 0. This has led to explanations of the boron effect in terms of the interaction of boron with austenite grain boundaries. Cr and Mo.001 and 0. This is because it can grow much more rapidly due to the much greater rate of diffusion of carbon compared to the rates of diffusion of substitutionally dissolved elements. % boron is added. This is valuable because lowering the Ms temperature causes martensite to form at lower temperatures which increases the likelihood of quench cracking occurring and can increase the amount of retained austenite. the carbide in the pearlite is essentially cementite. Boron increases the hardenability primarily by delaying the start of the transformations to ferrite and pearlite. are added to help to scavenge the nitrogen and to keep more of the boron in solution.The beneficial effects due to boron occur when the boron is in solid solution in the austenite. %.B)}6.005 wt. the steels are fully killed with aluminum. chromium carbide. this is not a solution. which react strongly with nitrogen. One expects both the start and finish lines of the pearlite transformation to be affected. It has been estimated to lie between 0.004 wt. particularly carbon and nitrogen. When graphite stabilizers. They cause significant shape changes to the start and finish lines on isothermal transformation diagrams.003 wt. e. g. In addition. iron boride precipitates on the austenite grain boundaries and causes a reduction in the final toughness. Also. even though the formation of the latter would provide a greater reduction in the free energy of the system. A valuable characteristic of boron is that it increases the hardenability without lowering the Ms temperature. the rates of nucleation and growth of pearlite in the alloy steels are smaller than those in plain carbon steels. If more than 0. The cementite can contain some dissolved carbide forming alloying elements which replace iron but it forms preferentially to the alloy element carbides. Nevertheless.003 wt. The solubility is very low. It is generally accepted that the austenite grain boundaries are affected in some manner because the transformations begin at the boundaries and the effect of boron is greater in fine grained austenite than it is in coarse grained austenite.

because. the kinetics of the reactions that form bainite are retarded by alloying elements. Each of the martensitic crystals grows rapidly. they are expected to lower the start and finish temperatures for the martensitic transformation in order to attain the necessary degree of undercooling. This confirms earlier statements herein that the nose in plain carbon steel TTT diagrams happens to be where transformations taking place by different mechanisms merge. Because austenite stabilizing alloying elements expand the realm of austenite and. Appropriate changes are also found in continuous cooling diagrams. these alloying elements cause changes make the transformation more difficult. Ni and Mn have strong effects. In this case. Mo. however. This type thermo-mechanical treatment is referred to as ausforming. in particular. Ni. % C -6 wt. The combination of the effects due to the additional dislocation line introduced during the plastic deformation with those due to the formation of martensite can produce significant improvements in mechanical properties. This suggests that the larger driving force associated with the greater degree of undercooling at which the bainite forms negates the retarding effects somewhat.effect interphase mobilty. it is the initiation process that is time dependent. reduce the minimum temperature at which the austenite is stable. The bainitic transformation in steels that have a bay in the TTT diagram. Mo and Cr. and Cr are all present together in the same steel.6 wt. Martensite formation. In such a transformation. the kinetics of the transformation can be described by “C” shaped curves on a temperature-time plot. while the temperature is held constant. but it begins to form after an incubation time while held at that temperature. This is so in practice and C. Examples of the effects of alloying elements on TTT diagrams are shown in the accompanying sketches. Presumably. The carbide formers. Presumably. % Mn alloy. martensite begins to form. the effects on proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite formation are so strong that the start and finish curves for these transformations are separated from those of the bainite transformation by a region in which the austenite remains in metastable equilibrium for long times. It is 88 . An interesting example of thermo-mechanical processing can be carried out with steels that possess bays in their TTT diagrams. In these cases the TTT diagrams show the two types of transformation separated by a "bay". Isothermal martensitic transformations are rare and do not occur in standard low alloy steels. They can be austenitized and cooled to a temperature within the bay and then deformed by rolling or forging while still austenitic. takes place more rapidly than the transformations that occur at higher temperatures. This increases the dislocation density present in the austenite prior to the formation of martensite or bainite when the steel is finally cooled. It is not obvious what these changes are. their combined effects are dramatic. it is possible for alloying elements to cause the martensitic transformation to take place isothermally. Steels that have useful properties when ausformed are often called ausforming steels. in these steels. in which austenite can be retained after quenching and then. Therefore the Ms temperature remains an important parameter. When Mn. In a few instances. no martensite forms while the austenite is cooled to the temperature chosen. An example of an isothermal martensitic transformation has been observed in an Fe-0. Bainite formation In general. In some steels. the effects arise for reasons similar to those mentioned for the transformations that occur at higher temperatures. bainite can form more rapidly than pearlite. where the transformation is athermal. also lower the Ms temperatures even though they are ferrite stabilizers and would be expected to enhance the driving force for the transformation.

possible that the initiation sites are affected. Solid solution strengthening of the austenite and changes to its shear modulus which might resist the necessary shape change may contribute. Nevertheless, all five elements lower the martensitic start temperature. Numerous amounts of experimental data have been accumulated for particular families of alloy steels in order to assess the effects of composition on the start of the transformation. Using such data, a number of empirical equations have been published which relate the Ms temperature to the percentages of C, Mo, Cr, Mn, and Ni in the steel by means of multiplication factors. Several different ones have been published. Such empirical equations can be of practical use in material selection but they provide little help towards elucidating the fundamental reasons for the particular effects. While we are on the subject of the martensitic start temperature, we should now recognize that steels with significant concentrations of alloying elements that depress the temperatures at which martensite forms, can retain large amounts of austenite when quenched to room temperature. If more martensite is desired, the steel must be cooled below room temperature. If this is not done before the tempering treatment then the decomposition of the retained austenite which will occur during tempering, can have significant effects on the final microstructure and properties. This is a suitable time to introduce the Md temperature. It has been observed that the Ms temperature can be raised by the application of stress to the steel sample. This is because a crystal that forms during a martensitic transformation has a different shape than the volume of steel from which it formed. Therefore, if there is help available to achieve this shape change, the transformation will be accomplished more easily. If it can occur more easily, then it will require less thermodynamic driving force for it to occur which means that the necessary degree of undercooling below the A3 line will be smaller. Hence, we deduce that if an applied stress is locally oriented so that it helps the transformation to produce the shape change it will allow martensite to form at a higher temperature than that which pertains to the unstressed condition. In general, tensile stresses are found to be more effective than compressive stresses, but rolling can have appreciable effects. The highest temperature to which the Ms temperature can be raised by applied stresses is defined as the Md temperature. When this temperature lies above room temperature and the Ms is below room temperature, it is possible to retain the austenite at room temperature and then to form some martensite by working the metastable austenite at room temperature. This can be important in highly alloyed steels such as stainless steels.

89

R3 R1 T Ms

Changes occur to R3,R1 and Ms. Roted in the text but not considered in these sketches

T

Logt plain C Steel Hypoeutectiod. e.g. 1040 Logt

Nickel added. Curves moved. Shapes not affected much.

T

Mn added Curves ---> pearlite finish curve changed

T

Cr added Curves--> Both pearlite startand finish curves changed Logt

Logt

+Fe 3C mixed pearlite “BAY” T Ms oC = 539-423 (%C) 30.4 (%Mn)- 17.7(%Ni) - 12.1 (% Cr) - 7.5(%Mo) Example of empirical relation 10 secs 104 secs Logt Bs

Bf

+Fe 3C 1 week

A.I.S.I 4340 mo =0.33 %, N i = 1.79 %

Cr = 0.80 % Mn = 0.78 %

90

1000

301 10-3/s 201 304L

150

Engineering stress (MPa)

800

120

600 301 400 201 200 304L 0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 Engineering strain

90

60

30

0 0.8

After: V. Talyan, R.H. Wagoner, and J.K. Lee: Formability of Stainless Steel, Mater. Trans. A, 1998, Vol.29A, pp.2161-2171.

60

Type 301 Temperature

10-1/s 10-2/s 10-3/s 10-3/s

120

40

100

Temperature (C)

0 10-2/s -20

60

40

-40 10-1/s -60 0

% Martensite
20

0.2 0.4 Engineering strain

0 0.6

91

% Martensite

20

80

% Martensite

the hardest microstructure produced by continuously cooling austenite is that corresponding to 100% martensite. After the quench. the graphs can be used to rank the steels in an order corresponding to their depths of hardening. provided the radius R and the hardenability of the steel are both appropriate. The smaller the specified decrease in hardness. the variation of the hardness with position shown on the graph reveals the variation of microstructure. the same heat treatments and the same quenching medium. the bar is sectioned perpendicularly to its length and hardness measurements are made on the cross section at locations that span the diameter of the bar. It is the variation of the hardness with position that is significant because this provides information about the variations of microstructure. In this section we will explore this property in more detail. say water at 20°C. This property is very important in engineering design with respect to selecting particular steels and heat treatments for manufacturing a very wide range of components. If one is to use the depth of hardening approach one must choose the “specified hardness percentage decrease”. a collection of graphs are obtained. Now. When this experiment is carried out for a variety of steels using bars of the same size. particular hardness measurement in this experiment has no direct significance with respect to hardenability. The data obtained are used to create a graph of hardness versus position in the bar. When a bar of steel is austenitized and quenched so that it is cooled below the Mf temperature. it is possible for it to be almost entirely transformed to martensite or to have a rim of martensite at its 92 . It is important to recognize that the value of a single. When hardenability is important in the material selection process. or what? Let us consider the microstructures. The microstructure at the center of the bar can contain ferrite plus pearlite.g. In any case. When the specified percentage is chosen. the microstructure near the surface can contain the maximum amount of martensite that can form in the steel when it is quenched to 20°C. The hardness varies from the softest to the hardest condition as the microstructure varies between these two extremes. 100% martensite) can have quite different hardness. Now suppose that this bar is austenitized at Ta and quenched in a particular quenching medium. it is self evident that it would be useful to have a method of quantitatively comparing the hardenability of steels. Basic concepts for selecting steels for hardenability Earlier in this article. Similar microstructures in different steels(e.The Hardenability of Steels. we introduced that property of steel which determines how rapidly the steel must be cooled in order for transformations that occur by mechanisms that require diffusion to be suppressed and which is called hardenability. (the spheroidized microstructure doesn’t form in these treatments). The depth of hardening. greater the depth of hardening the greater the hardenability. Then we define a “depth of hardening” as the magnitude of the distance from the outside surface to the position where the hardness is less than that very near the surface by a specified percentage. Therefore. How can this be done? Possible method #1. A depth of hardening to the depth at which a particular microstructure was formed. the softest microstructure is equiaxed ferrite grains and colonies of coarse pearlite. Should it be 15%. Consider a cylindrical bar of steel that has a radius R and a length that is several times larger than R so that end-effects can be eliminated from consideration when examining the microstructure and properties of the material inside the bar. the larger will be the % of martensite in the microstructure. The hardness value at a particular location reflects the nature of the microstructure at that location: for the steels that we are considering. 40%.

because the performance characteristics of nominally similar quenching media can vary with time and place. Thus. For these reasons.surface and various mixtures of martensite. M. is most rapid where the 50 % martensite mixture is located. therefore. Method #3. this microstructural mixture is most readily located experimentally and.A. the 50 % martensite is the most easily recognized microstructural mixture. The critical cooling rate decreases as the hardenability of the steel increases. Hence. because the variation of the % martensite in the microstructure is gradual. If we make the approximation that any effects due to stresses generated by thermal contraction are negligible. it is found that there is one particular diameter for which a microstructure of 50 % martensite is found at the center of the bar. This problem was investigated by Grossman and his colleagues 50 years ago with the objective of describing the hardenability by a parameter that is independent of the quench bath (“Elements of Hardenability. ASM. we can refer to a critical cooling rate as that cooling rate that will produce the 50 % martensitic microstructure. they do not provide an absolute value for the hardenability. if two steels are quenched in the same medium and so examined. cementite and ferrite within. A knowledge of the critical diameters in different quenchants is of practical use but. the steel with the larger depth of hardening is the steel with the greater hardenability. There 93 . This diameter is called the critical diameter. But in order for that to be done it is necessary to define what is meant by the thickness. then we can expect all locations that had the same rates of cooling to have the same microstructures. It is the diameter of a bar that has a depth of hardness equal to its radius. N. Method #2. if several steels are compared. On this basis. they do not provide a quantitative measure of the property. The term “depth of hardening” under discussion here should not be confused with the term “case depth” in carburized parts such as axles and gear teeth. The case depth is usually specified in terms of a specific hardness value such as that depth at which the hardness is RC 50. Typically. Similarly the depth of hardening is the depth at which the hardness corresponding to 50 % martensite is located on a cross section. Many experiments have shown that for the standard etchants. The critical cooling rate The nature of the microstructure of a given steel at any location within a quenched bar is mainly dependent upon the rate at which that location cooled. The critical diameter When bars of the same steel but with different diameters are quenched in the same quenchant. this is the place where the rate of decrease in hardness with position is the greatest. Whereas these kinds of observations clearly allow different steels to be ranked in order of their hardenability. This is the same dilemma that we met when considering how to specify the depth of hardening. Furthermore.B. the microstructure varies from almost fully martensitic through various mixtures that include bainite and pearlite The thickness of the martensitic rim can be measured by quantitative metallography. Grossman. it so happens that the rate of variation of the hardness as the microstructure changes. such as nital that attacks intercrystalline and interphase boundaries. the thickness of the martensitic rim usually refers to the location at which the microstructure contains 50 % martensite. 1952). the steel with the greatest hardenability will possess the largest critical diameter.

This is fortuitous because these temperature ranges are those through which the steel must usually be cooled fastest in order to avoid diffusion controlled phase transformations. The rate at which it can do this depends upon the thermal conductivity. Of course. Although this quench is unobtainable it is quite closely approached by quenching into vigorously agitated. containing embedded thermocouples. quench hardening of steels and the martensitic transformation in steels might never have been discovered! The greatest possible rate at which heat could be removed from the surface of a quenched bar. Its value for the case above is ∞. Siebert. would occur if the quenchant was able to immediately lower the temperature at the surface of the bar to that of the bath and hold it there during the cooling process. degree Celsius. the temperature at the centers dropped to about 650°C at a relatively slow cooling rate.has been a great deal of work done since. It is interesting to note that it is fortuitous that the greatest cooling rates for water happen to occur at temperatures corresponding to the nose of TTT diagrams for low to medium carbon steels. f. This creates a temperature gradient in the bar. Evidently. 94 .V. The combined effects of the rate at which heat is extracted and the rate at which it is conducted to the surface from within. D. the heat transfer process during quenching in water is not a simple one. Obviously. The value of the coefficient depends on the materials concerned and the state of the system as well as on the units used. ASM 1977) in which half inch diameter bars of nickel-5%Si.sec. In order for the heat to be transferred to the quenching medium it has to get to the surface of the bar. depends upon the conductivity of the steel. In the next phase. While this separation existed. down the temperature gradient. k. f can vary widely being much smaller for an object cooling in still air than for one cooling in rapidly flowing cold water. Breen. These bubbles rose from the surface due to gravity and convection turbulence. were heated to 850°C and immersed in water.A. The quenching power of a quenching medium is described by a coefficient H. When a hot bar of steel is immersed within the quenching fluid. by C. the surfaces of the bars almost immediately became separated from the water by a blanket of steam. During this stage the cooling rate rose to over 300 degrees per second as the temperature dropped to about 450°C at the center of the bar. determines the rates of cooling at various locations within the bar. Doane and D. This caused a rapid decrease in the cooling rate which decreased to less than 50 degrees per second during the time taken for the temperature to drop another 100 degrees. The cooling rates at the surface of the sample being quenched vary with time during the quench and thus with the actual temperature of the surface. in experiments ( see “The Hardenability of Steels. iced brine. An example of units is calories/cm2. calories/cm. heat is extracted from the surface of the bar and the temperature of the surface is decreased. Should it have happened in practice that the cooling rate was small in these temperature ranges. At this stage the nucleation and growth of steam bubbles ended and the rate of cooling became dominated by convection in the coolant.H. For example. but the early work established the basic concepts and the terminology. for a given thermal conductivity. Newton’s law of cooling relates the rate of loss of heat through a unit area of a solid surface in contact with a coolant fluid to the temperature difference between the surface and the adjacent fluid by a heat transfer coefficient. The quenching process Let us consider the quenching process more closely. liquid water made contact with the sample and steam bubbles formed rapidly. which has units of similar kind i. The rate of flow of heat from the interior of the bar.e. such a quenching process is unobtainable practically and is defined as an ideal quench. Experimentally determined values ranged up to 50 degrees per second.

This is illustrated in the appended sketches. ( the factor of two arises because the experimental results were related to the diameters of the quenched bars not the radii). the form of the variation of the untransformed diameter caused by variations of the bar diameter. Hence Di is equal to Dc for an ideal quench.D would have the same form for all those steels for which H.sec.D. 95 . degree Celsius. The ideal diameter Grossman introduced a term called the ideal diameter which he defined as that diameter of a bar that would just harden through when quenched in an ideal quench. This means that two such curves would superimpose on one another when an appropriate scale is chosen. Consider the results of experiments in which the effects of bar diameter and different quench baths are investigated. no effects due to stress and that the microstructure was a function only of the local cooling rate. D. The intercept of that curve on the abscissa. Such a scale is obtained when Du/D is plotted against H. if two steels of different hardenability are quenched in two different baths. reveals the critical diameter for that steel and quenching medium. is as shown in the graph of Du /D versus D. but the two curves differ at other diameters. and it is found that its diameter exceeds the critical value. It has units of length -1. then it is possible to find a combination such that the two critical diameters are equal. H is infinity because f would be infinite. These curves are called characteristic curves.Dc is the same. which allow the quenching power of any bath to be estimated. On the basis of experimental observations and computations assuming a constant thermal conductivity. The procedure is as follows. where H1 and H2 are the quenching powers of the two baths. The early workers took the ratio of H = f to describe the severity of a 2k quench. It is written as Di. and h1 and h2 denote the hardenability of the two steels.Du versus H. Grossman predicted that the curve of H. Now. When a series of different diameter bars are quenched into the same bath. For the ideal quench. then one can define the diameter of the material that contains less than 50 % martensite as Du. If it were possible to list the ideal diameters of various steels. This is shown in the sketch. constant H. Sets of them have been produced. the list would provide an absolute indication of the hardenability of each steel. When a quenched bar is sectioned and examined either microstructurally or by a hardness survey.

4068 STEEL HRC 35 0 1th/ 16 INCH DIVISIONS ON SCALE 96 .EXP DATA GIVES Du vs D 1 Du --D Plot of Du/D vs D yields Dc and the data to fit to the chacteristic curves 0 Dc Calculated Dc. D gives H. H & Dc gives Di 0 H. Di.E. Dc JOMINY TEST RESULTS 65 S.A. H relations 1 Dc H= Some characteristic curves 1 H=5 Du ---D DECREASING H 0 Di Thus.

the jet of water emitted from the pipe rises to a height of 2. its lower end is 0. the end of the bar becomes dark and the boundary between the dark and red-hot steel can be observed to move upwards. Numerous investigations have been carried out to correlate the results of a Jominy test with other measures of the hardenability. the values of Du and D are determined for a given steel in a given bath. the diameters of bars that have the same cooling rates at their centers as those at particular distances along a Jominy bar are plotted against the Jominy distance. The most widely-used test for measuring hardenability is the Jominy end-quench test. It turns out that when steels are quenched in violently agitated iced brine. The graph enables the determination of the distance along a Jominy bar of the location at which the cooling rate would be the same as at the center of the bar. This has to be done with care lest any microstructural changes are induced by the heat generated in the grinding process. The Jominy End-Quench Test. Di and H to obtain Di. Meanwhile. results obtained from bars that have diameters that are much bigger than the depths of hardening cannot be made to match the characteristic curves. an H value of 5 can be attained. Presumably.5 inches above the end of the pipe. The water pressure in the pipe is set (prior to the test) such that when a fast-opening valve is activated. provided that the effect of the size of the bar on H is taken into account. This test involves quenching the end of a bar of particular dimensions in a specified manner. The hardness at the center of the bar can now be obtained from the results of the Jominy test. The final step is then to consult calculated graphical relations among Dc.9 to 1 for still water and 0. Jec. Nevertheless. 0. a flat surface. the Di values provide a useful guide to hardenability. The results provide Dc. Suppose a particular part is 97 . the test bar is one inch in diameter and four inches long. Knowing Dc the value of H is determined. the results are compared to the set of characteristic curves to find the particular curve with the best fit. However. Experiments have shown that the value of H assigned to a quenching bath is not constant throughout the quench and can vary with the size of the bar. Then. For example. An example is shown later. It is austenitized and placed in a jig that suspends it vertically above a half-inch diameter water pipe which points upwards. the assumption that H is constant is invalid. When the end-quench is complete. These graphs have practical use. When the test bar is put in place. This value produces results that are close to those predicted for an infinite value of H. 0.15 inches deep is ground along the length of the bar. The valve is opened immediately and the water sprays onto the end of the bar. It is kind of entertaining to watch. Then Rockwell C hardness measurements are made at intervals of one sixteenth of an inch along the bar. When everything is correct. Other examples of H are: 2 for still brine.By experiment. this is due to the approximations used. the water only contacts the end of the bar and then sprays outward and downward resembling an umbrella.5 inches above the end of the pipe.3 for still oil. Typically. In this diagram. Curves for two different quench severity’s are presented. from Siebert et al (page 11). The results are plotted as hardness versus distance from the quenched end.25-0. This is to be expected from the temperature versus time behavior described earlier for quenched cylinders. The Jominy distances involved are called Jominy equivalent cooling rates or Jominy equivalent conditions. Lets consider another example of their use.

these locations cooled similarly to the corresponding positions on the Jominy bars. i. An appropriate steel is to be chosen. It is important that the test bars and parts are exposed to the same thermal history. These are the Jec’s for the particular locations. For example.e. 98 . selected parts are sectioned and the hardness at the critical locations is measured. This procedure requires the test steel and those of the members of the group from which the selection is to be made to have similar thermal conductivity so that the cooling rates are similar at similar Jominy distances. the Jominy distances corresponding to these hardnesses can be found. This reduces the risk of problems that might arise with respect to quench cracking and distortion if the quenching process is vigorous. Meanwhile the Jominy bars are tested to determine the end-quench data. it is usual to choose a steel with the lowest satisfactory carbon content and of the minimum hardenability necessary for the job. Finally. end quench data available for various steels produced for selection on the basis of hardenability can be examined to choose one which will produce the specified hardnesses at the measured Jec’s. Then by comparing the hardness values measured on the parts with the end quench data. Following the heat treatment.to be manufactured and heat treated in a currently available process that uses a particular quenching medium and the hardness value for particular locations within the part are specified. When steels of suitable hardenability are identified the final choice is made taking into account other factors. These parts along with the Jominy bars are heat treated in the production facilities. One procedure is to manufacture a number of the parts using a relatively shallow hardening steel such as 8620 or 1040 and also make Jominy test bars of the same heat of steel.

Two examples HRC J JEC’s The Effects of Alloying Elements on Tempering Reactions 99 . Consider the results for the smaller hardness # that defines the JEC at X. Also heat treat with the componets. Heat treat in currently available process. x Measure hardness at X. Perform jominy tests.H=5 Dx Dy D H=1 The jominy distance is that distance along a jominy bar at which the hardness is that obtained at the center of a bar quenched in a mediam of H JDx JDy JOMINY DISTANCE X locations have required specified minimum hardnesses x Fabricate from. Compare to obtain JEC. Now a steel can be chosen That will produce the specified hardness at that JEC. say 1040 or 8620. jominy test bars of the same steel.

80 % C steel 200 300 400 500 600 700 Q 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Tempering temperature.2% C steel 0.Tempering temperature. Rockwell C 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0. F 100 100 .35 % C steel 1. C 100 80 Hardness.

5 to 1 hour produce carbides that consist primarily of cementite due to the comparatively high carbon content and also because the rate of diffusion of the carbon is so much faster than those of the alloy elements. Solute drag refers to an effect that can arise due to the tendency of solutes to segregate at or away from intercrystalline boundaries. 101 101 . alloying elements dissolved in the martensite reduce the rates at which these processes occur. When this happens their growth rates are controlled directly by the diffusion rates of the (substitutional) solutes. Obviously. The austenite stabilizers. precipitation from solid solution. These elements retard the rates of the transformations that occur during tempering. Segregation lowers the effective surface energy and hence the driving force for boundary migration. the decomposition of this austenite during tempering can have important effects and therefore stage two tempering processes can become important unlike the case for hypoeutectoid plain carbon steels. Equivalent effects require smaller amounts of solute the greater the affinity of the solute for carbon. b) Carbide Formers. it still retards the growth rate. The retardation in the carbide growth rate suggests that the solutes diminish the rate at which carbon can diffuse in the steel.15 wt. In the following discussion of the effects of alloying elements upon tempering reactions in martensite we will neglect effects due to retained austenite. are effective elements for lowering the martensitic start temperature. this is being done so that we can focus on martensitic reactions.5 wt. However. the steel will have a smaller hardness than would be predicted from the carbon concentration of the steel because of the crystals of retained austenite distributed within the martensite. possibly by reducing the diffusion rate of carbon. At high tempering temperatures where the growth of ferrite crystals becomes important. % Mo and 0. Also. a) Graphite formers and Mn. alloying can decrease the Ms temperature and give rise to significant quantities of retained austenite when the quenchant is at or near room temperature Accordingly. the net hardness can increase. % V have similar effects. Si and Ni partition to ferrite and avoid being incorporated in cementite. when the austenite transforms to bainite during tempering in the appropriate temperature range. Mn can be incorporated into the carbides and does not need to diffuse away. particle coarsening and grain growth. 1 wt. Mn and Ni. Then. % Cr. In general. As quenched. They do so by substitutional diffusion with the result that the growth rates of the cementite particles are retarded in comparison to the case of rate control by the diffusion of carbon. Alloy carbides that are rich in alloying elements can form instead of cementite in more concentrated alloy steels at high tempering temperatures. For example. At these alloying levels. 0. the solutes can impede the migration rate of the ferrite/ferrite interface by solute drag.The Effects of Alloying Elements on Tempering Reactions The reactions that take place when martensite is tempered involve solute segregation and clustering at crystal defects. tempering times of 0. This means that the rate of growth of the carbide particles depends on the rate at which these elements can diffuse out of the way.

5%Mo=0.5 0 1200 F 600 800 1200 F Rc Strong C.15%V Rc Larger amounts cause secondary hardening 12% Cr 2 0.Sc Rc mn Austenite stabilizers and graphite formers Retard softening effect of Si >Mn >Ni 1200 F Carbipe formers retard in small amounts 1% Cr= 0.F’s move peak to high T 600 800 1200 F 102 102 .

0.5% Cr steels as influenced by molybdenum Softening with increasing tempering temperature.50 %Cr 10 Q 400 1000 1200 600 800 Tempering temperature.5% Mo 40 0% Mo 30 30 20 0.35% C. of quenched 0.0% Cr steels as influenced by molybdenum contentent 103 103 0% Mo . Rockwell C 60 200 60 Hardness.35% C 2% Cr 1000 1200 600 800 Tempering temperature. F 10 Q 400 300 400 500 600 300 400 500 600 700 5% Mo 50 2% Mo 0. Rockwell C 5% Mo 50 2% Mo 0.35% C. F Softening with increasing tempering temperature.35 %C 0.5% Mo 40 20 0.Tempering temperature. C Tempering temperature. of quenched 0. 2. C 200 700 Hardness.

F Softening with increasing tempering temperature.45% C steels as influenced by an increase of manganese from about 0. Rockwell C 55 50 SAE T1340 (1. F Q 400 600 SAE 1040 (0.75% Mn) 12% Cr Hardness.75% Mn) 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 20 0.35% C steels as influenced by chromium content 104 104 5% Cr . 30 Carbon steel Q 800 1000 1200 Tempering temperature. Rockwell C 50 4% Cr 40 2% Cr 0.75 to 1. C 300 400 500 600 700 Hardness.Tempering temperature.75%. C 100 200 60 60 200 300 400 500 600 700 Tempering temperature.40% C.45% C 10 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Tempering temperature. Softening with increasing tempering temperature. of quenched 0. 0.40 to 0. of quenched 0.

50 to 0.45% C steels as influenced by about 3.55 %C 60 55 200 300 400 500 600 700 200 300 400 500 600 700 Hardness.45% C 1000 1200 Q Q Tempering temperature.3% Si 45 1. C Tempering temperature. F Softening with increasing tempering temperature.40% C. 0. Rockwell C 60 55 3.40 to 0.Tempering temperature.5% Ni) 0. of quenched 0.8% Si 50 2.3% Si 40 35 0.5% Ni 105 105 . C 100 100 65 0.5% Si 30 25 1 Hr. 20 600 200 400 800 1000 1200 Tempering temperature. F 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 200 400 600 800 SAE 1040 SA 2340 (3. Rockwell C Hardness.

the events described earlier take place during tempering. Eventually. the steel softens continuously. let us austenitize the steel at a temperature that is high enough to transform the steel into homogeneous austenite. important changes can arise.Hardness measurements provide a convenient method of following the progress of tempering reactions because these reactions change the hardness of the steel. At the high tempering temperatures of 800°F and above. in alloy steels in which significant amounts of alloy carbides can form. What then? The hardness of the as-quenched martensite will be lower than that of the martensite produced in the first experiment because it has less carbon dissolved in it. the gliding dislocations meet a higher density of obstacles to slip and the hardness of the steel is increased. It is the spacing between these carbides that determines how effective they are at hindering the glide of dislocations. Let us consider an example to predict the kind of changes that can occur. First. there is less carbon in the austenite because some resides in the undissolved carbides. The hardness in hypoeutectoid steels is usually gradually reduced by tempering because the carbon initially dissolved in the martensite forms precipitates of carbides causing the martensite to become softer and to lose its tetragonality. In fact. the new carbides replace the coarsening cementite-rich carbides with a new. Also. When this is not so. plain carbon. The hardenability will also be reduced because the grain size of the austenite will be smaller than in the previous case due to the lower temperature of austenitization and because the vanadium carbides inhibit grain growth. also. The first effect that we predict is a change in the hardenability of the steel. The hardenability will be decreased in comparison to that of the previous case because the vanadium is not dissolved in the austenite and. However. 106 106 . The particular temperatures at which secondary hardening occurs depends on the species of carbide that forms and increase as the stability of the carbide increases. and many low alloy steels continue to soften because of the coarsening of the carbide population and. also. Then suppose that the steel is successfully transformed to martensite during quenching. However. Secondary hardening would not take place. Now suppose we repeat the experiment but this time the steel is held at a temperature that is not far above the A3 point during the austenitization treatment. This process reduces the number of carbides per unit volume which causes the spacing between them to increase.% V has been added and which has a microstructure that contains vanadium carbides. We select an AISI 1050 steel to which 1 wt. Therefore. because of ferrite grain growth. let us suppose that we are fortunate and that the sample is successfully transformed into martensite. Because the vanadium and the carbon are dissolved in the martensite. When the dense array of fine alloy carbides forms. That could certainly cause problems if a fully martensitic component was a required result of the heat treatment. it is possible for a reduction in the hardness to arise due to auto-tempering that could occur because of the increase in the M s temperature due to the absence of Vanadium and the reduction of carbon in the austenite. the transformations that occur will be very similar to those that would occur in a plain carbon steel that contains less carbon than a 1050 steel. when the precipitation of cementite is complete. This phenomenon is called secondary hardening and is clearly of practical importance because it provides another method of obtaining a microstructure of high hardness and toughness. At this temperature the ferrite is converted to austenite but the vanadium carbides are not dissolved so the austenite contains them when it is quenched. Note that the rapidly diffusing carbon enables relatively pure cementite to form first because the nucleation and growth of the alloy carbides is paced by substitutional diffusion. fine array of alloy carbides. continued tempering causes the average size of the carbides to increase in order to reduce the total area of the ferrite/carbide interphase boundary. the hardenability could now be so low that we may fail to produce a uniformly martensitic sample. It is important to recognize that this discussion of the effects of alloying elements applies to situations in which the alloying elements were initially in solution in the austenite. When such samples are tempered.

the toughness falls. In these cases. The microstructural changes that take place in low alloy steels during tempering usually cause a reduction in the hardness of the steel unless. there are occasions when this is not so and. a very ductile fracture is obviously associated with extensive plastic deformation. These adjacent parts then become connected on the final fracture surface by steps that are called cleavage steps. The initiation of a crack in a cleavage fracture may involve some localized plastic flow but the crack is sharp and advances by material separation at its end. 107 107 . macroscopic plastic deformation. typically {100}in BCC crystals. bending and reduction in thickness. The nucleation of the micro voids is frequently easier at small included particles in steels. There are two types of embrittlement. of course. ductile and brittle failures were described from the macroscopic point of view. Cleavage cracks tend to follow particular crystallographic planes. In the preceding paragraph. The decrease in hardness is usually accompanied by an increase in the toughness as shown by the results obtained during impact tests. These features are called dimples. Studies of the ductile fracture process under a tensile stress. However. Let us review some pertinent aspects of fracture in metals. One is called tempered martensite embrittlement. and creates distortion such as elongation. from the macroscopic point of view. It is also referred to as 500°F embrittlement and one step embrittlement. it is not necessarily true that a fracture that proceeds by micro void coalescence. The crack advances through this array of micro voids by tearing the metal ligaments that separate neighboring voids. there that can be little indication from the macroscopic view. It could be initiated at a reduction in section or some other stress concentrator. BCC and CPH metals can break by cleavage. then it is common to observe the particle sitting in the dimple when the fracture is examined with a large enough resolution. instead. The work done during the gross deformation accounts for the high values of the energy absorption in the total failure. two step embrittlement. that the failure took place mechanistically by a ductile mode. a very brittle fracture takes place without the production of any obvious distortion and smaller amounts of energy are absorbed during the failure. Fractures which occur by cracks that do not propagate by micro void coalescence can occur in metals. will be associated with extensive. On the microscopic scale the ductile failure mode produces characteristic fractographic features visible at magnifications above a few hundred times. In contrast. Most of this plastic deformation precedes the fracture itself. The process of micro void coalescence is a ductile process and the fracture is therefore a ductile fracture. Here we have an inherently brittle process on the microscopic and macroscopic scales. If plastic deformation does occur ahead of the crack then the crack can become blunt and stop. has shown that micro voids nucleate and grow in the metal ahead of the crack. First. However.Embrittlement During Tempering The aim of a quench and temper treatment is to produce a microstructure that has a particular set of mechanical properties. secondary hardening occurs. The other is simply called temper embrittlement or. The one step and two step terminology is less confusing. They are small craters or holes bounded by raised ligaments and their presence demonstrates that the crack propagated by a process that involved a ductile failure mechanism. This reduction in the toughness raises the ductile to brittle transition temperature and can reduce the energy absorbed during fracture at and above room temperature. Adjacent parts of the crack can advance along different. leaving behind the tell-tale dimples on the fracture surfaces. but parallel planes. perhaps preferably.

Fracture surfaces can show regions of micro void coalescence and regions of cleavage. This range of tempering temperatures corresponds to the beginning of stage three tempering in which sheets of cementite needles and platelets precipitate heterogeneously on interlath boundaries. A typical treatment that produces it is austenitization. quench and tempered 4140. it is said to have become embrittled. Because cleavage cracks follow particular crystallographic planes. this can happen during tempering. The tolerance of the material to defects decreases as the toughness goes down and catastrophic failure can occur under “normal loading conditions”.g. one might 108 108 . It can also occur in plain carbon steels that contain phosphorus.Fractures that occur by cleavage and by micro void coalescence usually produce distinctive characteristic topographic features on the fracture surfaces that enable them to be distinguished and readily identified. there is usually little or no micro void coalescence involved. One Step Embrittlement. The toughness of steels is of great practical importance. Intergranular fractures during which the cracks follow the grain boundaries within the material can also take place.) The embrittlement manifests itself by raising the ductile to brittle transition temperature and by reducing the amount of energy absorbed during the impact in comparison to those pertaining to samples tempered immediately above and below this range. It is to be expected that some components that are made of steel will contain small cracks or similar flaws. the fracture paths pass through grains and the fracture is called transgranular. This form of embrittlement can occur in standard low alloy steels that are heat treated for high strength levels. quenching to martensite and tempering in the region of 450°F to 550°F. invoking the principle that the properties of the whole sample are dominated by those of the most continuous phase. Again. In general terms. These fracture surfaces are characteristically smooth and comprise curved and flat facets that clearly reveal the intercrystalline boundary path followed by the cracks. As we said earlier. e. Sheets of cementite particles can also be deposited from retained austenite when this austenite transforms during the tempering treatment. A cleavage failure usually takes place rapidly and consumes less energy than does a ductile failure. This mode of failure is brittle on both microscopic and macroscopic scales and can occur in FCC metals as well as BCC and CPH metals. If a material that would normally be expected to have adequate toughness under certain conditions develops a microstructure that permits crack propagation in a brittle mode. We have described three modes of fracture that can occur when metals are broken. As the percentage of the former decreases so does the energy consumed during the failure and the metal becomes less tough. It is important to realize that a metallic component can fracture by more than a single mode. ( Hence the old name of 500 degree embrittlement. The energy consumed during the fracture is small because the crack follows a path across which there is weak cohesion.

ONE STEP TWO STEP F Austenitize Austenitize Cool very slowly past 350 C T Temper 450-550 F Temper 600 C OR TWO STEP Austenitize 600 C Temper C Quench T Reheated TO 350 C Impact energy DBTT Impact temperature 109 109 .

If the steel can be cooled rapidly from the tempering temperature then it is not embrittled. As a result of this work. that cannot be done with very large components. There are many applications of steel for which through hardening is unnecessary. as is unfortunately the case in practice when heat treating very large turbines made from steels containing Ni. gears and bearing shafts.g. Indeed. Surface Hardening Treatments in Steel Components Most of our discussion about quench hardening and tempering heat treatments has so far been concerned with through hardening components. At 375°C several hundred hours are required. although hard. It retards the embrittlement. occurs typically at about 550°C. the embrittlement is effected during the tempering time required to produce these microstructures. but it does not afflict plain carbon steels. wear resistant surfaces can be required for 110 110 . Cr. Furthermore. encourage the segregation. this form of embrittlement is reversible by reheating to 600°C and then cooling rapidly. e. Si and Cr seem to exacerbate the problem. Much of this work has employed Auger spectroscopy to analyze the composition of fracture surfaces immediately after breaking the sample. For example. Elements that are known to cause embrittlement are P. In addition. the embrittlement is associated with intergranular failure along prior austenite grain boundaries. it is very similar to the intergranular mode of failure in one step embrittlement. eventually. This is particularly unfortunate because this temperature range is often encountered in practical applications and. Two Step Embrittlement. However. These times are typically about an hour. Hence the term two step embrittlement. If the susceptible steel is heated into the 375 to 500°C range subsequently and held there. Indeed. they are often undesirable. the embrittlement demon lies in wait. The fracture paths are transgranular and the failure mode is often a mixture of cleavage and microvoid coalescence. Obvious examples are those in which wear resistance and dent resistance is important. The kinetics of the embrittlement process exhibits “ C ” curve behavior during isothermal aging at various temperatures. there is general agreement that the loss of toughness is due to the segregation of tramp elements in the alloy steels. Even when it is possible to cool fast enough to avoid the problem. when the steel contains high amounts ( say 0. At first sight. Such microstructures can be unnecessary in the interiors. tempered at 600°C (note the switch to Celsius) and then slowly cooled past 350°C. particularly Ni. The nose of the curve. It arises in alloy steels containing Ni. Mo and V. Mn. within the apparatus. It appears that these elements. This is a loss of toughness because of the occurrence of intergranular failure along prior austenite grain boundaries. where the rate of embrittlement is most rapid. Molybdenum is beneficial. Cr and Mo that are converted to martensite. flaws in the steel can become super critical as the toughness gradually falls with time. At this temperature significant embrittlement can occur in times of the order of an hour. The cooling rate must be very slow. This seems to be true when the steels are relatively free of P and N because the fracture paths follow the sheets of cementite. the alloying elements Ni. Sn and As. but for which a high hardness at and near the exterior surface is important. This suggests that the embrittlement is also associated with a diminution of cohesive strength across prior austenite grain boundaries due to the segregation thereon of impurities within the steel as well as with precipitates of cementite. A great deal of research has been devoted to understanding two step embrittlement. Unfortunately.03 wt. Sb. Other examples include power transmission shafts subject to bending and torsion actions that create much higher mechanical stresses at the surface regions than in the interior. it will become brittle. in situ.expect a deterioration of toughness with these microstructural changes. In such instances it is desirable to produce the hard strong microstructures at and near the exterior surfaces. %) of P.

These requirements have led to the development of a variety of commercial practices aimed at surface hardening components. The oscillating field produced by the induction coils induces electrical eddy currents in the steel. surface hardening by localized heat treatment techniques is applied to steel components that have uniform compositions. often medium to high carbon steels are used. The objective of the flame hardening process is to austenitize the steel at and near the surface and then to remove the flame and rapidly quench the work to produce martensite and. However. however. Then. the mechanical engineering analysis of an axle might specify a particular minimum tensile yield strength at the 3/4 radius position from the center of the shaft. In these treatments the composition of the steel is uniform. it should be noted that steel plate is often cut by means of flame torches which can alter the microstructure and properties of the steel near the cut surface. The selection of the steel must be made with this in mind so that the appropriate carbon content for the required hardness is chosen. a rotating shaft within a surrounding. The 3/4 radius position mentioned in this example can be relatively distant from the outer surface e. In passing. It is more adaptable than flame heating because a wide variety of coil configurations are possible. to use the flame to temper the martensite. These eddy currents are produced within a certain depth of the outer surface called the skin depth. Usually. For example. stationary array of burners. This is achieved by using appropriately shaped induction coils made from hollow. Flame and Induction Hardening. oscillating.g. finally. The eddy currents cause Joule resistance heating in the skin depth which rapidly raises the temperature of the steel at the surface. The relatively low thermal conductivity of steel is an enemy when one is trying to through harden bulk pieces.g. The removal of heat from a quenched bar is partially controlled by the rate at which it is conducted through the steel to the cooled surface. in a 3 inch diameter axle. The use of high frequency. magnetic fields induced in the surface layers of steel parts is an important method of surface hardening. the heating and cooling is not uniform. burn and quench assemblies. the choice of the steel will also include hardenability considerations. The use of induction heating is not restricted to producing changes close to the surface. when one only wishes to austenitize a region near the surface because it enables surface regions to be austenitized using high rates of energy input without the interiors being significantly affected. water-cooled copper tubing that are placed near the surface ( or even selectively near parts of a surface).a shaft it can be also important that the less severely loaded interior be tough and resistant to crack propagation. In this case. the interior wall surface of cylindrical tubes can be induction hardened. for example. This depth decreases as the oscillating frequency is increased. Many variations on the theme can be envisioned ranging from hand held torches wielded by workers of various skill levels and experience to automated ignition. Probably the oldest technique for surface hardening is flame hardening in which heat is applied directly to the surface concerned using torches that burn gases such as oxygen-acetylene mixtures. is first to produce the interior microstructure by a uniform heat treatment applied to the whole part and then to selectively heat treat the surface only. e. One way to produce a microstructure at the surface of a component that is different from the microstructure in the interior. This translates into a certain hardness that is to be produced there in the tempered condition and thereby specifies the minimum carbon content for the steel. after the appropriate time. The process is readily automated. It becomes an ally. Induction heating for longer times and in the lower frequency ranges enables the appropriate austenitization to be achieved. the power is interrupted and the part is quenched. in many cases 111 111 .

During treatments in which the heating depth is greater.e. Shape changes due to thermal expansion and transformation of structure are accommodated by plastic flow in the hot metal. Surface hardening refers to all treatments that are intended to make the surface of articles harder than the material in their interiors. nitrogen or both. Then. to be another term for surface hardening. The method employs solid state diffusion to enrich the surface with carbon. i. 112 112 . is that the surface is in compression.when the needed depth of hardening is quite shallow. The increases can be about 5 points on the Rockwell scale. the depth to which the steel is austenitized is small. the situation can be reversed and the surface can be put into tension which is not good when fatigue resistance is important. locally different heating and cooling rates are used to produce different microstructures in particular locations in the steel components of uniform compositions. Case Hardening In the methods described above. In these processes the case depths are relatively shallow. This is true. We note first that coarse microstructures such as massive carbides widely dispersed in large grained ferrite are not suitable as a starting microstructure because the time required to produce relatively homogeneous austenite is too long. but is probably related to refinements in the comparative scales of the microstructures. unlike the case of an induction hardened automobile axle. often.This means that the austenitization time is very short which can have significant effects on the microstructural changes. The result. much more often than not it refers to a surface hardening process that depends on modifying the composition near the surface. A high temperature excursion can compensate by raising the diffusion rates but this increases the risk of obtaining a large austenitic grain size. This can endow the part with an increased resistance to fatigue because fatigue usually requires tensile stresses. In short time induction heating processes. If this is done then the article is encased ( completely or partially in selected places) in a hardened layer. from the surface to the interior. Refinement of the initial microstructure such as by normalization is helpful. when the rim transforms to martensite during cooling it tries to expand but the core on which it sits is relatively cool and resists plastic flow. This has not been completely explained. the induction heating time is completed within a few seconds (lengthy heating cycles allow time for heat conduction into the workpiece). An interesting observation that has been made is that the hardness of martensite manufactured in treatments using rapid heating and short austenitization times exceeds that obtained in the same steel by conventional through hardening heat treatments. Case hardening would appear then. It is possible to produce similar kinds of effects by means of through heating treatments given to steels in which the composition varies locally. but I have separated it here because it has been my experience that when the term case hardened is used.

the steel is quenched to render the case martensitic and is then tempered. and nitrogen which acts as a diluent. Typical case depths are less than a tenth of an inch and are often fractions of that. The result is that a chosen carbon concentration can be established and maintained at the surface. Because the factor that has the greatest effect on the hardness of martensite is its carbon content. if the austenite was put in oxygen it would be decarburized as CO and CO2 are created. temperature and time. The process by which this is done is called carburizing. increasing the concentration of carbon at the surface of a component provides a means of endowing the surface with a greater hardness than the interior. Similarly. % carbon in solution. O2 and CH4. It is done by exposing austenite to an appropriate environment that maintains the concentration of carbon at the surface of the steel at a chosen high value while carbon diffuses into the steel. and. The appropriate mixtures generate and maintain chosen carbon levels. Typical commercial atmospheres use mixtures of natural gas. CO2. then the carbon would be dissolved in the austenite so that the C in the equation would correspond to the carbon concentration in the austenite that is in equilibrium with the particular mixture of gases. Carburization times depend upon the desired case depth. We will consider a gas carburizing process to illustrate some of the principles. Active gases in the mixtures are CO. The quenching process can be done at the end of the carburization time or the part can be cooled down and then re-heat treated for case hardening. The eventual case depth will then be a function of the surface concentration. hardnesses a few points higher are required in the as-quenched part which enables the carbon level at that location to be predicted. which provides methane. When a piece of low carbon austenite is placed in a gas mixture for which a greater carbon content in the austenite corresponds to equilibrium. H2O. the reaction will move to the right increasing the components on the right hand side.002-0.006 inches: this is simply a statement that implies neither approval or disapproval. I have seen specifications calling for case depths of 0. carburization is not carried out using pure CO and CO2 mixtures. An important reaction is 2CO = CO 2 + C If we consider a particular mixture of the gases and a piece of austenite at equilibrium at a given temperature and a total pressure of one atmosphere. When the carburization is completed. This happens rapidly provided there are adequate quantities of the gas mixture available and it is continually being mixed. Carburization temperatures are usually in the range of 850 to 950 Celsius. A common definition of the case depth is that depth below the surface at which the hardness is RC 50 in the final quenched and tempered part . The variation of carbon concentration in austenite as a function of the partial pressures of CO and CO2 is shown on page 404 of Darken and Gurry’s Physical Chemistry of Metals. It is possible because austenite can accept up to 2 wt. 113 113 . Thus. Practically. the reaction will proceed to the right until the required carbon concentration is established at the surface of the steel. The diffusional flux into the steel is slow enough under the usual conditions for the chemical reaction at the surface to maintain the composition there. H2. If the CO content is increased. in particular the carbon concentration in the austenite.Carburizing. The time required for the carburization treatment can be estimated from the appropriate solution of Fick’s second law. Meanwhile carbon diffuses down the concentration gradient into the steel.

proeutectoid films can grow along the austenite grain boundaries during this stage and these films are retained along the prior austenite grain boundaries during quenching. the re-austenitization of the ferrite produced on cooling from the carburization furnace produces a fine grained austenite in contrast to that which exists after prolonged carburization because the re-austenitization temperature is lower. This usually means that the microstructure within the core is a mixture of ferrite and pearlite with ferrite being the dominant phase. In some applications the steel that is carburized has a relatively low bulk carbon content. Many of the martensitic plates are bigger because the grains in which they form are large and. As an extreme example. the retained austenite is less finely dispersed. the steel chosen will have a hardenability large enough for the core to become martensitic or bainitic during the quench. the austenitic grain size at the end of the carburization time is large.Cx − Cs x  = erf  2 Dt  C0 − Cs Where the subscript s refers to the surface of the austenite. Case hardening can also be done via the formation of numerous precipitates of nitrides near the surface 114 114 . In this case. Thus. also. This reduces the thermal shock by decreasing the temperature difference between the sample and the quenching medium. The microstructures in the carburized case depend upon the details of the temperature -time history. Such solutions have been cast in the form of: case depth = K(t)1/2 and tabulated results published. In contrast. warping and cracking. Often the part is cooled below the Acm before it is quenched. The microstructure so formed comprises fine crystals of martensite that is about a hard as it can be and a dispersion of proeutectoid particles that is beneficial for wear resistance. Many have about 0. when the samples are quenched. The carburizing process requires that the parts be quenched.2 wt. x refers to distance into the austenite and the suffix 0 refers to the initial base steel being carburized. In the latter case. On the other hand. Examples can be found in the metal handbooks and in Krauss’ book. there are many applications for which strong cores are necessary as well as hard cases. However. dispersed in the martensite. A major difference exists in samples that were quenched directly from the carburizing furnace compared to samples that were first cooled and then re-austenitized and quenched. The quenching action and martensitic transformations always create the risk of distortion.%. Krauss gives the examples of carburizing steels shown in the accompanying figure. the metal parts which have raised letters on their end faces and used to be used in typewriters to print letters by striking a dyed ribbon were often made of carburized (shallow case depth) AISI/SAE 1010. Other symbols have their usual meanings. usually below the Acm line. the steel matrix is austenitized and the proeutectoid cementite forms into globular particles that are retained as such. Others appear in the handbooks. Nitriding Steels.

4 0 0 1 2 Distance.291 115 115 . 0.001 in.6 t = 2 hrs 1.Distance.2 t = 4 hrs t = 8 hrs 0.001 in.8 t = 16 hrs 0.6 0 40 Distance. wt% 2 1. 925 C 1.4 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 Distance.8 0. 0. mm 3 4 5 Carbon concentration.2 0. 80 120 160 1800 F 1. wt% 0 40 80 120 160 1700 F D=Const. mm 1700 F 1600 F From: Krauss PP290. 2 Carbon concentration.

035 0.030 0.071 0..122 0.050 0. 30…………….073 0.150 t for 927 0C (1700 0F). 36……………. ksi 300 8620 steel 4-pt bend Single reheat 200 Direct quench 100 103 104 105 106 Cycles to failure 107 From: Krauss.087 0. 0. Double reheat Maximum stress.084 0. 16…………….100 0.086 0.025 0 Case depth (in..097 0.018 t for 871 C(1600 0F). 0.126 1700 F 0.Case Depth Calculated by the Harris Equation Time. pp292. For normal carburizing (saturated austenite at the steel surface while at temperature).021 t for 899 0C (1650 0F).116 0. 20…………….112 0.050 0.061 0. t (h) 2……………… 4……………… 8……………… 12……………..042 0..108 0.094 0.035 0.071 0..060 0.137 0.. 24…………….) after carburizing at(a): 1600 F 1650 F 0.103 0.299 116 116 . 1.025 0.079 0. Case depth = 0.

During single stage. nitriding treatments in which a single nitriding atmospheric composition is maintained. When this is unacceptable the layer is removed by surface grinding. 1. This nitrogen diffuses into the steel and also combines with the iron at the surface to form iron nitride. is shallow. e. These temperatures are typically 500 to 525°C. the steel to be nitrided is a medium carbon steel that is initially quenched and tempered at temperatures from 540°C to 700°C. Thus. in this case the depth of the precipitate band. This process is called nitriding and. is performed while the steel is largely ferritic not austenitic.) This layer is iron nitride and is hard but it can crack and spall. The reaction is NH3 = N + 3H Nitriding steels contain alloying elements that form nitrides so that the nitrogen that diffuses in forms numerous very fine precipitates. The high tempering temperature is intended to minimize microstructural changes that might occur during the subsequent nitriding processes that are carried out at lower temperatures.3 wt. Alternatively a two stage nitriding process is used in which. the atmospheric conditions are changed so that iron nitride no longer forms at the surface and the existing layer is removed because its nitrogen content dissolves into the steel. (So-called because in standard etchants for steels it is unattacked. Typically. the process does not involve rapid temperature changes and allows excellent dimensional control. 117 117 .% Al. combined processes have been developed in which both carbon and nitrogen are simultaneously diffused into the surface These are carbonitriding and nitrocarburizing and are done to both austenite and to ferrite. a “white layer” is formed. Aluminum is used for this purpose. in contrast to carburizing. usually less than half a millimeter. The case depth. even though nitriding times can exceed a 100 hours. Because the two processes described are successful.g.of the steel. Nitriding is conducted in controlled atmospheres that use the decomposition of ammonia to generate nascent nitrogen on the surface of the steel. after the first stage.

In general. Following this reasoning. 0. It is able to delay these reactions sufficiently for useful residual stress relief and concomitant toughness improvement to be obtained during tempering at 300°C before harmful quantities of carbides form. This is necessary in spite of the fact that the tempering reduces the yield strength: the objective is a compromise that gives acceptable strength and toughness and.65-2 % Ni.9 Mn.35-0.45-1.45 % C. which is 0. Additions of Si have been found to be effective for this purpose.45 % Mo. practical problems arise because one step tempered martensite embrittlement lurks dangerously nearby. 1.7-0. It is generally accepted that one step tempered martensite embrittlement is associated with the formation of sheets of carbides at the beginning of stage 3 tempering and. Steels with strengths near and above the upper end of the latter range are called ultrahigh strength steels. Examples of applications which ask for very high yield strengths are aircraft landing gear.05 % V with P and S less than 0. Modified standard alloy steels. Some standard low alloy steels such as 4130. also.g. submarine hulls and high pressure chambers. yield strengths of 690 -1380 MPa (100 -200 KSI) are considered to be high. 0. When appropriate alloying elements that might accomplish this are considered. INCO 300M. the toughness of the decomposition products of austenite is always improved by refining the austenitic grain size.65-0. high enough values of both for successful application. and those above 200 KSI and up to 300 KSI are very high.95 % Cr. Also. 4330 and 4340 in the tempered martensitic condition can have yield strengths above 200 KSI. When the grain size of the austenite is reduced.8 % Si. Many of the modified alloy steels have trade names e. 0. 100 KSI ≈ 689. Temperatures as high as 300°C can be required. in the present case there is an added advantage to having a small austenite grain size.Ultrahigh Strength Steel As a general guide. hopefully. 1. vanadium is often added in order for it to form carbides and nitrides which restrict grain growth during austenitizing.025 %. Because high and ultrahigh strength steels have very poor toughness when converted to martensite it is necessary to temper them. graphite stabilizers come immediately to mind because they retard the rates of nucleation and growth of cementite. While it is true that harmful residual stresses can be reduced during such tempering treatments and the toughness can be improved. 4140. 118 118 . Greater strengths are obtainable by modifying the compositions of the standard steels. the segregation of some solute elements such as phosphorus at prior austenite boundary sites.3-0. The carbides form by nucleation and growth processes and thus the time required for their appearance within the microstructure can be increased if the kinetics of the transformation can be retarded. The search for ways by which these standard alloy steels might be modified in order to reduce the risk of one step tempered martensite embrittlement has been the subject of much research in the past few decades. High strengths can also be produced by combining plastic deformation processes with heat treatment in what are called thermo-mechanical treatments. To obtain high strengths it is usually necessary to heat treat the steel to convert it to tempered martensite. 0. the area of the prior austenite grain boundaries is increased. Thus contributions to embrittlement from solute segregation at these interfaces should be reduced.5 MPa.

0.Hour CHARPY ENERGY 80 Same alloy 480 C tempering treatment Arrows show results of increasing temering time 40 160 Test at 27 C y (0.850 T C Austenitization Fabricate Time MAR M 300 heat treatment 3 Hrs Age 480 C 10 Ni---2Cr 1Mo.19 C Tempering curve HARDNESS Secondary hardening steels 200 400 600 Tempering temperature C 1. 8 Co.2% offset) KSI 180 200 119 119 .

03 % C max. When a steel contains inclusions they can often dominate the impact toughness even when other favorable microstructural changes are made.6 % Ti.. It is unfortunate that the tempering process is necessary because it tends to reduce the strengths initially achieved.austenitization at 850°C. Mo helps to defend against the segregation. They contain a rather high content of Ni which makes them expensive. 9 % Co. For the ductile failure mechanism. 5 % Mo.1 % Mn max. Note that because the steel contains less than 0. Hence the steel has a high hardenability. A typical heat treatment is as follows:. scanning electron microscopic studies have demonstrated that inclusions in steels are often involved in the formation of the voids. During austenitization essentially all the alloying elements are dissolved. One example is a group of steels called maraging steels which were so named because the martensitic transformation was used to obtain a saturated solid solution in which precipitation hardening was subsequently obtained by aging the steel at a suitable temperature. A typical example is Mar M 300 for which the yield stress can reach 350 KSI (2. favorable effect on toughness during transgranular fracture. cool to room temperature and age for 3 hours at 480°C. the diffusion controlled transformations that have to be avoided in order to form martensite those that form ferrite and those that involve precipitation of intermetallic 120 120 . however. they are still not very tough and they do not tolerate flaws. Even when very high strength steels are successfully treated to take advantage of the strength of tempered martensite while remaining free from one step tempered martensite embrittlement. this form of tempered martensite embrittlement is indeed avoided. Mo.Here we have V to lower the austenite grain size and thereby improve toughness in the final product. 0. Mn.4 GPa). Ni is not a desirable element with respect to intergranular failure by temper embrittlement because it tends to promote segregation. 0. This led people to consider whether or not secondary hardening processes during tempering could be effective enough to produce ultrahigh strength steels. Si. 0. then the Ni that is dissolved in the matrix has a strong. 0.1% Al. and is air-hardenable in thick sections. Thus as the yield strengths of the steels are increased to higher and higher levels it becomes increasingly important to control the inclusion content and shape. This indicates that the interface between the inclusion and the matrix is one across which there is weak bonding so that it is a site at which a void can more easily nucleate. Si to strongly retard cementite formation which enables tempering to be done while minimizing the risk of embrittlement. cracks propagate by cleavage below the DBTT and by micro void coalescence above it. When the fracture surfaces are studied. S and O must be reduced. These steels were first developed in the 1960's and have been used in aircraft landing gear. it is to be expected that large structures will contain flaws such as pre-existing cracks or sites at which cracks can form more easily than elsewhere. Minimizing P and S reduces segregation. of tramp elements at grain boundaries. . Yield strengths can be as high as 350 KSI with 6 % elongation in tension... 18 % Ni. Additions of rare earth elements such as Ce are beneficial for making very small spherical oxide inclusions. Generally. Precipitation Hardened Steels The strengthening mechanisms used in the modified standard alloy steels described above are those provided by the martensitic transformation.03 % C. small inclusions are found inside many of the dimples. Ni and Cr to increase hardenability.1 % Si max. Typically. Modern steel making techniques produce cleaner steels than those made earlier and this also improves the fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of a material that contains such a flaw determines the critical applied stress at which the flaw will propagate. The lower the toughness the lower the stress for a given flaw to propagate. If. This partially explains why they have not been as widely used as their properties would imply that they should be.

carbides are unimportant. in this document. many small precipitates of Ni3Mo and FeTi form. Because the martensite has a low carbon content it is relatively soft. Also. 1 wt. because they nucleate heterogeneously on dislocations. These compounds grow by means of substitutional diffusion which is a sluggish process compared to interstitial diffusion. detailed experiments were conducted by tempering in the range of 480-510°C which spanned the secondary hardening peak. S and N. % Co and 0. Cr. % Ni. S and P. The maraging steels contain very little carbon and the precipitation reactions described above involve substitutional elements that form intermetallic compounds. as the tempering temperature was 121 121 . The cobalt provides some solution strengthening and it has been suggested that the cobalt-rich matrix undergoes short range ordering which would also contribute to strengthening. it is interesting to note that these steels have been found to have good resistance to stress corrosion cracking. it accelerates the kinetics of the nucleation and growth of the alloy carbides responsible for secondary hardening. in which secondary hardening yields very high strengths and good toughness. and Mo has been developed during the last 25 years. 4. of course. % Mo. The martensite has the low-carbon.12 wt. These precipitates provide the barriers to dislocation glide that are necessary for the high strength. lath type of microstructure and contains many dislocations and interfaces. This is rather smaller than the carbon levels in some of the modified xx40 standard steels because low carbon content promotes weldability. N. Vacuum melting techniques are used to minimize P.. we consider the effects of temperature at fixed tempering times of one hour. Speich et al. 2 wt. O. These become important during aging process because they are catalytic sites for heterogeneous nucleation of the intermetallic compounds. Because the tempering treatments that cause secondary hardening are carried out at higher temperatures than those used in the heat treatments of low alloy and modified low alloy steels. 303 (1973). they pin much of the dislocation density present initially which prevents recovery from taking place during the aging process. it dissolves mainly in the matrix and provides some solution strengthening and. Finally. %C and which contained small amounts of Si and Mn and trace amounts of Al. The investigation showed that initially. Let us consider some examples. In contrast. the phenomenon of secondary hardening that can occur during tempering of martensite in appropriate steels is associated with the precipitation of fine carbides that are rich in alloying elements such as Mo and Cr. we are familiar with the general roles and effects due the Ni. Much research has been devoted towards this objective and a class of steels containing Ni. The highest carbon content was 0. importantly. During aging. describes an investigation in which they studied 19 steels that had compositions that were variations around a basic mixture of 10 wt. would reduce the yield stress. 8 wt. It is important to remember that the microstructural changes produced during tempering are functions of time and temperature. Recovery. in Met Trans. Based on the results obtained in these experiments.19 %. improved toughness can be expected. At this stage. Typical heat treatments were austenitization at 845°C and quenching into water after which samples were tempered at temperatures that spanned the range from 100-700°C for various times. % Cr. This can be advantageous provided the secondary hardening precipitation processes are able to produce ultrahigh strengths. First. Co. Mo and carbon but what about the cobalt? The principal effects discovered during this research are: cobalt additions cause an increase in the Ms temperature in contrast to the reductions caused by the other elements.compounds among the iron and the alloying elements. typically in the range of about RC 25-30. Cr. this is necessary to ensure that the toughness is acceptable. This means that it is machinable so that parts can be easily manufactured after the martensitic transformation has occurred.

This work led to many subsequent investigations of similar steels which has resulted in the commercial development of steels such as: AF1410. as the tempering temperature was increased further. Sept. 122 122 . 13. more rapid than its rate of increase with temperature for temperatures that were below.increased. P with O and N in parts per million. for which aging at a constant temperature causes a gradual increase in hardness with time until a peak is reached. Cobalt did not partition to the alloy carbides yet its presence in the alloy raised considerably the peak hardness and also the yield strength that could be obtained in a given tempering time. when the temperature was above the value that gave peak hardness. Eventually. a tempering treatment can be chosen to obtain an optimal combination of strength and toughness. 1993. The authors concluded that nickel was beneficial with respect to the toughness. Consequently. Yield strengths of over 180 KSI ( 1240 MPa) were obtained. was rapid. Presumably. Al. This curve shows that as tempering in the secondary hardening range begins. The observations described above. An interesting observation made in the work being described here for secondary hardening was that when the Charpy impact energy and yield strength of the samples were both determined as a function of tempering time. It also increased with an increase in the molybdenum content.8 % Co. as the tempering time grows longer. in general. and AerMet 100 which was developed in the early 1990’s and has compositions near 0. page 2511.. Then when the temperature became high enough. 1996. 27A.0. S. page 1943 and in Met Trans. both the strength and toughness initially increase. the hardness rose to a peak and then declined again. 11 % Ni. reaching a maximum at 1%. 14% Co. This is in contrast with the usual behavior of materials in which the toughness generally decreases as the material becomes stronger. as shown in the appended figures. 24A. either there was little variation in the hardness or some softening occurred due to the precipitation of cementite during tempering below the secondary hardening range. This is. 0.Cr)2C alloy carbides began. Then the hardness decreases from the peak value as time elapses while aging is continued. as in the usual behavior. 1 % Mo.16 % C. These microstructural changes caused secondary hardening to begin and. 3 % Cr.16 % Mn and trace amounts of Ti. The height of the peak in the hardness versus tempering temperature. this is due primarily to the fact that Co enhances the kinetics of the transformation. A notable aspect of these results is that the rate at which the hardness decreased as the temperature increased. and small amounts of Mn and Si. We will refer to this again when we consider the reasons for overaging later. similar to the usual behavior of precipitation hardenable alloys. showed that a hardness peak is obtained when tempering is carried out for fixed times of one hour at different temperatures. Sept. typically in the 420-480°C range.. Chromium additions shifted the tempering curve to slightly lower temperatures but this effect saturated out at about 2 %. 10 % Ni. overaging begins and the strength begins to fall while the toughness continues to increase. Recent publications describing the microstructural phenomena in these steels are by Raghavan and Machmeier in Met Trans.16 % C. Ordinarily during this process in precipitation hardenable alloys the toughness decreases as the hardness rises and then increases again as the hardness decreases. 1. increased with increasing carbon content because the volume fraction of the carbide phase increased accordingly.2 % Mo. the curve obtained by plotting impact energy values against the yield strength values was an inverse “C” shaped. These steels are vacuum melted and manufactured with careful attention to cleanliness so that they contain low amounts of impurities. the cementite dissolved and the precipitation of numerous very fine particles of (Mo. 2 % Cr.

Cr and Fe. The initial microstructures of the martensites are controlled by the particular heat treatments and the Ms temperature of the steel. the austenite contained some MC and M23C carbides that were retained in the martensite after quenching but they did not participate in the tempering reactions. the precise composition of the carbides depends on the total composition. the more recent investigations show that at peak hardness. produced plates of cementite on plate. Secondary hardening is produced in the martensite of both types of steel by the precipitation of a high density of M2C carbides during tempering. Samples tempered at 510°C rapidly overaged. increasing the molybdenum content to 1 % increases the molybdenum content of the carbides. Furthermore. then the molybdenum content of the carbides is increased. It is generally true that the tendency for martensite to adopt a twinned plate morphology. When these steels are quenched to room temperature it is usual for them to contain a small amount (1-2 %) of retained austenite.g. the dislocation density and sub cell size. the tendency for the formation of dislocated lath martensite increases as the M s temperature increases. Because the magnitude of the coherency strain depends upon the differences in the lattice parameters of the two phases it will change and therefore so will the magnitude of the resistance to the glide of dislocations due to the coherency strain fields. Instead. rather than carbide coarsening due to Ostwald ripening. Then in the temperature range of 450485°C secondary hardening occurred. if the molybdenum composition in the alloy is raised. It appears to be agreed that the passage of dislocations through the precipitate array is by Orowan looping of dislocations around the particles. increases as the Ms temperature decreases. the dominant microstructural parameter that effects the stress required to force a dislocation to glide through the array is the inter-particle spacing. Here the M stands for metallic elements. This description is based on details of the TEM observations in which characteristic contrast effects indicated that for the peak hardness the particles were surrounded by coherency strain fields. This changes the lattice parameters of the carbides because of the different atomic sizes of its constituents. Lath martensite predominates in AF 1410 while partially twinned plate martensite predominates in the Aermet 100. This allows us to begin to understand the effects due to the variations in the composition of the steel on the secondary hardening curves. When looping occurs in the absence of strain fields around precipitate particles. This contrast was absent around carbides that formed at 510°C. The observation that overaging sets in rapidly when coherency is lost and before there is any significant change in this spacing suggests that the interactions between the strain fields of the carbides with those of the dislocations are an important contribution to the strengthening effects of the carbides.The strength of these steels is controlled by the inherent flow stress of the matrix. For example. rapid softening at the higher temperatures is caused by a transition from coherency to incoherency. Refrigeration eliminates the retained austenite. the grain size and the effects due to the precipitate population. lath and twin boundaries in the martensite. Conversely. The ratio of metal atoms to carbon atoms is 2: 1 but the metal atoms in the carbides include Mo. Autotempering reactions occur more readily the higher the Ms temperature is. There seems to be general agreement that the secondary hardening peak occurs when the optimum population of M2C is generated. The austenitizing treatments used in the investigations referred to above did not produce completely homogeneous austenite. for temperatures below about 427°C. Combinations of tempering times and temperatures that allowed cementite to form but which did not produce secondary hardening e. Here optimum refers to the particle size and spacing. For example. the carbides are needle-shaped and coherent with the matrix and that the sudden. 123 123 .

rolled sheet or plate) in which it is intended to be used? The first thing that must be recognized is that the properties of the ferrite are the important properties because the ferrite dominates the contributions from the small volume fraction of pearlite that might be present. dislocation content. changes the properties of the transformation products in the heat affected zones and enhances residual stresses in the vicinity of the weld. sheets and bars. low carbon. gas and oil pipe lines and oil-drilling platforms. it is used directly as supplied. say. Before we see what kind of steels these are. fine grain size raises toughness and yield stress.25 wt. Because of these limitations on plain carbon steel. a high density of dislocations raises the flow stress. this reduces the yield strength. These steel are called high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels. What can be done to solve this dilemma? Contemplation of the relevant factors reveals that both the yield stress and the toughness of low carbon steels can be increased by refining the ferrite grain size. water cooling. Recrystallization takes place in the austenite during hot rolling. toughness.High Strength Low Alloy Steels (HSLA). the final product of such treatments has coarse ferrite grains which lowers the strength and toughness. Naturally.g. Instead. Sometimes they are referred to as microalloyed steels because they do not contain large amounts of alloying elements. elements dissolved in the ferrite provide solution strengthening. it is essential that the steel has good formability and good weldability as well as reasonably high strength and toughness. a new class of low carbon steels has been developed in the last few decades. Unfortunately. For good weldability it is desirable to keep the carbon contents low. There are many applications of steel for which the steel is not heat treated to produce hardening via the martensitic transformation. also. on the rate of cooling after the final rolling pass. Thus we must consider the factors that control the properties of ferrite. It is not possible to hot roll the standard low carbon steels in the range of 900-1000°C and also produce fine grained austenite because dynamic recrystallization takes place during rolling. Examples of the form of the steel are plates. 124 124 . The objective has been to produce a material with good strength. a distribution of finely spaced precipitates provides precipitation hardening. the successful use of the “as manufactured” steel depends on how well the manufacturing process produces material in the appropriate form and with the desired properties. The mechanical properties depend upon details of the microstructure as has already been described. Plain carbon steel sheet and plate is easily produced by hot rolling wherein the steel is rolled while austenitic and then cooled. %. reducing the carbon content in the interests of improving weldability and toughness decreases the volume fraction of pearlite in the steel. precipitates.g. unalloyed steel at temperatures as low as 760°C. For many applications e. This is also desirable for good toughness. formability and weldability. solutes. This means that unless the cooling process is accelerated by. Recrystallization can occur in semikilled. ships. After natural cooling these steels have microstructures that consist of mixtures of proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite. let us ask how we would go about designing a steel which will have these properties when manufactured in the physical form ( e. These are: grain size. The final grain size of the proeutectoid ferrite in hot rolled products depends upon the grain size of the austenite when it transforms during cooling and. The carbon content is kept at or below 0. Increasing the carbon content of the steel increases the strength but decreases the weldability because it raises the hardenability.

the transformation during cooling should yield a fine-grained ferrite. we note that a 30 % reduction in thickness at 815°C in a semi-killed. precipitation of carbides and nitrides occurs and the progress of recrystallization and grain growth is impeded. Then. However. Leslie points out an interesting fact in his book. e. This morphology indicates that the ferrite forms at relatively high temperatures while the steel is being cooled. The Mn helps to controls any sulfur and provides solid solution strengthening. The buck demands respect! 2) In method 1) described above we concentrated on producing grain refinement in the final rolled product. when we considered the microstructural characteristics of ferrite we noted that equiaxed ferrite forms in slowly cooled austenite.25 wt. are not specified. the austenite containing small quantities of the alloying elements mentioned is mostly a solid solution in which the alloying elements are dissolved. % Nb has been added. as the temperature drops. It was recognized that the logical candidates for these second phase particles are carbides and nitrides. Then. Also. above 1000°C.1) How do we produce a fine grain size in the ferrite and still use high rolling temperatures to form the austenite? First we must find a way of inhibiting dynamic recrystallization and grain growth in the austenite because fine-grained austenite provides many more heterogeneous nucleation sites for the proeutectoid ferrite than does coarse grained austenite. the highest temperatures experienced by steel during the rolling process are those existing at the beginning of the process. The use of small additions of Nb to carbon steel in order to strengthen the ferrite was patented in 1936. Has this been done? Yes. which is not particularly high from the point of view of strengthening. provided grain growth can be controlled. because there was no real commercial demand for such steels. % Mn. while for the same amount of recrystallization to occur when 0. At these temperatures. so we need to arrange that suitable particles are in the steel during the hot working process. Al forms nitrides. any excess amounts of these elements that are left in solution in the ferrite. It is well known that refinement of the austenitic grain size can be done by putting particles of second phases into the austenite.65 wt. But it was just a scientific curiosity then because of the cost of Nb and. Ti. a 50 % reduction is required at 925°C. low carbon steel is accompanied by 10 % recrystallization. Typically the steels contain 0. 20 or so years later the price of Nb dropped and also the need for pipe line steel appeared. the dislocation density within the grains is of the order of 108 cms/cm-3. more importantly.03 wt. These elements are very effective for this purpose and only small additions are required. Economics drove the renewal of interest. O. Nb.K. When this occurs. and V form carbides and nitrides in steel. In practice. If these particles are also inherited by the ferrite then they will also impede ferrite grain growth. 950A sheet and strip has specifications of a yield strength of 50 KSI(345 MPa) and a tensile strength of 70 KSI (483 MPa). What other microstructural characteristics could contribute? An additional way of strengthening ferrite is to increase its dislocation density. if we contrive to make the ferrite form at low 125 125 . These HSLA steels are produced to mechanical property specifications. How might we accomplish that without cold work? Previously.g. The yield and ultimate strengths of the high strength low alloy steels range from 40 to 80 KSI and 60 to 95 KSI respectively. As an example of the effect. % or less of carbon and 1 to 1. will contribute to solution strengthening. The actual contents of Nb etc.

An example is : C 0. Si . Al 0. Instead. the steel began to yield gradually with a rounded stress strain curve and then work hardened rapidly. as is clear from the TTT diagram sketched below. the austenite decomposes at lower temperatures as it cools.08 %. air cooled.02 % and N 0. the carbon level is raised to increase the strength and Nb is added to control the austenitic grain size. Such steels can yield in the range 65120 KSI. acicular ferrite and a greater dislocation density. yielding fine grained. then the ferrite morphology changes from equiaxed grains to acicular grains and. because the ferrite is not exposed to the higher temperatures during cooling. Therefore. The result is to separate the ferrite and pearlite curves from the bainite curves so that the transformation to bainite is easily achieved. Such acicular ferrite can contain a dislocation density as high as 1010 cms per cm3 . An interesting discovery that was made when these dislocated acicular ferrites were produced.07 %. Acicular ferrite can be made to form by cooling the steel rapidly. It turns out that the ferrite is often then supersaturated with respect to Nb so that precipitation can occur if the steel is reheated. Nb 0. These alloy additions refine the austenitic grain size and also cause the beginning of the transformation to be retarded because the ferrite start curve on the TTT diagram is displaced to longer times. Mo 0.18 %. Mo and B are introduced to form a bay in the TTT diagram.temperatures. A logical extension of the acicular ferrite case is to arrange to produce low carbon bainite. recovery processes are suppressed. the ferrite formation has to be retarded.08 % C plain carbon steel is about 25 to 30 KSI. For steels of the composition above. For this to happen. contains a significant population of mobile dislocations.1 %. yield can occur at 70 KSI in samples in the hot rolled. the lower flow stress in a 0.007 % (this composition is in wt. However. Mn 2. For comparison. it is more desirable to avoid this necessity and to arrange for the acicular ferrite to form during air cooling. This suggests that the microstructure produced in this manner. A1 + Fe3C T B s Ms Bainite log t 126 126 . condition. was that the yield point phenomenon disappeared. This can be done economically by adding Mn and Mo. %0. To do so.38 %.

VC. We will consider another type of reaction first. This means that the precipitates used for refining the ferrite grain size are of little use for precipitation strengthening. It is called interphase precipitation. looks pretty. Often precipitation hardening is used in addition. V. How can we bring this about? One obvious approach is to seek additional alloying elements that will be retained initially in solid solution in the ferrite and then enable a distribution of fine precipitates to be produced by aging. HSLA steels are low carbon steels with various combinations of small (microalloying) additions of Nb. When the concentration drops as indicated in the sketches. and B.1 % P and 0. can form in closely. 0. 0. Ti. they must be closely spaced. pin the boundary which stops migrating. Mo. the driving force for forming ferrite is increased.. as the interface advances. versions of such steels existed before. 3) Precipitation Hardening. The precipitation mechanism begins after a ferrite grain has nucleated in the steel as it is cooling from the rolling process. One of the principal reasons that it has been used is that it is an example of a weathering steel in which the combination of the Cu and P affects the rusting process so as to produce a tightly adherent. then the ferrite is supersaturated and another population of fine precipitates can occur as ferrite forms or as it is aged. However. where the strength was provided by solution strengthening and solute clustering. USS Corten steel has the composition: 2. Its major characteristics are that the precipitation occurs on the interface between the ferrite and the austenite and the final morphology is regularly spaced sheets of small particles within the ferrite. Then. however. Thus if the matrix composition of the austenite in which the grain refining precipitates have formed is inherited by the ferrite.5 % Si. because they are large and their spacing scales with the grain size. and then the carbides grow. 0.8 % Cr. This occurs more readily for vanadium additions than for niobium. The observations of the phenomenon suggest that the boundary "un-zips" from the sheets of precipitates so that its forward migration is actually accomplished by the sideways movement of boundary ledges.4 % Cu. It has been observed in other alloy systems since its was discovered in HSLA steels. the carbon gradient ahead of it builds up again until nucleation of the carbides can occur again and the process repeats itself. 0. Very small particles. This is fine for antirecrystallization purposes because the scale of the microstructure is larger but finer spacings are necessary for additional strengthening due to precipitation hardening. In order for precipitates to be effective obstacles to dislocation motion. because it turns out that the solubility of the niobium and vanadium carbides are greater in austenite than in ferrite. 127 127 . spaced arrays that are effective strengtheners. so some people claim. % C. Eventually it becomes large enough to overcome the restraint of the precipitates on austenite/ferrite interface and allow the ferrite to grow. Grain refinement is a very desirable way of strengthening these types of steel because this also improves toughness.In summary. reddish patina that protects the steel and.35 % Mn. Copper additions such as those in Corten steel can do this. Heterogeneous nucleation of the carbide phase then occurs along the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. of the order of 5 NM. They have increased in popularity during the last quarter of a century. An interesting mode of precipitation occurs in these alloys.g. As they grow they deplete the carbon concentration in the austenite at the interface. The particles of carbide e.

Nucleation Growth Growth Carbides %C G %C Interface Magnification Break away Uzipping mechanism Net growth Uzipping 128 128 .

additions of substitutional elements such as Mn. Thompson and G. There has been continued interest. It was discovered many years ago that supersaturated binary alloys of Cu in BCC Fe could be obtained by solution treating and quenching. An example is A710 which is described in the 1995 ASTM book of standards. % Cr. 0. however. They also show. metastable BCC copper precipitates appear within the ferrite. 1. 0. % N. the degree of tetragonality is small because of the small amount of carbon in solution and the copper is essentially in solution in a BCC host.% Al. % P. Colvin and G. page 1573. Thompson. & Mat. dislocated ferrite etc. Thompson and Krauss show that when the quenched steel is aged at 455. % Si.The fact that copper rich precipitates can form in copper bearing steels was mentioned at the beginning of this section.% S. These authors refer to this microstructure as polygonal ferrite. In the HSLA alloys under discussion. Previous work had indicated that 129 129 .2 wt. An example of HSLA-80 is: 0. % Cu for precipitation hardening. aluminum. % Mo. 0. 0. % C.05 wt.12 wt. Inspection of the compositions of the steels shows that austenitic grain size control is effected by the niobium. 0.02 wt. Isothermal aging of the metastable solid solutions caused precipitation of copper. The complexities of the microstructural characteristics are impressive. 0. It is appropriate to end the section by returning to this topic to consult recent work. they also observe that even with this low a carbon content. over 1 wt.009 wt. 1557 (1996) and S. 0. J. 0. 565 and 675°C FCC copper precipitates form. 0. 27 A. It would be reasonable to predict that if the austenite is cooled sufficiently slowly. A particular example of this group is HSLA-80 which is so designated by the US navy for ship building.Krauss. presumably because they match the ferrite structurally and can form coherently which is favorable for nucleation. Al and N for grain size control. % Nb.009 wt. Detailed studies of the phase transformations in these alloys both during continuous cooling and during isothermal aging have been described recently by S. 0.035 wt. These authors also observe small equiaxed ferrite crystals which they call granular ferrite. Krauss ibid. W.88 wt.002 wt. Alloys have been developed which have very low carbon content. This is so in practice. % Cu. % Mn. as previous work had indicated. More rapid cooling reduces the amount of polygonal ferrite and increases the amounts of Widmanstatten ferrite side-plates and acicular ferrite. Their results enabled them to present a continuous cooling diagram. W. nitrogen and carbon. the copper is in solution when the steel is austenitic. Let us now turn to the precipitation reactions. Initially. Leaving aside consideration of the copper for the moment. % Ni. acicular. In the early Seventies there was a great deal of interest in the nature of the precipitation of copper from iron and low carbon steel primarily because of fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Met. If the austenite is rapidly quenched so as to form martensite. Mo and Cr for hardenability along with Nb.5 wt. Some martensite associated with a little retained austenite can form although the bainitic transformation is suppressed. as copper bearing HSLA steels have been further refined. However. fine ferrite grain size. but the ingredients for good properties are there. The S and P contents are low to minimize undesirable effects due to inclusions and segregation. Trans. small pockets of austenite become enriched in carbon and transform to upper and lower bainite and martensite. D. Ni. These precipitates grow to about 4 NM and transform in-situ to the FCC structure.71 wt. that copper precipitation can also take place during slower cooling treatments. A typical A710 is very similar. the austenite to ferrite transformation should produce predominantly relatively equiaxed grains with normal dislocation content. inspection of the remainder of the composition leads one to conclude that these alloying elements will be in solid solution.28 wt.

Yield strength as a function of grain size in low-carbon steels.HEAT TREATMENTS TO PRODUCE PERRITE AND PEARLITE ASTM Grain Size Number 0 4 8 10 12 600 Yield strength (MPa) 250 100 25 d (microns) 10 Mild steels HSLA steels 5 75 400 Y ksi 50 Ferritic grain-size 25 200 Solid solution 0 0 5 Matrix strength 10 d-1/2(mm-1/2) 0 15 Fig. (Ref 5.30) From: Krauss.137 130 130 .24. Contributions of various other strengthening mechanisms are indicated. 5. p.

Today. precipitation from a supersaturated single phase at this temperature was nucleated heterogeneously.17. 1997.018. This is accomplished by the dual processes of taking care to reduce the carbon and nitrogen levels during the manufacture of the steel and by scavenging these elements from solid solution by adding small quantities of niobium. Perhaps now is a good time to re-read the section from the fist page that followed the question “What. As we should expect. aluminum and titanium. interstitial free (IF) steels represent the state of the artfor sheet steels which have exceptionally good deep drawing properties. The precipitates are not restricted to be located at dislocations in the ferrite and may form in successive finely spaced lines of precipitates that are effective at precipitation strengthening. Trans. 28A. Equiaxed ferrite forms when the cooling rates permit the ferrite to form at high temperatures. Accordingly Thompson and Krauss compared the morphology of the copper precipitates produced during isothermal aging at 675°C with their morphologies when formed during continuous cooling experiments.006. Al 0.008. 131 131 . indicating that in these materials.003. There is a useful consequence of this. the dominant mode of precipitation was interphase precipitation at interphase boundaries between ferrite and austenite. In contrast.1437. it is an appropriate time to mention interstitial free steel.019. The nature of the ferrite matrix depends upon the characteristics of the austenite at the end of the hot rolling process and the manner in which it is cooled. S 0. In the language of IF steel such ferrite is called polygonal ferrite. The formability is also improved. The properties of the final product are determined by the chemistry of the steel and the particular thermo mechanical history.006. %: C 0. Ni 0. The steel that they describe had the following composition in wt.0038. is a steel?” The final microstructures comprised ferrite grains in which there was a dispersion of a variety of fine particles of nitrides. These are steels in which the concentrations of interstitially dissolved solute elements are very small. P 0. An example of such a steel is discussed by Rauf and Boyd in “Microstructural Evolution During Thermo Mechanical Processing of a Ti-Nb Interstitial-Free Steel Just Below the Ar3 Temperature” Met. detailed transmission microscopic studies established that when the copper precipitated during continuous cooling of the austenite. Ti 0. These two determine the nature of the ferrite and the nature of the second phase particles present. then. Increasing the cooling rate eventually suppresses the polygonal ferrite because the austenite then transforms by the massive transformation that creates the characteristic blocky. Note that it is very rich in iron but is still called a steel. The results showed that the precipitates produced in the isothermal aging experiments were predominantly located at dislocations. Interstitial Free Steel Now that we have discussed HSLA steels which have low carbon contents. Mn 0. the basic behavior is essentially that which was described for iron on pages 8 and 9. Si 0. One of the original reasons for producing such steel was that it was discovered that reducing the carbon concentration improved the quality of enamel coatings. sulfides and carbides. N 0. massive grains.043.the copper precipitation in appropriately cooled austenite began near 675°C.

this would lower the strength and would not be a useful solution unless other modifications can be found to raise the flow stress and we’ve already considered high strength low alloy steels. This reduces the magnitude of the ratio of the ultimate tensile strength to the lower yield stress. the plastic strain rate within the band is high which causes the flow stress to be relatively high. c) When the dislocations in ferrite are pinned by the interstitial solutes. removing these elements from the steel would eliminate the problem. we need to be able to modify its microstructure so that either some clean dislocations exist in the as-produced material or to generate residual stress concentrations that can be superimposed upon the applied stresses so that slip is activated. What can be done then? Question 1. 1981 This is another example of a class of steels that has been developed with the object of tailormaking certain desirable properties for particular applications. as in the automobile industry for example. Thus we need some way to produce local stress concentrations within the steel. In essence. However. How do we eliminate the yield point phenomenon? a) Temper rolling. low carbon. plain carbon steel sheet usually deforms via upper and lower yield points followed by Luders band propagation. This causes non uniform straining and localized thinning during forming. Steel sheet is commonly formed into complicated shapes for use in a variety of applications. unpinned dislocations which can then glide during forming and thus eliminate the upper yield point . The problem with it is that it uses up some of the available ductility before the forming process can properly begin and it tends to reduce the practical UTS/YS ratio.Dual Phase Steels Reference-Raschid in Ann. no yield point phenomenon because that can cause non-uniform strains during the forming process. Mat. b) Because the yield point phenomenon is caused by carbon and nitrogen interstitial solutes. eliminate or minimize the occurrence of plastic instabilities and produce high yield strength in the deformed regions of the final part because of strain hardening. This process has been used for years. a rapid work hardening rate and a high ratio of the ultimate tensile strength to the initial yield strength. When the necessary strength levels of the steel sheet require the presence of significant volume fractions of pearlite colonies. hot rolled. a low initial yield strength. Sci. These stress concentrations will have to be distributed throughout 132 132 . the pinning forces are so strong that the dislocations cannot break away unless the local stress is very high. Slowly cooled. These properties give rise to uniform straining. Because the Luders extension is localized. Good formability and high strength are desirable for production reasons and for weight reduction so as to economize on fuel use by the final product. Rev. difficulties arise because of local failure mechanisms associated with the formation of cracks and pores in and adjacent to carbide lamellae. If we consider these properties with respect to the behavior of plain carbon ferrite /pearlite sheet we note that this material has some short comings. This is a process wherein the steel sheet is passed through rolls that bend it and re-flatten it in order to introduce fresh. A summary of desirable properties is: high ultimate tensile strength for a good strength to weight ratio.

However. This leaves ferrite. there we are. The final microstructure should then comprise a mixture of ferrite and martensite. Consider martensite. To obtain a high rate of work hardening during plastic deformation it is necessary to arrange for a rapid rate of increase in the dislocation density within the deforming grains. Fine grained ferrite is still desirable.and that a better name might be ferrimart or some such concoction. however. it is hard and it generates localized strains around it due to its change in shape and volume.ferrite and cementite. One way to lower the yield stress is to increase the grain size but that would adversely affect the ductility and lower the tensile strength. separated. a rapid work hardening rate and a high tensile strength? Desired Behavior Not wanted The first thought that comes to mind is that the dominant matrix phase should be ferrite because it is ductile above the DBTT. If we can find a way to generate numerous small. Because we want to accomplish all this during the production of the steel it makes sense to ask what can be done via the phase transformations that occur during heat treatments. 133 133 . Thus we find that we find a single way to answer both questions. The production of ferrite/pearlite mixtures has already been ruled out. Question 2 Assuming that we will be able to solve question one we now have to ask question 2. The general procedures described above have been successfully carried out. If some more proeutectoid ferrite forms during the cooling it should have no particularly adverse effects. A purist might complain that ferrite/pearlite steels also contain two phases. Because the product is a mixture of martensite and ferrite. This would be a fine solution if we can find a way to do it. How do we create a low yield stress. Now. Thus the steel must be held in the alpha/gamma two phase field and then cooled such that the austenite transforms to martensite. Such incompatibilities are generally disadvantageous in heat treatments designed to fully transform the steel because of the risk of the occurrence of distortion and quench-cracking. A low applied stress for yield will arise if we can introduce residual stress concentrations that help to initiate slip. When some martensite forms in a steel which has a significant carbon content. we are searching for a way to produce residual stresses. The way to produce such a microstructure is first to produce a mixture of fine ferrite and austenite grains and then to quench it to convert the austenite to martensite. bainite and martensite. volumes of martensite dispersed throughout a ferritic microstructure we might have a solution our problem.the steel in order for them to cause macroscopically uniform plastic flow. the formation of pearlite is undesirable. the steels have been dubbed Dual Phase steels.

g. 1. martensite or lower bainite whose microstructures depend upon the carbon content and the M s temperature. some proeutectoid ferrite that formed from the austenite during cooling and is therefore more dislocated than the other ferrite. 0. the continuous annealing is preceded by cold rolling. 0. T RT Fe x Wt %C T Ms Time Rc3 Rc1 BAY T log t Deformation Behavior and Microstructure The general microstructural constituents that can be present in dual phase steel after production are: a fine-grained ferrite matrix in which there is a relatively low dislocation content because of the high temperature excursion. With appropriate control of the rate of heating and the degree of cold work.4 % Mo. Another production method is to finish the hot rolling stage so that 80 to 90 % ferrite forms and to allow the remaining austenite to transform later while the steel is being formed into a coil. Sometimes it is reheated to temper the martensite. 0. 0.5 % -0. a fine grained mixture of ferrite and austenite can be obtained. In some processes. In a typical process the sheet is passed through a continuous annealing furnace where it is heated into the alpha/ gamma range and then cooled again. For this to be successful. An example is 0.In order to ensure that the martensitic or lower bainitic transformation does occur during natural cooling it is necessary to augment the hardenability. creates a window so that the metastable austenite can be coiled before the martensite or bainite begins to form e. The time at the high temperature has to be short to retain these fine grains.06 % C. reduce stress concentrations and lower the UTS which defeats the whole purpose. Note that these compositions are similar to some of those of HSLA steels so the properties of both are being combined. the deformed ferrite recrystallizes during heating. These martensitic and bainitic volumes are associated with residual stresses be cause of the transformation shape 134 134 .9 % Si. so the austenite is inhomogeneous. the steel must have suitable continuous cooling transformation characteristics. Typically the aim is to produce about 15 to 20 % austenite.1 % C. This can be done by adding Mn and Si.6 % Cr and 0. but normally this is not done because it tends to anchor clean dislocations. Alloying to produce a bay in the TTT diagram.2 % Mn.9% Si and 1 to 3 % Mn. In this case.

however. stress concentrations and clean dislocations is not clear. the plastic strain occurs in the ferrite that existed before cooling began because this is the softer ferrite due to its low dislocation content. Here. It is clear. Elongations of about 20 % are obtained. the steel yields at relatively low stresses and work hardens rapidly.changes. Initially. Electron microscopic studies have shown that eventually the martensite begins to deform and fracture. In contrast. that the yield point phenomenon is absent. The tensile strength varies approximately linearly with the % martensite or lower bainite. when V or Nb are present there can be carbonitride particles embedded within the matrix. the ratio in dual steels is 0. 135 135 . This is successfully achieved by the processing that has been described.6. Typically. When these kinds of steels are deformed at room temperature. Because the Ms temperatures for these steels are high. When that ferrite has work hardened so that its flow stress is the same as the yield strength of the ferrite that formed during cooling. During the tensile deformation of ferrite/pearlite steels. The first objective to be satisfied by these steels is for them to yield smoothly and at low stresses. The relative importance of residual stresses. the steels also contain some retained austenite and finally. The equation relates the true stress to the true strain.5-0. we consider the general types of behavior. The associated shape change contributes to the dimensional strain ocurring during the deformation and the transformation produces more of the hard phase. auto tempering should lock many of the dislocations generated during the transformation. Typical results are 80 KSI for 10 % by volume rising to 110 KSI at 30 %. Examples of the behavior that has been observed are shown. Dual phase steels do not obey this kind of equation. the precise behavior will depend on the microstructural details. well obeyed as is shown by the curves marked alpha/P in the following sketches. the lower yield strength is typically 2/3 to 3/4 of the tensile strength. This linear relationship is frequently. Voids open up at the martensite/ferrite interfaces and general failure ensues if the deformation is continued. we see that this equation predicts a linear relation between logσ and logε with a slope n. schematically in the sketches by the unlabeled lines. all the ferrite deforms. Consequently. By taking logarithms of both sides. After the Luders extension is completed the stress strain curve for ferrite/pearlite steels can be quite well described by the equation =K n where K is a constant and n is called the strain exponent. The retained austenite usually transforms to martensite early during the deformation.

fraction mart of lower bfff 136 136 .6 -2 log -1 110 u 80 0.1 0.3 vol.5 log d(log ) n d(log ) 4.

Its range of specialized uses. As the effects of alloying additions on the properties of steels became increasingly understood. The four main types of stainless steel are further identified by a mixture of numerical and letter 1390 codes. iron attempts to return to its former state by forming rust or scale. weathering steels have already been mentioned. % Cr. see for example the ASM handbook. tightly adherent layer of oxide on the surface of the steel that prevents or minimizes further corrosion. All the steels that we have considered so far are generally subject to degradation by forming oxides and hydroxides. This behavior along with other corrosion processes such as dissolution in dilute acids. molybdenum and copper are helpful for increasing lifetimes at ambient temperatures. form the family of steels called stainless steels. handbook. 12 50 137 137 . The tonnage of stainless steels used annually is only a small fraction of that of carbon and low alloy steels. the introduction of the ferrite stabilizing Cr forms a gamma loop in which resides those combinations of σ temperature and composition for which austenite is the stable phase. sacrificial coatings such as zinc that corrodes preferentially. we will consider stainless steels to be steels that contain at least 11. however. once made and put into use in steels. contain rather more chromium than four % so.5 wt. These include protective coatings such as paint. it was discovered that Cr dramatically improves the corrosion and oxidation resistance of steel. There are minor classifications such as duplex stainless steels which contain significant quantities of both austenite and ferrite. and the application of electrical potentials designed to provide protection by inhibiting the electrochemical reactions. The fourth group contains stainless steels in which strengthening is provided by precipitates of a second phase. austenitic and precipitation-hardening stainless steels. As the binary phase diagram shows. the AISI has defined a steel to be stainless if it contains more than 4 wt. According to the US steel Co. The oxide scale spalls off and oxidation continues as long as the steel is hot. viz. ferritic. Consequently the steel continues to rust as time passes. Cr oxidizes and forms a thin. % Cr. Many methods of combating rusting and corrosion have been and are still being used. either by oxidation when heated or by corrosion unless protected from environments that contain water and oxygen. edition 9. They are further classified by being divided into four main groups. however. the corrosion product is not effective protection for the steel below it. It is extracted from ores in which it exists mainly combined with oxygen in oxides. plastic and tin that are intended to isolate the steel from the corrosive agent. Oxidation occurs readily when carbon steel is heated. for our purposes.Wrought Stainless Steels Iron is not mined in its elemental form. Hence. Alloying elements such as silicon. Most standard types. T Because the most important alloying element in ferrite stainless steel is Cr. spanning from knives and forks through brewing to aerospace applications. After being extracted it is then used to manufacture steels. is very wide. imposes obvious limitations on the use of carbon and low alloy steels. martensitic. volume 3. with the occasional exception such as weathering steels. Steels to which sufficient Cr has been added for this purpose. Usually. it is logical to begin a discussion C of the physical metallurgy of these materials with a 910 consideration of the binary Fe-Cr system. transparent.

weight percent 12 ( Gamma loops formed in various binary systems of iron. ) 138 138 . F 2200 Al 1800 V Si Mo W Cr 1400 C Mn Ni 1000 0 2 4 6 8 10 Alloy addition. C 1600 1400 1200 1000 L 1505 C 910 C 850 C 600 Fe 10 20 30 820 C 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Chromium (wt %) After: Krauss. p251 2000 1800 C 1800 L L 1539 C Temperature. p353 3000 C 2600 Ni Mn Temperature.After: Honeycombe.

the martensite forms when the part is removed from the austenitizing furnace and simply allowed to cool down in still air. i. We infer from this that if the cooling process is conducted in a manner that precludes this transformation from occurring by diffusion controlled nucleation and growth processes then a martensitic transformation is possible. Martensitic Stainless Steels. The binary Fe-Cr diagram indicates the compositional limits of those alloys that can be rendered into martensite. First. Fe-Cr. Quenching in oil is sometimes used for thick sections.This phase field is separated from the ferrite phase field by the two phase field. certain heat treatments can form mixtures of ferrite and austenite in which cooling could convert the austenite to martensite. austenite stabilizers such as carbon. the existence of martensitic stainless steels. An example of a section at 0. Thus we can have fully martensitic microstructures and ferrite/martensite microstructures.Cr)23C6 C2 = (Fe. the solid solutions of the alloy can be transformed into austenite by heating them into the gamma loop. % Cr steels. it is possible for ferrite to exist at all temperatures at which the binary alloys are solid.e. in order to avoid delayed cracking. Because the Cr is to be kept as high as possible for anti-corrosion purposes. tempering is performed soon after the martensite has formed. These additions enable martensite to be produced in 11. The complexity is obvious. the carbon dissolved in the martensite has a significant effect on its hardness. %C Fe+11%C 139 139 . This phase diagram shows that for some compositions. The term quenched is somewhat of a misnomer because with such large alloying element contents parts made from these steels are often air-hardenable. especially when there is significant carbon present. the formation of chromium carbides becomes possible and the pertinent phase diagram becomes the ternary Fe-Cr-C diagram.5 wt. In either case. The binary system also contains the intermetallic.1 wt. sigma phase. % C is shown below. This is tetragonal and has a unit cell that contains 30 atoms. Also. Two important additional things can be recognized. When the carbon content becomes significant. Hence. When the Cr content exceeds 12%. It also shows that when the austenite is cooled it must transform to ferrite to attain equilibrium.Cr)7C3 α+C1 α+C1 +C2 wt. manganese and also nickel are added to expand the austenite phase field. Martensitic stainless steels are used in the quenched and tempered condition. γ C α+C1 α+γ α+Cc α+ C2 α+γ α+γ+C 1 L+α Cc = Fe3C C1 = (Fe. As was true for the martensitic steels considered previously. a variety of chromium carbides can form. This implies that the classification of a particular steel as martensitic or ferritic cannot be done solely on composition but must also recognize the microstructure existing during use.

AISI type no.75 Mo max 0.15S min 0.95-1. %---------------------C Mn Cr Ni Others 0.0 11. magnetic.5 0.75-0.75 1.15 max 1.0 16-18 … 0. p252 1600 1500 1400 Temperature (C) 1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 + K0 0 + K2 + K1 + K2 10 20 Chromium (%) K0=M3C K1=M23C6 K2=M7C3 30 + K1 L L+ Compositions of AISI Type 400 Martensitic Stainless Steels.15 max 1.15 min 1.15 max 1.After: Honeycombe.0 16-18 … 0.60-0. 403 410 416 420 431 440A 440B 440C ---------------------Nominal composition.0 16-18 … 0.5-13 0.95 1.0 12-14 0.20 1.20 max 1.2 12-14 … 0.2-2.5-13 0.75 Mo max Body-centered cubic.0 15-17 1.75 Mo max 0. heat treatable After: Krauss: p381 140 140 .0 11.

s 104 1 1 day week 45 HRC 105 106 -200 200 0 Temperature. F 200 400 95 RB= 600 A Type 410 Charpy Impact energy. p17. C (F) A Approximate Astart A+F 75HRB 81 HRB 87 HRB 90 HRB Hardness t 700 (1290) 600 (1110) 500 (930) 400 (750) 300 (570) 200 (390) A+F+C F+C A 50% M50 M90 Ms 100 (210) 0 (30) 1 (0. J 0C 125 Impact energy.39 141 141 .5) 1 min 10 100 1h 103 Time. ft-lbf T= 5 Temper: C 150 79 R C=24 B 66 0 R C=3 T= T= 59 5 C C 100 100 75 50 50 25 0 -200 0 0 200 Temperature.900 (1650) 800 (1470) Temperature. C 400 After: ASM-stainless steels.

20 Energy. p18 142 142 . F (C) at 925 C Tempering temperature.600 Brinell hardness 500 400 300 200 280 (1930) 240 (1655) ksi (MPa) Tensile strength 200 (1380) 0. F (C) at 1010 C After: ASM--Stainless steels. ft-lb (J) 0 120 (160) 80 (110) 40 (55) 0 0 (-15) El in 2 in.2% YS PL Percent RA Izod Izod 400 (205) 800 (425) 1200 (650) 0 (-15) 400 (205) 800 (425) 1200 (650) Type 410 Tempering temperature. TS Brinell hardness Brinell hardness 0.2% yield strength 160 (1105) 120 Proportional limit (830) 80 (550) 40 (275) 80 Reduction of area 60 40 Elongation in 2 in.

11. This embrittlement appears to be related to the beginning of the secondary hardening process in which sheets of carbides precipitate on boundaries. the DBTT's of these steels are around or barely below room temperature which means that they are not useful in cryogenic applications. 143 143 . One consequence of this is that stress relief can occur and residual stresses can be removed during tempering. It shows that secondary hardening due to the precipitation of chromium carbides can occur. N and Ni and the ferrite stabilizer Cr. 430 designates a ferritic steel while 431 refers to a martensitic steel. The tensile yield stress and the tensile ultimate stress for samples of a 12 % Cr 0.5-13. This endows the steels with high hardenability. Cr strongly retards the rates of the processes that occur during tempering. d) In a similar manner to its effects on the diffusion controlled reactions involved in the transformation of austenite. a) The extent of the austenite phase field is usually controlled by the competition between the austenite stabilizers. It is not. 1 % Si. Unfortunately. which corresponds to the initiation of the mild secondary hardening peak. These are fine properties and some enhancement is possible through additional alloying. Indeed. immediately obvious that a 4xx steel is martensitic or ferritic. An example is 410 which has 0.5 % Cr. c) The carbon endows the martensite with hardness and strength. Mn. produces hardening but reduces the impact toughness severely as is shown in the corresponding sketch. 1% Mn. b) During the decomposition of the austenite by diffusion controlled processes. many sections are air-hardenable. C.The martensitic steels are given 4xx numbers in the AISI numbering system. Besides this embrittlement problem. tempering in the vicinity of 885 °F (475°C).15 % C. This is obviously of practical use. the ferritic steels which as we will soon see are mainly ferrite. Let us consider the main roles of alloying elements in martensitic stainless steels with respect to properties other than corrosion resistance. the high concentration of Cr strongly retards the transformations and moves the nose of the TTT diagram to the right. therefore.1% C steel are depicted as a function of tempering temperature in one of the following sketches. The tempering temperatures were one hour in each case. are also described with 4xx numbers. before serious softening takes place. The Cr contributes additional hardening. Another consequence of the sluggish rates of the diffusion controlled transformations is that martempering processes are readily conducted. increasing the time for the start of the transformations to over 300 seconds. However.

13% C Tests at room T 475 C 144 144 .300 secs T logt 210 190 u 130 y 600 F 1200 Charpy I vs T impact I 12% Cr 0.

This remedy is of little use if the heat treatment cannot be done. their mechanical properties are not very good. The embrittlement is associated with the precipitation of a coherent chromium-rich phase throughout the grains. It is important if the component is intended to operate in the relevant temperature range.1 C diagram shows. indeed. For these reasons. several hundred hours are necessary for the embrittlement to occur. However. Quenching is unnecessary because this form of embrittlement requires long times to form. mixtures of austenite and ferrite can form in these steels at high temperatures. From the practical point of view. Because of the high hardenability. The binary alloys of that composition would. 0. ferritic stainless steels have not been very popular for structural applications. 145 145 .Ferritic Stainless Steels In the classical sense. the kinetics of the precipitation process is very slow. Hence it doesn't happen during the usual times of cooling or welding. The embrittlement is removed by heating the steel above 800 °C where the sigma phase is dissolved. as the Fe Cr 0.1-0. In the common cases where the steel contains N. High temperature embrittlement When ferritic steels containing the usual contents of C. the DBTT can be higher than room temperature. commercial alloys have a transition temperature near room temperature. P and S are heated above 1000 °C and then cooled naturally as for example during welding. 0. An exception is 405 (11. large grains produced in the heat affected zones at welds can reduce the local strength. because the grain size cannot be refined by heat treatment. Most of the commonly designated ferritic steels can behave in this manner.08 % C. a better definition of a ferritic stainless steel is a steel that contains more than 12 % Cr and is used in a state in which its microstructure is mainly ferrite plus carbides.3 % Al) has been used in the petroleum industry. particularly those containing 17-18 % Cr. Very pure steels have much better toughness but most normal.5-14.5 % Cr. Being BCC they have a DBTT. the austenite can transform to martensite during cooling. 1 % Si. However.04 % P 0. 0. S and C. 1 % Mn. P. AISI 446 (27 % Cr ) has a DBTT around 150°C.03 % S. ferritic stainless steels have been considered to be those that possess Cr contents that would place them to the right of the gamma loop on the binary Fe Cr phase diagram. Sigma phase embrittlement When ferritic stainless steels are aged for very long times between 540-750°C the sigma intermetallic phase is precipitated and the steel becomes brittle. It can be cured by reheating the steel above 800 °C and cooling. be ferritic to the melting point. N. The phenomenon is similar to sensitization in austenitic steels( to be considered later) and is considered to be caused by precipitation of Cr carbides and nitrides on grain boundaries. Ferritic stainless steels have very good corrosion resistance in many environments. this ignores the effects of carbon and. 475 °C or 885 °F embrittlement This is a loss of impact toughness that can be caused by holding the steel at temperatures between 400°C and 540 °C . Fortunately. The inherent problems of the BCC structure and irreversible grain coarsening are exacerbated by the existence of three forms of embrittlement that can arise during particular heat treatments. they can become severely embrittled and also lose their corrosion resistance near grain boundaries. Furthermore.

15 max 2. nonmagnetic.0-18.08 max 2. C Mn Cr 201…………….5 23. % C Mn Cr 0.0 17-19 8.20 max 1.25N max Compositions of AISI Type 200 Austenitic Stainless Steels. p374.0 0.15 max 7.0-18.Ta min After Krauss. % type no. AISI type no. 430F Se……… 446…………….5 16-18 202.. nonmagnetic.08 max 2.20 max 2.0-12 304L 0.0 18-20 8.0-10 304 0.25 16.08 max 2.0 22-24 12-15 310 0.0 17-19 9-13 Face-centered cubic. 430F………….0 0. AISI Nominal Composition.0 18-20 8.03 max 2.6Mo max 0.03 max 2.0 16-18 10-14 321 0. 0.Compositions of AISI Type 400 Ferritic Stainless Steels. not heat treatable Others 2-3 Mo 2-3 Mo (5x%C) Ti min (10x%C) Nb .08 max 2.. not heat treatable Others 0.0 24-26 19-22 316 0.12 max 1.08 max 1 16.0 17-19 Face-centered cubic.0 0.15Se min 0. 0.0 16-18 6.0-27. not heat treatable Others 0.15 max 10.6Mo max Compositions of Selected AISI Type 300 Austenitic Stainless Steels.25 max 2. C Mn Cr Ni 301 0.………….25 16.0 302 0. 430…………….0 16-18 10-14 316L 0. % type no.12 max 1.372.0-8. AISI Nominal Composition.15 max 2.0-18.0 cubic. magnetic.0 17-19 9-12 347 0. Body-centered Nominal Composition.0-12 309 0.359 146 146 .

combined with the embrittlement and the localized loss of corrosion resistance. Ag. The first is to pay stringent attention to the steel making process in order to ensure a very low interstitial solute content.15 % C 2 % Mn 1 % Si 304 18-20 % Cr 8-10 % Ni 0. Accordingly. In contrast. At 35 % Cr. has been very troublesome. Pd. In this case we already have the problem that there is no way to refine the grain size if it becomes large in the heat affected zone. In these cases the third method is via the addition of other substitutional solutes. V in the range of 0. These two methods can be successful . 301 16-18 % Cr 6-8 % Ni 0. They do not arise otherwise and do not occur during welding because of the very sluggish rates at which the transformations occur. The second is to add small amounts of very strong carbide and nitride formers e. 301 304 Consider the room temperature tensile stress-strain curves that are typical for tests on the two austenitic steels. This.08 % C 2 % Mn 1 % Si 147 147 . 301 and 304. i. It has been found that small additions of Al. However. the interstitial level can not be reduced low enough by these methods. as the Cr content increases so does the minimum acceptable level of interstitial solutes. Nb and Ti to scavenge these elements.3 % can improve the as-welded ductility and corrosion even in the presence of relatively high quantities of interstitial solutes. however. It has been of particular concern with respect to welding. Pt. V. There have been three main methods used to combat this problem. Cu.The first two forms of embrittlement are of no great concern unless the steel can experience them during use.1 -1.g. when the M d temperature is above room temperature.e. Austenitic stainless steels This group of steels are iron chromium alloys to which enough Ni and Mn have been added to prevent the formation of significant amounts of ferrite. Because this is achieved by the austenite stabilization effects of the alloying elements (superimposed on those due to C and N) it is important to realize that different alloys comprise austenites of different stability’s as reflected by them having different Ms temperatures. That of 304 shows the "normal" behavior of an FCC polycrystal while that of the 301 has an increased work hardening rate caused by the impedance to slip provided by the formation of martensite on the active slip planes. the high temperature embrittlement has been a very serious problem for years. they can be subdivided into two groups depending on whether or not the austenite can be induced to transform martensitically when deformed at room temperature. In these groups we have stable austenite which does not transform and metastable austenite which does form some martensite.

specified. A major reason for alloying so as to create an austenitic steel is to eliminate the DBTT and obtain good impact toughness over a wide range of temperatures. For example. As a result.The Md temperature for a 304 steel is usually just below room temperature. An alternative approach is to try to combine the carbon into precipitates that do not easily dissolve at high (>950 °C) temperatures. V and Ti are added to sequester the carbon. These modifications are similar to those employed in the case of ferritic steel. residual stresses due to prior processes can be effective. these carbides nucleate heterogeneously on grain boundaries and grow for a while as the steel cools further. involve compositional modifications. The required modification is obvious. The corrosive media are generally specific for the particular material. Elimination is not presently feasible but a reduction is. Stress corrosion cracking Stress corrosion cracking is a process in which cracks form and grow into a material that is simultaneously experiencing a stress and is in an appropriate corrosive environment. Their tensile strengths can be varied by varying the grain size and the dislocation density. These steels are generally of good toughness and good corrosion resistance. Sensitization When held at high temperatures and then slowly cooled through 600 °C these alloys can lose their corrosion resistance in the near vicinity of grain boundaries and become less tough. the process can take place at ambient temperatures and will occur more rapidly as the temperatures are raised. This has been confirmed by modern electron micro-analytical techniques. Because the loss of corrosion resistance is restricted to narrow strips at the grain boundaries. Obviously these two approaches can be combined. it is necessary to minimize residual stresses and to ensure that the environment does not contain those species such as chlorine that are known to be particularly potent for stress corrosion cracking. It has been established that the loss of corrosion resistance is associated with the precipitation of chromium carbides on the grain boundaries. modified 304 called 304L has 0. The treatment is said to have sensitized the steel. There are a couple of negative aspects that must be recognized. The cracks tend to branch frequently and propagate through the grains. Severe localized corrosion is the result. This means that if the steel is refrigerated and then deformed. Stress corrosion cracking is a serious problem for austenitic steels but ferritic stainless steels are immune to it. The stress need not be applied externally. A similar phenomenon can occur in ferritic steels but it appears to have been more troublesome for austenitic steels. For this purpose small additions of Nb. Eliminate the carbon and no carbides will precipitate. In general. The chromium required for this growth must be supplied by substitutional diffusion which occurs slowly and more slowly as the temperature decreases. the chromium concentration near the boundaries on which the carbides grow is severely depleted. To avoid this problem when it is desirable to use austenitic stainless steel. on either side of it. a thin layer of steel in which the chromium content is not high enough to provide protection. deep grooves are formed. They are not necessarily particularly aggressive from the point of view of general dissolution and corrosion. As the temperature falls past 600 °C . Attempts to cure this problem when it is not easily possible to avoid the heat treatment that causes it. Austenitic stainless steel is particularly susceptible to aqueous media that contain chlorine ions. Eventually sheets can be cracked completely through. Hence a grain boundary has. martensite can form in 304 and change the stress-strain curve accordingly.03 % C max. Often this is not 148 148 . Whole grains can "fall out ".

0. 7% Ni. It is then shipped to the customer who fabricates it into particular products. 17 % Cr.5 % Mn. 2. Ni. 1. 0. The chemistry of these steels is chosen with the aim of balancing the ferrite and austenite stabilizing elements so as to control the Ms temperature. Precipitation occurs when the martensite is aged at 450-650 Celsius.3 % Mo. 25. An example is Allegheny-Ludlum ‘s A-286: 14. An example of such a steel is Armco 17-7 PH.45 % Mn.05 % C. The general procedure is as follows. if the Ms temperature in the steel after the mill anneal is too high. using Celsius. austenitic steel components (as well those made from numerous other alloys) continue to fail in the field from stress corrosion cracking. 0.8 for 10 minutes and an air-cool.7 %).easy to do. 0.g. The metallurgy and heat treatment schedules for these steels are quite complex. The steel must not be too stable as austenite because then the Ms temperature will be too low for convenience.15. Conditioning enables the steel to be transformed into martensite by refrigeration. the 8 the nickel content (8 % ) and the Mo indicates that it contains molybdenum (2. the 13 denotes the chromium content (12.75 % Cr. In this case the solution treatment produces homogeneous austenite that transforms to martensite on cooling. The heat treatment is relatively simple: solution treat for 1 hour at 1000 Celsius.04 % N. water quench and age at 730 Celsius.2 %). 1. These products are then given a heat treatment known as conditioning.3 % Si and 0. specially during winter. On the other hand. Yield strengths of 190 KSI can be obtained but these type of steels are not widely used.15 % Ti . There are three main classes of precipitation hardenable alloys : austenitic PH steels. This is typically achieved by precipitating chromium and carbon from solid solution. Finally.07 % C for which a mill anneal is. After production the steel annealed at the Mill (called the Mill anneal) which puts the steel into its semi-austenitic state. An example is the PH 13-8 Mo type. Conditioning involves heating to a particular temperature and maintaining the temperature for a specified time and air -cooling. The martensite is produced by refrigeration to -73 and precipitation occurs during an hour at 510°C. the martensite can be precipitation hardened by an aging treatment.2 % Al. Members of the first group have compositions that produce very stable austenite with respect to martensite. conditioning is at 953 + or . Ti and Al. Although the phenomenon has been known for many years. martensitic PH steels and semi-austenitic PH steels. Here the PH indicates precipitation hardenable. forming deformation and to adjust the composition of the matrix solid solution so that its Ms temperature is raised to close to room temperature from its earlier lower value. The martensitic precipitation hardenable stainless steels are similar to maraging steels. 0. The semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steels are so named because in the annealed or solution treated condition they generally contain 5-20 % delta ferrite which persists. martensite might be produced during transit. 1053 + or . 149 149 .3 % V. 1. The object of the conditioning treatment is to remove the microstructural effects of the fabrication process e.25 % Ni. The precipitates involve the alloying elements Mo. 0.15 % Al. The alloy has a low carbon content and contains some aluminum. Precipitation Hardenable Stainless Steels Under appropriate conditions it is possible to produce precipitation of intermetallic compounds that can cause precipitation hardening in stainless steels.

2 ….005B After: Krauss.15 2.2 Semiaustenitic grades 631 17.25 2. % type no.07 17 7.2 3.10N 0.05 14.2 2.3 Cu Al Ti Other 0.S.15 0.1 0.25 1.04 16 4. Steel) 0.75 25.75 Austenitic grades 600 A-286 (Allegheny Ludlum) 0.2 0.75 6.04 12..5 4. p386 150 150 .25 630 17.8 0.30V.7 8.Compositions of Selected Precipitation-Hardening Stainless AISI Nominal Composition.06 16. 0.05 16. Trade name / producer C Cr Ni Mo Martensitic grades 635 Stainless W (U.25Cb 1.1 633 AM 350 (Allegheny Ludlum) 0.7 PH (Armco Steel) 0.4 PH (Armco Steel) 0. PH 13-8 Mo (Armco Steel) 0.4 1.

108.25 Austenite 20 Nickel equivalent (%) 15 Austenite + martensite Austenite + .75(Nb) +1. Cr equivalent = (Cr) + 2(Si) + 1.. Effect of alloying elements on the basic structure of Cr-Ni stainless steels (Schneider and Climax Molybdenum Co.ferrite 10 Martensite 5 Austenite +martensite + ferrite Martensite + ferrite 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 -ferrite Chromium equivalent (%) Schaeffler diagram.5(Mn) + 0. Foundry Trade J.5(Ti) + 0.5(Mo) + 5(V) + 5.3(Cu) + 25(N) + 30(C) 151 151 .75(W) Ni equivalent = (Ni) + (Co) + 0.1960).562.5(Al) + 1.

p259 152 152 .From ASM Stainless Steels.

a simple plain carbon steel can be perfectly adequate. reaming. a much more sophisticated steel is necessary. In many applications the tool material must be capable of being sharpened and then be able to resist becoming blunt rapidly. To begin a survey of tool steels. but how are the first kind of tools made? Diamond is an example of a material that has excellent properties from the view point of a variety of tools. material removal or fracture. For these. the value of the fact that the properties of steels can be changed by heat treatments becomes evident. (5) High temperature stability. The work-piece should have a minimum effect on the form of the tool in order for the tool to do its job successfully and for it to have a reasonable lifetime. For example. (1) Strength. (4) Shock resistance. These processes involve the forming machines themselves and various cold and hot work dies that interact directly with the work pieces. It is clear that there is an enormous range of applications for tool steels. Therefore. bull-dozer blades etc. Obviously. (3) Wear resistance. we need tools with which to make tools. Then there are the processes in which materials are formed into different shapes by deformation in hot or cold working operations such as stamping. With this background in mind let us list those properties of materials that should be important with respect to selecting or designing a material for a tool. Then when they have been made. scissors. milling and lathes. (2) Edge retention. pliers. During operations conducted at elevated temperatures such as hot forming and high speed cutting it is important that the tool material retain its properties at those temperatures rather than rapidly undergoing microstructural changes that cause undesirable changes in its properties. In general the tool should be stronger and harder than the work piece. highly alloyed steels. tools made of a material with superior properties can be used to make tools from materials of inferior properties (referring. during which the cutting tool can become red hot. It is then necessary that tools can be manufactured from them. mower blades. There are many such steels ranging from relatively simple plain carbon steels to complex. Then there are numerous operations in which materials are cut or fractured. of course. it is extremely hard. Usually the shape or form of the work-piece is changed by plastic deformation. such as a chisel. they can be heat treated in order to endow them with the properties required for operation as a tool. razor blades and jack-hammers and tools for drilling. In many operations tools are loaded rapidly and must therefore be capable of sustaining stresses created during shock loading. axes. forging. rolling and extrusion. farming implements. In other cases such as high speed machining.Tool Steels Tool steels are obviously those steels from which tools are made. wrenches. spades. It is used in a number of abrasive tool applications but it does not lend itself easily to being manufactured into monolithic tools. This property often determines the useful lifetime of the tool. This enables tools to be fabricated into shapes close to their final physical form from steels that are initially easily formed and/or machined. Wear removes material from tools and thereby changes their shapes. And. we require tools such as screw drivers. In contemplating this situation.. It is this versatility that accounts for 153 153 . to relevant properties). broaching. A factor that is common to tools is that they are used on some type of work piece. Now let suppose that we have materials that possess some or all of these properties. saws. We begin with procedures in which items or other material are moved. lest we forget. there is a common requirement for tools. let us first consider the range of operations in which tools are used. chisels. This is a reflection of the enormous variety of operations that are performed by tools. post-hole diggers. for these we require knives. For some tools.

one might attempt to organize them by classifying them chemistry or by their intended application. a) Hardenability is an important consideration because it controls the sizes that can be heat treated throughout or the depth of case hardening. At first. many steels contain the same alloying elements and. b) A high carbon concentration dissolved in the austenite is required to obtain tempered martensite that has a high hardness. C and Mn should be important alloying elements in tool steels. then they should precipitate during tempering as opposed to being inherited from the austenite. a favorite hedge against that problem is grain boundary pinning by very strong carbides such as vanadium carbide. so a classification in terms of use is not clear. We conclude that Cr. we predict that Cr should be an effective alloying element. cooling rapidly enough to form martensite and then a tempering treatment. This suggests the use of Mo. When the desired properties can be obtained by using plain carbon steels then they are the most economical choice. Cr and Mn. There is a large number of different tool steels. Although. As always. Inspection of the list of desirable properties leads us to conclude that in many cases the heat treatment will involve austenitization. the customer is responsible for subsequent heat treatments. Otherwise alloy steels are required. Unfortunately. The stable alloy carbides coarsen more slowly than does cementite and are therefore more effective than cementite at higher temperatures. again. the tool or the working parts of it will consist of tempered martensite. In this respect. Furthermore. wear resistance at the surface of the tool is enhanced by the presence of hard particles of second phases. For any particular application. some steels can be grouped together according to their compositions.the wide use of steel to make tools. The obvious second phase is a carbide. W. it is to be expected that heat treatments involving high austenitization temperatures and long times will be required to form austenite in which the appropriate amount of the relevant alloying elements is dissolved. This is partly because of the many different applications of tools. then. Often many different steels can be used for the same application. Let us consider the main alloying elements that we might predict to be important in tool steels. distortion and dimensional change can be minimized by reducing the rate of cooling required to produce martensite. The hardenability also dictates the necessary quench rates. there does not seem to be an easy method whereby they can neatly classified. Therefore. Mo. This creates the risk of excessive grain growth during austenitization. These can deteriorate rapidly unless the material resists oxidation and decarburization. Usually the steel is delivered in the annealed or spheroidized condition. it is often possible for a major element in one steel to be partially or entirely 154 154 . Mo. Often. There are many different kinds of tool steel. W and V and sufficient carbon to provide these alloy carbides while also endowing the martensite with enough hardness. c) Very often it is the properties of the material at the surface of the tool that determine the performance of the tool. We predict the use of carbide formers such as Cr. the steel chosen should have adequate properties to perform properly and also be an economical choice. When the most important role of the alloy carbides require that they be finely distributed within the steel. This is particularly important because the incidence of quench cracking. V.

25 0.AISI classification and nominal compositions of major tool steels Identifying elements.40 0.00 1.35 P21 T51621 0.50 2.00 V … 0.00 1.25 D4 T30404 2.00 2.45 S7 T41907 0.25 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 1.25 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … Cr … … 0.25 A8 T30108 0.35 H13 T20813 0.50 … … 1.50 A10(b) T30110 1.25 5.50 D7 T30407 2.00 A6 T30106 0.25 … … … … … … … … … … … 1.10 P20 T51620 0.50 Oil-hardening cold-work tool steels O1 T31501 0.40 1.20 (Al) … … … … … … … … … … Si … … … … 1.00 1.50 1.70 Mold steels P2 T51602 0.00 … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 4.90 O2 T31502 0.00 (c) 1.90 O6(b) T31506 1.00 0.10 Shock-resisting tool steels S1 T41901 0.20 Air-hardening.00 0.25 5.25 1.35 H12 T20812 0.55 A9 T30109 0.00 5.25 1.80 … … … 2.00 4.25 9.40 H11 T20811 0.00 5.00 … 0.00 … 1.10 (a) L6 T61206 0.80 … … … … … … 1.20 … … … … … … … … 0.20 Chromium hot-work tool steels H10 T20810 0.50 1.00 … 12.20 … 0.40(a) W2 T72302 0.00 Mo … … … … 0.25 (c) 0.50 1.50 D3 T30403 2.75 … … 0.40 1.00 … … … … … … … … 1.25 … … … … Ni … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 1.00 15.40 0.25 … … … 1.00 5.50 1.00 … … … 1.60 5.00 11.50 … 5.00 2.00 3.00 12.00 1.40 … 1.35 H22 T20822 0.25 1.00 … 1.50 3.5-1.00 5.25 3.50 … … … … … … Co … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 3.07 P5 T51605 0.00 1.45 O7 T31507 1. (c) Optional 155 155 .50 1.40 1.60 0.30 H24 T20824 0.75 5.40 Tungsten hot-work tool steels H21 T20821 0.00 0.00 4.50 S5 T41905 0.00 1. C Water-hardening tool steels W1 T72301 0.50 … … … … 0.50 1.00 … … … 4.25 … 1. % UNS AISI No.00 2.00 1.60-1.00 … … … … … … … … … … (continued) (a) Available with different carbon contents.00 … … … … W … … … 2.70 … 3.40 H19 T20819 0.35 High-carbon.40 0.45 Mn … … … … … 0.00 … … 4.75 2. high-chromium cold-work steels D2 T30402 1.70 A7 T30107 2.75 … … … … 1.00 1.00 12.00 5.50 … … 0.50 … … 1.00 12.00 1.50 0.50 S2 T41902 0.00 A3 T30103 1.25 A4 T30104 1.00 5.35 H14 T20814 0.40(a) W5 T72305 1.80 … … … … … … … … … … … … … 1.40 … 2.55 S6 T41906 0.50 … 4.00 12. medium alloy cold-work tool steels A2 T30102 1.10 P6 T51606 0.80 1.07 P3 T51603 0.50 0.50 1.40 … … 0.60-1.75 … 1.25 … … 3.00 12.00 12.25 D5 T30405 1.35 Low-alloy special-purpose tool steels L2 T61202 0.35 H23 T20823 0.50 1.10 P4 T51604 0.00 2. (b) Contains graphite.00 1.00 … 2.

00 2.00 2.75 1.10 Mn … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … Si … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … Cr 4.00 3. G.25 8.00 4.25 4.85-1.00 4.AISI classification and nominal compositions of major tool steels Identifying elements.00 4. 5t h edition.75 1.50 0.00 18.00 3.50 Co … … … … … 5.90 0.75 … 2. Kennedy. Tungsten hot-work tool steels (continued) H25 T20825 H26 T20826 Molybdenum hot-work tool steels H42 T20842 Tungsten high-speed tool steels T1 T12001 T2 T12002 T4 T12004 T5 T12005 T6 T12006 T8 T12008 T15 T12015 Molybdenum high-speed tool steels M1 T11301 M2 T11302 M3.30 0.80 0.00 1.00 5.00 20.00 6.00 4.75 9.80(a) 0.00 1.20 1.00 2.00 8. class 2 T11323 M4 T11304 M6 T11306 M7 T11307 M10 T11310 M30 T11330 M33 T11333 M34 T11334 M36 T11336 Ultrahard high-speed tool steels M41 T11341 M42 T11342 M43 T11343 M44 T11344 M46 T11346 M47 T11347 C 0.25 5.00 4.00(a) 0.40 3.60 0.80 1.00 4.00 1.00 4.25 3.00 Ni … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … (a) Available with different carbon contents.00 4.15 2.25 2.00 5. Krauss.25 0.00 12.50 2.00 2.25 W 15.25 12. pp8-9.00 8.80 0.20 1.75 5.00 6.00 4.00 5.00 8.00 8.50 6.00 4.00 14.00 2.60 2.50 4.00 3.00 4.00 6.00 4.75 0.05 1.50 0.00 6.00 5.00 … … … … … 12.00 18.00 4.00 … … 5.90 0.00 8.00 4.50 4.75 8.50 Mo … … 5.00 5.00 … … … … … … … 8. % UNS AISI No.50 8. (b) Contains grapite.80 1.00 18.00 2.25 1.75(a) 0.10 1. and R.25 1.00 2.00 18.75 4. 1998 156 156 .00 8. Roberts.00 1.50 8.25 9.00 4.00(a) 1.00 4.00 4.20 1.85-1.00 4.75 V … 1.00 2.15 1.00 4.00 9.00 1. (c) Optional After: "Tool Steels" by G.50 2.00 5.00 8.00 1.00 0. class 1 T11313 M3.00 4.00 5.00 1.15 1.00 5.00 6.80 0.00 2.10 1.00 4.00 1.00 4. ASM International.00 2.00 8.00 1.00 8.00 6.00 1.00 12.8 0.00 5.50 2.75 3.00 4.50 5.00 18.

The hardness of the tempered martensite is primarily controlled by the carbon dissolved in the austenite prior to the quench. it is unnecessary for all of the carbon to be dissolved in the austenite during austenitization. For selecting and identifying tool steels one should consult manuals on the subject.. As we have seen. % to 1. by George A. mold tool steels and special purpose tool steels. it is probably true to say that this class of tool steels is widely used because the relatively low hardenability of the steels enables water-quenching to produce tools as cores of fine pearlite encased within hard martensite.6 wt.25 % Mn and 0. The AISI classifies tool steels into seven major categories. The desirable type of microstructure that achieves this purpose is either a 157 157 . I can see no simple way deducing the details of the classification.2 % V is present.35 % and 0. to produce a suitable microstructure for delivery to the customer.0. Forging is carried out at temperatures well in the austenite phase field but below those which would cause dissolution of the vanadium carbides present in some steels.Same as W 5 except that the Cr level is 0.1 % C. hot work tool steels. 4th edition. There are some applications of carbon tool steels for which they are used when having a pearlitic microstructure..g.4 wt. the intended microstructure in the tools made from these steels is tempered martensite where it is needed and softer. 0. we recognize that hypereutectoid tool steels are not selected for use because their high carbon contents endow the martensite with additional hardness but because the volume fraction of carbides in them is greater and this provides increased wear resistance.5 % Cr W7. The additional alloying elements. A fine reference is the ASM’s publication “Tool Steels”. They contain from 0. The purpose of the annealing treatment is to enhance the machinability of the steel. therefore. % carbon with a manganese content of usually 0. tougher microstructures elsewhere.25 % Si W 5.6 % C. however. They are basically plain carbon steels and are also called carbon tool steels. These are: water-hardening tool steels. %. Cary. high speed tool steels. always comprise a fraction of a wt. Typically.. Because of this. cold work tool steels. however. shock-resisting tool steels. Therefore. Indeed. Some of them contain small amounts of chromium or vanadium and a few contain both vanadium and chromium and. Roberts and Robert A. Water hardening tool steels. Then it is annealed. eliminate any residual stresses and to provide a microstructure that will respond uniformly to subsequent hardening heat treatments. Most commonly.replaced by another element without creating much of a change in the properties of the steel.25 % Mn and Si and 0. treatments and properties in the light of the fundamental relations between composition and phase transformations that we have examined hitherto. %.. Here we see a classification by a mixture of use and heat treatment.6% to 1. These steels are so named because they have relatively low hardenability so that they are hardened by being austenitized and quenched in water. The full story of the heat treatment of carbon tool steels begins with the forging process that produces the desired stock e. The steel is air cooled after forging.6 wt.25 wt. bars. 0.. Examples are: W 1. the hardness increases approximately linearly with carbon content in freshly formed martensite until about 0. thereafter it varies slowly and is essentially constant by 0..8 %. the group is sub-divided according to such details. the working hardness in the case is in the range of HRC 58-65 and the core hardness is in the range of HRC 38-43.. What I propose to do here is to select a number of particular tool steels and consider their compositions. These seven major classes are then subdivided into numbered classes ranging from the 100 class to the 600 class. sometimes after a normalization treatment. % C.

For example. If it is desired to transform as much austenite as possible then cooling should not be interrupted for significant delays. shows that another 1% or so of martensite forms in an hour and about 2 or 3 % in 50 hours. For example. if continuously cooled. These microstructures are produced by heating to and holding at temperatures within the austenite/cementite two phase field followed by slow cooling ( maximum rate 50°F per hour) to 1000°F. Very likely. It is well known that tool steel articles can suffer delayed cracking if stored for periods of time after being quenched. 41. the chromium that becomes incorporated in the cementite improves the wear resistance provided by the carbides. The microstructure before the quench comprises austenite grains in which proeutectoid cementite particles and possibly vanadium carbides are embedded. (1949). Trans. The steel is protected from excessive scaling and decarburization during annealing. until the temperature is about -250°F where there is typically 1 % retained austenite present. Vol. also. It is time now to elaborate on the martensitic transformation in these steels. however. these degradation processes should also be minimized by using protective atmospheres or baths during heat treating. For hardening. It is. for practical purposes. these steels are austenitized above the A1 line but below the Acm line. 35. a definition that is not exactly true.finely spheroidized microstructure or a mixture of fine spheroidite and pearlite. Another important contribution of the dissolved chromium is that it retards the rate of tempering reactions which enables some residual stress relief to be accomplished without too much softening. the remaining austenite also becomes more resistant to the athermal transformation because when cooling is resumed martensite does not form until the temperature has decreased on the order of a hundred degrees and much less of it forms. If the sample is immediately cooled further. often by being embedded in inert substances such as sand. Let us consider the behavior of W1 in greater detail. the transformation continues as if the cooling was continuous. However. The microstructure in the case of carbon tool steels austenitized as above and then waterquenched to room temperature is not 100 % martensite even very near the surface. If the quench is to room temperature the hardness of the mixture of martensite and retained austenite is typically above HRC 65 and roughly 90 % of the microstructure is martensite. These subtleties become important now. ASM. It is important to avoid the formation of films of cementite along austenite grain boundaries or a coarse spheroidal microstructure. I defined it as usually being an athermal transformation during which the quantity of martensite produced was dependent on the temperature to which the steel was cooled and not on the time spent at that temperature. however. the volume changes produced by the continuation of the 158 158 . samples of W1 steel austenitized at 1450°F begin to transform to martensite at approximately 400°F and will continue to transform. the transformation to martensite is incomplete with typically 12 % of the sample being retained austenite. If. quenching to room temperature generally means continuously cooling to below the Mf temperature. These carbides restrict grain growth during austenitization and are retained within the martensite when quenching is complete. For hypoeutectoid plain carbon and low alloy steels this definition is fine because it is close to the truth and. Cohen in “Retained Austenite”. The austenitization temperatures are high enough for the Cr be dissolved. During this isothermal hold. the sample is held at room temperature for significant times. Retained austenite is usually present because the Ms temperature drops below room temperature as the carbon content rises. If a sample is quenched to room temperature. some of the austenite does transform. When we first broached the subject of the martensitic transformation in plain carbon and the standard low alloy steels. Finally. This is desirable partly because it then is helpful in resisting oxidation and decarburization. This was to emphasize the difference between its kinetics and those of diffusion controlled nucleation and growth transformations.

This is related to quench cracking which refers to cracking that occurs during the quenching process.2 % V 1. 3) high hardenability when austenitized at low austenitization temperatures. Of these.transformation during storage contributes to this delayed cracking phenomenon. It is particularly important that such steels be tempered immediately after being quenched. due primarily to carbon dissolved in the austenite. compositions that enable air hardening to occur are used. 2) high as-quenched hardness.5 % Cr 0.e.2 % Mn 0. 4) reasonably good resistance to quench-cracking in intricate shapes.5 % W 07 1. the compositions that require quenching in oil are probably the most commonly used but when larger parts are used or when smaller dimensional changes are desirable during heat treatment. These are good properties.95 % C 1.8 ? Tough core γ Low hardenability T +Fe 3C Fe wt.6 % Cr 0. 5) good retention of a keen cutting edge during use. As was summarized by Roberts and Cary. however. Austenitization temperatures why intercritical at %C > .25 % Mo 159 159 . they do not retain hardness when red-hot. The risk of quench cracking increases as the carbon content of the austenite increases and as the severity of the quench increases. hence small finishing work required. It is also true that quench cracking becomes more likely to occur as the austenitic grain size increases. The phenomenon of delayed cracking was mentioned in the foregoing paragraph.25 % Mn 0. The steels are used in a wide variety of applications involving tool and die work.2 % C 0.25 % Si 0. the major properties of these steels are: 1) small dimensional changes ( called movement) during hardening.2 % V 0. % C Tempered martensite Cold Work Die Steels This is a very important family of tool steels. the steels are limited to cold work because they soften when heated and have no “red-hardness” i. Examples are: 01 0.6 % W 0.25 % Si 0. This is another reason that vanadium is added to the higher carbon steels to refine the austenitic grain size.

When the Mn content is high.25 % V and 1 % Mo Now. 18 % is typical. This retained austenite can transform during tempering. An example is A2 which contains: 1 % C 0. Any elastic shape changes that occur because of differential expansion/contraction while the temperature is changing. Another reason for the intermediate hold is that it provides a means of bringing the times spent at the maximum temperature by the surface and the interior closer together so that their microstructures are more similar. even though it is usually packed in protective materials. Sometimes A2 is refrigerated to reduce the amount of retained austenite within it. One should note that because of the high carbon content and the effects of the dissolved alloying elements. the permissible austenitization temperature is at the lower end of the range because Mn is an austenite stabilizer. The increased amount of Cr also adds the benefit of increased resistance to oxidation and decarburization.25 % Si 5 % Cr 0. Double tempering might then be necessary. in order to raise the hardenability by means of the increased alloy content it is necessary to dissolve more of the alloying elements into the austenite. hold at that temperature and then to continue up to the final temperature. are more serious the longer the steel is at the elevated temperature. are eliminated when the temperature of the tool is uniform. will raise the hardenability. Reducing the austenitization temperature is helpful for retaining prior dimensions. With the increase in the dissolved alloy content comes an increase in the volume fraction of retained austenite because of the reduction in the Ms temperature. typically around 10 % by volume. Tempering is typically carried out below 300 Celsius. Typically they are austenitized at about 1000 Celsius. if dissolved in the austenite. air cooled and tempered. These steels are thus austenitized at higher temperatures than are the oil hardening types. the logical thing to try is to increase the hardenability so that the martensitic transformation will occur during very slow cooling rates that eliminate serious temperature gradients in the work piece. If the stresses associated with these changes are large enough to cause plastic deformation before the temperature becomes uniform then the shape changes are not recovered and are superimposed on those due to the phase transformations. Indeed chromium carbides can form within it thereby reducing its carbon and chromium content such that its Ms temperature is raised above its former value causing martensite to form during cooling after tempering ( similar to conditioning in stainless steels). Austenitization temperatures are in the range of 840 degrees where some of the alloy carbides except the vanadium carbides dissolve. so the principal role of dissolved alloying elements is then to retard softening while residual stresses are relieved. This leads us to air hardenable tool and die steels in which greater amounts of Mo and Cr are present. When even greater dimensional stability than that which can be obtained in intricate parts during quenching in oil is desirable. The intermediate hold allows some of the phase transformations to be performed which reduces the time required at the highest temperature. These steels typically undergo forging processes that are conducted around 1000 to 1100 degrees Celsius and are then annealed around 850 before being austenitized. The ability to austenitize the tool at relatively low temperatures reduces the dimensional changes that occur subsequently. This is beneficial because the effects due to decarburization etc.We see that the amounts of alloying elements are not high and that most of them are carbide formers and. The vanadium carbides and the low austenitization temperatures resist grain growth. quenching to room temperature usually leaves a significant quantity of retained austenite in the steel. It is common to heat to 750 . 160 160 .800.6 % Mn 0. Heating to the austenitization temperature is carried out in stages to minimize distortion.

high carbon. A typical annealing process is to heat to about 875°C in a controlled atmosphere.8 % Mo 0. An example is D2: 1. of course. It is irrelevant whether the primary nuclei are delta ferrite or austenite. Typically the tools are preheated to and soaked at an intermediate temperature and then heated to about 980°C. the eutectic constituents that solidify are austenite and carbides. Higher temperatures are not used because the eutectic constituent can melt. To ensure minimum dimensional changes and to avoid scaling. Some of the steels are oil-quenched but the molybdenum in D2 makes it air-hardenable in large sizes. There is. however. In fact the alloy content is so great that there are very significant departures from the behavior of carbon steels that are important to note.3 % Mn 0. The actual final “austenitization” temperature is quite important because. marked coring occurs as Cr and C are rejected from the solid. The forged steel is annealed before it is machined into tools. Because chromium and chromium carbides give these steels good properties it follows that the effects of increasing the amounts of these two elements are worth examining. It is clear from this composition that the steel will be rich in alloy carbides and have good resistance to oxidation. a tendency for artifacts such as carbide stringers to arise. Forging is carried out from about 1000°C to 1100°C. consists of primary grains surrounded by a eutectic mixture. endows the material with more uniform properties. cold-work tool and die steels. very slow cooling rates are needed to avoid the formation of martensite. complete austenitization does not occur . The final microstructure is a mixture of large and small alloy carbides in a ferrite matrix. Austenite transforms to ferrite as the casting cools and it is possible for martensite to form. cold work steels. More of the carbides dissolve the higher the temperature that is used. The as-cast microstructure of the steel following its manufacture. So far we have considered cold work tool steels that are of relatively low alloy content. These steels have lower thermal conductivity than low alloy steels so that a pre-heat soak and slow heating rates are necessary. The steel will be austenite plus alloy carbides and the volume fractions of these phases will vary with the temperature. in turn.6 % V 0. Again the tools are hardened after they have been machined to shape.High chromium. Forging serves not only to produce the steel in suitable forms but also modifies the microstructure creating a more uniform mixture of matrix and carbides which.25 % Si. hold for two hours and then to slowly cool to 775°C. Also. hold there for 2-4 hours and air-cool. This results in the high chromium. As solidification begins.5 % C 12 % Cr 0. This increases the concentration of solute 161 161 . high carbon. heating is done slowly in baths or protective atmospheres.

This implies a resistance to mechanical and thermal shocks.25 % Cr 4. particularly at its surface in contact with the work-piece.5 % Si 5.5 % Mn 0. the steels have medium to high contents of alloy element. The “conditioning refers to the rise in the martensitic start temperature of the retained austenite caused by the precipitation of carbides therein during tempering. steels are unsuitable for hot working processes is that although they can be produced to have high hardness and strength at room temperature. For example. We have considered the main types of cold work tool steels but there are variations of these. The following are some of the important properties that should be possessed by hot-work tools steels. Furthermore when the higher austenitization temperatures are used. they soften rapidly at elevated temperatures. Commonly temperatures can range above 1000°F. secondary hardening can arise due to carbide precipitation and the formation of martensite in the “conditioned” retained austenite. There are many applications in which the work piece is hot. special wear resistant cold work die steels. 2) They should be shock resistant. Hence D7: 2. Vanadium and tungsten carbides are harder than chromium and iron carbides.3 % C 0.1 % Mo Hot work die steels.1 % W 1.dissolved in the austenite which lowers the Ms temperature. Good notch toughness is desirable to avoid catastrophic crack propagation. many of the parts that are made from aluminum alloys are made by hot working operations. both of which are encountered in service. the rate of softening is low because the progress of the tempering reactions is restrained by the high alloy 65 aust 1850 F aust 2050 F 60 55 Rc 50 45 40 35 800 1000 1200 1400 F content. This. so the an improvement should be obtained by replacing some of the chromium carbides with these. in turn. For this to be so. To satisfy this requirement most hot work tool steels have low to 400 600 162 162 . wear resistant carbides and lots of them. In general. but they do so slowly and retain enough strength to have a significant working life. What do we need for improved wear resistance? The answer is: hard. The variation of hardness during tempering is also dependent upon the austenitization temperature because of the effects of the composition of the austenite. The main reason that high carbon.75 % V 1. During hot working operations the dies are often cooled by water or air blasts but the tool still becomes hot. 1) They should resist being deformed at the working temperatures. For example. causes an increase in the volume fraction of retained austenite which reduces the as-quenched hardness. It is true that the hot work steels that are used also soften when heated. low alloy tool.

5 % C 0. typical hardness values of 44-50 are used for working tools. it is desirable that dimensional changes and warping are minimized when they are heat treated.25-0. The most common method of minimizing dimensional changes during heat treating is to use high alloy contents that raise the hardenability so that rapid temperature changes are unnecessary. those which contain W or Mo as the principal alloying element and those which contain about equal quantities of Cr and W. The phenomenon is known as “heat checking” or “craze cracking”. This is a common practical problem and its occurrence is often the limiting factor in the life of a die. An example is shown below and refers to an H11 steel that was austenitized at 1850°F. 163 163 . 3) As is usually the case for tools. 4) Tools used in hot work operations experience cyclic variations in the surface temperature as they heat up and cool down. An obvious reason is that this will reduce the need for subsequent machining and thereby the cost of the tool.1 % Cr 1.4 % V H14 0. This is beneficial with respect to undesirable effect caused by thermal shocks and thermal gradients.4 % C 0. If. aircooled and tempered at various temperatures and times. for a hardness of HRC 50 a horizontal line drawn across the diagram at that hardness intersects the curve at a particular value of the abscissa parameter. Then knowing the value of T( 20 + logt) it is possible to determine the various combinations of t and °F for which the hardness will be at least HRC 50.7 % Mn 0. however. Examples S7 0.92 % Si 5. This is particularly true when the tool is intended to produce a part as close as possible to its required net shape as is the case for dies. The hardness measurements were. of course made at room temperature.25 % Cr 1. The curve is used to estimate the combination of temperatures and times for which the tool can be used before it becomes too soft. Most of them contain V which is combined with carbon and is not taken into solution during the normal heat treatments. The cracks are usually along the traces of grain boundaries and grains can even be pulled out of the surface. g.3 % Si 3. 0.%.25 % V 5 % W An interesting aspect of the metallurgy of hot work die steels is the use of master tempering curves.5 % Mo 0.3 % Mn 1 % Si 5 % Cr 0.4 % Mo H11 0. The hot-work tool steels can be divided into three broad classes: those in which Cr is the principal alloying element.6 wt. These temperature excursions generate cyclic stresses with the result that thermally induced fatigue is very common. For example.4 % C 0. Wear rates tend to increase as toughness increases. this film is removed during grinding processes required to adjust dimensions after heat treatment then the useful life of the tool will be less. The diagram was constructed from the experimental data as a plot of hardness ( HRC) versus the parameter T(20 + logt ) where T is °F + 460 and t is the tempering time in hours. The increase in toughness has to be a compromise of course because it is necessary to maintain adequate hardness and strength and also to avoid rapid wear or erosion. This phenomenon generally manifests itself by the development of a network of fine cracks on the surface of the tool.medium carbon contents e. Hot work steels can develop a protective surface film during heat treatment.

The cutting process generates heat which can raise the temperature of the working part of the tool. An increase in the rate at which a particular machining process can be performed is economically desirable. Their major function is cutting and their major property is hot hardness.55 50 Rc 28. high speed tool steels can be grouped as tungsten based.75 % C 0. and molybdenum-tungsten based. In contrast. some secondary hardening during use would be useful provided overaging is not rapid. This steel is capable of cutting while at a visible red heat. they retain a high hardness when heated to a red heat. These elements along with cobalt are the important alloying elements in high speed tool steel. Its composition is: 0. The alloying elements that are suggested by these requirements are moderate to strong carbide formers that have low rates of diffusion in ferrite. molybdenum based. Tungsten was the first major element explored for this class of steel and the classic 18-4-1 high speed steel emerged around 1910. liquid coolant streams are commonly used in machining processes to lengthen the tool life by minimizing heat induced deterioration of its properties.3 % Mn 0. i. Mo and V.3 % Si 18 % W 4 % Cr 1 % V 0. Although the original tool steels were tungsten based.7 % Mo In general. Typically a HRC of 52 at 1000°F and HRC 48 at 1100°F can be achieved.e. Vanadium and cobalt are the other important alloying elements. Faster machining rates are possible if the cutting tools can be made of a material that resists softening when heated. So the steel should contain carbon and be of such a composition that it can be converted largely to martensite by a heat treatment. each now has a molybdenum counterpart 164 164 . Accordingly. Heat is created at greater rates the faster the machining is carried out and this imposes a limit on production rates. The first thing that comes to mind when contemplating making a steel hard is the martensitic transformation. This suggests elements like W. tool steels. the basic function served by the tool during many machining processes is to change the form of the work piece by cutting pieces (chips or swarf) from its surface. In order for it to have good wear resistance and to maintain a good cutting edge it should contain a high volume fraction of alloy carbides. Indeed. Tool steels which possess this property are called high speed. This means that the rates of tempering reactions and carbide coarsening processes should be small at the temperatures concerned. Then for it to have “red hardness” undesirable changes in the microstructure should not occur or should occur slowly when the tool is hot. The tool is in contact with the work piece and the two move relatively.000 High Speed tool steels Cold and hot work dies are tools that are designed to form the work piece into a desired shape and size.000 T ( 20 + log(t) ) 36.

Initially the microstructure is an array of ferrite grains and alloy carbides..Fe3W 3 . One should note that tungsten is roughly twice as heavy as molybdenum when comparing weight percentage compositions.. dissolves Fe. T4 The 18-4-1+5 % Co M2 0. ferrite and carbides.... Microstructural constituents and treatments The cast steel is extremely cored due to the segregation that occurs during solidification. The heat treatment used to harden these steels first produces a mixture of austenite and alloy carbides... For example heating to 1650°F and quenching doesn’t produce martensite because austenite doesn’t form. g. During the solidification process... Some other examples are.3 volume fraction of carbides.. these steels have high levels of carbide formers which produce excess carbides in the tempered martensite.. Fe4W 2C.25 -0....e....... We may simply note that the steels are rich in these elements and the metallurgy of the various alloys is quite similar...g.. When the steel is heated to within 150°F of its melting point. eutectic constituent in the final volumes to freeze........e. by electron diffraction) as follows: M6C. M23C6.. Fe3W 2.. The first step after casting is to break down the eutectic network and to produce an array of ferritic grains containing alloy carbides.Tungsten or molybdenum rich carbide The matrix contains some of the alloying elements in solid solution and very little carbon... Mo and W MC. Cr. Then M23C6 begins to dissolve and the dissolution is complete when 2000°F is reached during slow heating. i. It is possible for intermetallic compounds to form when the total carbon is low e..... Roughly half of the chromium content is in solution which is beneficial for corrosion resistance.. the enrichment of the liquid results in the formation of a skeleton-like.... Secondary hardening by the precipitation of fine alloy carbides occurs during tempering and during use.. When the austenite begins to form the microstructure contains austenite.. This is accomplished by hot forging or rolling and annealing at 1650°F.which has come to be more widely used in this country as a result of strategic materials limitations during wars. the martensitic transformation occurs in austenite that contains alloy carbides so that these carbides are inherited by the martensite...... Because of the high content of ferrite stabilizers..... austenite forms and dissolves sufficient carbon and other alloying elements so that it can then be hardened to HRC 63 or higher by cooling in air in thick sections............. Embedded within it are some carbides and usually an amount of lamellar pearlitic-like constituent.3 % Mn 0.Chromium rich.. Then partial 165 165 .. Both the ferrite grains and the carbide particles restrict the grain growth in the austenite. the ferrite has been dissolved away using appropriate chemical reagents) and identified (e.. V... It is irrelevant whether or not delta ferrite or austenite is the nature of the initial nuclei because the first portion to solidify is relatively lean with respect to its alloy content and is ferrite at room temperature. V and Co dissolves in the former and Mo replaces the tungsten in the latter in Mo steels... The carbides have been extracted (i.3 $ Si 4 % Cr 2 % V 8 % Mo In general... Typically these steels contain 0.... austenite isn’t formed after holding at temperatures suitable for low alloy steels.8 % C 5 % Mo 6 % W 2 % V 4 % Cr M10 0.Vanadium rich M2C.9 % C 0.

some crystal boundaries become unpinned before the others. the rates of diffusion of W and Mo are very low and it requires very slow cooling for significant carbide precipitation to occur on the grain boundaries and within the grains. 3) From 400. 2) In the range 300-400°C BCC plus epsilon carbide goes to BCC plus cementite. Once a high speed tool steel has been hardened by such a heat treatment they cannot be rehardened by a straight forward repetition of the same heat treatment because discontinuous grain growth occurs. 15-30 % FCC austenite and 5-12 % MC and M 6C. This reduces the concentration of dissolved alloying elements in the austenite which raises the Ms temperature. Then a few grains are able to grow rapidly at the high temperatures and consume their neighbors. the small acicular BCC crystals transform to austenite but their intercrystalline boundaries are pinned by fine carbides. precipitation of alloy carbides also occurs in the retained austenite which is also supersaturated. This causes more martensite to form when the tool is cooled after being tempered. However. 1) Up to 270°C. On cooling there is an immediate tendency for the carbides to re-precipitate.solution of the other carbides occurs until the austenite typically contains about 7-12 % alloy carbides of the types MC and M6C. BCC plus cementite changes to BCC with less cementite and the formation of alloy carbides occurs. This process leads to exaggerated grain growth in which a few grains become very large. It is very hard and also very brittle with much residual internal stress. BCT martensite transforms to BCC plus epsilon carbide.560°C. especially on austenite grain boundaries. More rapid cooling yields bainite and then martensite plus carbides plus retained austenite. The effect is inherited in the tempered martensite that is formed subsequently causing very poor toughness. During the heating process used to austenitize the steel. 65 Rc 1000 1200 oF The starting material is 60-80% BCT martensite. Some precipitation occurs. While these transformations are taking place at the higher temperatures in the martensite. Often double or even multiple tempering is necessary to eliminate the retained austenite. The elimination of this tendency requires special treatments such as long term cyclic heat treatments. 166 166 . as the carbides dissolve.A typical tempering response is indicated in the sketch. The usual tempering range is 950 to 1100°F but for the sake of completeness we will note that three stages of tempering have been observed. These carbides restrict grain growth until high temperatures are reached whereupon . This completes our dash through part of the kingdom of tool steels. The red hardness is due to the reluctance of the carbides to coarsen because of the slow rates of diffusion and also because secondary hardening can occur while the tool is hot.

Additional Pictures: Mounting fixture 1” Jominy specimen 1”/2 4” Flat ground along bar Rockwell C hardness tests Water spray (24 oC) 1”/2 167 167 .

Hardness, HRC

Typical hardenability plot of Rockwell C hardness as a functin of distance from the quenched end.

Distance from quenched end
70

Hardness, HRC

60 50 10 30 20 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Distance from quenched end (in.)

800

Temperature ( oC)

600 400

(a)

(b)
Aus

tenit

e

ear to p

lite

1200 1000 800 600

M (start)

200
Austenite to Martensite

400 200 0
(d) Pearlite

0
(a) (b) Martensite Martensite and pearlite (c) Fine Pearlite

Cooling transformation diagram Coolng curves Transformation during cooling

10-1

100

101 Time (s)

102

103

Correlation of hardenability and continuous cooling information for an iron-carbon alloy of eutectoid composition. (Adapted from H.Boyer, Editor, Atlas of Isothermal Transformation and Cooling Transformation Diagrams, American Society for Metals, 1977, p376

168 168

Temperature (oF)

(c)

1400 (d)

Cooling rate at 700 oC (1300 oF)
490 270 305 125 56 170 70 31 33 18 16.3 9 10 5.6 7 3.9 5.1 2.8 3.5 2 oF/s oC/s

100

Hardness, HRC

50

4340

80 50

40

4140 8640

30 1040 20 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 1.25

5140

1.5

1.75

2

in.

0

10

20

30

40

50 mm

Distance from quenched end

169 169

Percent Martensite

60

Cooling rate at 700 oC (1300 oF)
490 270 305 125 56 170 70 31 33 18 16.3 9 10 5.6 7 3.9 5.1 2.8 3.5 2 oF/s oC/s

60 8660 (0.6 wt% C)

Hardness, HRC

50

40

8660 (0.4 wt% C)

30 8660 (0.2 wt% C) 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1

8660 (0.3 wt% C)

20

1.25

1.5

1.75

2

in.

0

10

20

30

40

50 mm

Distance from quenched end

170 170

75 2 in.25 0.3 9 10 5.6 7 3.1 2. 0 10 20 30 40 50 mm Distance from quenched end 171 171 .490 270 305 125 56 170 70 31 33 18 16.5 0.5 1.5 2 oF/s oC/s 60 Hardness.9 5.8 3.75 1 1. HRC 50 40 30 20 0 0.25 1.

25 in.5 0.25 10 0.25 in.Cooling rate at 700 oC (1300 oF) 305 170 125 70 56 31 33 18 16. in. 30 mm 0.75 20 1 Distance from quenched end (a) 172 172 .75 20 1 0 1. 30 mm Distance from quenched end (a) Cooling rate at 700 oC (1300 oF) 305 125 56 170 70 31 33 18 16.6 7 3.25 10 0.5 0.3 9 10 5.6 7 3.9 oF/s oC/s Diameter of bar (in.) 4 3 3/4 R Surface Center 1/2 R 100 75 2 1 0 0 0 50 25 0 1.9 oF/s oC/s Diameter of bar (in.3 9 10 5.) 4 Surface 1/2 R Center 100 75 Diameter of bar (mm) Diameter of bar (mm) 3 3/4 R 2 1 3/4 R Center 50 25 Surface 1/2 R 0 0 0 0.

(100mm) 173 173 . HRC 4140 Hardness. (50mm) 4 in. (50mm) A 2 in. HRC 50 40 1040 30 45 40 20 2 in.60 60 55 50 Hardness.