P. 1
River Cities' Reader Issue #762 - September 30, 2010

River Cities' Reader Issue #762 - September 30, 2010

|Views: 221|Likes:
Published by River Cities Reader

More info:

Published by: River Cities Reader on Sep 29, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/25/2014

pdf

text

original

R

i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
2
Slug_0-7
Title:
1st insert:
Version:
Pubs:
Color/B&W:
Pickup ref:
Live:
Trim:
Bleed:
Gutter:
Scale:
Art Director
Copywriter
Project Mgr
Print Prod
Studio Mgr
Buddy Check
Creative Dir
Acct Mgmt
Proofreader
Legal
Client
Product Info
8-2-2010 1:07 PM Updated: Printed at:
PUBLI CI S & HAL RI NEY
SAN FRANCI SCO
Approvals EPro:
Production notes:
Job: 6768PRM0060-024429
Prints Newspaper Colors:
- Slate prints C43, M3, Y7, K0
- Blue prints C100, M60, Y0, K5
- Red prints C0, M100, Y69, K5
- Legal prints K100
- .5 pt. black keyline on trim prints
- Vendor to convert Android Logo Green PMS376C to
newspaper colors
Final Art:
- All type, logos and clouds
FPO Art:
- Photographic Art
cgibson
Released
024429-PRM0060-USC_SN16.indd
Document
02
08-02
Promo 3A Nationwide 3G ROP 4C
By Date
Mike Whelan
Joe Bultman
Catherine Moore
Michael Blair
Inks, Images & Fonts :
Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black
USC-PRD-10-099_4C.eps (CMYK; 272 ppi; 24.36%),
USC-PRD-10-100_4C.eps (CMYK; 334 ppi; 19.89%), C3_
dynamic_slate_newsprint.psd (CMYK; 193 ppi, -194 ppi;
155.43%, -155.43%), USC_believe_std_news_CMYK.
eps, facebook_favicon.eps, android_logo.eps
Berthold Akzidenz Grotesk (Medium Condensed,
Light Condensed), SanukOT (Regular, Bold), Matrix II
Script USC (Reg, Bold), Rosewood (Fill), Trade Gothic
(Condensed No. 18)
Inks, Images & Fonts Cont'd :
4C
None
9.5" x 11"
None
None
1" = 1" @ 100%
100%
8/10/10
SN16
See media rotation
CTA verification
Toll-free#/Acct Mgmt
URL/Acct Mgmt
Email/Acct Mgmt
By Date
Toll-free#/Proofreader
URL/Proofreader
Email/Proofreader
By Date
Things we want you to know: New two-year agreement (subject to early termination fee) and credit approval required. A $30 activation fee may apply. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies; this is not a tax or government-required charge. Additional fees, taxes, terms, conditions
and coverage areas apply and vary by plan, service and phone. Use of service constitutes acceptance of the terms of our Customer Service Agreement. Promotional Phone subject to change. Mail-in rebate will be paid by U.S. Cellular in the form of a U.S. Cellular Visa Debit Card.
U.S. Cellular Visa Debit Card issued by MetaBank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Allow 10–12 weeks for processing. Card does not have cash access and can be used at any merchant location that accepts Visa debit cards. Card valid for 120 days after issued. Required Data
Plan is $30 per month. Application and data network usage charges may apply when accessing applications. $20 Virtual Account: $20 virtual accounts are issued by MetaBank. Credit must be redeemed by 11/1/10. Customer must have or create a Google Checkout account in order
to redeem. Credit will be processed within four to eight hours and provided to customer via e-mail. Once redeemed, credit is valid for 120 days. Virtual account funds can be used only for online purchases with Google Checkout. BOGO: Buy one handset and get a second handset for
free. Mail-in rebate and activation required on each handset. See store for details or visit uscellular.com. Limited-time offer. Android, Android Market, Gmail and Google Maps are all trademarks of Google, Inc. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners.
Nationwide 3G Coverage not available on certain devices or in certain areas, including the greater St. Louis, Missouri, area. See store for details or visit uscellular.com. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. ©2010 U.S. Cellular.
For more information about our Android: visit uscellular.com/android or call 1-888-BUY-USCC
• Access to over 50,000 useful and exciting apps—all readily available from Android Market
TM
• Faster browsing speed so you can navigate the Web more easily
• Full access to Gmail,
TM
Google Maps
TM
and Google Talk on your phone
Our exclusive new Samsung Acclaim
TM
gives you all the
advantages of an Android-powered phone, including:
ANDROID
TM
IS
now
AT U.S. CELLULAR.
®
Follow us on Facebook.
®
SAMSUNG ACCLAIM
get one free
when you buy one
for
$
99
95
After $70 mail-in rebates that come as Visa
®
debit cards. Requires
new 2-yr. agmts. and applicable Data Plans. $30 act. fees may apply.
USC-PRD-10-100 USC-PRD-10-099
Download and access your Android
TM
apps faster—wherever you are—
on our Nationwide 3G Network.
Eurographics 39496 Version:01 08-03-10 jv
Have a
few
apps on us.
Get $20 for cool apps from Android Market
when you buy the Samsung Acclaim.
TM
$20 virtual accounts are issued by MetaBank.
TM
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
3
a candidacy from progressivism by winning
a primary, establishment Republicans lost
their minds, continuing to run as write-ins,
and excising supporters of such upstarts from
establishment-party committees.
Tere is no reason to believe that the
incumbents from either major party, both of
whom are clearly responsible for the eroding
condition of our country, have the know-how,
let alone any intention, of correcting for their
decades of errors. It is just plain insulting to have
to sufer the campaign posturing, knowing it is
purely for election day and not a minute beyond.
Tere is no other reasonable action voters
can take to declare their outrage than to vote
the incumbents out, regardless of party. Te
challenge for those of us who prefer a republican
or constitutional form of governance is that the
pickings are very slim from the non-incumbent,
establishment Progressive Party candidates.
Tere are at least two races on the ballot for
Scott County residents that have refreshing
candidates who are worth evaluating and
seriously considering.
Te mainstream media would have Iowans
believe that there are only two gubernatorial
choices this November: Culver or Branstad.
Because the Progressive Party’s leadership does
not want Iowans too informed about a viable
third candidate – Johnathan Narcisse – he has
not been included in the three debates hosted by
the complicit media culprits. Nor are his polling
statistics included in any of the media’s political
l
f there were any doubt that America has
just one major political party with two
branches, Democrat and Republican, it
was permanently dispelled once the nation’s
primaries ended. I would call it the Progressive
Party, with Progressive Democrats on one
branch and Progressive Republicans on the
other. My defnition of a “progressive” is one
that believes in political change and social
improvement by coercive governmental action.
Under a true “republican” form of government,
which our founding compact dictates, societal
improvement comes from self-determination
and mutual respect of each other’s property. Te
only thing that has progressed, under both major
parties, is the size and burden of the welfare and
warfare state, for this and future generations of
Americans.
Te evidence of the charade that the two major
parties are not one and the same – and that the
establishment media is complicit in maintaining
this myth that there is a diference and you
actually have choices – is this issue’s cover story
on ballot access in Illinois. Further evidence is the
Progressive Party’s vitriolic response to the Tea
Party movement. Rather than engage Tea Party
participants (an obviously growing and organized
voting bloc) about their concerns, no matter
which party their voter-registration card reads,
the Progressive Party demonized them.
First the Democrats stereotyped Tea Partiers
as racists and then, when some Tea Party-backed
GOP candidates succeeded in emancipating
Refreshing Races to Watch in November
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
analysis. It is a blatant betrayal of the public trust
to deliberately limit Iowans’ access to Narcisse’s
positions and views. Te two incumbents have
thoroughly proven they are unft for the job
of Iowa governor. Narcisse is an informed and
viable challenger, whose governance agenda and
strategies and ideas to fx what ails Iowa have been
formed in the crucible of the corruption-ridden
state capital where he lives. (See last issue’s cover
story and interview with Narcisse by Jef Ignatius.)
It is no secret, but heretofore largely
unreported, that beginning with Branstad and
culminating with Culver, 100 percent of the urban
high schools in Iowa are now ofcially failing.
Tat includes all the high schools in Scott County.
Te mainstream media, Culver, and Branstad will
not talk about this. But Narcisse will and does as
he espouses opting out of federal-government
programs and empowering entrepreneurship-
driven budgeting and operations by teachers
and parents. A new documentary, Waiting for
“Superman,” may possibly verify much of what
Narcisse has been trying to expose as a failed
model. Narcisse breaks the mold, as he is a
former co-chair of the Polk County Democrats
and is just as comfortable addressing a room
full of Tea Partiers. His ideas about tax reform,
education, and governance cross over the stilted
us-versus-them monolithic Progressive business
as usual, and his Web site is worth taking a look
at: NarcisseForIowa.com.
Te second refreshing race to watch is the
Scott County Board of Supervisors ballot, where
three of the fve seats are up for election. Scott
County problems can no longer be defned along
partisan lines, because both parties are spending
and borrowing like drunken sailors, growing
inefcient government on the backs of taxpayers.
Recent property assessments have more than
doubled on some commercial parcels, with
no logical reasoning other than “We need the
money.” Te Scott County Board of Supervisors
recently gave a blank check to a newly established
taxing authority to govern the Scott County
Emergency Center. While this happened quietly,
the proverbial horse is out of the barn, and all
residents can do now is hope that a new slate
of independent supervisors will succeed in
maintaining fscal and operational vigilance over
a potential boondoggle that already has problems
with construction and radio technology emerging
before it is built.
Happily, we do have three independent
candidates from the newly established Iowans for
Accountability (IFA): John Riley (Blue Grass),
John Green (Davenport), and Jesse Anderson
(LeClaire). If their moniker is to be believed at
all, then taxpayers do have some real choices this
fall. You can learn more about the IFA and its
candidates at ScottCountyIFA.com.
Full disclosure: River Cities’ Reader Publisher
Todd McGreevy is co-chair of Iowans for a Fair
Debate (supporting Jonathan Narcisse’s inclusion
in debates) and a member of the IFA central
committee.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
4
Food for Thought:
Savor the Circle of Life!
Thursday, October 14
5 to 7:30 p.m.
Rock Island
Main Library
401 19th Street
Bid for Books! An
all-inclusive night of
dining, drinks, music
and more to support
your library
Join a circle of friends,
food & fun at the library:
Bid for premium seats to
The Lion King in Chicago,
signed books, literary
baskets & more
Surround our circle
of food & beverage
stations from SCC Culinary
Arts Academy, Cool Beanz
coffeehouse, Chefs Eudell
Watts, III, Albert Ames and
Robert Lewis.
Wrap your hand around
Blue Cat Brew Pub ales,
wines & soft drinks
Revolve to the cool tunes
of Edgar Crockett & the
Blackhawk Jazz Quartet
Gather ‘round the grape
grab wine pull or the retro
recipes room
Admission at door:
$25 per person/
$45 per couple
309-732-7302
www.rockislandlibrary.org
Auction items
include four
premium
seats at
in Chicago!
Feels likeVegas!
Tastes likeVegas...
Looks likeVegas...
Looking for real Vegas-style gaming excitement? The
loosest and biggest selection of slots? Weekly slot and poker tournaments? You’re
going to love Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, voted the “Best Casino” in the Quad Cities!
New for Mondays starting October 4!
Southern Nights BBQ Buffet 4pm—9pm $9.99*
Our newest buffet features: smoked beef brisket, baby back
ribs, bacon-wrapped BBQ pork fillets, steamed crawfish,
St. Louis ribs, ranch-style baked beans and warm red skin
potato salad. Plus, pulled pork, shredded BBQ beef, cajun
fried whole catfish and smoked turkey drumsticks. Get your
choice of three specialty BBQ sauces, including our signature spicy sauce, too.
Music? We’ve got the Edje! We bring you the Quad Cities’ finest live entertain-
ment. Showtimes are 8pm-12am Fri. & Sat. Never a cover—always FREE!
October 1 & 2 Gray Wolf Band October 8 & 9 Dani Lynn Howe Band
October 15 & 16 Pappa-Razzi October 22 & 23 Brushfire Band
It’s truly
Style at Jumer’s!
Looking for
V
eg
a
s
www.jumerscasinohotel.com
309-756-4600 • 800-477-7747 • Open 7am-5am daily
If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services
can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537). *With IMAGE Players Club
Card—$14.99 without card.
A
LW
AYS SMOKE-FREE!
Visit Us On Facebook
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
5
joked last week that his caucus rarely asks
whether respondents approve of the General
Assembly’s job performance. Te results
were just too depressing.
A solid Democratic source who has seen
two complete House Democratic polls of
collar-county districts says one showed a 14-
percent legislative approval rating; the other
came up as 12.
“Te scary part,” the Democratic source
said, “is if they blame all these losses on
this wave, that means they think they
haven’t done anything wrong to cause this.”
Instead, the source argued, his party needs
to come to terms
with the fact that
they’re exacerbating
the national
party problem
with their own
mismanagement.
“Illinois has created
its own wave,” he
insisted.
A top state
Republican (who
monitors just about
every GOP poll
taken in this state) privately predicted last
week that the wave could very well be bigger
than 1994’s. He has a point.
Te populist anger seems more vicious
and is far more organized via the Tea Party
and the Internet. Te 24/7 news media is
more uniformly outraged and is aiming its
anger right at Democratic leaders. Reform
groups of all shapes, sizes, and causes are far
more bitter because of their legislative losses.
Downstate independents have completely
abandoned Governor Pat Quinn. Te usually
pro-Democratic network of human-service
groups and their supporters are despondent
over budget cuts and late state payments.
And the state’s economic problems under
total Democratic control are infnitely more
severe than they were 16 years ago, when the
Republicans held the governor’s mansion
and all but one statewide ofce. Te state’s
current unemployment rate is almost double
what it was in 1994, and vast swaths of the
Democratic base are the hardest hit. And
then, of course, there’s that monstrous state
defcit, the mismanagement, and the whole
Blagojevich disaster.
Any Democrats who aren’t ahead by
double digits right now had better work
like their very lives depended on it. And all
Republicans who are losing by anywhere
near that margin should do the same. Tis
has been the most fascinating state campaign
season I’ve ever seen. And it’s only going to
get better.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and TeCapitolFaxBlog.com.
by Rich Miller
l
f you talk to state legislative Democrats,
they’ll tell you that their latest round
of polling is showing improvement in
most of their races since the summer. Te
Republicans, however, believe they have
history on their side.
Te House Democrats say their
candidates are sticking to a strict and intense
precinct-walking program. Tat, plus the
end of the Rod Blagojevich trial, allowed
them to stabilize their campaigns. Tey see
polls showing their candidates doing better
than they were and believe they’ve turned
the corner.
Te Democrats
have a lot of things
going for them that
they didn’t have
during the big 1994
national Republican
landslide. It’s their
map, there’s no
more straight-party
voting, they have
a tried and true
incumbent-protection
program, and
their gubernatorial
candidate isn’t doing as badly as their ’94
candidate (although he’s getting completely
and totally blown out Downstate). Tey
have at least two statewide ofcials (Lisa
Madigan and Jesse White) who will serve
as “stoppers” for the party. Te Democrats
also have a president from this state who has
managed to keep Illinois in his corner more
than just about anywhere else.
But the House Republicans point to recent
history as a guide. Two years ago right
about now, they thought they were doing
okay against the Barack Obama Democratic
tide. Tey believed their losses would be
manageable. By mid-October, the Obama
wave was in full force, and there wasn’t
anything they could do about it.
Pretty much the same thing happened in
1994. September polling showed problems,
but the Democrats thought it could be
contained, and they derided the House
Republicans for jumping into several new
races where nobody gave them a chance. By
the middle of October, the bottom fell out.
And it was even worse come election day
when Democratic voters failed to show up.
Te Republicans won just about every one of
those contested races.
It’s no coincidence that the House
Republicans say they’re planning a move
into new races in the coming days. Tey’re
following their own playbook.
Te Senate Democrats say they
continually adjust and monitor their likely-
voter polling screens to make sure they’re
not unduly surprised. And, so far, they like
what they see. But one Democratic operative
7rust History 0ver PoIIing
in 7his Year’s Races
A top state Republican
privately predicted last
week that the wave could
very well be bigger than
1994’s.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
6
horrifed to learn his eggs may have made
people sick and has prayed several times a
day for improved health for those afected.
“Over the years we have grown to be
pretty big in producing eggs,” DeCoster
said. “Unfortunately we got big quite a while
before we stopped acting like we were small.
What I mean by that is we were big before
we started adopting sophisticated procedures
to be sure we met all of the government
requirements.”
DeCoster has been identifed as a “habitual
violator” of environmental regulations by the
state of Iowa and has been assessed $219,000
in civil fnes. But DeCoster said for about
10 years now, the company has focused on
meeting government requirements, including
when it comes to fghting salmonella.
“With all of these systems, we have made
important strides, and I am proud of our
work,” DeCoster said. “Still, these challenges
never stop.”
Peter DeCoster, the CEO of Wright
County Egg and Jack DeCoster’s son, blamed
the conditions at the company’s hen houses
on inclement weather in Iowa over the past
year. He said the local co-op had gotten
behind on removing manure from buildings,
and he believes the salmonella outbreak was
due to meat and bone-meal ingredients in
feed given to the hens.
Te younger DeCoster also said
salmonella is a fact of life in the egg industry,
and noted that’s why egg cartons carry safe-
food-handling instructions.
“As an Iowan, I’m ofended by the
claim from some in the egg industry that
consumers are somehow responsible for
getting sick because they didn’t properly
cook their eggs,” said U.S. Representative
Bruce Braley (D-Waterloo). “Now is the time
for accountability, not blame-shifing.”
U.S. Reprsentative Henry Waxman (D-
California), chair of the House Committee
on Energy & Commerce, said he’s skeptical
that feed was the problem and noted that the
DeCosters have had problems for more than
30 years.
“You’ve claimed that you’re going to
modernize and clean up your facility, but it
doesn’t appear that you’ve modernized and
cleaned up your facilities,” Waxman said.
“It sounds like to me that both of you are
refusing to take responsibility for a very poor
facility.”
For an expanded version of this article, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
Tis weekly summary comes from
IowaPolitics.com, an online government
and politics news service. Reporter Andrew
Dufelmeyer and other correspondents
contributed to this report.
by Lynn Campbell, IowaPolitics.com
l
owa Democrats are targeting those
who don’t normally vote in midterm
elections along with frst-time voters
who supported Barack Obama in 2008
in the push for early voting, which began
September 23 in Iowa and lasts for 40 days.
“Tomorrow is Election Day in Iowa,”
Iowa Democratic Party Chair Sue Dvorsky
declared on September 22. “Iowans will be
able to vote early; they’ll be able to vote by
mail; they’ll be able to vote early in person
at their auditor’s ofces. We have been
preparing for Election Day tomorrow since
last year, and we are very excited to get
ready to kick it of.”
As of Friday, Iowa Democrats had
requested more than twice as many
absentee ballots as Republicans – 40,632
compared with 16,286 – according to the
Iowa secretary of state’s ofce. Tere have
been a total of 69,376 requests for absentee
ballots.
Dvorsky said Democrats also have
a 55,000-voter registration edge over
Republicans.
“But we also know that it is the
independents ... who will swing this
election, and so that is who we have been
targeting,” she said. “We know that our
Democratic base will come out and vote.
... So we have really made sure that we
have contacted those voters who typically
may not be as willing or ready to vote in a
midterm election.”
Meanwhile, the Republican Party
of Iowa on Tursday launched its own
statewide efort to encourage Iowans to take
advantage of early-voting opportunities.
“Iowans don’t have to wait until
November to change the direction of this
state and this country,” said Republican
Party of Iowa Chair Matt Strawn. “It’s
time to return principled, conservative
leadership to the state of Iowa, and that
starts today with electing Republican
candidates. We have 40 days to bring
competent leadership back to Iowa.”
Strawn said traditional absentee voting
is but one part of the GOP’s voter-contact
program.
“For the frst time, Iowa Republicans
have worked with all 99 counties to develop
early-voting locations all across Iowa as
the next 40 days will be a series of election
days,” he said.
DeCosters Testify About
Salmonella, Egg Recall at
Congressional Hearing
Austin “Jack” DeCoster, the owner of
Wright County Egg, on September 22 told
members of the U.S. House Oversight &
Investigations subcommittee that he was
$tate Kicks 0h
40 0ays of Voting
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
7
How the Political Establishment Restricts Voter Choice
0uardians of the CastIe
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
0
n the general-election ballot in Illinois,
voters will be able to choose from four
candidates for U.S. Senate: a Republican,
a Democrat, a Green, and a Libertarian.
Tat might seem like sufcient choice – and it
certainly covers a wide political spectrum – but
consider that seven candidates were removed by
the Illinois State Board of Elections.
Tat’s because Illinois has put so many
barriers between people who want to run
for ofce and the ballot. Established parties
– Republicans, Democrats, and Greens presently
– need to collect 5,000 valid signatures for
their statewide slates. Independent statewide
candidates and other parties need to collect fve
times as many valid signatures: 25,000.
Beyond that, the petitions of third parties and
independent candidates are ofen challenged
by people working on behalf of Democratic or
Republican organizations. Tis year, Republicans
have been most active in the ballot-access
wars, perceiving a threat from several limited-
government parties.
Tese challenges have several efects. First,
they make the efective signature threshold
much higher. “Te challenge process efectively
turns the 25,000 requirement into a 50,000
requirement to account for potential[ly]
invalid signatures,” wrote Steve Hellin, the
communications director for Illinois’ Libertarian
Party, in an e-mail.
Second, the fnancial, human, and time
resources required to fght a challenge are
signifcant and come at the expense of traditional
campaign activities such as fundraising,
advertising, and connecting with voters one-
on-one. “Attention is put to the mechanics of
existence, which may or may not be especially
relevant in actually getting someone elected,”
wrote Phil Huckleberry, chair of the Illinois
Green Party. “It’s an absurd approach to
democracy.”
A Question of Choice
Tis might seem like a trivial issue, fghting
for the right to third place in a winner-takes-all
system. But what’s really at stake is voters’ rights
– the electoral equivalent of having 11 cereal
choices at the grocery store instead of just four.
As attorney Doug Ibendahl wrote in a
court fling asking for judicial review of the
Constitution Party’s nominating petition: “It can
be said with confdence that the right to vote,
on the one hand, and the right to seek ofce,
on the other, are among the most cherished in
this land. Illinois courts have also observed in a
variety of contexts that there is a dual import to
ballot access. In McGuire V. Nogaj ... the court
observed: ‘Te right of a party or an individual
to a place on a ballot is entitled to protection
and is intertwined with the rights of the voters.’
... Te McGuire court further noted that this
state has a policy in ‘favor of a candidate’s
eligibility’ ... , and the Illinois Supreme Court has
observed that the right of access to the ballot is a
substantial one that may not lightly be denied.”
Put simply, a key right of voters is choice
on the ballot, one that is severely curtailed by
Illinois’ current ballot-access system.
As Michael White, the Constitution Party’s
gubernatorial candidate who is now running
as a write-in, said in an e-mail: “While voters
are aforded the opportunity to vote, the ballot-
access process limits a voter’s ability to choose
among any candidate. Tis is the same as saying
you have the right to vote, but someone else is
deciding among whom you may choose.”
Christina M. Tobin, the founder and chair
of the nonpartisan Free & Equal Elections
Foundation (FreeAndEqual.org), said in an
interview last week that Illinois is “one of the
most restrictive ballot-access states in the United
States. ... Having to get 25,000 signatures alone is
not an easy thing to do. It can be quite costly.”
Free & Equal doesn’t include Illinois’ among
its fve “worst state ballot-access laws in
America.” Tat list includes Oklahoma (more
than 73,000 signatures required for statewide
ofce in 2010), North Carolina (85,000), and
Texas (43,000).
But that doesn’t change the fact that Illinois’
system is onerous for third parties.
Consider Iowa as a contrast. To participate in
the primary for one of Iowa’s established political
parties for governor or U.S. Senate, one must
gather 0.5 percent of the vote total for the party’s
last top-of-the-ticket candidate – either governor
or president. For 2010, a Republican had to
gather 3,412 signatures, a Democrat 4,145. For
other statewide ofces, the requirement is 1,000
signatures.
Te requirement for being nominated by
petition for any statewide ofce: 1,500 signatures.
Iowa’s system is fundamentally fairer than
Illinois’ in two ways. First, the threshold for
established parties compared to independent
candidates is actually higher for governor and
U.S. Senate, and similar for other statewide
ofces. Second, even adjusting for the fact that
Illinois has almost four times as many registered
voters as Iowa, the number of signatures
required for an independent candidacy is more
easily attainable in Iowa.
The Constitution Party Case
You can see Illinois’ ballot-access system at
work with the Constitution Party.
According to Ibendahl’s petition for judicial
review, the Constitution Party on June 28
submitted 32,899 signatures for its slate of
seven statewide candidates. Afer a records
examination, the State Board of Elections on
August 3 determined that 25,017 signatures were
valid – enough to qualify for the ballot.
But that wasn’t the end of it. “Te Illinois
Republican Party is so desperate to keep these
candidates of the ballot ... [that] they threw the
kitchen sink at these guys,” Ibendahl said in an
interview last week. “Tey threw so much mud
at the wall just hoping something would stick.”
Ultimately, the Illinois State Board of
Elections ruled on August 27 that the
Constitution Party had submitted 22,043 valid
signatures. Te board concluded, based on the
testimony of a handwriting analyst paid by
an attorney for the objectors, that there was a
“pattern of fraud” with roughly 3,000 signatures,
even though only 444 signatures were examined.
“Te code specifcally says, and all the court
cases say, that the burden of proof is on the
objector,” Ibendahl said. “Legally, that’s true, but
these proceedings turn into a mad scramble for
the candidates to prove their innocence.”
On Friday, a Cook County Circuit Court
judge threw out the “pattern of fraud” claim,
giving the Constitution Party a valid-signature
total of 24,920. Tat could end up being a mere
moral victory; without an additional signature
restoration, the Constitution Party won’t appear
on the general-election ballot.
Ibendahl is still pursuing the case in court, but
the reality is that a three-month administrative
and court process has made it difcult for the
Constitution Party’s candidates to efectively
campaign or raise money.
Tat’s also true for those who manage to get
on the ballot.
Lex Green, the Libertarian candidate for
governor, wrote in response to an e-mail
questionnaire that even though his party
survived a challenge to its petition signatures,
“our party sufered in terms of press coverage
and campaign donations because of the
uncertainty of our ballot standing. We then
entered the race with fewer resources, and now
have to catch up on name recognition.”
Te Green Party’s Huckleberry gave the
example of his campaign for state representative:
“I submitted 2,550 signatures, collected
within 90 days. My volunteer team was very
inexperienced and have [sic] never experienced
anything like that before. Tey were totally
burnt out. Instead of surging in activity and
enthusiasm in October, my volunteer base
peaked in June, when I basically overextended
them.
“On a larger scale, this is also what happened
to the Green Party in 2006. We poured so much
time and energy into the petition process,
and then the petition-defense process, that
it completely distracted us from much of the
other work we should have been doing, notably
building up a fundraising base.”
Even so, gubernatorial candidate Rich
Whitney garnered more than 10 percent of the
vote that year, making the Greens an established
party and setting a signature threshold of 5,000
for this year’s slate of candidates. (Whitney is
running again for governor.)
What’s galling to Ibendahl is that Democrats
and Republicans limit ballot access through
challenges but don’t put the names of party
Continued On Page 18
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
8
l
n a genre that stresses
heaviness, rifs, chops,
and menace above all
else, Georgia-based Kylesa is
something of a rarity.
Te fve-piece psychedelic-
metal band is most notable for
its strong sense of melody and
dynamics within undeniable
heaviness, and that’s partly a
function of having three vocalists
(including a woman!) and two
drummers. But Kylesa is greater
than the sum of those parts,
commanding a wider range
of feelings and textures than
most metal bands even attempt,
let alone pull of. Tey caress
listeners while still bludgeoning
them, ofen at the same time and
rarely straining.
Playing RIBCO on October
8 as part of the Sanctioned
Annihilation Tour with High
on Fire and Torche, Kylesa is
poised to release the majestic,
thunderous Spiral Shadow on
October 26, and it might be my
favorite metal album in years.
One early review of the
album referenced Sonic Youth,
Hüsker Dü, and the Pixies, and
guitarist, vocalist, songwriter,
and producer Phillip Cope
acknowledged those infuences
in a phone interview last week,
expressing surprise that people
hadn’t noticed them much
before.
What’s important to understand, though,
is how buried those touchstones are: What
Kylesa borrows from those seminal bands
from the 1980s is an inclination rather than
an aesthetic or genre – a melding of noise
with that which the ear fnds naturally
pleasing. “It’s okay to put something in there
that’s undeniably catchy,” Cope said.
Te most direct connection to those
alt-rock luminaries is the hook of “Don’t
Look Back,” a thick, dirty child of the Pixies’
“Debaser.” Nothing else on Spiral Shadow is
as direct or instantly accessible, but within
every song are easy entry points, even for
people who generally fnd metal tiresome.
“Dynamics is defnitely something
we were going for,” he said. Te aim was
“hopefully a more interesting listen.
Something that has more valleys and peaks
to it. ... When you hear it, there’s something
there that catches your attention and keeps
you listening, and there’s also something
about it that makes you listen to it again.
And when you do, you notice things that
maybe you didn’t notice the frst time
around.”
Tat’s a normal recipe for good music,
but Kylesa pulls it of without sacrifcing
ferocity. Part of the credit must go to Cope
the producer, who said he was trying to get
“more of a three-dimensional sound” this
time around. Tat was something the band
accomplished with its dual drummers on
2009’s Static Tensions, but he said he wanted
to expand it to the entirety of the sound.
It helps that the songwriting is excellent
– concise (nine of 11 tracks
come in under four minutes)
and varied. Spiral Shadow is
experimental on a sonic level
without being “experimental” in
the sense of eight-minute epics
loaded with empty rifage.
Tat’s likely a function of
maturity. Te choice to use two
drummers (starting with 2006’s
Time Will Fuse Its Worth) was,
Cope admits, part of a metal
arms race. “As simpleminded as
this is, it was just to be heavier,”
he said, because Kylesa had
maxed out the number of amps
it could reasonably haul around.
But it quickly became apparent
that “we had to think a lot
broader than just that.”
And they have. Te intricate
yet pummeling percussion of
Spiral Shadow is a testament to
Cope’s production skills, in the
sense that it’s apparent there are
two drummers if you know it,
but they’re of-a-piece with the
songs, never there for show. “It’s
still very open with possibilities,”
he said of what the band can
accomplish with two drummers.
Cope had produced some
local bands in Georgia, but,
until Time Will Fuse Its Worth,
he lef Kylesa’s production to
outsiders, not wanting to be
seen as a control freak in what
had always been (and remains)
a democratic band. “Afer some pretty bad
experiences in the studio working with other
people, it became pretty obvious that maybe
it was time for me to step up,” he said. “I’m
going to know better what works for this
band than an outside person.”
Kylesa will perform on Friday, October 8, as
part of the Sanctioned Annihilation Tour, also
featuring High on Fire and Torche. Advance
tickets are $20 and available from RIBCO.
com. Te show starts at 9 p.m.
For an interview with High on Fire’s Matt
Pike, visit RCReader.com/y/fre.
For more information on Kylesa, visit Kylesa.
com.
Ferocious $ensitivity
Kylesa, October 8 at RIBCO
VoI. 17, No. 762
$ep. 30 - 0ct. 13, 2010
532 W. 3rd St.
Davenport IA 52801
RiverCitiesReader.com
(563)324-0049 (phone)
(563)323-3101 (fax)
Publishing since 1993
The River Cities’ Reader is an independent newspaper
published every other Thursday, and available free
throughout the Quad Cities and surrounding areas.
© 2010 River Cities’ Reader
DEADLINES
• To purchase a display ad,
(sales@rcreader.com): 5 p.m. Wednesday
• To purchase a classifed ad,
(classifeds@rcreader.com): 10 a.m. Monday
PUBLISHER
Todd McGreevy
EDITOR
Kathleen McCarthy
EDITORIAL
Managing Editor: Jef Ignatius • jef@rcreader.com
Arts Editor, Calendar Editor: Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Contributing Writers: Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Lynn Campbell,
Michelle Garrison, Luke Hamilton, Rich Miller, Thom White
ADVERTISING
Account Executive:
Chris Walljasper • chris@rcreader.com
Advertising Coordinator: Nathan Klaus
Advertising rates, publishing schedule, demographics,
and more are available at
QCAdvertising.com
PRODUCTION
Art Director, Production Manager: Shawn Eldridge •
shawn@rcreader.com
Graphic Artist - Nathan Klaus
ADMINISTRATION
Business Manager: Kathleen McCarthy
Ofce Administrator, Classifeds Manager, Circulation Manager:
Rick Martin • rick@rcreader.com
Distribution: William Cook, Cheri DeLay, Greg FitzPatrick, Tyler
Gibson, Daniel Levsen, J.K. Martin, Jay Strickland
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
Photo by Geof L. Johnson
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
9
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
10
C
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
Y RCR 10.10.pdf 1 9/27/2010 8:02:36 AM
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
11
F
riday, September 24, 11:30-ish: I attend a
morning screening of You Again, and pretty
much know what I’m in for as soon as the
Touchstone Pictures logo appears: a brightly lit,
jauntily scored, aggressively manic entertainment
with plenty of “heart” and no laughs whatsoever.
(I half-expect a Tim Allen cameo, but instead
get a Dwayne Johnson
cameo, which probably
should’ve been more
expected.)
It turns out I’m wrong.
Tere actually are a
few laughs, courtesy
of Sigourney Weaver,
doing a witty rif on her
Working Girl monster,
and Kyle Bornheimer,
delivering a rehearsal-
dinner toast that’s
simultaneously poignant, pathetic, scary, and
hysterical. Te rest of director Andy Fickman’s
comedy of warring (former) high-school rivals
is a broad farce lacking in energy and invention;
the slapstick ranges from tired to embarrassing;
and most of the performers – including Kristin
Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis, Victor Garber, Kristin
Chenoweth, and Betty White (who should really
give it a rest already) – simply go through the
motions. I am, however, caught of-guard by the
scene that fnds Weaver and Curtis waging war
in a swimming pool. With the stars of Aliens
and True Lies submerged in water, and Weaver
previously described as looking “computer-
generated,” were You Again’s flmmakers not-so-
subtly sucking up to James Cameron?
1:15-ish: I’m not seeing it in 3D (aw, crap!),
but it’s time for the animated adventure Legend
of the Guardians: Te Owls of Ga’Hoole. I’d write
more about the experience, but the title has eaten
up much of my word count. Jesus, this movie is
weird. I’d read the flm described as “Happy Feet
meets Lord of the Rings,” but it’s more “Happy
Feet meets 300,” which shouldn’t be surprising
considering its director is Zack Snyder. You might
not think the swords-and-sandals auteur would
fnd much opportunity for clanging metal and
stylized, slow-motion, CGI violence in a “family-
friendly” tale of feisty owls battling for avian
domination. Yet that’s exactly what’s in store; given
the portentous dialogue, blaring soundtrack,
and almost unremitting grimness, Ga’Hoole is
like a cartoon 300 without Gerard Butler and
homoeroticism. Tere are a few arresting images,
and the animation is extraordinary, but my brain
turns to mush upon hearing silly yet humorless
bromides (“Follow your gizzard”) spouted by
winged characters named Ezylryb and Otulissa
and Kludd, and I only manage to stay alert by
playing Guess Tat Celebrity Voice. Geofrey
Rush, Sam Neill, and Helen Mirren? No problem.
Jim Sturgess, Hugo Weaving, and True Blood’s
Ryan Kwanten? Who knew?
2:45-ish: Its trailer was awful, but I’m still
curious to see Te Virginity Hit, in which
writers/directors Huck Botko and Andrew
Gurland fashion a raunchy teen sex farce
exclusively through (staged) documentary-style
footage. Hey, if it worked for Te Blair Witch
Project and Te Last Exorcism, it might work for
this ultra-low-budget
outing, right? Wrong.
You may not realize how
much flmmaking savvy
– or even competence
– is required in an
American Pie-esque lark
until you sit through
one without it; barring a
few clever interjections
by the debuting Zack
Pearlman (reminiscent of
a schlubbier Jonah Hill),
Te Virginity Hit is terribly lit and composed,
which was to be expected, and terribly written
and timed, which wasn’t. (Among the producers
are Will Ferrell and Adam McKay, founders of the
comedy Web site Funny Or Die. Tis flm Dies.)
I credit Botko and Gurland for trying something
new with an over-familiar genre, but the movie is
no more impressive for being sort-of-novel, and
gets docked extra points for making viewers – at
least this viewer – as shallowly beauty-conscious
as its leads. Te movie’s girls are cute, but the
guys made me long for the rugged Hollywood
handsomeness of Seth Rogen, Martin Starr, and
Jay Baruchel. Yeah, I know.
5-ish: Afer a quick bite, I’m catching Wall
Street: Money Never Sleeps. And I don’t know if
the sandwich and momentary escape from the
cineplex helped, but I fnd Oliver Stone’s sequel
smart, gripping, and a really great time – which
is pretty unanticipated, considering how little
of it I actually understood. But if you, too, fnd
your eyes routinely glazing over during lengthy
discussions about fnance, know that this tale
of corporate chicanery in post-Gordon Gekko
America is blessedly easy to follow (Shia LaBeouf
= Good Guy, Josh Brolin = Bad Guy, Michael
Douglas = Good Bad Guy) and directed by Stone
with thoughtfulness, speed, and exquisite visual
panache. Like too many women in Stone flms,
the lovely, eternally teary-eyed Carey Mulligan
is a serious drain on the fun, but there are
sensational supporting turns by Frank Langella
and Eli Wallach, and Douglas’ confdence and
élan in his iconic role is truly something to see;
although his Gekko is less of a bastard than he
was 23 years ago, Douglas’ obvious sense of
actorly joy is as ripe as ever. In the end, Money
Never Sleeps is a talky movie that plays like a
thriller, and it’s a total kick.
7:30-ish. I arrive home, grateful that I’m done
with movies for the day ... and fnd my Netfix
rental of Michael Douglas’ Solitary Man sitting in
my mailbox. I’m seriously tempted.
Ll$7£N 70 MlK£ £V£RY FRl0AY A7 9AM 0N R0CK 104·9 FM Wl7H 0AV£ & 0ARR£N
ßIah, ßIah, ßIah ... and $urprisingIy
Fun: Notes on a 0uadrupIe Feature
Movi e Revi ews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movi e Revi ews
Michael Douglas and Shia LaBeouf in
Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
YGUNN
cb/jb/jb
4.86 x 5.44”
ATT001850B 9/22/2010
Customer Service
ATTRPA006 3
RIVER CITIES READER
Customer Service
Representative
Diversity is the AT&T way of standing apart. Equal Opportunity Employer.
© 2010 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T
and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.
Goodbye
ordinary jobs.
Hello cutting
edge.
Simply put, AT&T delivers the industry’s hottest products and services. We need customer-
focused people like you to work closely with customers to answer questions and connect
them to the latest technology. Say hello to amazing training, great benefits, and a real career
on the cutting edge.
DAVENPORT CALL CENTER – OPEN HOUSE
5348 Elmore Circle Drive • Davenport, IA 52807
Saturday, October 2, 2010 • 12PM - 3PM
Please bring Resume and Photo ID!
Connect today at www.at.jobs/QuadCities
Come dressed to impress & express
Visit midwestwritingcenter.org or
call 563.324.1410 to join this party of misfits!
Ad Sponsor: Riverboat Development Authority
$35 / person
$30 / 2 or more
Performances by
the Barley House Band,
Burlesque Le’ Moustache &
other acts of wonder!
Oct. 16, 7-10 p.m. - Putnam Museum

R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
12
Multiplayer has been an essential strength
of the Halo series, and Reach expands the
options. Cooperative play can be done
with friends in the main story, or by
banding together to fght waves of enemies
in Firefght mode. Competitive player-
versus-player games bring back Slayer
death matches in
individual or team-
based play, along
with objective team
games such as
Capture the Flag. On
top of these modes,
variant play styles
are introduced with
special rules such as
“sniper rifes only.”
Te super-serious
competitive players
have a new haven
in Arena, ranked
matches that can be
played either solo
or in teams, with
worldwide rankings
and champions
crowned monthly
– the ultimate in
Halo bragging rights.
With all that and
the ability to create your own multiplayer
maps, you’ve got tons of content to keep you
hooked.
Watching the game in action, you can
see how much extra efort has been put into
Reach. Character and background-texturing
details are improved over Halo 3’s, with
more realism added to this futuristic world.
Weapons no longer look like they belong in
a toy box; humans don’t have mushy faces;
and staring into the distance shows you a
living, moving world under siege. Add in
voice acting and music that deliver a sense of
foreboding and desperation, and you could
almost reach out and touch Reach.
Te Halo franchise has run its course, and
it’s been one hell of a ride. Reach delivers an
experience that will be remembered for its
narrative and played for years to come with
its diverse multiplayer. If you’re on the fence
about it, trust me: Tis is Halo at its fnest.
Halo: Reach is now available for Xbox 360
in a Standard Edition for $59.99, a Limited
Edition for $79.99, and a Legendary Edition
for $149.99, each with varying content
for collectors. For this review, the author
completed the story on Legendary difculty,
repeated levels on Normal difculty, played
the Firefght mode, and played several online
multiplayer modes.
Luke Hamilton is a buyer, creative designer,
and online coordinator for Video Games Etc.
H
alo might be the most important
franchise for the Xbox. Te 2001
original defned console frst-person
shooters with its groundbreaking precision
controls, keeping Xbox system sales alive
during its early years and setting the standard
for nearly every modern shooter to date.
What the truly
hardcore fans
realize, though, is
that the original
game’s popularity
skyrocketed with
prequel novels that
dug deeper into the
tale of humanity’s
desperate battle for
survival against the
aliens known as Te
Covenant. Te key
book in all of this
was 2001’s Halo: Te
Fall of Reach. Tat
novel comes to life
in the fnal game in
the franchise, Halo:
Reach, and developer
Bungie has crafed
one of the best stories
in video games today
while adding even
more to its trademark multiplayer in what is
truly the defning version of Halo.
Te Covenant has invaded Planet Reach,
and Earth will be next unless the Spartan
soldiers of Noble Team can stop them. Right
from the start we know that Reach is a lost
cause, that Te Covenant will win the battle
and therefore set up the story of the original
Halo game. But the more I played, the more
drawn I felt to continue the fght. Tere’s a
compelling drama at work with a sci-f twist
behind it; the combination of watching allied
bases being overtaken by the enemy, rushing
to save civilians as enemy forces invade, and
being witness to the sacrifces of Noble Team
creates a gripping narrative that you want to
see through to the bitter end. Reach might
have been destined to fall, but I made sure
to put as many Covenant in the ground as I
could.
Gameplay remains largely unchanged
from prior games, but that’s a very good
thing. Moving and shooting are just as tight
and responsive as Reach’s predecessors. New
additions include interchangeable armor to
enhance your combat capabilities, such as a
hologram to distract enemies and a jetpack
to reach new heights.
Enemy AI is greatly improved on the
higher difculties, with almost no discernible
patterns. It would’ve been nice to see this
balanced with better ally AI, but more ofen
than not your game-controlled friends
become bugs fying into the zapper.
A 0reat $tart for a FinaIe
by Luke Hamilton
ssj_4luke@hotmail.com
Halo: Reach, for Xbox 360
888-9-PAY-FINE PayTheFineIowa.gov
NOW’S THE TIME
TO PAY THE FINE.
Program expires November 30, 2010.
More than four years late paying
an Iowa fne or court fee? You could
pay only half of what you owe.
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
13
Be ACTIVE in your fight against Acne
*Higher concentration of Benzoyl Peroxide
Get the Acne Kit that’s
STRONGER than the
one on TV!
*
1800 E 54th Street, Suite B
Davenport, IA (563) 344-7546
SoderstromSkinInstitute.com
We are a participating provider in most insurance plans.
Your Partner In Acne Care For 35 Years
Most Appointments In About A Week - Call (563) 344-7546 Today!
Medical professionals will
develop a special treatment
plan for you.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
14
Music
Clutch
Rock Island Brewing Company
Monday, October 4, 8 p.m.
D
escribed by PlugInMusic.com as
delivering “the kind of straight-
ahead, honest groove that no other band
really comes close to pulling of,” the
rockers of Clutch will make a special area
appearance on October 4, in a concert at
the Rock Island Brewing Company.
Te Maryland-based ensemble – composed of lead vocalist Neil
Fallon, guitarist Tim Sult, bassist Dan Maines, and drummer Jean-
Paul Gaster – has rocked crowds as one of the nation’s foremost jam
bands since 1991, currently sharing its powerhouse blend of heavy
metal, punk, and hard rock in upward of 100 tour sites per year. And
with Clutch’s ninth studio album, last year’s Strange Cousins from the
West, the band proved that it still possesses the power to thrill fans
and critics alike, with Ultimate-Guitar.com raving about the group
“pounding out track afer track of catchy blues-rock rifage, and
Neil’s powerful vocals rounding out to an almost perfect sound.”
Consider yourself a major Clutch fan? Try matching the band’s
eight previous studio CDs in the order they were released. Do so
correctly and win a prize!
Clutch plays RIBCO with special guests 2Cents, and more
information on the night is available by calling (309)793-4060 or
visiting RIBCO.com.
Music
From the Top
Adler Theatre
Tuesday, October 12, 8 p.m.
D
avenport’s Adler Teatre, in conjunction
with Orchestra Iowa and the Quad City
Symphony Orchestra, will host a
special event on October 12: the
recording of a live performance for
National Public Radio’s popular
series From the Top. I will attempt
to make it through this piece
without letting my seething envy
get in the way.
Showcasing some of America’s
most promising musicians, and
reaching more than 700,000
listeners per week, From the Top is one of radio’s
premier classical-music programs. Over the
past decade, the show has taped more than 200
broadcasts in concert halls nationwide, and has
been described by the San Francisco Chronicle as
“contemporary culture’s feel-good success story.”
Yet what sets From the Top apart from
other programs of its type is the makeup of its
performers, all of whom are, incredibly, between
the ages of eight and 18.
During the Tuesday-night taping, you’ll be
witness to the talents of Iowa City also saxophonist
Justin Moser, age 17; Chicago-based percussion
duo Marcelina Suchocka and John Ringor, who
are 17 and 16, respectively; Ohio violinist Michael
Ferri, age 15; a Music Institute of
Chicago string quartet composed of
Sophia Cho and Zachary Spontak
(both 18) and Leah Ferguson
and Ben Fried (both 17); and
fnally, pianist Sherry Tang, who
will perform Felix Mendelssohn’s
“Andante & Rondo Capriccioso,
Op. 14,” and who makes her Adler
Teatre debut at the ripe old age of
12.
Twelve. 12! At 12, I couldn’t
freakin’ pronounce Mendelssohn, let alone
“Andante & Rondo Capruccioso”!!!
Sorry. I’m fne. Have fun at the Adler, kids.
Tickets to the From the Top taping are $15 and
$25, and can be reserved by calling (800)745-3000
or visiting AdlerTeatre.com.
What’s Happenin’
Theatre
The Shape of Things
Richmond Hill Barn Theatre
Thursday, October 7, through Sunday, October 17
“H
i. My name’s
Evelyn. What’s
yours?”
“Oh, um, it’s uh ... it’s
Adam.”
“Nice to meet you,
Adam.”
“Yeah, um ... you, too.”
“Listen. I’ve been watching you, and I think
you’re very attractive, and I thought maybe
you’d like to come with me tonight to see the
Richmond Hill Barn Teatre’s new production
of Te Shape of Tings.”
“What? Well, um ... .”
“Don’t mumble.”
“Okay.”
“It’s an acclaimed dark comedy by Tony
Award nominee Neil LaBute, and it features a
fantastic acting quartet in Matt Mercer, Maggie
Woolley, Adam Overberg, and Cara DeMarlie.”
“Tat’s great, but, um ... I actually had plans
with friends tonight ... .”
“You don’t want to hang with them.”
“Oh. Um ... . No, I guess I don’t.”
“Richmond Hill’s production is being directed
by popular area actor Chris White – sit up
straight, Adam – and PegasusNews.com called
the play ‘madly entertaining,’ while CurtainUp.
com labeled it ‘a must-see.’ So let’s go.”
“Um ... . All right. But why do you want to go
with me? I mean, you’re so beautiful, and I’m ...
I’m ... .”
“You’re wonderful. And if you lost a few
pounds and maybe got that nose taken care of,
you’d be perfect.”
“Wow. Um ... . Okay! I’m on board! So what’s
the play about?”
“A woman meets a guy and convinces him
to change everything about himself, and
the results turn out to be both hilarious and
disastrous.”
“Heh heh. Who’d ever believe that could
happen?”
“You’re not going to wear that shirt, are you?”
“I’ll go home and change.”
Te Richmond Hill Barn Teatre’s Te Shape
of Tings runs October 7 through 17 – with
performances at 7:30 p.m. Tursdays through
Saturdays and 4 p.m. on Sundays – and tickets
are available by calling (309)944-2244 or visiting
RHPlayers.com.
Exhibit
Microbes: Invisible Invaders, Amazing Allies
Putnam Museum & IMAX Theatre
Saturday, October 2, through Sunday, January 30
A
ccording to the Putnam Museum & IMAX Teatre’s Web site,
the venue’s new exhibit ofers an exploration of that “which
sustains all life on earth while holding the deadly potential to wipe
out millions.” Much like my What’s Happenin’ jokes.
But what the Putnam is actually referring to is the astonishing
world of microbes, which will be in full, interactive display in the
traveling exhibit Microbes: Invisible Invaders, Amazing Allies. From
October 2 through January 30, this 3,000-square-foot exhibition
will examine what microbes are, what
they look like, the history of disease, and
how scientifc research is helping fnd
cures to save lives, bringing an unseen
world into vibrant view through displays,
short flms, and hands-on activities.
And if your kids bristle at the thought
of an experience that might be, you know,
educational, I’ve got two words for you
to share with them: video games. Within
such exhibit sections as Paris Crypt, Egyptian Tomb, and the
Microbial Superhighway, children are invited to play a number
of video and virtual-reality games that will both educate and
entertain.
“Virtual Invaders” gives participants the chance to wipe out
incoming viruses with white blood cells.
“Antiobiotic Artillery” fnds players
fring rounds of antibiotic ammunition
at infectious bacteria. “Race a Bug” pits
two computer microbes in a winding
race through simulated arteries in 3D
animation. And “Gobble De Goop” lets
kids use joysticks to guide microbes
as they gobble up an oil spill. So if the
Putnam’s Microbes exhibit doesn’t inspire
your children to pursue a career in science, they might instead be
compelled to seek employment in the Gulf of Mexico.
Too soon?
For more information on the Microbes: Invisible Invaders,
Amazing Allies exhibit, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org.
1) Blast Tyrant
2) Clutch
3) Te Elephant Riders
4) From Beale Street to Oblivion
5) Jam Room
6) Pure Rock Fury
7) Robot Hive/Exodus
8) Transnational Speedway League
A) 1993
B) 1995
C) 1998
D) 1999
E) 2001
F) 2004
G) 2005
H) 2007
A n s w e r s : 1 – F , 2 – B , 3 – C , 4 – H , 5 – D , 6 – E , 7 – G , 8 – A . D i d y o u g u e s s t h e m a l l c o r r e c t l y ? C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s ! G o t o R I B C O a n d r e c e i v e y o u r p r i z e : a
b i g h u g f r o m b a r t e n d e r J o n H o r v a t h ! D o n ’ t t h i n k t h a t ’ s m u c h o f a p r i z e ? Y o u ’ v e o b v i o u s l y n e v e r g o t t e n a b i g h u g f r o m b a r t e n d e r J o n H o r v a t h .
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
15
Music
From the Top
Adler Theatre
Tuesday, October 12, 8 p.m.
D
avenport’s Adler Teatre, in conjunction
with Orchestra Iowa and the Quad City
Symphony Orchestra, will host a
special event on October 12: the
recording of a live performance for
National Public Radio’s popular
series From the Top. I will attempt
to make it through this piece
without letting my seething envy
get in the way.
Showcasing some of America’s
most promising musicians, and
reaching more than 700,000
listeners per week, From the Top is one of radio’s
premier classical-music programs. Over the
past decade, the show has taped more than 200
broadcasts in concert halls nationwide, and has
been described by the San Francisco Chronicle as
“contemporary culture’s feel-good success story.”
Yet what sets From the Top apart from
other programs of its type is the makeup of its
performers, all of whom are, incredibly, between
the ages of eight and 18.
During the Tuesday-night taping, you’ll be
witness to the talents of Iowa City also saxophonist
Justin Moser, age 17; Chicago-based percussion
duo Marcelina Suchocka and John Ringor, who
are 17 and 16, respectively; Ohio violinist Michael
Ferri, age 15; a Music Institute of
Chicago string quartet composed of
Sophia Cho and Zachary Spontak
(both 18) and Leah Ferguson
and Ben Fried (both 17); and
fnally, pianist Sherry Tang, who
will perform Felix Mendelssohn’s
“Andante & Rondo Capriccioso,
Op. 14,” and who makes her Adler
Teatre debut at the ripe old age of
12.
Twelve. 12! At 12, I couldn’t
freakin’ pronounce Mendelssohn, let alone
“Andante & Rondo Capruccioso”!!!
Sorry. I’m fne. Have fun at the Adler, kids.
Tickets to the From the Top taping are $15 and
$25, and can be reserved by calling (800)745-3000
or visiting AdlerTeatre.com.
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 17
What £Ise
ls Happenin’
MUSIC
Friday, October 1 – Frankie Avalon.
Beloved ’50s teen idol in concert. Quad-Cities
Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle
Parkway, Bettendorf). 7:30 p.m. $20-40. For
tickets and information, call (800)843-4753 or
visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Friday, October 1 – Gov’t Mule. Outdoor
concert with nationally renowned jam band.
University of Iowa Pentacrest, Iowa City.
Performing after the 5:45 p.m. University of
Iowa homecoming parade. Free admission.
For information, call (319)335-3395 or visit
ScopeProductions.org.
Saturday, October 2 – Ultraviolet
Hippopotamus. Progressive funk musicians
in concert, with openers Bacon. The Redstone
Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 9 p.m. $7.
For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333
or visit RedstoneRoom.com.
Saturday, October 2, and Sunday,
October 3 – Quad City Symphony
Orchestra. The frst Masterworks concerts of
the 2010-11 season, featuring Beethoven’s
“Egmont Overture”and “Symphony No. 7,”
and Chopin’s “Piano Concert No. 1.”With
conductor Mark Russell Smith and pianist
Gustavo Romero. Saturday – Adler Theatre
(136 East Third Street, Davenport). 8 p.m.
Sunday – Augustana College’s Centennial Hall
(3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 2 p.m.
$11.45-59.45. For tickets and information, call
(563)322-7276 or visit QCSymphony.com.
Sunday, October 3 – Scott Miller.
Knoxville-based singer-songwriter in concert.
Exhibit
Microbes: Invisible Invaders, Amazing Allies
Putnam Museum & IMAX Theatre
Saturday, October 2, through Sunday, January 30
A
ccording to the Putnam Museum & IMAX Teatre’s Web site,
the venue’s new exhibit ofers an exploration of that “which
sustains all life on earth while holding the deadly potential to wipe
out millions.” Much like my What’s Happenin’ jokes.
But what the Putnam is actually referring to is the astonishing
world of microbes, which will be in full, interactive display in the
traveling exhibit Microbes: Invisible Invaders, Amazing Allies. From
October 2 through January 30, this 3,000-square-foot exhibition
will examine what microbes are, what
they look like, the history of disease, and
how scientifc research is helping fnd
cures to save lives, bringing an unseen
world into vibrant view through displays,
short flms, and hands-on activities.
And if your kids bristle at the thought
of an experience that might be, you know,
educational, I’ve got two words for you
to share with them: video games. Within
such exhibit sections as Paris Crypt, Egyptian Tomb, and the
Microbial Superhighway, children are invited to play a number
of video and virtual-reality games that will both educate and
entertain.
“Virtual Invaders” gives participants the chance to wipe out
incoming viruses with white blood cells.
“Antiobiotic Artillery” fnds players
fring rounds of antibiotic ammunition
at infectious bacteria. “Race a Bug” pits
two computer microbes in a winding
race through simulated arteries in 3D
animation. And “Gobble De Goop” lets
kids use joysticks to guide microbes
as they gobble up an oil spill. So if the
Putnam’s Microbes exhibit doesn’t inspire
your children to pursue a career in science, they might instead be
compelled to seek employment in the Gulf of Mexico.
Too soon?
For more information on the Microbes: Invisible Invaders,
Amazing Allies exhibit, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org.
Music
Concert of Caring: Jearlyn & Billy
Steele
Trinity Lutheran Church in Moline
Friday, October 8, 7 p.m.
O
n October 8, Moline’s Trinity Lutheran
Church will host its Concert of Caring,
featuring beloved singer Jearlyn Steele and her
Grammy Award-winning brother, Billy. Tere
are a few reasons you might want to consider
attending.
For one thing, the event is a beneft
performance for the charitable organization
Lutheran Social Services of Illinois, a statewide
not-for-proft that – in the Moline/Rock Island
area – ofers afordable retirement apartments
in Forsberg Village, foster care and adoption
services, and pregnancy counseling.
For another, the Steeles are remarkably talented.
Billy, who also serves as the assistant director for
the Grammy-winning group Sounds of Blackness,
is a gifed soul, jazz, and R&B performer who
has collaborated with the likes of Rod Stewart
and Luther Vandross. And
Jearlyn – whose powerful
vocals can be heard on the
CDs of such artists as Mavis
Staples, George Clinton, and
Prince – has been a headliner
at both Minneapolis’ Guthrie
Teatre and New York’s Carnegie Hall, and is a
regular guest on NPR’s Prairie Home Companion,
where she performs frequent duets with host
Garrison Keillor.
But if you somehow need even more
motivation to attend Trinity Lutheran’s Concert
of Caring, check this out: Your $15 ticket will
also enable you to enjoy a post-concert reception
at the church, where you’ll have the chance to
speak with Billy and Jearlyn personally. Jearlyn
appeared with Meryl Streep in the Prairie Home
Companion movie. Streep appeared with Kevin
Bacon in the movie Te River Wild. Which means
that, as of October 8, there’ll be only three degrees
of separation between you and Kevin Bacon. And
you can’t put a price tag on that.
Trinity Lutheran Church is located at 1330 13th
Street in Moline, and more information on the
Concert of Caring is available by calling (309)762-
3624 or visiting TrinityLutheranMoline.org.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
16
Featured lmage from the 0uad City Photography CIub
(Editor’s note: Te River Cities’ Reader each month will publish
images from the Quad City Photography Club.)
Photographer: Jack Denger.
Getting the shot: Each year at the Quad City Photography
Club’s annual June banquet, members draw a subject from
a hat that ends up being their “summer challenge,” with
example topics such as “the color red,”“water,”“black and
white,”“depth of feld,” etc. At our September meeting, all club
members show just one image they took over the summer
based on their challenge topic. Jack Denger’s challenge was
insects. His image shows a large Tiger Swallowtail butterfy
feeding on a milkweed fower. This impressive insect – yellow
with black tiger stripes and a wingspan up to 5.5 inches – is
relatively common, but it can be hard to fnd one that will
pose for the photographer.
Technical data: Canon 7D with a Sigma 150-millimeter macro
lens; f/11; 1/500 second.
Te Quad City Photography Club holds digital and print
competitions most months. At its meetings, members discuss the
images, help each other to improve, and socialize. Te club meets
at 7 p.m. the frst Tursday of the month September through June
at the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline. Te club
also has special learning workshops and small groups that meet on
specifc photography topics.
For more information on the club, call (563)332-6522 or visit
QCPhotoClub.com. To see works by club members, visit QCCC.
SmugMug.com.
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
17
Continued From Page 15
What £Ise ls Happenin’
Circa ’21 Speakeasy. (1818 Third Avenue, Rock
Island). 7 p.m. $10. For tickets and information,
call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.
com. For a March River Cities’ Reader interview
with Miller, visit RCReader.com/y/miller.
Wednesday, October 6 – Chanticleer.
Grammy Award-winning male chorus in
concert, opening the Nova Singers’ 25th
season. Orpheum Theatre (57 South Kellogg
Street, Galesburg). 7:30 p.m. $10-30. For tickets
and information, call (309)342-2299 or visit
TheOrpheum.org.
Wednesday, October 6 – An Evening
with Joan Baez. Legendary folk musician in
concert. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington
Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $40-50. For tickets and
information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.
org.
Thursday, October 7 – The Van-Dells. 1950s
and ’60s rock-and-roll revue with the popular
singers/comedians. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse
(1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $20.
For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733
extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Friday, October 8 – Brother Trucker. Des
Moines-based roots rockers in concert. The
Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
8:30 p.m. $7. For tickets and information, call
(563)326-1333 or visit RedstoneRoom.com.
Tuesday, October 12 – Head for the Hills.
Colorado-based progressive, acoustic, and
roots musicians in concert, with openers The
Giving Tree Band. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $10. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit
RedstoneRoom.com. For a March River Cities’
Reader interview with Head for the Hills’ Adam
Kinghorn, visit RCReader.com/y/hills.
Tuesday, October 12 – Iron & Wine. Popular
singer/songwriter Samuel Beam in concert.
Iowa Memorial Union Main Lounge, University
of Iowa (125 North Madison Street, Iowa City).
8 p.m. $20-25. For tickets and information, call
(319)335-3395 or visit ScopeProductions.org. For
a 2008 River Cities’ Reader interview with Beam,
visit RCReader.com/y/iron.
THEATRE
Friday, October 1, through Saturday,
October 30 – The Rocky Horror Show. Richard
O’Brien’s musical/comedy/sci-f cult classic.
Harrison Hilltop Theatre (1601 Harrison Street,
Davenport). Fridays and Saturdays – midnight;
Tuesdays and October 7 and 14 – 8 p.m. $20. For
tickets and information, call (563)449-6371 or
visit HarrisonHilltop.com.
Friday, October 8, through Sunday,
October 10 – The Drowsy Chaperone. Tony
Award-winning musical-within-a-comedy,
directed by Corinne Johnson. St. Ambrose
University’s Galvin Fine Arts Center (2101 Gaines
Street, Davenport). Friday and Saturday – 7:30
p.m.; Sunday – 3 p.m. $11-15. For tickets and
information, call (563)333-6251 or visit SAU.
edu/galvin.
Saturday, October 9 – Legally Blonde the
Musical. Broadway musical/comedy based
on the hit movie. Adler Theatre (136 East Third
Street, Davenport). $31.50-51.50. For tickets, call
(800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.
ART
Saturday, October 2 – Mercedes Matter
Symposium. Lectures and discussions
in conjunction with Mercedes Matter: A
Retrospective Exhibition, including Ellen G.
Landau’s “What a Picture Should Mean: Hans
Hofmann, Mercedes Matter, & the Role of
Drawing in Modernism”and Michael Zakian’s
“Mercedes Matter & the Modernist Still Life.”
Figge Art Museum (225 West Second Street,
Davenport). 2 p.m. Free with $4-7 museum
admission. For information, call (563)326-7804 or
visit FiggeArtMuseum.org.
LITERATURE
Sunday, October 3 – Harriet Brown. New
York-based author signs her new book Brave
Girl Eating: A Family’s Struggle with Anorexia in
an event sponsored by the Quad Cities Eating
Disorder Consortium. Borders Books, Music, &
Cafe (4000 East 53rd Street, Davenport). 5-7 p.m.
Free. For information, call (309)779-3077 or visit
QCEatingDisorders.com.
Saturday, October 9 – The Pen-in-Hand
Writers Conference. Annual workshop event,
featuring “Research for Fiction Writing”with
Ellen Tsagaris, “Writing Short Stories”with David
McFarland, “Research for Poetry”with Sarah
Gardner, “College Entrance Application Essay
Writing for High School Students”with Kent
Barnds ($10), and a creative-writing workshop
for 10- to 14-year-olds with Ryan Collins (free).
Midwest Writing Center (225 East Second
Street, Suite 303, Davenport). 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
$20-25 per adult workshop. For information
and to register, call (563)324-1410 or visit
MidwestWritingCenter.org.
MOVIES
Sunday, October 10 – Train to Nowhere:
Inside an Immigrant Death Investigation.
Documentary about those connected to the
2002 railcar deaths of 11 undocumented
immigrants found inside a freight car in Denison,
Iowa. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second
Street, Davenport). 2 p.m. Free admission;
donations appreciated. For information, call
(563)326-7804 or visit TrainToNowhere.com.
EXHIBIT
Saturday, October 2, through Sunday,
January 9 – Moneyville. 2,000-square-foot
educational exhibit featuring hands-on
activities, video and computer games, and an
interactive setting that includes a bank, a store,
an anti-counterfeiting lab, and a shipping dock.
Family Museum (2900 Learning Campus Drive,
Bettendorf). Mondays-Thursdays 9 a.m.-8 p.m.;
Fridays and Saturdays 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sundays
noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-6 museum admission.
For information, call (563)344-4106 or visit
FamilyMuseum.org.
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
18
Continued From Page 7
Illinois and has a legislator (whom she declined
to name) willing to sponsor a bill. In addition
to ballot-access issues, Free & Equal also hosts
debates that include third-party candidates; a
gubernatorial debate is planned for late October.
“It’s very important to educate the people
about what these candidates outside of the two-
party tyranny think is best for the voters of the
United States,” Tobin said.
Even if the Constitution Party doesn’t end
up on the ballot, she added, its gubernatorial
candidate will be included in the debate.
“Michael White should be on the ballot,
and [Constitution Party candidate] Randy
Stufebeam as well for U.S. Senate,” Tobin said.
“Te fact that they are not on the ballot is wrong.
Te system has been using ... their insiders to
knock these qualifed candidates of the ballot.”
Free & Equal supports allowing candidates
to pay $500 to be on the ballot instead of
submitting signatures. Tat is among several
ideas that could make Illinois ballots more open:
• Signature equity. Make third parties
submit the same number of signatures as
Democrats and Republicans. Constitution Party
gubernatorial candidate White wrote that the
current system undermines the one-person/one-
vote concept: “When the ballot-access system
requires an established-party candidate to obtain
5,000 petition signatures and a third-party
candidate to obtain 25,000 petition signatures,
the ballot-access system is telling us that each
leaders on the objections. “Te Illinois
Republican party is trying to hide what they’re
doing,” claimed Ibendahl, who was general
counsel for the state Republican party from 1998
to 2001. “Tey’re trying to hide the money fow.”
Illinois Republican-party chair Pat Brady
has admitted that his organization was involved
in the petition-objection process. “Our lawyers
were working on it,” he told Springfeld’s State
Journal-Register. “Our position is [that], as a
party, we have to preserve the integrity of the
ballot.”
Ibendahl said the party shouldn’t be using
money donated by voters to challenge third-
party candidacies. “Tese people are giving
money to the Illinois Republican party with
the assumption that it’s being used to fght
Democrats,” he said. “In actuality, a big chunk of
it has been used ... this summer to kick people
of the ballot. ...
“Tese guys don’t get it. ... Having some
competition on the ballot, especially a
conservative challenge, would be the best thing
that could happen to the Republican party. Te
Illinois Republican party has become fat and
lazy, atrophied, and some healthy competition
would be the best possible thing.”
Options for Reform
Free & Equal’s Tobin said that her
organization is pursuing ballot-access reform in
0uardians of the CastIe
by Jef Ignatius
jef@rcreader.com
of the 25,000 individuals signing a third-party
petition is only worth one-ffh of a person.”
• Streamlined administrative process. Te
argument that Illinois’ current challenge system
guards against fraud and abuse is disingenuous
in three ways. First, only challenged signature
petitions are reviewed. Second, in a system that
is supposed to favor ballot access, the challenge
process efectively shifs the burden of proof
to third-party and independent candidates.
Tird, while a less-rigorous system might allow
candidates on the ballot who technically don’t
meet the valid-signature requirement, voters
would still have the fnal say.
• Only allow challenges by other
candidates. “At least let the opposition publicly
declare that they are the ones trying to subvert
voter choice,” the Libertarian Party’s Hellin
wrote.
• Filing-fee alternative to signatures.
While Free & Equal supports a $500-fee option
in lieu of signatures, Libertarian gubernatorial
candidate Green said $5,000 for a statewide
ofce would be fair. Candidates and parties
would still be allowed to collect and submit
signatures.
• Proportional representation. Tis idea
– supported by Free & Equal – is less about
ballot access than ensuring that votes for third-
party candidates are genuinely meaningful.
While there are a variety of proportional-
representation systems, the oversimplifed gist
is that if the Green Party gets 5 percent of the
vote, it also gets 5 percent of the legislative seats.
So even if third-party candidates don’t have a
realistic shot at winning a statewide ofce, votes
for them could still result in representation.
Te challenge with any of these reforms, of
course, is that the political establishment would
fght them. Te primary reason the two major
parties challenge third-party and independent
petitions is the fear that alternative candidates
will siphon votes from the big guys.
Republicans, for instance, aren’t afraid
that the Constitution Party’s Stufebeam will
be Illinois’ next U.S. senator; they fear that
a signifcant minority of people who would
vote for Mark Kirk absent an ideologically
conservative alternative might instead cast a
ballot for Stufebeam. In a close election, just 1
or 2 percent of people voting for a third-party
candidate could mean the diference between
victory and defeat.
And that’s what these ballot-access battles are
really about.
To see which candidates qualifed (and which
ones didn’t) for the Illinois ballot, go to RCReader.
com/y/ballot.
To read the full responses to the River Cities’
Reader ballot-access questionnaire of third parties
and their candidates, go to RCReader.com/y/
access.
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
19
OCTOBER 22 - 8:00 PM
OCTOBER 23 - 2:00 PM & 8:00 PM
CAPITOL THEATRE
CHOREOGRAPHED BY DEANNA CARTER
STORY INSPIRED BY MIKE ROMKEY
Tickets: $22 Adult, $15 Senior, $10 Youth
Online at www.midwestix.com or 515.244.2771
A haunting dance journey inspired by area author
Michael Romkey’s novel about the death and undead
life of Chicago lawyer David Parker. Learn of David’s
deepest desires and his fondest obsessions.
In his own words... “I am neither good nor bad,
neither angel nor devil. I am a man. I am a vampire.”
See the last live performance at the Capitol Theatre. Parties
continue before and after each evening’s
performance at Mac’s Tavern right next door!
The
Bechtel
Trusts
Vickie
Anne Palmer
Foundation
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
20
Dancing Towards Death, Through January 9 at the Figge
0eath ls a Many-$pIendored 7hing
by Michelle Garrison
michelle_m_garrison@hotmail.com
0
ne might expect a collection of images
featuring the personifcation of death
to be morose, dark, depressing, and
grotesque, but in the new Figge Art Museum
exhibit Dancing Towards Death, many of the
works are instead humorous or thoughtful. Te
show is more about the uses of death-related
imagery (and Death as a character) than death
itself, with the skeletal manifestation conjuring
a variety of moods and themes.
Te show (which runs through January 9)
was mostly drawn from a private collection
and was supplemented with work from the
Figge’s collection. Te art-history connoisseur
will appreciate the inclusion of big names such
as Albrecht Dϋrer, Rembrandt, and Käthe
Kollwitz, but the exhibit also features unknown
crafspeople, such as the artisans who created
Books of Hours. And the accessibility of
both the theme and the imagery will provide
a meaningful experience for the casual art
viewer.
In curating Dancing Towards Death, the
Figge successfully shows myriad uses of the
skeletal motif over fve centuries, but it’s
Europe-heavy, and works from more cultures
might have ofered a richer experience. Tere’s
nothing here from Asian, Native American,
Middle Eastern, or African cultures, and there’s
only a single reference to Mexican Day of the
Dead celebrations – in Victor Delhez’s 1948
work Danse Macabre.
Some works primarily serve as a memento
mori – a reminder that death will come for us
all some day – including an untitled portrait
with a skull by Barthel Bruyn the Elder, Faces
of Death by Georg Grosz, and Vom Tode, Erster
Teil, Opus XI by Max Klinger.
Te latter, a portfolio of 10 etchings from
1889, is done with a gorgeous complexity.
Te series begins with a self-portrait of
the artist staring at the horizon, appearing
darkly contemplative. Te subsequent prints
appear to be visualizations of his thoughts on
mortality, with death crafily disguising itself
to surprise its victims, and the newly departed
representing all aspects of society – an artist,
a man on a throne, and a lonesome traveler,
for instance. Te scenes depict beautiful but
remote landscapes and realistically rendered
fgures with fowing, draped clothing,
reminiscent of classical narrative painting.
At the end of the series, a man kneels before
death, calmly accepting his fate. Klinger
masterfully integrates a whole spectrum of
emotions one could feel toward death before
fnally reaching calm acquiescence.
Te 1958 collage Faces of Death, meanwhile,
approaches the topic more playfully. Grosz
afxed images (mostly from advertising)
of people and consumer goods to a tan
background, and then glued an illustration
of a skull onto faces as well as inanimate
objects. Te meaning here is ambiguous,
with inevitable mortality balanced tonally
by cartoonish skulls and kitschy marketing,
with the efect of reminding viewers of death
without distressing them by being too realistic.
While Grosz appeared to want to spur
ambivalent reactions, a series of calendars
produced by Louis Crucius in 1899 uses a
similar approach but seems (in retrospect)
bizarrely misguided. Tese illustrations were
commissioned by Antikamnia Chemical
Company to promote a new line of medicines.
Te calendars depict people from various
professions in seemingly normal environments,
except their heads have been replaced by skulls.
It appears that Crucius wanted to show death
as laughable in the face of this new medication,
and the fippant use of death iconography
appears ofen in media as we try to rob the
fgure of its mystique and power. Te irony
here is revealed in context provided by the
Figge: Te advertised medicine was later found
to be toxic and addictive.
Other portrayals seem fascinated by the
skeleton. Te visage of Death appears more
seductive in a fruitwood carving made by an
unknown artist in 17th Century Germany. Te
fgure’s fesh and clothing are formed to appear
partially rotted away, revealing the skeleton.
Its unnaturally tall and slender body stands
in a relaxed pose, leaning on its bow and
carrying a quiver
of arrows. Despite
its grotesque
appearance, the
wood’s smooth,
shiny texture is
exquisite. Te detail
of the clothing,
bones, and fesh
draws the viewer
in to inspect the
fgure closely. Te bow and arrow are not
threatening, and the skeletal face appears to
grin – creating a character who feels more like
a guide or protector.
In that way, the carving fts comfortably in a
tradition showing Death as a jovial character.
Te Danse Macabre – usually showing a
skeleton leading an individual toward oblivion
– began in the 15th Century and ofen showed
Death dancing with his victims. In the Figge
exhibit, we see this merry but ominous
skeleton appear in the works Death Room/Te
Last Rites from a Book of Hours circa 1480,
as well as in Imago Mortis from the Liber
Cronicarum (Nurenberg Chronicles), from
1493. Manuscripts such as these were usually
Christian and thus had reason to depict dying
as a welcome transition from the toils of life to
the eternal pleasure of heaven.
But Dancing Towards Death
doesn’t skimp on fear and terror.
In Kollwitz’s 1910 etching Death
& a Woman, a female fgure
is being dragged by a skeleton
while a small child reaches
toward her, attempting to hold
her from death or perhaps
accompany her. Te background
contains nothing but splotches
and scratches of ink, leaving no
sense of setting. Te woman and
child seem both powerful and
powerless – vulnerable through
their poses, clearly losing their
physical struggle with death, yet
powerful through the force of
their resistance and Kollwitz’s
rendering of dense musculature.
Tis specifcally references the
torment of losing a parent, and
how the passing of one person
causes ripples of grief, frustration,
and helplessness through
families. Death here is
a formidable, villainous
opponent, but this
implies that if we were
smart enough or strong
enough, we could win.
Tat potential victory
is the theme of Ivo
Salinger’s 1920 piece Der
Artz (Te Physician),
which shows the heroic
doctor protecting a
woman from Death by
placing his hand on its
skull.
Te exhibit’s
contextual information
– on the walls, near
individual works, and
on the Figge’s Web site
– is excellent, leading
the viewer to a fulflling
intellectual as well as aesthetic experience.
Te small descriptions next to the older
works are especially informative, but the
modern works have not been given the same
in-depth treatment. Many newer pieces are
simply labeled with the artist, title, and year
when additional context would have been
illuminating.
But that doesn’t detract much from a show
that turns the difcult and overwhelming
concept of death into a character study. We can
dance with it, fght with it, or laugh at it, and
through these things, we feel that we can know
the unknowable.
Michelle Garrison is a mixed-media artist who
teaches art and design at Geneseo Middle School
and J.D. Darnell High School.
ABOVE: Louis Crucius - Antikamnia Chemical Company calendar.
TOP RIGHT: Unknown artist 17th Century fruitwood carving. RIGHT:
Ivo Salinger - Der Artz (The Physician)
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
21
101 West River Drive
Davenport, IA 52801
www.rhythmcitycasino.com
© 2010 Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc.
Must be 21. Gambling a problem? There
is help. And hope. Call 1-800-BETS-OFF.
Valid now through 10/13/10
Must be 21 or older to enter the casino. Management
reserves the right to cancel or change the promotion
at any time without prior notifcation. Limit one per
person per day. Not valid with any other offer.
Gambling a problem? There is help. And hope.
Call 1-800-BETS-OFF.
MMN OME MMEEE3,
OE3 OME EMEE
OM BO° OEE EOM
EÆM3N OE OME
572 RC 10/13
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
22
now it’s “Don’t think you have a choice.”
Tere needs to be some point of compromise
between your wife’s family culture and your
happiness. Maybe you show up for major
holidays and events (as much as you’d rather
be fshing, golfng, or dead), but maybe the
fve-year-old’s birthday can still be a happy
afair without you sufering through it.
Ten again, consider whether the potential
afermath is worse – going to pick up your wife
and having the birthday boy present you with
a set of oddly shaped balloon animals: “Tis
one’s you, Uncle Charlie, escaping out our
bathroom window, and this one’s Aunt Gloria,
refusing to have sex with you ever again.”
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2009, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the Advice Goddess
ßY AMY ALK0N
Ask
the Advice Goddess
Ask
the Advice Goddess
ßY AMY ALK0N
l’m Knot with the ßand
of the calendar for the big day, or tell you
“Our day will come!” and maybe even believes
it in the moment. But let’s get real. Distant
consequences don’t exactly play a part in his
decision-making, and his idea of planning for
the future probably involves remembering to
get to the payday loan place so he can get his
guitar out of hock before the weekend.
Women in your position ask themselves
(and some strange lady on the bus, and
anybody who’ll listen), “If he loves me, why
won’t he marry me?!” It isn’t always that
simple for men. Studies by sociologist Pamela
Smock and others suggest that men’s readiness
to marry is ofen tied to whether they feel
fnancially stable and successful in their
careers. Careers? Your boyfriend doesn’t have
one, let alone $20 to carry him through the
weekend. Still, he clearly isn’t commitment-
averse. He’s been committed to you for fve
years; he’s just squeamish about signing a
contract to drive you to Bingo when you’re 90.
Yes, getting married is supposed to be the
ultimate way of showing love and devotion,
and maybe that’s why so many people do it four
times. You need to ask yourself: Are you more
in love with the guy or the idea of marrying
the guy? Whatever you do, quit trying to drag
him to therapy. He isn’t mentally ill. He doesn’t
even sound troubled. Okay, so he can’t hang
onto a dollar or have adult conversations about
uncomfortable subjects, but he seems to love
you and want to be with you. And maybe he
can, if only you can accept him for who he is
– a guy who might eventually pop the question,
but it’ll probably be something along the lines
of “Would you like another round?” And if so,
can he “borrow” $8?
I’m 28 and my boyfriend of fve years is
29. I’m ready to get married, and he’s fat-
out not but wants us to stay together. Our
maturity levels vary greatly. I’m getting my
Ph.D. while working full time. He has a job,
but can’t save or manage money and just
wants to play in his bands, and stay out and
party. He’s very afectionate and constantly
tells me he loves me, but regarding getting
married, he always says things like, “It’ll
be our turn one day,” or says he’ll propose
by the end of “X” month, but never does.
I’m in therapy over this, but he refuses to
come. In general, he can’t articulate himself
in an argument and ofen refuses to discuss
unpleasant topics (money, bills, emotional
issues). Everyone around us is getting
married, and in our society, there are articles
and web sites that say a man’s proposal is the
ultimate way of showing his devotion and
love. I try to remember that my value comes
from within, but I need to know that the
man I love wants me that much, and forever.
– Waiting
It’s hard to compete with all those girls
showing of that princess-cut diamond in a
platinum setting when all you have to show for
your relationship is the ring your boyfriend’s
pint glass leaves on the table in a dive-bar
setting.
Everything you say about the guy screams
that the only aisle he’ll be walking down
anytime soon is one with a big sale on Tostitos
or beer. Tis doesn’t make him a bad person
– just a bad person to be hitting up for a
marriage proposal. Sure, in the name of love
and confict avoidance, he’ll pluck a month
My wife has a big family, getting bigger
all the time. Not only do they celebrate
numerous holidays, but they have birthday
parties for everyone (adults and little
children). Tis averages out to about two
gatherings a month. While we were dating,
she said not to feel obligated to attend family
events that didn’t appeal to me, but now she’s
very upset if I want to do something else.
– Overbooked
Some people get fat afer marriage; some
people get family. Tere’s been some event-
attendance bait-and-switch here. While you
were dating, it was “Don’t feel obligated,”
Wife of the Party
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
23
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
24
September 16 Answers: Right
ACR0$$
1. Wash against
5. Key group of personnel
10. Hazards
15. Without
19. From a distance
20. With full force
21. Loosen
22. Sign on a door
23. “Trinity” author Leon _
24. Metalloid element
25. Sauvignon _
26. Festival
27. Start of a quip by Joan Rivers:
5 wds.
31. Versatile bean
32. Decline
33. Like a scrag
34. Wood fle
36. Black tea
38. Injures a muscle
40. British colonies count
44. Rhodes or Beaton
45. Fathered
46. Mackinaw
47. Jason’s ship
48. Cord of goat’s hair
49. Chanted
50. King or Hagman
51. Yeasty foam
52. Part 2 of quip: 3 wds.
56. Recognized formally
57. Timetable: abbr.
58. Scintilla
59. Salesman’s spiel
60. Cut
61. _ ex machina
62. Pitcher’s specialty
63. Pennsylvania port
64. Sense
67. Herding dog
68. Lacking substance
69. Bravo!
72. Angry
73. Part 3 of quip: 5 wds.
76. Field mouse
77. Gift for Troy
78. Leave out
79. Unmixed, said of liquor
80. Port of Yemen
81. Underground passage
82. The 47th veep
84. Machine-made images
85. Lookout
87. Brainteaser
88. Taters
89. Mind
90. Get out!
91. Member of the peerage
92. Blvds.
94. End of the quip: 5 wds.
102. Sunk fence
104. Racetracks
105. Hold forth
106. Far East housemaid
107. Desktop picture
108. Embankment
109. Petty person
110. Fey or Louise
111. Cut
112. Arrange attractively
113. Paradises
114. Vortex
00WN
1. Acclaim
2. Big hairdo
3. Futile
4. Former
5. Poolside structure
6. Plant that lathers
7. Swarthy
8. Go on a rampage
9. Dignify
10. Flemish painter
11. Dental flling
12. Pierce
13. Resin used in tanning
14. Stock certifcate
15. Triangle part
16. Madden
17. Plains structure
18. Linger
28. East Asian weight
29. Mufn tin, e.g.
30. Seaman
35. Abstract sculpture
36. Engendered
37. City in central Florida
38. Ear
39. Press for
40. The Pentateuch
41. Partner of Rodgers
42. Heron
43. _ _ guerre
44. Spelunking venue
45. Befts
46. Early psychic Edgar _
49. Dark ale
50. Neighbor of Estonia
53. A relative
54. Plant with milky juice
55. Coronach
56. Silk-cotton tree
60. Meaning
61. A cooling of between nations
62. Seaboard
63. Pixyish
64. Prima donnas
65. Destroy by degrees
66. “American Idol”: 2 wds.
67. Lyric anagram
68. Online-fun enthusiast
69. Nymph
70. Cash advances
71. Newts
73. Fashion
74. Stem joint
75. Incriminate
77. Firm grip
82. Ill-bred one
83. Carbon-12 or carbon-13, e.g.
84. Energetic
86. Borrowing charge: abbr.
87. Stages
88. Cavalry weapons
90. Tennis great Monica _
91. Devoured
92. Relative of a spacer
93. Fast-food item
95. Perpetually
96. Privileged one
97. Rainbow: prefx
98. Beneft
99. In the company of
100. Rub smooth
101. Carriage
103. _ -Margret
$eptember 30, 2010 L0V£ $70RY
£MPL0YM£N7
PR07£lN$M007Hl£ MAK£R$ Needed. 2 - 4 hours a day.
UnIimited income potentiaI. New cIubs opening now. 7rain to
be a teamIeader. CaII PauI at 563-579-2202.
ßUY and $£LL
WAN7£0: M00£L$ to pose nude for ñgure drawing cIass
at Augustana Art 0epartment, 7uesday and7hursday
afternoons. $14/hr. Contact $ue Radtke ø 309-794-7729.
APAR7M£N7$ F0R R£N7
$625.00 1 ßRVlC70RlANAPAR7M£N7. Village Historic District.
Hardwood foors, bay window with river view, large shady yard.
HEAT, SEWER, WATER PAID. No pets/no smoking-frm. 563-324-0257.
H0M£ $£RVlC£$
Handy Man $ervices Call Paul Weathers 563-570-5888 Roofng,
Drywall, Construction & More!
H£AL7H $£RVlC£$
FR££W£LLN£$$ PR0FlL£$ and Body Analysis. Protein
smoothies for health & wellness. Call 563-355-6713.
W£l0H7 L0$$ CHALL£N0£ starting Sept 8th. Cash pool fund.
Nutritional training, free Wellness Profle w/personal coach. QC
Fusion 563-579-2202.
C0MMUNl7Y £V£N7$
C.R.O.P. Hunger Walk of the Quad Cities sponsored by Churches
United. Walk 6 miles including across the beautiful Centennial
Bridge, get some exercise and raise money for hunger issues. For
more information, contact Churches United at 563-332-5002.
CRAF7 FAlR$/ßAZAAR$
Large Rummage $aIe &ßazaar, Something for Everyone! Oct 14
& 15 (8am ‘til 7pm) and Oct 16 (8am ‘til 3pm) at St. Mark Lutheran
Church, 2363 West 3rd St, Davenport.
$eptember 16 Crossword Answers
CALL TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!
(563) 324-0049 or visit
RiverCitiesReader.com/cIassiñeds
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
25
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Bier Stube Oktoberfest -Bier Stube Moline,
417 15th St Moline, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
DJ Scott Keller & Karaoke (weather permit-
ting) -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge,
4506 27th St Moline, IL
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ
Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S
State Ave Hampton, IL
Firesale -Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
First Friday Coffeehouse (5pm) -Beadology
Iowa, 220 E Washington St Iowa City, IA
Frankie Avalon -Quad-Cities Waterfront
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway
Bettendorf, IA
Funky Monks -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Gov’t Mule -University of Iowa Pentacrest,
University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, 777
Jumer Dr. Rock Island, IL
John Wasem -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd.
N. LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Lord Green Record Release Show - Bent
Life - Haddonfield - Cricoris -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Los Mocambos (11:45am) -Rogalski Center
- St. Ambrose University, 518 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
NINE-1-1 -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Pappa-Razzi -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Public Property - Shoeless Revolution
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
River City 6 -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River
Dr. Davenport, IA
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D.
Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Salsa Vibe -Englert Theatre, 221 East Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Smoochknob - Brutus & the Psychedelic
Explosions -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Tami & the Bad Boyfriends -Ri versi de
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
The Thermals - Cymbals Eat Guitars -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
The Wild Bill Rodeo Show featuring Billy
Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St. Moline, IL
uneXpected -Uptown Neighborhood Bar
and Gri l l, 2340 Spruce Hi l l s Dr. Bet-
tendorf, IA
2010/10/02 (Sat)
BackTrack and Hollywood Horns -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Betten-
dorf, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s,
826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Bier Stube Oktoberfest -Bier Stube Moline,
417 15th St Moline, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
Dennis McMurrin & the Demolition Band
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Even Steven -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Funktastic Five -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Gray Wolf Band -Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, 777
Jumer Dr. Rock Island, IL
Hello Dave - Tim Stop Trio -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Hi-Fi -Bruce’s Dawg House, 902 16th Ave.,
East Moline, IL
Igor & Red Elvises - One Night Standards
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
JoBu -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413
5th Ave. Moline, IL
Joe & Vicki Price - The Unidynes - The
Slough Bouys -Eagles Club - Clinton,
222 S. 2nd Street Clinton, IA
John Wasem -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814 7th
St Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Caman-
che Ave Clinton, IA
Lubriphonic - Uniphonics -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Modern Mythology -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
NINE-1-1 -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Nitrix -City Limits Pay Station, 1303 10th
Ave. Viola, IL
Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd
Street Davenport, IA
Rehab Club Dance -RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd
St Davenport, IA
River City 6 -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River
Dr. Davenport, IA
River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) -Moj o’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera,
601 15th St. Moline, IL
Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St. Moline, IL
Slough Buoys -Downtown Clinton, Clinton, IA
Tami & the Bad Boyfriends -Ri versi de
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
Ultraviolet Hippopotamus w/ Bacon
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
2010/10/03 (Sun)
Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch
performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA
Scott Miller -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Sharon Bousquet: How Spirit Sings (1pm)
-Unity Church of Christianity, 5102 47th
Ave Moline, IL
The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
The Glenn Miller Orchestra (4pm) -Or-
pheum Theatre, 57 S. Kellogg St. Gales-
burg, IL
The Manny Lopez Trio (10am) -Brady Street
Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel
Davenport, IA
Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL
2010/10/04 (Mon)
Clutch - 2Cents -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2010/09/30 (Thu)
Big John Bates & the Voodoo Dollz - The
Krank Daddies -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Black Hawk College Jazz Ensemble (6:30pm)
-Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St Rock Island, IL
Buddy Olson (5:30pm) -Figge Art Museum,
225 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
“Candy” Jam Session w/ Alan Sweet -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Betten-
dorf, IA
Dumpstaphunk w/ Lubriphonic -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Flat Black Studios’ New Belgium Battle III
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa
City, IA
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia Night
-Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516
5th Ave Moline, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Chris Dunn (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
The Fiyah -Mojo’s (River Music Experience),
130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
The Poison Control Center - Utopia Park
- Mumford’s -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring Jim-
mie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memorabilia
Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille,
2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2010/10/01 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA Continued On Page 26
1 FRIday
2 Saturday
30 Thursday
Live Music Live Music Live
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Here Come the Mummies @ RIBCO – October 9
4 monday
3 sunday
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
26
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S
Main St Port Byron, IL
Joan Baez -Englert Theatre, 221 East Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Social Dancing, Listening & Fellowship
(1pm) -CASI (Center for Active Seniors),
1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Land-
ing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy
Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St. Moline, IL
2010/10/07 (Thu)
Bl ack Hawk Col l ege Jazz Ensembl e
(6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St
Rock Island, IL
Brothers Burn Mountain - Crystal City - The
River Monks -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
“Candy” Jam Sessi on w/ Al an Sweet
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
DJ Johnny O -Greenbriar Restaurant and
Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Fool’s Gold -Ki l kenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Guitar Masters: Eric Johnson, Andy McKee,
& Peppino D’Agostino -Englert Theatre,
221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia Night
-Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Head for the Hills -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516
5th Ave Moline, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche
Ave Clinton, IA
Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Lee Blackmon (6pm)-Cool Beanz Coffeehouse,
1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Nitrix -The Office, 305 3rd St Sherrard, IL
No Control -Chopper’s Bar & Grill, 17228 Rt. 5 &
92 East Moline, IL
Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd Street
Davenport, IA
Pat’s Acoustic Disco - The Mayflies - Jennifer
Danielson -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa
City, IA
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera, 601
15th St. Moline, IL
Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th St.
Moline, IL
Songwriters in the Round (3pm) -River
Music Experience, 129 Main St Daven-
port, IA
The Dawn -Bent River Brewing Company, 1413
5th Ave. Moline, IL
2010/10/10 (Sun)
Breille -The Hat Eatery & Pub, 1618 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Davina & the Vagabonds -The Muddy Wa-
ters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch
performance) -The Lodge Hotel, Spruce
Hills & Utica Ridge Bettendorf, IA
The Avey Brothers -Rascals Rock Memora-
bilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
The Five Bridges Jazz Band (10am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel Davenport, IA
Troy Harris, Pianist (11:30am) -Bass Street
Chop House, 1601 River Dr Moline, IL
Jordan Danielsen (6pm) -Rhythm City Ca-
sino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd.
N. LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Kevin Presbrey -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Live Lunch with Tony Hoeppner (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
No Control -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St
Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave
Moline, IL
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D.
Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
Will Hodge -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
2010/10/09 (Sat)
Bad Summers -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s, 826
W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Blackstones -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Cosmic -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge,
4506 27th St Moline, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe,
102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W. Mayne
St. Blue Grass, IA
Final Mix -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184
Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Here Come the Mummies -RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jucifer - The Post Mortems -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Justin Morrissey & Friends -Martini’s on the
Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814 7th
St Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Rose ‘n’Thorns (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
Pat Willis -Mojo’s (River Music Experience),
130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Red Wanting Blue - Kevin Carton -RIBCO,
1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memo-
rabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille,
2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
2010/10/08 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Ci rcl e Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commodore
Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Bob Pace Band featuring Steve George -The
Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Brother Trucker -The Redstone Room, 129
Main St Davenport, IA
Brown Bag Lunch at Noon: Just for Fun
-Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning
Campus Bettendorf, IA
Concert of Caring: Jearlyn & Billy Steele -
Trinity Lutheran Church - Moline, 1330 13th
St Moline, IL
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe,
102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ Service
-Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S State Ave
Hampton, IL
Final Mix -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184
Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Habitat for Humanity Fundraiser -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
High Cotton Blues Band -Mojo’s (River Music
Experience), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
High on Fire - Torche - Kylesa -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jason Reeves -Englert Theatre, 221 East Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Jazz After Five:Soul Jazz Collective - Sam
Salamone (5pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
Joe Jack Talcum - Samuel Locke Ward & The
Boo Hoos - Lipstick Homicide -The Mill,
120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
10 SUNday
9 Saturday
2010/10/05 (Tue)
40 oz. to Freedom: Sublime Tribute Band
-Gabe’s, 330 E. Washi ngton St. I owa
City, IA
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper
Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Steve Couch (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Steve McFate (6:30pm)
-Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mi c w/ Jordan Dani el sen -Bi er
Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s
Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL
Seth Wenger - Cassie Morgan & the Lonely
Pine - Beth Bombara -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Memo-
rabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
2010/10/06 (Wed)
Breathe Owl Breathe - Rosalee Motor
Revival - Strand of Oaks -The Mill, 120
E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Chanticleer -Orpheum Theatre, 57 S. Kellogg
St. Galesburg, IL
Dave Ellis -Ci rcl e Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
Head for the Hills @ The Redstone Room – October 12
Continued From Page 25
8 FRIDAY
7 thursday
5 tuesday
6 wednesday
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
2



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

3
0

-

O
c
t
o
b
e
r

1
3
,

2
0
1
0
27
Live Music Live Music Live Music Live Music
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront Cafe,
102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
Emily Jawoisz -The Grape Life Wine Emporium,
3402 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA
Flat Black Studios’ New Belgium Battle:
Finals -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Hi-Fi -Len Brown’s North Shore Inn, 700 north
Shore Dr., Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Cheers Bar & Grill, 1814 7th
St Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Moe’s Pizza, 1312 Camanche
Ave Clinton, IA
Lissie - Dylan LeBlanc -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Messy Jiverson -Bent River Brewing Company,
1413 5th Ave. Moline, IL
NINE-1-1 -Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night -Coffee Dive, 226 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -One Library, 230 W. 3rd Street
Davenport, IA
Pappa-Razzi -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s
Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock
Island, IL
Salsa and Cumbia DJ Night -La Primavera, 601
15th St. Moline, IL
Salsa Dancing -Club Boulevard, 1801 10th
St. Moline, IL
Sellout Band -Riverside Casino and Golf Re-
sort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Smooth Groove -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Tapped Out -Jesse’s Saloon, 803 1st Ave.
Silvis, IL
The Lovedogs -Sportsman Park, Donahue, IA
Third Rail (outdoor party) -Greenbriar Restau-
rant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
This Must be the Band -RIBCO, 1815 2nd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Live Lunch w/ Ren Estrand (noon)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130
W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Musicians United to Save the Englert:
Greg Brown - Shame Train - Dave
Moore - Brooks Strause & the Gory
Details - Matthew Grimm - The Gilded
Bats - Monadnoc - The Mayflies - BF
Burt -Englert Theatre, 221 East Wash-
ington St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Pappa-Razzi -Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s
Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92
Rock Island, IL
Pieta Brown - Justin Morrissey -The
Redstone Room, 129 Main St Dav-
enport, IA
Rotate the DJ w/ Chronik Solutionz -M.D.
Green’s, 1808 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Sellout Band -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Slough Buoys -Mr. Z’s Sports Bar, Route
84 Thomson, IL
Smooth Groove -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
The Bucktown Revue -River Music
Experience, 129 Main St Daven-
port, IA
Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds - Passifire -
Katastro - Rude Punch -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2010/10/16 (Sat)
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Crabby’s,
826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL
Bohemian Ball: Burlesque Le’ Moustache
- The Barley House Band -Putnam
Museum & IMAX Theatre, 1717 W 12th
St Davenport, IA
Dave Ellis -Ci rcl e Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Drum Circle (6pm) -Teranga House of Africa,
1706 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Jeff Miller (6pm) -G’s Riverfront Cafe, 102 S
Main St Port Byron, IL
Open Mic Night -Mojo’s (River Music Experi-
ence), 130 W 2nd St Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Old Stardust Sports
Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Social Dancing, Listening & Fellowship
(1pm) -CASI (Center for Active Seniors),
1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA
The Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Land-
ing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
Wild Bill’s Rodeo Show featuring Billy
Peiffer -Rascals Rock Memorabilia Bar,
1414 15th St. Moline, IL
2010/10/14 (Thu)
Anna Vogelzang - Bree Nettie - Daniel
& the Lion -The Mill, 120 E Burlington
Iowa City, IA
“Candy” Jam Sessi on w/ Al an Sweet
-The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bet-
tendorf, IA
Chicago Afrobeat Project -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
D. Bess’ Man vs. Bear Fundraiser -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Hart to Hart DJ Service / Music Trivia Night
-Beer Belly’s - Rock Island, 1704 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Stephen Cee (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
2010/10/11 (Mon)
Karaoke Night -The Old Stardust Sports Bar,
1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2010/10/12 (Tue)
Buddy Olson (6pm) -Greenbriar Restaurant
and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL
Dance Party USA -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
From the Top -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper
Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Head for the Hills - The Giving Tree Band
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Dav-
enport, IA
Iron & Wine -Iowa Memorial Union Main
Lounge - Uni versi ty of I owa, 125 N.
Madison St. Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -McManus Pub, 1401 7th
Ave Moline, IL
Live Lunch w/ Lars Rehnberg (noon) -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
Open Mi c w/ Jordan Dani el sen - Bi er
Stube Davenport, 2228 E 11th St Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic w/ the Pena Brothers -Racer’s
Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Rascals Rock Memo-
rabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Twosdays Jam with Lojo Russo -Mojo’s
(River Music Experience), 130 W 2nd St
Davenport, IA
2010/10/13 (Wed)
Ana Sia - Kraddy - Eliot Lipp -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Papa Roach - Skillet - Trapt - My Darkest
Days -i wireless Center, 1201 River Dr
Moline, IL
The Steady Rollin’ Blues Band featuring
Jimmie Lee Adams -Rascals Rock Memo-
rabilia Bar, 1414 15th St. Moline, IL
Troy Harris, Pianist (6pm) -Red Crow Grille,
2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
Irie Soundsystem w/ DJ THC -QC Zone, 1516
5th Ave Moline, IL
More Than Lights -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Bl ack Hawk Col l ege Jazz Ensembl e
(6:30pm) -Huckleberry’s, 223 18th St
Rock Island, IL
2010/10/15 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Bee All U Can Bee Karaoke & DJ -Commo-
dore Tap, 2202 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Carrie Underwood - Sons of Sylvia - Billy
Currington -i wireless Center, 1201 River
Dr Moline, IL
Cosmic Railroad - Messy Blend -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
David Killinger & Friends -G’s Riverfront
Cafe, 102 S Main St Port Byron, IL
DJ Night -Uncle Harley’s Bar & Grill, 202 W.
Mayne St. Blue Grass, IA
DJ Scott Keller & Karaoke (weather permit-
ting) -Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge,
4506 27th St Moline, IL
Emily Jawoisz (6pm) -The ARTery, 1629 2nd
Ave in the District Rock Island, IL
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ
Service -Shannon’s Bar and Grill, 252 S
State Ave Hampton, IL
Gloria Gaynor -Quad-Ci ti es Water front
Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway
Bettendorf, IA
Jazz After Five: Equilateral (5pm) -The Mill,
120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Jordan Danielsen (6pm) -Rhythm City Ca-
sino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd.
N. LeClaire, IA
Karaoke Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd
St Davenport, IA
Lee Blackmon & The Gamblers (6:30pm)
-Mojo’s (River Music Experience), 130 W
2nd St Davenport, IA
Jason Reeves @ Englert Theatre – October 8
13 wednesday
Get Your Gig or Venue
HIGHLIGHTED
Advertise in the Reader.
Call 563-324-0049
11 monday
16 Saturday
15 Friday
12 TUESDAY
14 Thursday
AD PROOF:
(DH)
Proof Due Back By: 09/09 5pm
Ad #: P07968-f-12827-4x5
Deadline To Pub: 09/10 3pm
First Run: 09/16/10
Publication: Moline Dispatch
Section: Education/Career Training
Specs: 4.94 x 5.625
T
Approved as is.
T
Approved with revisions.
TRevise and resend.
Ìnitial _________ Date __________
M
I
S
N
P
We’ve Moved
to a Larger Location in Bettendorf!
Some of the improvements
include a complete
renovation, new medical labs,
new computer labs, and
expanded program offerings.
Classes starting soon!
Meo
6a=,as
M
eo
6
a=
,as
t||1 6.r|=»ecia Þa.
be¡¡eoaec+. |A 9t7tt
OUR NEW LOCATION
2119 E. KimberIy Road
Bettendorf, IA 52722
Move your education ahead with
Brown Mackie College – Quad Cities
Accredited Member, ACICS
©2010 Brown Mackie College 2432-09/10
Our convenient
ONE COURSE A MONTH
schedule fts your life.
Expanded Program
Offerings Coming Soon!
Call for more information!
1.888.870.5543
ClickBrownMackie3.com
B
u
s
i
n
e
s
s



P
o
l
i
t
i
c
s



A
r
t
s



C
u
l
t
u
r
e



N
o
w
Y
o
u

K
n
o
w



R
i
v
e
r
C
i
t
i
e
s
R
e
a
d
e
r
.
c
o
m
R
i
v
e
r

C
i
t
i
e
s


R
e
a
d
e
r


V
o
l
.

1
7

N
o
.

7
6
1



S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
6

-

2
9
,

2
0
1
0
28
www.gogreenmetro.com
OVER HALF
OF METRO’S
FLEET RUNS
ON CLEAN
BURNING
COMPRESSED
NATURAL GAS.
I like knowing that I’m doing my part
for the environment by riding Metro.
Their fleet of CNG buses make the skies
a little bluer now for everybody.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->