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Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER
Release 2000i2 T072-310-02

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

Copyright
Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER
COPYRIGHT © 1989-2000 PARAMETRIC TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER Training Guide may not be copied, reproduced, disclosed, transferred, or reduced to any form, including electronic medium or machine-readable form, or transmitted or publicly performed by any means, electronic or otherwise, unless Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) consents in writing in advance. Use of the software has been provided under a Software License Agreement. Information described in this manual is furnished for information only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by PTC. PTC assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this manual. The software contains valuable trade secrets and proprietary information and is protected by United States copyright laws and copyright laws of other countries. Unauthorized use of the software or its documentation can result in civil damages and criminal prosecution. Pro/ENGINEER and Pro/MECHANICA are registered trademarks, and all product names in the PTC product family and the PTC logo are trademarks of Parametric Technology Corporation in the United States and other countries. All other companies and products referenced herein have trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. US GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND This Software and Documentation are provided with RESTRICTED RIGHTS. Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software-Restricted Rights at 48 CFR 52.227-19, as applicable. Parametric Technology Corporation, 128 Technology Drive, Waltham, MA 02453 © 2000 Parametric Technology Corporation. Unpublished – all rights reserved under the copyright laws of the United States. PRINTING HISTORY Document No. Date T072-310-01 T072-310-02 07/10/00 09/08/00

Description Initial Printing of Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER for Release 2000i2 Revisions to Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER for Release 2000i2

Order Number DT-072-310-EN Printed in U.S.A

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

Training Agenda
Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER
Day 1
Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER The Pro/ENGINEER Interface Pick-and-Place Features The Sketcher Mode Sketched Features

Day 2
Datum Planes Parent/Child Relationships Simple Sweeps and Blends Relations

Day 3
Patterns and Copy Drawing Creation and Views Additional Detailing and Associativity Creating Assemblies

Day 4
Layers and Suppression Additional Datum Features Additional Advanced Features The Resolve Environment

Day 5
Information Tools Configuring Pro/ENGINEER Modeling Philosophy

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

PTC Telephone and Fax Numbers
The following is a list of telephone and fax numbers you may find useful:

Education Services Registration in North America
Tel: Fax: (888)-782-3773 (781) 398-5553

Technical Support (Monday - Friday)
Tel: (800) 477-6435 (U.S.) (781) 894-5332 or (781) 894-5523 (outside U.S.) Fax: (781) 398-5650

License Management
Tel: (800) 216-8945 (U.S.) (781) 398-5559 (outside U.S.) Fax: (781) 398-5795

Contracts
Tel: (800) 791-9966 (U.S.) (781) 398-5700 (outside U.S.)

In addition, you can find the PTC home page on the World Wide Web at: http://www.ptc.com. The Web site contains the latest training schedules, course descriptions, registration information, directions to training facilities, as well as information on PTC, the Pro/ENGINEER product line, Consulting Services, Customer Support, and Pro/PARTNERS

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Acknowledgments
The Pro/ENGINEER curriculum is a joint development effort between the courseware development teams at PTC and RAND Worldwide. Both companies strive to develop industry leading training material and in turn deliver it to you the customer.

PTC 128 Technology Drive Waltham, MA 02453 USA 1-781-398-5000 http://www.ptc.com

RAND Worldwide 5285 Solar Drive Mississauga, ON Canada L4W 5B8 1-877-726-3243 http://www.rand.com

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

Table of Contents
Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER
INTRODUCTION TO PRO/ENGINEER 1-1
Pro/ENGINEER: A SOLID MODELER............................................................................1-2
Feature-Based .................................................................................................................... 1-3 Parametric .......................................................................................................................... 1-4 Associative......................................................................................................................... 1-5

THE PRO/ENGINEER INTERFACE

2-1

SCREEN LAYOUT............................................................................................................2-2
Main Window .................................................................................................................... 2-2 Pull-Down Menus .............................................................................................................. 2-2 Toolbar............................................................................................................................... 2-3 Display Area ...................................................................................................................... 2-3 Message Area..................................................................................................................... 2-4

WORKING WITH MODELS ............................................................................................2-4
Using Dialog Boxes ........................................................................................................... 2-5 Retrieving Models.............................................................................................................. 2-6 Retrieving Multiple Models ............................................................................................... 2-8 Saving Changes.................................................................................................................. 2-9 Closing Windows............................................................................................................... 2-9 Deleting Files ..................................................................................................................... 2-9

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................................................2-11
EXERCISE 1: Using Pro/ENGINEER ............................................................................ 2-11 EXERCISE 2: Manipulating Model Size and Orientation ............................................... 2-14 EXERCISE 3: Interrogating the Model Tree ................................................................... 2-17 EXERCISE 4: Challenge Exercise................................................................................... 2-20

MODULE SUMMARY....................................................................................................2-24

PICK-AND-PLACE FEATURES

3-1

PICK AND PLACE FEATURES.......................................................................................3-2
Creating the Straight Hole Feature..................................................................................... 3-2 Creating the Simple Round ................................................................................................ 3-5 Specifying Radius Values for a Simple Round .................................................................. 3-7

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited

Creating an Edge Chamfer .................................................................................................3-7

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ......................................................................................... 3-9
EXERCISE 1: Creating an Edge Chamfer .........................................................................3-9 EXERCISE 2: Creating a Simple Edge Chain Round Feature .........................................3-14 EXERCISE 3: Exploring the Straight Hole Feature.........................................................3-20 Exercise 4: Challenge Exercise ........................................................................................3-29

MODULE SUMMARY ................................................................................................... 3-32

SKETCHER BASICS

4-1

THE SKETCHER ENVIRONMENT ................................................................................ 4-2
The Sketcher Interface........................................................................................................4-2 Intent Manager ...................................................................................................................4-3 Pop-Up Menus....................................................................................................................4-4

SKETCHER MODE FUNCTIONALITY ......................................................................... 4-5
Sketcher Menus ..................................................................................................................4-5 Specifying References ........................................................................................................4-6 Creating Geometry .............................................................................................................4-6 Dimensioning .....................................................................................................................4-8 Constraining .....................................................................................................................4-10 Additional Sketcher Tools................................................................................................4-11 SETTING SKETCHER PREFERENCES........................................................................4-14

SKETCHER PHILOSOPHY ........................................................................................... 4-17
Rules of Thumb ................................................................................................................4-17

LABORATORY PRACTICAL ....................................................................................... 4-19
EXERCISE 1: Sketching Basics.......................................................................................4-19 EXERCISE 2: Sketching in Steps ....................................................................................4-25 EXERCISE 3: Sketching a Hexagon................................................................................4-30

MODULE SUMMARY ................................................................................................... 4-33

SKETCHED FEATURES

5-1

TWO SKETCHED FEATURES........................................................................................ 5-2
Specifying Extruded and Revolved Forms .........................................................................5-2

SKETCHING AND REFERENCE PLANES.................................................................... 5-3
The Sketching Plane’s Default Orientation ........................................................................5-4

SKETCHER BASICS ........................................................................................................ 5-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ......................................................................................... 5-9
EXERCISE 1: Creating a Cut.............................................................................................5-9 EXERCISE 2: Creating a Protrusion................................................................................5-20

MODULE SUMMARY ................................................................................................... 5-24

........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7-6 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .................................... 6-13 MODULE SUMMARY.........................6-16 PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIPS 7-1 PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIPS....7-19 SWEEPS AND BLENDS 8-1 SWEPT FEATURES ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7-5 Using Feature Insert Mode........8-3 Creating Parallel Blends...............................................................7-9 EXERCISE 1: Changing Design Intent .................................................................. 7-2 Parent/Child Relationships with a Sketched Feature ........................... 7-3 ORDER OF FEATURE REGENERATION ..........Commercial Use Prohibited DATUM PLANES 6-1 USING BASE FEATURES AND DATUM PLANES ........................................................6-5 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Base Feature ......................................... 8-3 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ...............................................8-6 EXERCISE 1: Creating Parallel Blend Features................................................................. 6-2 Using Default Datums as the Base Feature............................................ 9-3 DEFINING PARAMETRIC RELATIONS................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 6-9 EXERCISE 3: Creating an Additional Datum Plane ..............................................7-2 Parent/Child Relationships with Pick-and-Place Features ................................................................................................................................................ 7-10 MODULE SUMMARY............................... 7-2 Changing the Parents of a Feature ......9-2 ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 6-3 CREATING ADDITIONAL DATUM PLANES............................................................ 6-5 EXERCISE 2: Using Default Datums as References to Other Features .................................. 8-6 EXERCISE 2: Creating a Simple Sweep Protrusion................. 8-12 MODULE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................... 6-2 What is a Datum Plane? ................................................ 8-2 BLEND FEATURES....................................................................................... 6-4 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ...............................For University Use Only ...................................................................8-2 Defining a Sweep ................................................................................................................................................................................... 8-2 Sweep Sections and Trajectories.............................6-2 The Base Feature and Its Importance........................................6-3 Defining a Datum Plane...... 6-3 Internal Datums............................................................8-16 RELATIONS 9-1 Types of Relations ........................................................................................................................................................

10-8 Choosing Features .....9-4 Relations: An Illustration ..............................................10-17 EXERCISE 4: Copying Features....................................................................................................10-8 Establishing Dependence..........................................................................................................................11-2 Types of Views....................................................................................................................... 11-2 Creating a Drawing...................................................... 12-2 ....................................................9-4 Using Relations .............................................11-7 MODULE SUMMARY .9-8 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ..............................................................................................................10-10 EXERCISE 2: Creating a Reference Pattern ....................................................................................................................................For University Use Only ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10-31 DRAWINGS AND VIEWS 11-1 DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS............................................... 11-14 ADDITIONAL DETAILING AND ASSOCIATIVITY 12-1 CAPTURING DESIGN INTENT ..........................................................................................................................................10-8 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ................................................................. 11-7 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Drawing ...9-6 Design Changes................................................................................................................ 10-2 Benefits of Patterning ........... 9-16 DUPLICATING FEATURES: PATTERNS AND COPY 10-1 CREATING A PATTERN................................................................................................................................................................11-2 Adding Drawing Views.................................10-13 EXERCISE 3: Creating Rotational Patterns of Sketched Features.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................9-5 Order of Relations .................................................................................11-2 Adding a Cross Section ..................................................................................Commercial Use Prohibited Representing Relations: Types and Symbols .............................................................................................................................10-2 Pattern Options ..............................................................................................................................................................................................10-27 MODULE SUMMARY ....................................11-4 Manipulating Views .................................... 10-10 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Dimension Pattern......11-5 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .......................................................................................................................9-9 EXERCISE 2: Creating Parameters for Feature-Control........................................................................10-2 Types of Patterns ..................................... 10-8 Specifying Location..............................................................................................................................................10-3 THE COPY FEATURE .............................................. 9-9 EXERCISE 1: Creating Relations .........................................9-13 MODULE SUMMARY ........

............................................................................................ 13-3 Constraint Options .................................................. 14-3 Setting the Display Status of a Layer ............ 13-3 Packaging or Under-Constrained Components ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................14-2 Functionality .... 14-9 EXERCISE 2: Using Layers in Assembly Mode..................................................................................................... 14-20 ....................................... 14-2 Creating Layers........ 14-6 SUPPRESSION FUNCTIONALITY ............................................ 12-2 Manipulating Dimensions .........13-9 Extracting a Bill of Materials................. 14-2 CREATING LAYERS............Commercial Use Prohibited Detailing the Drawing.............................................................................................14-9 EXERCISE 1: Using Layers in Part Mode .......................... 14-8 Suppressing Parent/Child Relationships ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14-4 Manipulating Layer Display Status........................................................................................... 13-11 MODULE SUMMARY............................................................................12-5 EXERCISE 1: Detailing the Gear Part Drawing...For University Use Only ......................................... 13-8 OTHER ASSEMBLY OPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 12-3 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ...... 14-3 Associating Items to a Layer..... 12-5 MODULE SUMMARY.................... 12-2 Two Types of Dimensions .......................................................................13-22 LAYERS AND SUPPRESSION 14-1 DEFINING LAYERS ..........................................................................................................12-10 CREATING ASSEMBLIES 13-1 ASSEMBLY CREATION ....................... 14-8 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .................................................13-2 The Surface Normal Vector ........................................................ 13-9 Creating Exploded Views ...................................................................... 14-13 EXERCISE 3: Suppressing in Part Mode ............................................................................................................................................. 12-2 Drawing and Solid Model: Need for Consistency............................ 13-7 ASSEMBLY MODIFICATION....................................................................................................... 13-9 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 14-2 Working Rules ...14-7 Using Suppression..................14-2 Selecting the Object .......13-8 Changing Design Intent of the Assembly ........ 14-8 Saving and Resuming Suppressed Features ...........................................................................................................13-11 EXERCISE 1: Creating and Modifying an Assembly .........................

.............................................16-5 Creating Counterbores and Countersunk Holes.......................................................................................................................................... 16-8 EXERCISE 1: Creating a Neutral Plane Draft Feature ..... 15-2 Datum Axes.......................................... 17-6 EXERCISE 1: Resolving a Failure................................................ 16-4 Creating a Rib............................................................................................................................14-22 MODULE SUMMARY ........................17-2 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ..............................................................18-2 Accessing Information about Part Features............ 18-2 Obtaining Information about a Specific Feature................................................................................................... 17-10 INFORMATION TOOLS 18-1 MODEL DESIGN INFORMATION ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................16-8 EXERCISE 2: Creating a Rib........................................................................................................16-2 OTHER FEATURES ..............................................18-2 .........................15-3 Datum Coordinate Systems ........For University Use Only ............................................................ 14-25 ADDITIONAL DATUM FEATURES 15-1 ADDITIONAL DATUM FEATURES ....................................................................................................................................Commercial Use Prohibited EXERCISE 4: Suppressing Components in Assembly Mode ................................15-2 Datum Curves............................................................ 17-2 Entering the Resolve Environment.......................16-13 MODULE SUMMARY .............................................................................. 15-8 ADDITIONAL ADVANCED FEATURES 16-1 SURFACE DEFORMATION...................................................................................................................... 16-2 Creating a Draft Feature ............................................................................................................... 16-15 THE RESOLVE ENVIRONMENT 17-1 TYPES OF FAILURES .......................................................16-12 EXERCISE 3: Creating a Sketched Hole .......................................................................................................................................................................................................15-4 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ........................................................16-4 Creating Standard Holes Based on Units...................15-5 MODULE SUMMARY ......................................................................................................................17-2 Using the Resolve Environment Tools....................................................17-6 MODULE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................................................................................................15-3 Datum Points ........................................................................ 15-5 EXERCISE 1: Creating Additional Datum Features................................................................18-2 Obtaining Regeneration Information.......16-6 LABORATORY PRACTICAL ......................................................................................................................................................................................

......................................................................................................................................................................................... 19-10 Exercise 2: Creating a Mapkey .................................................................................................. 19-18 MODULE SUMMARY... 20-2 Creating Parent/Child Relationships ...................................................................19-21 MODELING PHILOSOPHY 20-1 THE DESIGN INTENT................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20-2 Advantages of Pro/ENGINEER’s Associativity................................................................................................... 18-3 Calculating Clearance and Interference ................................... A-9 SECTION 4: Creating the Upper Housing Part ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. INTERFERENCE.......................... A-5 SECTION 3: Creating the Snap Ring Part ........18-5 EXERCISE 1: Using Information Tools...............19-5 Adding Icons to Existing Toolbars .....................................................................................For University Use Only .........................................................................................................18-8 CONFIGURING PRO/ENGINEER 19-1 CUSTOMIZING PRO/ENGINEER .....................19-7 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .......................................20-5 PROJECT LABORATORY A-1 INTRODUCTION ............................................. 18-5 MODULE SUMMARY..............................................19-10 EXERCISE 1: Setting Up a Configuration File .A-18 ....... 19-2 Creating Mapkeys ... A-3 SECTION 2: Creating the Lower Housing Part..... A-11 CREATING ASSEMBLIES AND DEVELOPING PART MODELS ................................................................................... AND MASS PROPERTIES................................................................................................................................. 20-4 MODULE SUMMARY..................................................................19-2 Configuration Files ............................................................................................... 18-4 LABORATORY PRACTICAL .................................20-2 Recording Your Design Criteria ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................A-2 PART CREATION . 20-3 Changing Design Intent ...... 19-5 Pull-down Menus and Mapkeys............................................................................ 18-2 MEASUREMENT...................................................18-3 Calculating Mass Properties.............................................................................................................................................................................................................A-3 SECTION 1: Creating the Motor Part..................................................................... 20-2 Using Pro/ENGINEER as a Parametric Tool.................................................................................... 19-4 CONFIGURING THE TOOLBAR .......................................................................................... 19-15 EXERCISE 3: Configuring the Model Tree ....................................................................... 19-6 THE MODEL TREE .........Commercial Use Prohibited Obtaining Information about the Assembly .............

. A-29 SECTION 1: Designing the Cover Part.......................................................................................... C-8 Internet .............................................................. B-2 PTC Help Features ..................................... AND DRAWINGS ............................................................................................................................A-33 SECTION: 3: Completing the Blower Assembly.................................................................A-30 SECTION 2: Completing the Motor Part ........Commercial Use Prohibited SECTION 1: Creating the Motor Assembly.....................................................HELP B-1 PTC HELP OVERVIEW ............. C-5 ONLINE SERVICES ..................A-22 SECTION 3: Creating the Blower Assembly.... C-9 ELECTRONIC SERVICES ...................................................................A-23 SECTION 4: Creating the Motor Part Drawing ......................................... B-2 USING THE PRO/ENGINEER HELP SYSTEM ............................................For University Use Only ..................................................... C-2 OPENING A TECHNICAL SUPPORT CALL....................... C-2 Opening a Call via Telephone .....................................A-42 SECTION 2: Finishing the Lower Housing ...........................A-44 SECTION 3: Finishing the Drawing ................. B-3 PTC HELP MODULE LIST ............................... C-3 Sending Data to Technical Support ........................................................................................................................ C-8 Telephone ................................. B-2 To Get Help on Tasks in a Dialog Box.......................................A-35 SECTION 4: Finishing the Motor Assembly ........................................ C-13 .................................................................................................. C-2 Opening a call via email ............................................. C-4 REGISTERING FOR ON-LINE SUPPORT ............... B-4 PTC GLOBAL SERVICES: TECHNICAL SUPPORT C-1 FINDING THE TECHNICAL SUPPORT PAGE ...........................................................................................A-18 SECTION 2: Concurrent Design of the Motor Housing ............................................................................................................................................................. C-3 CALL / SPR FLOW CHART AND PRIORITIES.............................................A-39 .................................. C-8 CONTACT INFORMATION ....................................................................................A-26 MODEL INTERROGATION ................................................... A-42 SECTION 1: Developing the Motor Part ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................A-46 USING PTC............................................................................................................................................................................. ASSEMBLIES.................................................. C-6 FINDING SOLUTIONS IN THE KNOWLEDGE BASE....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... B-2 GETTING HELP THROUGH THE PTC HELP SIDEBAR ................................................................................................................... C-6 GETTING UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION.............................. C-3 Opening Calls on the PTC Web Site ................................................................................................................................................... A-41 FINISHING PARTS..............................................................

you will be able to: • • Explain Pro/ENGINEER’s uses as a solid modeler Define the three pillars of Pro/ENGINEER’s practical philosophy.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER Pro/ENGINEER is a powerful application. In this lesson. and parametric Page 1-1 . you will learn the concepts that drive this philosophy and the powerful functionality that it generates. associative. OBJECTIVES After completing this module. It is ideal for capturing the design intent of your models because at its foundation is a practical philosophy.For University Use Only . its being feature-based.

While you can manipulate a solid model’s display on the screen.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . You can calculate mass properties directly from the geometry you create.For University Use Only . In Pro/ENGINEER. associative.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pro/ENGINEER: A SOLID MODELER Pro/ENGINEER is a solid modeler—it develops models as solids. As a solid modeling tool. and parametric. Figure 1: Model Display Pag e 1 . the model itself remains a solid. allowing you to work in a three-dimensional environment. • • • • The solid models have volumes and surface areas. as shown in Figure 1. Pro/ENGINEER is feature-based.

as you construct your model feature by feature you choose your building blocks as well as the order you create them in. adding individual features one at a time. thus capturing your design intent. This means.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Feature-Based Pro/ENGINEER is feature-based.For University Use Only . Simple features make your individual parts as well as the overall model flexible and reliable. behind every feature creation.All Cuts and Holes Added Chamfer Added Rounds Added Figure 2: Building Models Feature by Feature I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R Pag e 1 .3 . Design intent is the motive. • • Base Feature Protrusion Added Blind Cut Added Thru. Things to remember: • • Pro/ENGINEER allows building a model incrementally. A feature is the smallest building block in a part model. Geometry is composed of a series of easy to understand features. the all-driving force.

This means: • • • • Geometry can be easily changed by modifying dimensions Features are interrelated. it is driven by parameters or variable dimensions.For University Use Only . A relationship. 5 10 Figure 3: Protrusion and Hole Follow Side of Block Pag e 1 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Parametric Pro/ENGINEER is parametric i.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . known as a parent/child relationship. thus preserving design intent.e. is developed between features when one feature references another. Modifications of a single feature propagate changes in other features as well.

5 . For example if you change dimensions on a drawing the change will be reflected in the associated part.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Associative Pro/ENGINEER models are often combinations of various parts. That means if you make changes at a certain level those changes propagate to all the levels. 5 Original shaft before length modification Shaft associated to assembly 10 Modification of shaft length Assembly automatically updates Figure 4: Associativity I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R Pag e 1 .For University Use Only . and other objects. Figure 4 shows associativity between a part and an assembly. drawings. assemblies. Pro/ENGINEER makes all these entities fully associative.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited .

erase. Prove the parametric. you examine the Pro/ENGINEER interface.Commercial Use Prohibited Module The Pro/ENGINEER Interface In this module. and feature-based characteristics of Pro/ENGINEER. associative. save.For University Use Only . Describe the uses of the Model Tree and the Menu Manager. Objectives After completing this module. you will be able to: • • • • • Define the four elements of the main Pro/ENGINEER window and describe their functionality. List the different Pro/ENGINEER model file types. Retrieve. Page 2-1 . Proficiency in the interface enables you to take advantage of Pro/ENGINEER’s powerful design functionality in subsequent lessons. and delete various Pro/ENGINEER models.

For University Use Only . the main window opens on your desktop. You create your designs in this window.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SCREEN LAYOUT Figure 1 Sample Model in Pro/E Main Window Main Window When you start Pro/ENGINEER.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . The four distinct elements of the window are: • • • • Pull-down menu Toolbar Display area Message area Pull-Down Menus The Pro/ENGINEER pull-down menus are valid in all modes of the system. Pag e 2 .

as well as sensitivity and optimization studies. Figure 2: Standard Pro/ENGINEER Toolbar Display Area Pro/ENGINEER displays parts. Info – Applications – Provides access to various Pro/ENGINEER modules. View – Datum – Creates datum features Provides access to options for model. Toolbar The Pro/ENGINEER toolbar contains icons for frequently used options from the pull-down menus. Analysis – Contains commands for performing queries and generating reports. Help – Contains commands for accessing online documentation. and models on the screen in the display area.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • • • • • • • File – C ontains Edit – commands for manipulating files Contains action commands Contains commands for controlling model display and display performance. Note: Surfaces of models are valid in Pro/ENGINEER regardless of the model display. the system distinguishes between an edge and a surface of the model by highlighting them in two different colors. Utilities – Contains commands for customizing your working environment. surface. The toolbar can also be customized. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. When you select the model on the screen.For University Use Only . curve and motion analysis. assemblies. drawings.3 . An object’s display depends on the current environment settings. Windows – Contains commands for managing various Pro/ENGINEER windows.

Note: When Pro/ENGINEER requires data input.For University Use Only . you can use the scrollbar located on the right. Prompting you for additional information by sounding a bell. . Displaying icons in the message area.ASM – Assembly files contain information on how 3-D parts and assemblies are assembled together.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . • • • • .PRT – Part files allow you to create 3-D models consisting of many features. it temporarily disables all other functions until you enter the required data. Pag e 2 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Message Area The message area between the toolbar and the display area performs multiple functions by: • • • • Providing status information for every operation performed. there is also a SKETCHER mode that allows you to create twodimensional sketches that are parametric.DRW – Drawing files contain 2-D fully dimensioned drawings of parts or assemblies. In addition. and assemblies. WORKING WITH MODELS Pro/ENGINEER has file extensions associated with different models such as drawings. . which represent different forms of information such as warnings or status prompts. Providing queries/hints for additional information to complete a command/task. To view old messages.SEC – Sketch files contain 2-D non-associative sketches that can be imported while in sketcher mode. parts. .

Optional elements are additional operations that you may perform but are not necessary for completing the feature. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. viewing. The following figure illustrates a model dialog box that defines a round feature. General Dialog Box A general dialog box performs general functions such as saving. general and model. and saving. Required elements are modifiable properties of a Pro/ENGINEER feature that must be specified to completely define a feature.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Using Dialog Boxes Dialog boxes in Pro/ENGINEER are used for model manipulation. and interrogating. There are two kinds of dialog boxes. Title Tabs Drop-down arrow Check box Text box Command button Figure 3: Example of a Dialog Box Model Dialog Box A model dialog box creates and modifies model geometry by requesting required and optional elements from the user.For University Use Only . feature creation. The graphic in Figure 3 represents some of the common elements in a general dialog box.5 .

creating the feature or model entity. Resolve rectifies failures in defined elements by allowing changes to these elements.For University Use Only .6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pro/ENGINEER also opens up a MODEL TREE window and a Menu Manager that allow you to create.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 4: A Model Dialog Box Buttons in the above dialog box are described below: • • • • • • – Allows you to define and/or change selected elements in the dialog box. Define Refs – Displays the external references of the current selected element. Preview In addition. Info – Completes the definition of the elements. It is not available until you have defined all required elements. You can choose features from the MODEL TREE for modification and deletion. Retrieving Models When you retrieve files into a working session by clicking File > Open . Using the Model Tree The MODEL TREE presents the model structure feature by feature. OK Cancel – Cancels the current feature or model entity. MODEL TREE icons denote the corresponding item type and its current status. – Generates a listing of the properties of the feature that you are creating. manipulate. – Allows you to check geometry before completing the feature definition. Pag e 2 . and modify model geometry.

Note: The system administrator must install and set up the online documentation for you to be able to access this functionality. Using the MENU MANAGER. modify. If you need additional help. Help with Menus Holding your mouse over any menu option provides one-line help displayed on the bottom of the current active window. and duplicate model geometry. choose the menu option with the right mouse button and click Get Help from the pop-up menu.For University Use Only . T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. you drive along a certain path to complete a task by making choices from menus. Each time you choose an option from a submenu. Pro/ENGINEER opens another submenu until you have finished making selections.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 5: Model Tree with Added Parameters Using the Menu Manager The MENU MANAGER displays a list of menus that you can use to create.7 .

However. you must click Window > Activate .8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . The new main window contains the same toolbars and message area as the first main window. Pro/ENGINEER automatically opens a new main window each time you open another model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Retrieving Multiple Models You can have multiple models in session at one time—each window containing a model—making it possible to refer to one model while working on another. To activate a window. Figure 6: A New Window over the Main Window Pag e 2 . Working with Multiple Sub-Windows If the main window currently contains a model.For University Use Only . Pro/ENGINEER allows you to work only on one active window at a time.

To erase all models that are in session but not displayed in windows.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Saving Changes Save changes at any time by clicking File > Save . The model still occupies RAM space on the computer. It is a good practice to save often. use the All Versions option. you must specify the version number in the retrieval name. Deleting Files Click File > Delete to remove old versions of a model. When saving a model. thereby creating two existing versions. Pro/ENGINEER creates a new version by increasing the version number. the system deletes all versions of the model from the system memory as well as from the hard drive. To display the version numbers in the FILE OPEN dialog box.For University Use Only . If the model is no longer required. To retrieve an old version. erase it from memory by clicking File > Erase > Current. When you click File > Delete > All Versions . click File > Erase > Not Displayed . this does not remove the model from the current session of Pro/ENGINEER. Figure 7: Opening a Version of a Model Closing Windows To close a window use Window > Close or File > Close Window .9 . However. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2.

5. Pag e 2 . Method The first two exercises of this lab deal with the user interface and how to manipulate the size and orientation of a model. 2. Click File > Open . 3. Click Apply . clear the Datum Planes and Datum Axes check boxes. 4. From the DEFAULT ORIENT drop-down list. Only assembly files become visible. click Hidden Line from the DISPLAY STYLE drop-down list. Click Apply . associative.asm . Manipulate the display of the assembly.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal To prove that Pro/ENGINEER is a parametric. Click Utilities > Environment . Open master.For University Use Only . Open the master assembly. and feature-based solid modeler. In the OPEN dialog box. EXERCISE 1: Using Pro/ENGINEER Task 1. In the ENVIRONMENT dialog box. At the bottom of the dialog box. Change the orientation of the assembly. 1. 2. click Isometric . associative. 3. click the Type drop-down arrow and click Assembly . Do not close the dialog box. 1. The final exercise demonstrates that Pro/ENGINEER is a parametric. Task 2. 1. Task 3. and featurebased solid modeler.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Use the toolbar to manipulate the model. Display datum planes Display axes Display coordinate systems Display datum points Figure 9: Datum Display Section of Toolbar 2. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2.11 . 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Click on the Datum Planes icon in the toolbar. Datum planes reappear.For University Use Only . Figure 8: Hidden Line Display of Assembly Task 4. Shade the model. Click Apply . Change the orientation back to Trimetric . Click OK to close the dialog box. Click the Shade icon from the toolbar. 1. 3.

4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Wireframe display Shade display Hidden Line display No Hidden Line display Figure 10: Changing the Model Display 3. revert back to hidden line display. 5. Pag e 2 .1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . Note: Hidden Line remains selected on the toolbar because we have only cosmetically shaded the model and have not switched to a shaded display mode. You may also use the pull-down menu to cosmetically shade the model. Once again. Click View > Shade . Click View > Repaint . Repaint the screen.

Change the size and orientation of the model using the toolbar. The model zooms in. 3. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. In Options. 1. Pick a location on the model with the left mouse button and pick a second location to create a zoom box. Reference 1 refers to what is to be parallel to the screen and Reference 2 what orients that parallel reference. Click the Zoom In icon. 3. 5. Click the Refit icon to resize the model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Manipulating Model Size and Orientation Task 1. Pick the front surface of the bracket part as shown in Figure 12. Orient the model so that the bracket faces front. Task 2. . 1. Now click the Zoom Out icon. Refit Repaint Orient the model Zoom In Figure 11: Model Orientation Options Saved Views 2.13 .For University Use Only . Leave the default FRONT from the REFERENCE 1 drop-down list. A dialog box opens with the Orient by Reference type already selected. 4. Click 2. 4. 5.

For University Use Only . Figure 12: Surface Selection for Orientation 6.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick this surface to face front for Reference 1. Pick this surface as the top for Reference 2. 7. 8. Now pick the other surface of the bracket part as Reference 2. Click OK in the ORIENTATION dialog box. The model changes its orientation. Figure 13: Model after Orientation Pag e 2 .1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . as shown above.

Tips & Techniques: You can also manipulate the model orientation by using the mouse buttons and <Ctrl> key.15 . Change the model back to the default orientation. and the right pans it.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 3. 1.For University Use Only . the middle spins it. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. Click View > Default . The left mouse button zooms the model.

Click Done/Return in the ASSEM MOD menu. if the Model Tree is not on. This proves the parametric nature of the assembly. 4. Pick the shaft as shown in Figure 14.PRT. The shaft moves to its new location. Modify offset of the master shaft part. Right-click and hold on MASTER_SHAFT. Click Done in the MODIFY menu of the MENU MANAGER. click Regenerate . Click View > Model Tree . 2. 5. 1. 3. Pag e 2 . 2. click Automatic .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Interrogating the Model Tree Task 1. 4. 6. Note that the gear and crank parts follow the shaft. In PRT TO REGEN menu.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .PRT. Open MASTER_SHAFT. Task 3. Click Modify from pop-up menu. Pick the 76 dimension that appears. 1. In ASSEMBLY menu. In the text box in the message area. type [90] and press <ENTER>. Modify dimensions of model using the MODEL TREE. 3. Test the associativity by modifying length of the shaft part. 7. Click Modify in MENU MANAGER.For University Use Only . Task 2. 1. 3. 2. Regenerate the assembly.

Task 4.PRT. 8. 3. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. Make the assembly window active. click Regenerate > Automatic . The regenerated assembly appears with modified shaft dimensions. 7. Figure 14: Modifying the Shaft 4. From Menu Manager.For University Use Only . Accept the default name of MASTER_SHAFT. Check for associativity between the shaft and the assembly 1. 5. Type [250] and press <ENTER>. Click Window > Activate . Click Regenerate in the MENU MANAGER.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick the shaft here Pick this dimension to modify. Pick the 152 dimension. as shown below. 2. Regenerate the assembly. Save the shaft model by clicking . 6. 4.17 . Close the SHAFT window by clicking Window > Close Window .

For University Use Only . Pag e 2 . This proves the associativity of Pro/ENGINEER. A modification made to a part automatically modifies the whole assembly.1 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 15: Assembly after Modification and Regeneration 5.

For University Use Only . Click File > Close Window . 6. 3. Now. investigate the associativity between one assembly component and an incomplete drawing. Click Modify in the DETAIL menu. 1. Click Drawing > Regenerate > Model to see the changes. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. Enter 90. Open the drawing DRAW_CRANK2.19 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 4: Challenge Exercise Task 1.5 as the new dimension. Pick the dimension to be modified 60.50 . 8. Activate the assembly window. 4. 7. Notice that the crank is updated in the assembly. 2. Close the drawing window. DRW. Modify this dimension Figure 16: Crank2 Drawing 5. Save the drawing model.

3. Check for interference between the solid models of the assembly. The MODEL ANALYSIS dialog box appears. Accept the defaults and click Compute . 6. Use the arrow to toggle to the different models.2 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . In the RESULTS window.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 2. TYPE dropdown list Figure 17: Analyzing Global Interference 4. Change the analysis type to check for global interference. Pag e 2 . Start the calculation. Start the interference calculation. 1. Save the assembly model. Select Global Interference from the TYPE drop-down list. 2. Close the dialog box.For University Use Only . the system indicates that two parts are interfering. Click File > Save and accept default name. 5. Note that the volume of interference highlights on the screen. The default type is set to Assembly Mass Properties . Investigate the results. Click Analysis > Model Analysis .

Select CRANK2. Click OK from the dialog box to complete the operation. 1.21 . 2.For University Use Only . 1. Erase the models that are not displayed. Determine the results of closing the master assembly window. The system retrieves this model from the system memory.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 3. Click File > Erase > Not Displayed . In the FILE OPEN dialog box. 2. not from the computer hard drive. Click Window > Close Window from the pull-down menu. Remove the master assembly models that are not displayed in a window from the session memory. In Session icon Figure 18: Using the IN SESSION Option 3. Open the CRANK2 part that is still in memory. Task 4. Notice the base Pro/ENGINEER window cannot be removed as indicated in the message area. Click Open . PRT. T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. click the In Session icon. A dialog box appears with the selected models that are in session.

2 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 2. Erase the current file. Click File >Open . Click Cancel in the dialog box. Open the OPEN dialog box again. Close the operation. 1. Note that the CRANK2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 5. Task 6. Click File > Erase > Current .PRT is the only model that is listed because it was displayed in a window when you erased the other models. Erase the crank model from system memory to conserve RAM. Retrieve in session models again to determine which ones remain in session. 1. Pag e 2 . Confirm the operation.For University Use Only . Click In Session .

Pro/ENGINEER automatically opens a new main window each time you open an additional model.23 . T h e P ro / E NG IN E E R In t e rf a ce Pag e 2. Pro/ENGINEER models such as parts. Erasing models that are not in use frees up system memory.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you have learned that: • • • • • Pull-down menus. assemblies.For University Use Only . parametric. and associative characteristics. Models can be oriented and displayed on the screen in various ways. display area. toolbar. and drawings exhibit feature-based. You can work with multiple windows. and message area are the four important elements of the Pro/ENGINEER user interface.

Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only .

These features are called Pick-and-Place features. Objectives After completing this module.For University Use Only . Page 3-1 . delete. Create. Navigate among the various options of the HOLE dialog box to capture the intent of the hole element in the lab practical. and modify the three Pick-and-Place features. They are freely provided and can simply be utilized whenever needed. you will be able to: • • • Identify and define the three types of Pick-and-Place features.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Pick-and-Place Features Certain Pro/ENGINEER features need not be (Keep it simple) built.

Pag e 3 . Dimensions the center of the hole from two surfaces or edges using linear dimensions. you can choose from the following options in the PLACEMENT menu. Pro/ENGINEER places the feature on that location.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Choosing Hidden References Using Query Select When you click Query Select and then pick on a surface. The hole feature always removes material from your model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES PICK AND PLACE FEATURES The three Pick-and-Place features are: • • • straight hole edge round edge chamfer To create any of these features. Placement Options To place a hole on your model. you specify the appropriate placement references on your model and provide the required dimensions. • Linear – Places the hole on a plane.For University Use Only . That is. a dialog box appears with various reference options. if the placement reference moves. Creating the Straight Hole Feature Pro/ENGINEER creates all straight holes with a constant diameter. Note: Pick-and-Place features behave parametrically with respect to their placement references. the feature also moves.

Coaxial Figure 3: Coaxial Hole Pi ck-an d. only a diameter dimension for the hole itself. Does not create placement dimensions. Radial holes placed on a plane have a diameter. cylinder. Radial Figure 2: Radial Holes on a Plane • – Places the hole coaxially using an existing axis.3 . or cone. radius. or linear dimensioning scheme.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 1: Linear Hole • – Places the hole with respect to an axis using polar dimensions on a plane.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.

On Point Figure 4: On Point Hole Depth Options You can also create the hole from either side of the placement plane or from both sides using the Depth One and Depth Two options in the HOLE dialog box. Figure 5: Side Options The system determines how deep to create the hole based on your depth specification.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . Figure 6 illustrates the various depth options listed in the HOLE dialog box. Pag e 3 . The axis of the hole is normal to the placement surface.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • – Places the center of the hole directly on an on surface datum point.

Variable – Specifies radii at every selected edge at the endpoints and. Pi ck-an d. at intermediate vertices along the edge being rounded. Advanced rounds employ user-defined round shapes and transitions. Simple rounds employ the default round shape and transitions. Pro/ENGINEER offers two types of rounds: simple and advanced.For University Use Only . optionally.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Variable Thru All Thru Next To Reference Thru Until Figure 6: Hole Depth Options Creating the Simple Round Round features create a rounded smooth transition between two adjacent surfaces. Radius Options for a Simple Edge Chain Round • • Constant – Assigns the same radius value to every selected edge.5 . An edge round smoothes the hard edges between adjacent surfaces. Figure 7: Constant and Variable Radius Rounds • Full Round – Creates a round that completely removes a model surface.

Figure 9: Cut Feature Dimensioned to the Edge Round Pag e 3 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Full Round Figure 8: Full Round Note: Do not dimension other features to the edges or tangent edges of round features. Tip: You should create round features on your model as late in the design process as possible.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Round features make unstable parents.For University Use Only .

– Specifies a datum point. Thru Pnt/Vtx Default Values – Specifies a radius value as the system default value or a previously entered radius value in the SEL VALUE menu. Pi ck-an d.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Specifying Radius Values for a Simple Round • • • • – (default) Specifies a new radius value that does not appear in the menu. Use the <ESC> key to select other radius type options. Original Model Figure 11: Using the Thru Pnt/Vtx Option Creating an Edge Chamfer An edge chamfer feature removes a flat section of material from a selected edge or edges to create a beveled surface between the two original surfaces common to the edges. Round created tangent Original model Figure 10: Using the Pick On Surf Option Picked this vertex.For University Use Only . curve. The Pro/ENGINEER dimensioning schemes for edge chamfers are shown in Figure 12. Picked a point on this surface. or edge end through which the radius of the round should pass (Figure 11).Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3. vertex. Enter Pick On Surf – Specifies a point on the adjacent surface that determines the radius value (Figure 10).7 .

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited
NOTES

Figure 12: Edge Chamfer Dimensioning Schemes

Note:
When selecting circular edges for chamfers, Pro/ENGINEER only highlights one half of the edge. Since the system places the chamfer on the entire circular edge, you do not have to select the other half of the edge.

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LABORATORY PRACTICAL
Goal
By the end of this lab, you will have command over the important Pickand-Place features of Pro/ENGINEER: the Straight Hole, the Simple Edge Chain Round and the Edge Chamfer.

Method
This lab is structured to present the Pick-and-Place features in their order of complexity.

EXERCISE 1: Creating an Edge Chamfer
In this exercise, you add two edge chamfers to an existing model using two different dimensioning methods: 45 x d and d1x d2.

Figure 13: The Starting Model

Task 1.

Adding the 45 x d edge chamfer to a cylinder.

1. Retrieve the CHAMFERS.PRT from the INTRO_PROE_310 directory.

Pi ck-an d- Pla ce F eatu re s

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2. From MENU MANAGER, click Feature > Create > Solid > Chamfer . 3. Click Edge > 45 x d . Type [1.0] as the value for the chamfer dimension. 4. Pick the two circular edges on either end of the cylindrical protrusion. 5. After the edges have been selected, click Done Sel > Done Refs.

Pick these two edges

Figure 14: Selecting the Circular Edges

6. Click OK to complete the chamfer.

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Figure 15: Completed Chamfer

Task 2. model.

Add the D1 X D2 chamfer to the four edges at the bottom of the

1. Click Create > Solid > Chamfer > Edge . 2. Select D1 X D2 from the SCHEME menu. Type [1.0] as the value for D1 and [2.0] as the value for the D2 dimension. 3. Switch to a Hidden Line view. Click Query Sel , then pick the hidden bottom surface as the reference surface for the D1 dimension.

Pick the bottom surface.

Figure 16: Picking the Bottom Surface

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4. Pick the front edge and right side edge as edge references. 5. Click Query Sel , then pick the two hidden bottom edges.

Pick these two hidden bottom edges.

Pick front and right side edges

Figure 17: Picking the Hidden Edges

Note:
When Pro/ENGINEER prompts for you to pick an edge or surface, the system can determine the difference between the two, thus filtering out everything but the prompted reference type.

6. Click Done Sel > Done Refs . 7. Click OK to complete the chamfer. 8. Click the Shade icon to display a shaded model.

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Figure 18: Completed Chamfers Model

9. Save the model. Accept the default name when saving the part. 10. Close the current working window.

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EXERCISE 2: Creating a Simple Edge Chain Round Feature
In this exercise, you add four different simple edge chain round features to the model.

Figure 19: Simple Edge Chain Round Feature

Task 1.

Open the model and add some rounds.

1. Open ROUNDS.PRT. 2. Create the first round feature as a corner break on the front end of the cylinder. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Round > Simple > Done . 3. Give the round a constant radius value. Click Constant > Edge Chain > Done . 4. Leave the default tangent chain and pick the first edge of the cylinder to round, as shown in Figure 20. Click Done .

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Pick this edge

Figure 20: Selection of the Edge

5. Type [.5] as the value for the radius dimension and click OK . Task 2. Create a second edge round, similar to the first, at the other end of the cylinder. 1. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Round > Simple > Done . 2. Click Constant > Edge Chain > Done . 3. Pick the back edge of the cylinder, as shown in Figure 21, then choose Done .

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Pag e 3- 15

Pick the hidden vertical edge.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick this circular edge Figure 21: Second Edge Reference 4. Click OK . Pick the three visible vertical edges of the base as shown in Figure 22. Click One By One . Click Query Sel . Create a simple round with a variable radial attribute. Click Variable > Edge Chain > Done . Start defining the edge round. Click Done .1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Task 3. 5. Pag e 3 . Click Feature > Create > Solid > Round > Simple > Done . 1.For University Use Only .75] as the radius value. 3. Switch to the Hidden Line display. 2. Look at the final graphic of this section for an idea of what you want to achieve. Define the single edge references. Type [. 4. 6. 7.

2. type [0] as a value for the top of the edge. As the system highlights each end of every edge. Click Create > Solid > Round . Task 5. keeping track of the vertices that Pro/ENGINEER highlights. Complete the round feature. Do not add any intermediate points.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick these three edges Pick the fourth (hidden) edge here.17 . type [2] as a value for the bottom of the edge. part. Figure 22: Selecting the Variable Rounds References 8. Use the surface chain attribute to round the base edges of the 1. 2. Task 4. Click Simple > Done > Constant > Edge Chain > Done . Define the radius values. Click Done . Pi ck-an d. 1. Pro/ENGINEER highlights geometry when querying for information. Click OK .For University Use Only .

3. Click Pick on Surf . as shown in figure below. Pag e 3 . Click Query Sel .For University Use Only . 2.1 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . From the MENU MANAGER. 5. Click OK to create the feature. Figure 23: Selecting the Surface Reference 5. Task 6. press <ESC>. then pick the bottom surface as the selection reference. click Surf Chain over the default tangent chain. Pick the front edge of the base first. Read the message window. Click Select All > Done . 1. Now pick above the edge on the adjacent angled surface. 4. 4. Define a radius value by selecting on the surface of the model (without entering a numerical value as usually done). To activate the RADIUS TYPE menu. Pick the bottom surface.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3.

For University Use Only . Save the part and erase it from memory. The completed model will look as in the figure below. Pi ck-an d.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick this edge first Pickt this point on the surface to define radius Figure 24 Defining Radius by Picking on Surface 6.19 .Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3. Figure 25: The Completed Model 7.

Click Feature > Create > Solid > Hole . Pag e 3 .For University Use Only . as shown in Figure 27. 2. 1. as shown in Figure 26. Open STRAIGHT_HOLES.PRT. Create a linear placed hole with a variable depth of 30 on the top of the base feature of the model.2 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . The HOLE dialog box appears.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Exploring the Straight Hole Feature Four cooling fins Base feature 270-degree flange Fluid pipe Figure 26: Straight Hole Feature Task 1.

Leave the default hole type as Straight . Choose the placement plane by picking on the top surface of the base feature as shown in Figure 28.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3. Through the Primary Reference you define the location of the hole. 5. First click on the arrow next to the primary reference. Leave the depth one default as Variable and depth two as None . 7. Press <ENTER> .5] as the diameter value. Type [30] as the depth value. 6. 4.For University Use Only . Press <ENTER> .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 27 Hole Dialog Box 3. Type [7. Pi ck-an d.21 . 8.

10. click > Query Sel to pick the hidden side of the base feature. For the second linear reference again click > Query Sel to pick the visible front surface.For University Use Only . Press <ENTER>.2 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . For the first linear reference. Type [15] for the distance from this reference. Pag e 3 . 11.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Placement plane First dimension reference (hidden side surface) Second dimension reference Figure 28: Creating a Linear Placed Hole 9. Click . Type [10] as the distance for this reference. Press <ENTER>.

In the HOLE dialog box. 5. First dimension reference (hidden back surface) Second dimension reference (visible thin surface of fin) Placement plane Figure 30: Creating the Second Straight Hole Feature Pi ck-an d. Click Thru All as the depth option. 4. Pick the top surface of the first cooling fin near the right back corner. leave the default hole type as Straight . 1. Add a linear hole that runs through the cooling fins. as shown in Figure 30. Reference it to the back and right side surfaces of the fins.5] for the hole diameter.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 29: The First Completed Hole Task 2. 2. so that if the fins get longer or wider the hole will move with them. Press <ENTER>. Define the placement location.23 .Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.For University Use Only . Type [12. Start the definition of the hole feature. 3. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Hole .

Use the TO REFERENCE depth option to create another linear hole through the top three fins. Type [10] for the distance. In the HOLE dialog box. Then press <ENTER>. then pick the side surface (not the edge) of the topcooling fin. click Query Sel .2 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . use the repeat button . leave the default Straight hole type.5] as the diameter. then pick the hidden back side surface of the base feature. Note: If you are creating another hole after creating a hole. Figure 31: The Second Hole Placed Task 3. Press <ENTER> . For the first linear reference. Click To Reference in the Depth One option dropdown menu. Pag e 3 . Type [10] as the distance for this reference. 8. 2.For University Use Only . For the second reference.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 6. 1. 7. Then press <ENTER>. click Query Sel . You may preview the hole feature but do not close the HOLE dialog box. Type [12.

By this. Pi ck-an d. For the first Linear Reference. 7. 6. Define the second distance as 10 units as well. Complete the hole feature.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3. you are specifying that the hole has to end at the bottom surface of the third fin. 5. Press <Enter >. For the Primary Reference.25 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Pick this surface as the placement plane Second dimensional reference First Dimensional reference Figure 32: Creating the Third Hole 4. pick the visible side surface of the cooling fin. then pick the bottom surface of the third fin. For the second Linear Reference. Click Query Sel .For University Use Only . pick the top surface of the first fin as shown in figure. pick the front part of the base feature and type [10] for the distance.

3. Type [5] as a value for the hole diameter. select the front surface of the cylindrical protrusion as the primary reference. Let the Depth One dimension be a To Reference. In the HOLE dialog box. 7. 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Select the hidden underside surface Figure 33: The Up to Surface Hole Task 4.For University Use Only . leave the default hole type as Straight . Pag e 3 . Pick the A_3 axis of the cylindrical protrusion as the axial reference. In the HOLE PLACEMENT box. then pick the visible front surface of the base feature as the depth reference. Click Query Sel . Define the hole. 1. 6. If you cannot see the axis. turn it on in the toolbar. 4. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Hole 2. Select Coaxial from the PLACEMENT TYPE drop-down list.2 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Create a coaxial hole to the cylindrical feature.

Axis line (A_3) Depth surface to extrude up to Pick here for the placement plane Figure 34: Creating a Coaxial Straight Hole Pi ck-an d.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 8.For University Use Only .Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.27 . Click checkmark to complete the coaxial hole feature.

½ Diameter = 15mm ½ Depth One = To Reference ½ Depth Two = None ½ Depth Reference = Invisible surface of the circular flange. Set the hole placement. ½ Primary Reference = Visible front surface of the circular flange ½ Placement Type = Radial ½ Axial Reference = A_3 of the fluid pipe ½ Distance = 25 mm Pag e 3 .For University Use Only . Figure 35: The Completed Model 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Exercise 4: Challenge Exercise Task 1. 2.2 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Set the hole specifications. Create a straight hole radially placed on a planar surface.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES ½ Angular Reference = Front face of the flange near the angled cut. ½ Angle = 25. Optional: Change the diameter of the flange from 47 to 60 and regenerate to see the change in the model.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3. 4.For University Use Only .29 . Pi ck-an d. Complete the hole. Pick this axis Small angled surface Figure 36: Creating a Radial Mounting Hole Pick this surface as the placement location Figure 37: Selection of the Reference 3.

Pag e 3 .For University Use Only .3 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 5. Save the part and erase it from memory.

For University Use Only . coaxially. • • Pi ck-an d. they can complicate design intent with unwanted parent-child relationships. Also. and Chamfer form the three important Pick-and-Place features in Pro/ENGINEER. Chamfers can be placed not only on planes and perpendicular surfaces but also on circular edges.Pla ce F eatu re s Pag e 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. and on point and has many depth options. and Fully Rounded. Round. radially. Rounds can be created with varying radius options: Constant. Variable.31 . The Hole feature can be placed linearly. The Round and Chamfer features are best created towards the end of the design process because they are not good references. you have learned that: • • • Hole.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited .

Apply geometrical constraints to sketched entities. Page 4-1 . and sketched points. Objectives After completing this module. individual shapes.For University Use Only . you will be able to: • • • • • Describe the functions and tools in the Sketcher mode. rectangles. To enable this.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Sketcher Basics Previously. such as the “equal lengths” constraint and the “perpendicular” constraint. centerlines. arcs. you will actually sketch them. Explain how the Sketcher dimensioning scheme allows you to capture design intent. circles. This module starts with the basics of the Sketcher mode. Pro/ENGINEER provides a Sketcher mode and includes a built-in Intent Manager to help you capture design intent. Employ Sketcher Tools to change section sketches. For any geometry that involves the definition of more complex. you have learned that “Pick and Place” features allow for very fast creation of features such as holes and rounds whose geometry is easily understood as part of standard engineering operations. Create geometry including lines.

For University Use Only . Dimensions On/Off . A standard Pro/ENGINEER toolbar. An additional Sketcher toolbar with specific Sketcher functionality such as Undo .2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . An Intent Manager with fly-out icons on the right to perform frequently used actions. and Grid On/Off .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES THE SKETCHER ENVIRONMENT The Sketcher Interface The Sketcher interface consists of: • • • • • • A menu bar with the usual Pro/ENGINEER pull-down menus and two additional Sketcher-specific menus—EDIT and SKETCH. A message area below the toolbars. An additional Sketcher-specific message area at the bottom left of the window describing Intent Manager’s fly-out icons. Figure 1: Sketcher Interface Pag e 4 .

Default cursor to pick entities Icons to create different kinds of geometry To create dimensions To modify dimensions To impose constraints To trim Entities Figure 2 Intent Manager’s Fly-Out Icons • With fly-out icons.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • The color red is used to highlight and select entities. you can select individual or multiple-specific sketched entities. Using the mouse. Intent Manager • • The Intent Manager with fly-out icons appears automatically on the right side of the screen when you enter the Sketcher mode. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. you can access the most frequently used sketching tools with a single click without having to go to pull-down menus. These icons are logically grouped together. based on capability.3 . This provides accurate and easily identifiable entities selections.For University Use Only . or all entities that fall within a swept box.

modifying.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pop-Up Menus • • • Additional pop-up menus can be accessed by holding the right-mouse button in the Sketcher mode display area.For University Use Only . and undoing steps. These pop-up menus aid ease-of-use. Figure 3 A Typical Sketcher Pop-Up Menu Pag e 4 . dimensioning. deleting.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . They offer short-cut methods for sketching.

Trim . all Intent Manager commands are available through these menus. You can insert Text into the Sketching area using the Text option in the SKETCH menu. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4.5 . and Toggle Lock commands. Figure 4 Edit and Sketch Menus • • • In addition. They contain all the commands needed in the sketching environment. With the new EDIT menu. They are shown below. Toggle Construction . Move .For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SKETCHER MODE FUNCTIONALITY Sketcher Menus • • EDIT and SKETCH are two top-level menus specific to the Sketcher mode. you can manipulate your sketched geometry with the Modify.

you can create two types of sketched lines—straight lines from point to point or centerlines for referencing or constraining entities. It is good practice to reference before sketching. arcs.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Specifying References One of the first things you will be prompted for after beginning a sketch in the Sketcher mode will be to specify references of the section you are about to sketch. This provides the sketched entities a location to automatically align to and dimension from. The basic ones—lines.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Provide insufficient references to place a section. Arcs Figure 6 Arcs Fly-Out Icons Pag e 4 . Creating Geometry Sketcher mode enables the creation of a variety of geometrical shapes and entities. You will need to provide references when you: • • • Create a new feature. Note: The references that you select for a section create Parent/Child relationships. and circles—are discussed below. Lines Figure 5 Lines Fly-Out Icons Using the Line fly-out icons in the Intent Manager. Redefine a feature with missing or insufficient references.

A concentric circle. Sketched circle Concentric to this edge Figure 8 Sketching a Concentric Circle to an Edge Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. you can create three types of circles. you can create four types of arcs. A concentric arc.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Using the Arcs fly-out icons in the Intent Manager.7 . A full ellipse. You can create: • • • A circle by picking the center and a point on the circle. You can create: • • • • An arc by 3 points or tangent to an entity at its endpoint.For University Use Only . A conic arc. An arc by picking its center and endpoints. Circles Figure 7 Circle Fly-Out Icons Using the Circle fly-out icons in the Intent Manager.

pick the entity with the left mouse button and place the dimension with the middle-mouse button. Figure 10 Grabbing and Moving Dimensions Pag e 4 . The following figure illustrates the simple dimensioning of a rectangle. Figure 9 Creating Dimensions for a Rectangle • • You can grab a dimension and place it at a more convenient position in the Sketcher at any point during or after sketching. To place dimensions in Sketcher.8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Dimensioning After completing a sketch. An orderly arrangement of dimensions helps visual clarity. you must dimension it.For University Use Only . particularly when the sketch gets complex.

With the MODIFY DIMENSIONS dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Modifying Dimensions • • Sketcher makes it easy to modify dimensions of geometric entities at any time. you can now double-click on an individual dimension to change its value.For University Use Only . You also have the options to dynamically Regenerate and Lock Scale the sketch. shown below.9 . Figure 11 Modify Dimensions Dialog Box • • In addition. • Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. you can change the dimension values of multiple entities with just a click of the mouse. The SENSITIVITY scrollbar at the bottom right of the dialog box allows you to adjust the sensitivity of the control wheels for changing dimensions dynamically.

Make a line or two vertices horizontal. Create equal lengths. 6. Creates same points or points on entities. 4. Make two lines parallel. You are free to impose your own constraints overriding the system’s default constraints to capture your design intent.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 2. 7.For University Use Only . equal radii or same curvature constraint. Place a point on the middle of the line. Make two entities tangent. Pag e 4 . Make a line or two vertices vertical. 9. This can be done easily by accessing the CONSTRAINTS dialog box shown below. Figure 12 Sketcher Constraints Dialog Box You can use constraint options to: 1. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Constraining • • • Sketcher assumes certain constraints for the geometrical entities you create. Make two points or vertices symmetrical about a centerline. Make two entities perpendicular. 5. 8.

Use Edge Figure 14: Using Existing Model Edge to Create Sketched Entities Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4.11 .For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Additional Sketcher Tools EDGE The Edge tool has two instances represented by its two fly-out icons in the Intent Manager. as shown below: Figure 13 Edge Fly-Out Icons • – Uses an existing model edge to create sketched entities. Automatically selects that edge as a specified reference.

The MOVE ENTITY menu displays the following options: Drag Item – Moves an entity or its vertex to a new location. Copy Copies 2-D draft/imported entities from a drawing. Move • • Repositions sketched entities. Offset Edge Figure 15: Creating Sketched Entities at an Offset Distance Note: The Use Edge and Offset Edge options create parent/child relationships with the referenced feature. Pag e 4 . You can dynamically move and scale a section.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • – Uses existing model edge to create sketched entities at an offset distance.1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . This can be accessed by Edit > Mirror. ½ Drag Many – Translates picked entities within a sketch. Mirror This tool mirrors sketched entities from one side of a centerline to the other. making legacy data easier to manipulate. This functionality can be accessed by clicking Edit > Copy from the pull-down menus.

Replace Replaces a sketched entity from the original section with a newly sketched entity. ½ Dimension – Repositions a dimension within a sketch.13 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES ½ Rotate90 – Rotates sketched entities about a specified point by multiples of 90 degrees. Trim shortens (or extends) an entity in three different ways corresponding to the three fly-out icons shown below: Figure 16 Trim Fly-Out Icons ½ The first dynamically trims section entities ½ The second cuts or extends entities to other entities or geometry.For University Use Only . This option provides you with information about • • • • intersection and tangency points angles and distances dimensioning references entity curvature display Sketcher Points ½ They force coincidence among sketched entities. replacing the original with two new entities. ½ The third divides an entity at the point of selection. click Analysis > Section Analysis . Section Analysis To obtain information about a particular section within Sketcher. ½ Allow slanted dimensions between sketched entity end-points. Trim This can be accessed by clicking Edit > Trim . Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4.

Pag e 4 .For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 17: Midpoint Definition Using Sketcher Point Figure 18 Defining Theoretical Sharps Using Sketcher Points SETTING SKETCHER PREFERENCES You can now modify the Sketcher environment in the new SKETCHER PREFERENCES dialog box in the UTILITIES menu.1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

For University Use Only . Sketcher starts in 2-D orientation (that is. Click the Default button to reset the preferences.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 19 Sketcher Preferences Dialog Box Use the SKETCHER PREFERENCES dialog box to: • • • • Modify the display options of various sketcher entities. and accuracy parameters. with the sketching plane parallel to the computer screen).15 . grid spacing. Sketching in 3-D When you select the Use2D Sketcher option from the ENVIRONMENT dialog box. Set constraints preferences by enabling or disabling constraints assumed by Sketcher. Set grid. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 20 The Environment Dialog Box When you do not select this option. Pag e 4 . Using View > Sketch View . Sketcher starts in 3-D orientation. you can re-orient a Sketcher section into the 2-D view while in Sketcher mode. You may change the view orientation at any time and sketch in 3-D.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only .

½ Align sketched entities. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SKETCHER PHILOSOPHY Rules of Thumb Certain rules of thumb must be rigorously adhered to gain maximum advantage from the power of the Sketcher mode’s diverse capabilities.17 . you can increase Sketcher accuracy by changing it from 1. Use the grid as an aid. ½ The range for the accuracy is 1. Keep sketches simple. ½ Align centers horizontally and vertically.0 e-9 through 1. you cannot have more than one open section per feature. ½ When sketching an open section. 4. 6. resolve the sketch by modifying dimensions. 7. Use open and closed sections appropriately. Use the Undo option ½ The Undo option restores a sketched section to its prior state. concentrate on getting your geometry straight by sketching large. parallel. ½ Secondly. as is required with some solid modeling packages. 5. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. 2.For University Use Only . ½ This is extremely useful when sketching features incrementally. Do not sketch to scale.0 (default). ½ This makes the final model flexible and helps regeneration. or perpendicular. ½ To prevent Sketcher from making constraints. ½ Firstly. ½ There is no need to sketch sections that extend outside the part. ½ Create lines equal.0 to a lower number. Do not extend the sketch outside of the part. Make effective use of Sketcher accuracy. ½ This rule is particularly helpful when the sketched entities are small. 1.

you must explicitly align its open ends to the part. ½ When in doubt over whether you should use an open or closed section. Protrusion B Protrusion A Cut Figure 21: Open and Closed Sections Pag e 4 . you should use a closed one since it is easier to regenerate. and is less prone to failure.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES ½ If you use an open section.For University Use Only .1 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

2. 1. Type [ROUND_RECTANGLE]. Create a new sketch named ROUND_RECTANGLE. and generating solid models. you create a hex section using construction entities. dimensioning. In Exercise 2. creating straight lines. Sketcher mode activates. In the NEW dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal By the end of this lab. you learn sketching basics. Method In Exercise 1.19 . 3. 4. creating arcs. applying constraints. EXERCISE 1: Sketching Basics Figure 22 Completed Sketch after Exercise 1 Task 1. select Sketch . Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. In Exercise 3. you create a snap ring by sketching in steps. Click File > New .For University Use Only . you will be conversant with basic sketching skills such as entering sketcher mode.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 2. 2. the bottom line being horizontal. Sketch four lines as shown. Apply the constraint to make the lines perpendicular. once again pick the other two lines to make them perpendicular. then pick two lines to make them perpendicular. Similarly. Figure 23 Sketching a Quadrilateral Task 3. Click . > 1. Pag e 4 .For University Use Only .2 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Delete the two vertical lines. Click 2. 3. Task 5. Hold shift and pick the right vertical line. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 24 Applying the Perpendicular Constraint 3.21 . 1. . as shown below. Task 4. 3. 2. 1. Right-click and select Delete from the pop-up menu. Sketch a tangent end arc on the left side of the section. Pick the top left vertex and drag the mouse out of the left quadrant of the circle to get a tangent end arc. Close the CONSTRAINTS dialog box.For University Use Only . Pick the end point to be the bottom left end point. With the pointer icon pick the left vertical line.

Add the proper dimensions.For University Use Only . Click 2. Pag e 4 . Pick each arc with the left mouse button.2 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . . Repeat the process on the right side of the section. Select Tangent and Horizontal for type and orientation. Figure 26 Sketching Tangent End Arcs on Both Sides Task 7. 1. then place the dimension where you would like it to appear with the middle button.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 25 Sketching a Tangent End Arc Task 6. 3.

.23 . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 27 Dimensioning the Arcs Task 8. Figure 28 Dimensioning the Left Arc Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. Pick the left arc twice with the left mouse button and place it with the middle. Click 2. Create a diameter dimension on the left arc.For University Use Only .

Modify both dimensions. Figure 29 Modify Dimensions Dialog Box 2. 1. Save and close the MODIFY DIMENSIONS dialog box. Pag e 4 . 3. Modify the diameter to [2] and the linear dim to [4]. Figure 30 Sketch with Modified Dimensions 4.2 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 9.For University Use Only . Pick both the horizontal dimension and the diameter dimension using the <SHIFT> key and click icon.

and draw two circles as shown in the next figure. 1. Type [SNAP_RING] as the name of the sketch. Click File > New . 1. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Sketching in Steps Figure 31 Completed Snap Ring after Exercise 2 Task 1.For University Use Only . Create a new sketch called SNAP_RING. Task 2. Create two offset circles aligned horizontally.25 . Select Sketch . Click Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. 2.

For University Use Only . For the rectangle. Pag e 4 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 32 Two Offset Circles Aligned Horizontally Task 3.2 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Create a rectangle that snaps to the inside circle on both upper vertices. . click again to end sketching. Click . Just click once to start and then click 2. Then use the dynamic trim to create intersections. Put your cursor below the bottom horizontal line and drag it to above the top horizontal line. Stop cursor here Delete Start dynamic trim here Figure 33 Sketching Rectangle Inside Circles 1.

This time snapping to the outside circle and the bottom of the two vertical lines as shown below. Figure 34 Using Dynamic Trim Task 4. If all the crossed items are not highlighted continue to hold the mouse button and drag over the lines until they do highlight. Sketch another rectangle. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3.27 . 4. 1. Make sure that each item becomes highlighted. Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. Make sure not to snap through any of the arc’s vertices.For University Use Only . The result is shown in the figure below.

Use the dynamic trim to remove the final lines and arc.For University Use Only . Figure 36 Capturing Intent with Dynamic Trim Pag e 4 . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 35 Sketching a Second Rectangle Task 5.2 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . to trim the unwanted entities. The result is shown below. Click 2.

1. Click 2. Figure 37 Modifying Dimensions 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 6. Save and close Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. Pick each entity with the left mouse button and place the dimension with the middle mouse button.29 . Dimension the entities. Click to modify the six dimension values.For University Use Only . to create the dimensions. 3.

2. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Sketching a Hexagon Task 1.3 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Create a new sketch called HEX. Click on the centerline button in the line fly-out icons. Task 4. Modify the angles to 60°. Create a sketcher point 1. 2. Create a vertical centerline that passes through the point. Task 3. 1. Place a point in the center of the screen. Select Sketch and type [HEX] as the name. Figure 38 Modifying Angles between Centerlines Pag e 4 . Click File > New .For University Use Only . 1. Task 2. 1. Click the point button. Modify the angle between centerlines to 60° as shown below. Create two additional centerlines that pass through the point at an angle. Add vertical centerlines passing through the Sketcher Point.

Create a hexagon by sketching 6 lines from the intersection points of the circle and the centerlines.31 . Click Toggle Construction to convert it to a construction circle Figure 39 Creating a Construction Circle Task 6. 2. Create a circle centered on the point. 1.For University Use Only . Right-click and hold on the circle for a pop-up menu.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 5. Figure 40 Creating a Hexagonal Sketch Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. 3. Left-click on the circle to highlight it in red.

Pag e 4 . Save and close.0] 2.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 1.3 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Add a diameter dimension to the construction circle and modify it’s value to [1.

arcs. Mirror . splines. and Trim . Move . rectangles.33 . you learned that: • The Sketcher interface consists of the main sketcher area.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. circles. The system notifies you when there is a clash of constraints though. message areas. and constrained. pull-down menus. dimensioned. the INTENT MANAGER with fly-out icons. • • • • • • Sk etche r B asi cs Pag e 4. System dimensions can be over-ridden and dimensions can always be modified at any stage of model generation. toolbars. and pop-up menus.For University Use Only . It is possible to over-constrain a model. and many other geometrical entities using the Intent Manager. All geometry has to be sketched. Sketcher preferences can be set using the SKETCHER PREFERENCES dialog box. You can create lines. The EDIT and SKETCH menus contain most of the tools that are unique to Sketcher mode such as Copy .

Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only .

Page 5-1 . OBJECTIVES After completing this module.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Sketched Features In this module. Define the sketching plane and how to sketch on it. create its geometry. you will be able to: • • • • Create. and modify two sketched features—cuts and protrusions. delete. Investigate two forms of the sketched features—Extrude and Revolve. It gives you the ability to innovate in ways that richly capture your design intent. Proficiency with sketching is of paramount importance to any complex design process. and dimension it.For University Use Only . you learn how to sketch your own new features on a sketching plane and how to convert your sketches into actual robust features. Specify references for a sketch.

For University Use Only . Figure 1: Protrusion versus Cut Specifying Extruded and Revolved Forms • • When extruding . it creates a feature by revolving the sketched section around a sketched centerline. the system adds or removes material linearly from the sketching plane.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES TWO SKETCHED FEATURES • • remove material from a specified material side of an open or closed cross-section in a model.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . When revolving . Pag e 5 . Cuts Protrusions add material to a model in any desired shape.

For University Use Only . Sketching a new feature and dimensioning it is not enough. • Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. you sketch it on the surface from which you intend to begin feature creation. For this you must provide a reference plane to act as the orientation reference to the new feature. That is. You must also orient it.3 . Note The reference plane must be perpendicular to the sketching plane.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Sketched Figure 2: Extruded versus Revolved Features SKETCHING AND REFERENCE PLANES • When you create a new feature on a model. you make the surface your sketching plane.

4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . Sometimes.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES The Sketching Plane’s Default Orientation The default orientation of the sketching plane orients it parallel to the screen and chooses one of the default datums as a reference plane. Top orientation plane Direction of feature creation Sketching plane Sketcher orientation protrusion Sketcher orientation cut Resulting protrusion Resulting cut Figure 3: Two Features Defined by the Same Cross-Section Pag e 5 . you may want to manually pick the top surface of the model for a perpendicular reference orientation.For University Use Only .

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SKETCHER BASICS • • • • All sketches are parametric. you can first create them in a convenient scale and later modify their dimensions. Whenever you create a sketch. The different types of linear dimensions are illustrated Figure 5. A toolbar containing various sketching options and constraints appears on the right side of the window in sketcher mode.For University Use Only . Linear Dimensions • Linear dimensions indicate the length of a line segment or the distance between two entities. pick the entity with the left mouse button then place the dimension at the desired location using the middle mouse button. In Sketcher Mode. That is. Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. Ends line creation and toggles between entity creation and selection arrow.5 . Pro/ENGINEER automatically assumes a dimensioning scheme. Creates section entities by selecting points Toggles on/off constraints and opens pop-up menu Figure 4: Sketcher Mouse Button Functions Dimensioning Sections To override weak dimensions with strong ones. a new pull-down menu item Sketch containing all the necessary sketching tools appears in the menu bar.

To create a diameter dimension. Place the dimension Pick twice on the circle Figure 6: Diameter Dimension on Circle Pag e 5 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 5: Linear Dimensions in Sketcher Mode Note: You cannot dimension the length of a centerline.For University Use Only . Diameter Dimensions • Diameter dimensions measure the diameters of sketched circles and arcs.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . pick on the arc or circle twice and place the dimension.

Pick on the ARC (left) Place dimension (middle) Figure 8: Radial Dimension in Sketcher Mode Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. Place the dimension (middle) Pick 2 on sketched centerline Pick 3 on sketched entity once again. indicating that it is a diameter dimension rather than a radius dimension. Pick 1 on sketched entity Figure 7: Diameter Dimension for Revolved Section in Sketcher Mode Note: The diameter dimension for a revolved feature extends beyond the centerline. pick on the circle or arc and place the dimension. To create a radial dimension.For University Use Only . Then pick the entity again and place the dimension. Pick the entity to dimension and the centerline to use as the axis of revolution.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • To create a diameter dimension for a revolved section.7 . Radial Dimensions • Radial dimensions measure the radii of circles or arcs. use three picks.

Place the dimension using the middle mouse button. Figure 9: Angular Dimensions in Sketcher Mode • To create an arc angle dimension. Pick the two lines in any order.on arc Place dimension Figure 10: Arc Angle Dimension in Sketcher Mode Pag e 5 .8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . and finally the arc. Place dimensions in indicated positions. Pick 1 endpoint Pick 2 -endpoint Pick 3 . pick one endpoint.For University Use Only . then the other endpoint. Where you place the dimension determines how the system measures the angle.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Angular Dimensions • Create an angular dimension between lines by picking two lines and placing the dimension using the middle mouse button.

1.PRT. Sketch a cut feature within a closed section.9 . Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5.For University Use Only . Click Feature > Create > Solid > Cut . Method In Exercise 1. you learn to define a cut feature.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal The general goal of this lab is to enable you to sketch new features. In Exercise 2. The more specific goal is to introduce you to the Sketcher mode to extrude cuts and protrusions on a sketching plane. you learn to define a protrusion. Open the file SKETCHED_FEATURES. Change to Hidden Line display. 3. 2. EXERCISE 1: Creating a Cut Exercise 2: Protrusion Exercise 1: Cut Feature Figure 11: Completed Model Task 1.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Define the front surface as the sketching plane. Note Instead of manually orienting the model. Click Okay from the DIRECTION menu. 1.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . Pag e 5 . Accept the default One Side . Click Top from the SKET VIEW menu. Pick the top planar surface. 2. Pick top planar surface Sketching plane Figure 12: Selecting Sketching Plane Task 2. Task 3. Orient the model by selecting orientation references. 2. The feature should extrude into the part. 5. Click Extrude > Solid > Done . you can usually click Default in the SKET VIEW menu to enter the default sketcher mode. Leave defaults and Query Sel to pick the planar front surface of the block as the plane on which to sketch the shape of the cut. 1. You enter the sketcher mode.For University Use Only .

Click the middle mouse button to finish the line. Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. Note that Pro/ENGINEER automatically assumes two references. 1. 3. To sketch a horizontal line left click to start a line drag from left to right. Click Close . then left click to end the line. Define the section for the cut. 2.11 . Note that the REFERENCE dialog box entries are both Surf:F4(Protrusion). To delete these two references from the REFERENCES dialog box. The design intent of the cut is to be at a specified distance from the right side and the bottom of the model. delete the wrong pick and try again. Next define references.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. You may also right-click in the Sketcher window area and Query Sel . If the REFERENCE dialog box entries appear anything other than Surf:F4(Protrusion).For University Use Only . Pick this bottom surface as the first reference (selecting it on edge) Pick this side surface as the second reference Figure 13: Specifying References Task 5. 1. Pick the bottom surface and the right side surface as references. highlight each and click the Delete button.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 14: The First Sketched Line 2. Pag e 5 .For University Use Only . Note: If you did not sketch what you wanted. Click the right end of the line as the start point for the arc and drag a 180-degree arc. Click Sketch > Arc > 3 Point/Tangent End . you can undo the operation by selecting Undo. Click to end arc creation.1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r .

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 15: Creating a 3 Point/ Tangent End Arc 3. From the endpoint of the arc. Figure 16: Sketching another Horizontal Line Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5.13 . create another horizontal line segment.For University Use Only .

1. Finally. 2. Figure 17: Completing Sketch Task 6.For University Use Only . Or click . Next pick the two horizontal lines you want to make equal. sketch another tangent end arc that connects the open end of the second line to the open end of the first line. Click Sketch > Constrain > =. the DELETE CONSTRAINT dialog box appears. 3. Figure 18 Resolve Sketch Dialog Box Pag e 5 . Impose the Equal Length Sketcher constraint.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Make the two horizontal lines equal in length.1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . If the sketch is over-constrained.

Click Sketch > Centerline . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Override existing weak dimensions with your own strong dimensions. Pick the perimeter of the left arc. Click Sketch > Dimension > Normal . Task 7. Task 8. 2. Sketch a vertical centerline that is symmetric on the section. 3. Pick a point approximately half way between the two arc centers using the left mouse button. Retain the Equal Lengths constraint and delete any other constraint. override the weak dimension between the arc centers by placing your own dimension from center to center. click the left mouse button again.15 . move the cursor a short distance and click the middle mouse button to place the radius dimension. 3. 1. When the centerline snaps to vertical.For University Use Only . Similarly. Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. Figure 19 Dimensioning the Left Radius 2.

Place the dimension. Specify references to the sketched feature in default view. Click Sketch > Dimension > Normal .For University Use Only . 1. Or. Press <CTRL> + <D> 2. Task 9. Pag e 5 . Pick the left arc center and Query Sel the bottom of the base feature. Pick the centerline and the side surface as shown. force it using the constraint menu. Place dimension.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . click Undo and recreate the centerline. 3. Check for the symmetric constraint symbols—two arrows indicating a symmetric constraint located about the centerline. Sketching the Centerline 6. If Intent Manager added a dimension instead. Switch to the default view.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Symmetric constraint symbols Figure 12.

For University Use Only .17 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick the centerline and this side surface Figure 20: Specifying References Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5.

1 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . 3. Pick a dimension and type in the correct number. Pag e 5 . Click Edit > Modify. It represents a 2-D arrow perpendicular to the screen in the direction that is into the screen (away from you). 4. Click Okay to accept the arrow pointing towards the inside of the section. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Define the depth by clicking Thru All > Done . Note: Note that the system placed a circle with an X in the center of the part to indicate the direction of feature creation. Change dimension values as in figure below. Click OK . A circle with a dot in the center represents a 2-D arrow perpendicular to the screen in the direction that is out of the screen (toward you).For University Use Only . Finish defining the cut. Click Sketch > Done or click the checkmark. Figure 21: Modified Dimensions Task 10. 1. Define Material Side of the cut.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 5. Figure 22: Finished Cut Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. View your new cut feature in different views.19 .For University Use Only .

2. Click View > Default 2. Delete the two references in the REFERENCE dialog box. Pick the right side of the block as the sketching plane. 3. Specify two references for Sketcher in default view. Click Okay from the DIRECTION menu.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating a Protrusion Task 1. 6. 1. The arrow points outward from the block. Toggle off the icon so that you can clearly see the block. Click One Side > Done from the ATTRIBUTES menu. TOP orientation reference Sketching plane You are creating this protrusion Figure 23: The Completed Protrusion 1. Click Extrude > Solid > Done from the SOLID OPTS menu.2 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . 5. Click Default from the SKET VIEW menu. Create a cylindrical protrusion on the right side of the model. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Protrusion . Task 2. 4. Pag e 5 .

Click it again to finish the circle. Click the mouse to sketch a small circle.21 . Click Sketch > Dimension > Normal 2. Pick the circle twice with the mouse and place the dimension with a middle-click. 1. Pick here to query select the back surface reference Pick this top surface as a reference Figure 24: Selecting Section References 4. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. Strengthen dimensions.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Task 3. 1. Pick the top and back surfaces of the model as references (as shown). Define the section for the protrusion. Click Sketch > Circle > Center / Point. Task 4. 2. Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5.For University Use Only . Click View > Sketch View . 3.

1. 5. Click the icon. Click Sketch > Done or click the checkmark. 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Task 6. Pag e 5 . Change the dimension values to reflect the design Figure 25: Modified Dimensions 1. The MODIFY DIMENSIONS dialog box appears. 2. 2. Click Blind > Done from the SPEC TO menu. Pick each of the three dimensions consecutively while holding the <SHIFT> key. Now pick the center of the circle and the left reference surface.For University Use Only . Place the dimension with a middle-click.2 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . Type [3] in the ENTER DEPTH window and press <ENTER>. Task 5. 3. Define a blind depth value for the protrusion. Place the dimension between the center of the circle and the top reference surface. Click Edit > Modify. Change dimension values for each as shown in the figure above. 4.

Click File > Erase > Current . View your model in different displays.23 . 6. 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Click OK .For University Use Only . then click Yes from the dialog box. Click File > Save and press <ENTER>. Figure 26: The Finished Model Sk etche d Fe atu res Pag e 5. 4.

2 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . you can always sketch it as convenient and later alter the dimensions In a new sketch.For University Use Only . perpendicularity. • Pag e 5 . parallelism and symmetricity For a sketched feature. lines.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. arcs. concentricity. you learned that: • • • • Cut and Protrusion are two important features that can be sketched using the Sketcher Mode Both of these sketched features can be created in extruded and revolved forms When sketching a new feature. and circles can be constrained to different properties such as equal lengths. you not only have to dimension it properly but also have to orient it in relation to reference planes (usually the side surfaces of the base feature).

delete. Datum planes form the ideal base feature. In this module. you learned how to add pick-and-place features and sketched features to existing parts. Create.For University Use Only . you learn how to create a part from scratch starting from a base feature—a feature that acts as a foundation to capture design intent. Orient additional datum planes within your model. Explain the difference between internal and external datum planes.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Datum Planes In previous modules. and modify datum planes. Implement default or offset datum planes as non-solid base features. Objectives After completing this module you will be able to: • • • • • • Define a datum plane and explain why it is the ideal base feature. Align sketched section entities to part entities. Page 6-1 .

By default. It has no mass or volume. The choice of the base feature is crucial for the success of your model. datum planes have two sides: yellow (or the active side) and a red side (the passive side). In the default mode. Figure 1 illustrates the base feature for a finished part.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES USING BASE FEATURES AND DATUM PLANES The Base Feature and Its Importance A base feature is the first feature that you create to define a part model. Figure 1: Base Features What is a Datum Plane? A datum plane is an infinite. Features that are added to the model later depend on the base feature for many or all of their references. the system displays datum Pag e 6 . flat reference. It is the building block or foundation for the rest of the model. two-dimensional.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only .

Defining a Datum Plane When creating a datum. you can define it using several different methods. You can create additional datum planes as reference features for a model where references do not already exist.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES planes with a yellow side and a text name such as FRONT. TOP. Using Default Datums as the Base Feature When creating a new model. you can also remove them from display. You can create a datum at any time in the process of feature creation without having to back out and begin again. Surfaces on datums to clarify orientation Figure 2: Default Datums CREATING ADDITIONAL DATUM PLANES • • • You can create default datums for creating any part by clicking the icon. the Datum Plane constraints are the same: Datum Plan es Pag e 6. default datums should be the first feature you create for three important reasons: • • • They allow you to develop robust parent/child relationships. They act as planar surfaces in models that do not have any. and RIGHT.For University Use Only . Though methods of creation differ. While using them as a solid foundation for your model.3 .

Sometimes. it is beneficial to construct internal datums because the system builds their dimensions into your sketched feature. this datum plane stays visible because it can be referenced by more than one feature. Consider the following rules about the datum planes created on-the-fly: • • Datum planes that you create during feature creation are internal to and belong to that feature. while displaying the datums only temporarily. when specifying sketching or reference planes. When you use Copy/Mirror to copy features and use datum planes onthe-fly as the mirror plane. you can create an internal datum.For University Use Only . • Pag e 6 . Datum planes on-the fly become invisible after you create the feature. on the fly. This gives you more choices for varying dimensions when you create a feature pattern. Any associated dimensions positioning the datum plane are included with those of the feature.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • Through/Plane Offset/Plane Offset/Coord Blend Section Internal Datums If you do not want datum planes to be a feature of your model.

5 . 2. Three orthogonal default datum planes. 4. In Exercise 3. The first is to prove that Datum Planes make a good base feature. RIGHT and TOP. Create an extruded base feature starting with default datums. From the Menu Manager click Setup > Units > millimeter Newton Second (mmNs) > Set . Type [MOTOR_SHAFT]. then click Close . you create additional datum planes and establish good parent-child relationships. appear with their yellow sides facing you. 1. EXERCISE 1: Creating a Base Feature Task 1.For University Use Only . Click File > New . FRONT. Name the part. Click OK from the WARNING dialog box. you will use existing datum planes as references for other new features. Method In Exercise 1. Click Done to exit from the SETUP menu.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal This lab has three goals. Datum Plan es Pag e 6. In Exercise 2. you create an extruded feature that is based on default datum planes. 3. The third and final goal is to create Additional Datum Planes on the fly and exploring how parentchild relationships can be planned and executed. The second is to show that Datum Planes can be used as references for other features of a model.

3. Drag out the diameter of a circle and place with the left mouse button. Notice that the Intent Manager places references (RIGHT and TOP) for the intended protrusion automatically. Click OKAY to accept the default direction. Pag e 6 . Click Attributes > One Side > Done . Click Default in the SKETCH VIEW menu. 8. 2. Use the default datums as your sketching reference for the first 1. feature. Click Close . Pick the datum tag FRONT to make it the sketching plane. Click Feature > Create > Protrusion . 4. The Intent Manager adds a weak diameter dimension.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 3: Default Datum Planes Task 2. 7. 6. Pick the intersection of the default datum planes as illustrated below.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click Sketch > Circle > Center/Point . Click Extrude > Solid > Done . 5.

Modify the diameter dimension and regenerate the section to see the change.7 . Change the diameter. Press <ENTER>. Type [14. Click Edit > Modify and double-click the diameter dimension. 3. 2.5]. Define the depth of the protrusion. Datum Plan es Pag e 6.For University Use Only . Click Sketch > Done . 240mm. Task 4. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 4: Sketched Circle at Center of Datums Task 3. 2. Accept the default Blind by clicking Done from the SPEC TO menu. Type [240]. Complete the feature by extruding it to a blind depth of 1.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3.8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click OK . Click View > Default . Pag e 6 . Press <ENTER> 4. Change to the default view. 5.

1. 2. Task 2. 1.For University Use Only . 5. As section references. 3. If the REFERENCES dialog box accidentally closes before you define references. 4. Pick TOP datum plane as the first reference. Create a centerline and proceed to define the section.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Using Default Datums as References to Other Features Task 1. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. Datum Plan es Pag e 6. Delete the two references that the Intent Manager automatically provides. Click Sketch > References to access it 3. Pick RIGHT as the sketching plane. as shown below.9 . Pick LEFT and Query Sel the end of the cylinder nearer to you (SURF:F5 protrusion) to make the model horizontal. Click OKAY to confirm the direction of creation. Click and zoom in on the left end of the shaft. Click Feature > Create > Cut > Revolve > Solid > Done . 5. use the default datums. Click One Side > Done in the ATTRIBUTES menu. Then pick the silhouette edge of the protrusion and the left end surface of the protrusion as the second and third references. 2. In a revolved section you need to use a centerline in the sketch to define an axis of revolution. Add a revolved cut feature to the protrusion you created. 4. Now the RIGHT datum plane is the sketching surface.

Figure 6: Sketch for Revolved Cut (dimensions not shown for clarity) Task 3. Pag e 6 . Sketch three line segments. Create the diameter dimension. Sketch a centerline that coincides with the TOP datum plane. 1. Pick the TOP datum plane as the first reference. Figure 5: Selecting References for the Cut 6. 7.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . Click Sketch > Dimension > Normal .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick the end surface as the third Pick the silhouette edge as the second reference.

For University Use Only . Pick the horizontal line again.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Pick the horizontal line you sketched. Place the dimension using the middle mouse button. Pick the centerline. Figure 8: Modified Dimensions Datum Plan es Pag e 6. Figure 7: Creating the Diameter Dimension 3.11 . Click Edit > Modify and change the dimensions. Modify the dimensions of the section.

1. 7. Click View > Default . flip the arrow to remove material from the inside of the section. If necessary. Click 360 > Done in the REVOLVE TO menu. 5. 4.1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. 3. Click Sketch > Done . Otherwise. Click OK to finish the feature. 2. Click File > Erase > Current > Yes . Save the model. Pag e 6 .For University Use Only . 6. click Okay. Finish defining the revolved cut on the model. Change to the default view.

1. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Protrusion > Extrude >Solid > Done . Add this protrusion. Click Make Datum > Offset in SETUP PLANE menu. Open the part model INTERNAL_DTM. you add a protrusion to the model by first creating an additional datum plane feature on the fly. 3. 2. Pick the planar front surface of the block as a reference for the new plane. Click One Side > Done in the ATTRIBUTES menu. 4.PRT. Add a datum plane to the part to use as the sketching reference for the cylindrical protrusion you want to create.For University Use Only . Figure 9: The Completed Model Task 1. Datum Plan es Pag e 6.13 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating an Additional Datum Plane In this exercise.

For University Use Only .5. click Enter Value . 2. Make the vertical surface from which the cylinder protrudes the second reference. Delete the two default references. Click the Circle icon from the sidebar. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. Make the top planar surface of the model to go to the top. 6. 6. 1. Make the A_2 axis of the first cylinder the first reference. Finish defining the protrusion by using the datum plane as a sketching plane. Sketch a circle on the cylinder with its center coinciding with the A_2 axis. Click Sketch > Done . Task 2. Pag e 6 . Click Done . 4.1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Modify the distance from the left vertical surface of the base feature to 1. In the OFFSET menu.88. Flip the direction of the intended protrusion to point toward the model. 5. 7. 3. Modify the dimension of the circle’s diameter to 0. Type [1] as the offset value.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Offset from this front surface Figure 10: Creating a Sketching Plane 5.

Shade and save the model Datum Plan es Pag e 6.For University Use Only . 9.15 . Complete the feature.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 8. 10. Click Thru Next > Done in the SPEC TO menu.

two-dimensional. • Pag e 6 . There are different kinds of datum planes. you learned that: • • • • Datum planes are infinite. such as those that are created as Through/Plane. Offset/Plane. flat references that have no mass or volume. Datum planes act as the ideal base feature to create new parts and models.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . and Blend Section. You can build internal datum planes when you do not want the datums to be a feature of your model.For University Use Only . Offset/Coord Sys. Additional datum planes can be created in Pro/ENGINEER while creating a model.

Page 7-1 . These are called parent/child relationships and they determine feature interaction. you learn how to create and alter parent/child relationships and how to achieve a desired order of feature regeneration for your model.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Parent/Child Relationships In a model. Redefine and Reorder options to change the original design intent. the order in which features are created and the references that they are provided creates hierarchical relationships. Define a parent/child relationship with a Sketched feature. Change the parents of a feature in a model using the Reroute. Objectives After completing this module. Define a parent/child relationship with a Pick-and-Place feature. In this module. you will be able to: • • • • Define the nature of a parent/child relationship.For University Use Only .

When creating a new feature. Pag e 7 . • Tangent Chain – specifies a reference only to the selected edge. the feature moves along with it. – specifies a reference for each selected edge. the sketching plane and the reference plane become parents of the new feature. resulting in different parents for the feature. solid modeling is a cumulative process where the creation of certain features must. Any selection of a surface or edge for this purpose generates a parent/child relationship.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Parent/child relationships determine how a feature reacts when other features in the model change. • • One by One specifies a reference to the surface that is selected and a single edge. which is the child. Pro/ENGINEER references it to previously defined features for information on size. shape. if the reference plane that determines orientation changes.For University Use Only . and orientation. If the sketching plane moves. by necessity.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIPS In Pro/ENGINEER. the orientation of the feature changes as well. location. The feature used as the reference becomes the parent to the new feature. It also can create references to selected edges if the option From-To is used. The system supplies different options to select a reference. This forms the basis for a parent/child relationship. but developing the feature along all edges that are tangent to the selected one. Parent/Child Relationships with Pick-and-Place Features Pick-and-Place features also have parent references because they use existing geometry for location and orientation. Similarly. precede others. Surf Chain – Parent/Child Relationships with a Sketched Feature When sketching a feature.

You can either click Alternate and select a new reference. When rerouting a feature.3 . You have two choices.For University Use Only . Note: Pro/ENGINEER considers references that you use for alignment to be dimensioning references. Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips Pag e 7.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 1: Example of Parent/Child Relationship Changing the Parents of a Feature You can alter the parents of a feature by rerouting or redefining it. you can change the parents of a feature including sketching planes. Pro/ENGINEER highlights its external references one at a time and identifies each reference in the message area. Rerouting With the Reroute option in the FEAT menu. reference planes. and anything specified as a reference in sketcher. or click Same Ref and retain the current reference.

the same feature dialog box appears that is visible during initial feature creation.For University Use Only . Figure 3: Feature Dialog Box Pag e 7 .4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . To make a change. select the elements to redefine. When you select a feature to redefine. then click Define .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 2: Bracket with Datums Redefining The Redefine option in the FEAT menu also changes the parents of a feature.

you can change the sketch plane or the sketch itself. Pro/ENGINEER regenerates features one at a time. Therefore. Sketch The Resolve Environment Because Pro/ENGINEER bases the definition of a feature on its parents. following the order in which they appear in the Model Tree. As you create new features. it adds them to the bottom of the list in the Model Tree.5 . the system brings you into the Resolve Environment. add/remove constraints. in addition to being able to change the parents of a feature. For each. Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips Pag e 7.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Working with Sketched Features When sketching a section. Note To remove a feature from the regeneration process. you must also decide what to do with its children. ORDER OF FEATURE REGENERATION When regenerating a model. the feature needs its parents in order to exist or regenerate. if they exist. you can select an alternate reference or retain the same reference. and create and delete dimensions. The features that you created after sketching a section temporarily disappear. You can select and redefine all of the elements listed in the dialog box. If the parents are missing. – Allows you to use Sketcher mode to change sketched entities. When you select the Section element for a sketched feature. the menu displays the following options: Sketch Plane – Prompts you to specify a sketching plane and reference. you can also change other elements such as direction and material-side-plane before entering Sketcher mode. The system warns you if you try to delete an entity that is referenced by another feature.For University Use Only .

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Reorder The Reorder or Insert Mode options in the FEAT menu modify the order of the features. The system suppresses any features after it in the regeneration process. you must then specify if you want to resume the features that were suppressed when you activated insert mode. You can insert features at any point. nor can you reorder a child to be before its parents.For University Use Only . After you click Activate . If you resume them. you select the feature after which to insert features. Pag e 7 . Or you can simply drag and drop the features in the model tree to reorder their positions. Note You must regenerate a parent feature before you regenerate its children. except before the first feature or after the last feature. the system places them after the inserted features. Using Feature Insert Mode Using the Insert Mode option. Therefore. you cannot reorder a parent to be after its children. you can create one or more features at a selected position in the regeneration process.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . If you click Cancel to stop inserting features.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Base caps hole Finished model Cylindrical protrusion with hole added Figure 4: Reordering the Hole Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips Pag e 7.7 .

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Insert mode activated before hole Protrusion added Figure 5: Inserting the Protrusion Pag e 7 .For University Use Only .8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

This involves creating new parent/child relationships for the Cylindrical protrusion.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal The goal of this lab practical is to alter existing parent/child relationships in a model and create new parent/child relationships to capture changed design intent. Second protrusion Cylindrical protrusion Cut Base protrusion Slot feature Figure 6: Original Model Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips Pag e 7. Method In Exercise 1.For University Use Only . you move the Cylindrical protrusion on the base feature and place it on the Cut feature.9 .

Try to reroute the half cylinder protrusion to the surface of the cut feature. Specify a new reference for the sketching plane. 1. Do not roll back the part model. 3. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 7: Finished Model EXERCISE 1: Changing Design Intent Task 1. Pag e 7 .1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Retrieve the P_C_EXERCISE. Pick the half-cylindrical protrusion. Leave the default Alternate .PRT. Click Feature > Reroute. Pick the top surface of the cut. Accept the default No.For University Use Only . 4.

For University Use Only . Pick the side of the model. 7. Leave the back surface as the dimensional reference. Click Tree > Expand > All . 3. Click Info > Parent/Child. Pick the slot on the front side of the block. 1. 6. Pick this surface as the second dimensional Figure 8: Rerouting References for the Protrusion 5. Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips Pag e 7. Change the second dimensional reference. The model enters the Resolve environment because the changes that you have made created a problem.11 . as shown in Figure 8. In the REFERENCE INFORMATION WINDOW dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick this surface as the sketching plane. Click Undo Changes > Confirm . Investigate the parent/child relationships of the slot feature. Leave DTM3 as the horizontal reference. 2. Read the INFORMATION window that appears. Click Same Ref . Click Same Ref . Task 2. Task 3. Leave the default Alternate. select the Parent’s List to highlight it. 1. Investigate the problem and resolve it. It states that a slot feature needed to regenerate the model is missing references. 2.

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NOTES

Figure 9 References Information Window

4. Select SURFACE ID 16. The front surface of the block highlights as the sketching plane. 5. Select SURFACE ID 64. The top of the cylinder highlights as the horizontal reference plane. This is an unwanted relationship. 6. Select EDGE ID 73. The bottom edge of the cylinder highlights as a dimensional reference. This reference caused the reroute to fail. 7. Select EDGE ID 47. The right edge of the second protrusion highlights as a dimensional reference. This edge was used as an alignment reference. 8. Click Close . Task 4. Break the parent/child relationship between the slot and the cylindrical protrusion. 1. Pick on the slot . Right-click Reroute from the pop-up menu. 2. Click Yes to roll back the model. 3. Retain the same sketching plane. Click Same Ref . Read the message window. 4. Leave the default Alternate . Pick the top surface of the large protrusion as the new horizontal reference plane.

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NOTES Second protrusion

New horizontal reference New dimensional reference

Figure 10: Rerouting the Slot

5. Leave the dimensional reference to the second protrusion. Click Same Ref . 6. Change the edge of the cylinder’s dimensional reference. Leave the default Alternate . Pick the top surface of the large protrusion. Task 5. Reroute the cylindrical protrusion as planned.

1. In the Model Tree, press and hold the right mouse button while selecting Protrusion id 58. Release the button over Reroute . 2. Click NO to not roll back the part model 3. Pick the top surface of the cut as the new sketching plane. 4. Do not change the horizontal reference. Click Same Ref . 5. Do not change the dimensional reference. Click Same Ref . 6. Pick the side of the model as the second dimensional reference. Task 6. The new design intent of this model dictates that you should remove the second protrusion from the model. Try to delete it. 1. Select the second protrusion to highlight it. 2. Click Edit > Delete .

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NOTES

3. The slot highlights because it is a child of the second protrusion. Click Cancel in the WARNING window. Task 7. Break the parent/child relationship between the slot and the protrusion. In addition change the section of the slot. 1. Click Feature > Redefine . Pick the slot feature. 2. Click Section > Define > Sketch from the FEATURE dialog box. Tips & Techniques:
You can also double-click on an element to change its definition instead of highlighting and selecting Define .

3. Change the section, as shown in Figure 11. ½ ½ Pick the left vertical sketched line. Click Edit > Delete . Create a tangent end arc, as shown in Figure 11.

Delete this line segment.

Sketch this arc.

Figure 11: New Section for Slot

Task 8.

Change the dimensioning scheme of the slot.

1. Click > Explain . Pick the vertical bar constraint as shown in Figure 12. Read the message area.

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NOTES

Pick this vertical bar constraint symbol

Figure 12: Interrogating a Constraint

2. Click Sketch > References > Edge: F6 > Delete > Close > Yes. Tips & Techniques:
You can easily determine external references to edges and surfaces by looking for the brown dashed line.

3. Click View > Default . . Add a dimension from the left side of the base 4. Click protrusion to the center of the left arc.

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NOTES

Added dimension

Figure 13: Dimensioning the Slot

Tips & Techniques:
It is always good practice to dimension in the default view to avoid unwanted parent/child relationships.

5. Click Task 9.

> OK .

Remove the second protrusion from the design.

1. Highlight the second protrusion. Right-click and click Delete . Nothing should highlight in blue. 2. Click OK to confirm the deletion of the second protrusion.

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NOTES

Figure 14: Second Protrusion Deleted

Task 10. Change the design so that the slot passes completely through the model. 1. Click Feature > Redefine. Pick the slot. 2. Click Depth > Define > Thru All > Done > OK . Task 11. Analyze the model using shading. 1. Click View > Shade . Press <CTRL> and the middle mouse button to freely spin the model. 2. Click View > Saved Views >BACK > Set > Close . Tips & Techniques:
You can also select named views directly using the Saved View list.

Note:
You may need to re-shade the model if the machine you are working on has a low-end graphics card.

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Figure 15: Slot Redefined Using the Thru All Option

Task 12. Change the holes to have a collar. 1. Look in the Model Tree and confirm that the hole pattern (listed as PATTERN) is the last feature in the model. 2. Select SHELL from the Model Tree and drag it below PATTERN. 3. Note that the holes now all have a collar. Click View > Shade to see the results.

Figure 16: Reordered Shell Feature

4. Close the model without saving the changes. Click File > Erase > Current > Yes .

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I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R

For University Use Only - Commercial Use Prohibited
NOTES

MODULE SUMMARY
In this module, you learned that: • • Parent/child relationships are hierarchical relationships within a model whose features are cumulatively built beginning with a base feature. During regeneration of a model, Pro/ENGINEER strictly follows the order in which the features were built while accounting for parent/child relationships among them. A child feature can never be regenerated before its parent feature. Well-planned and executed parent/child relationships produce robust models. To capture changing design intent, parent-child relationships between various features of a model have to be re-negotiated. For this, Reroute, Redefine, and Reorder are used as needed. By using the Insert Mode option, new features can be inserted in between features of an existing model.

• •

Pa rent/ Chil d Rel ations hips

Pag e 7- 19

Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only .

Objectives After completing this module.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Sweeps and Blends In situations where you must create geometry that is too complex for simple extruded or revolved type features. In this module. Pro/ENGINEER gives you the ability to generate other forms of solid geometry. you will be able to: • • Define and create Swept features Define and create Parallel Blends Page 8-1 .For University Use Only . you learn how to create simple sweeps and parallel blends.

Sweep Sections and Trajectories A sweep trajectory can be sketched as either open or closed.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SWEPT FEATURES Defining a Sweep To define a sweep. the second step is creating the cross-section while locating it with respect to the trajectory. To illustrate this point. Open trajectory. The trajectory is the path along which you sweep the crosssection.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . closed section Pag e 8 . you define its two aspects—the trajectory and the cross-section. that is the section does not have to end at the point of origin.For University Use Only . Figure 1 provides three different combinations of trajectories and sections. Note: A sweep can add material when defined as a protrusion and remove material when defined as a cut. The first step in defining a sweep is always creating a trajectory.

creating the blended surfaces between the corresponding segments. Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8. each segment in each section is matched to a segment in the following section. In Figure 2. You create a parallel blend from a single section that contains multiple contours.3 . called subsections. Open Section (Add Inn Fcs) Figure 1: Sweep Trajectories and Section BLEND FEATURES Creating Parallel Blends The Blend feature consists of a series of at least two planar sections that Pro/ENGINEER joins together at their edges with transitional surfaces to form a continuous feature.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Closed trajectory. each section or subsection must always have the same number of segments/vertices. You can use blends as forms for either protrusions or cuts. Therefore. closed section (No Inn Fcs) Closed Trajectory.

4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Straight transition Smooth transition Figure 2: Parallel Blends When blending the sections together.For University Use Only . Or you can use the pop-up menu to select a different start point. Pro/ENGINEER connects the start point of each section and continues to connect the vertices of the sections in a clockwise manner. The Feature Tools option in the Sketch pull down menu changes the start point for any section to control the blend or twist of the blended surfaces. Pag e 8 .

The feature attribute for parallel blends is smooth or straight.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 3: Start Points and Blend Shape When creating a parallel blend.For University Use Only . all subsections can be dimensioned to them.5 . you create all of the sections for the blend in the same sketch. If you began your part with three default datum planes. we must toggle to distinguish between sections. The smooth attribute connects the section with spline surfaces. since it captures the design intent of the model. As with any feature. Subsections can be located with respect to the other subsections via dimensions or constraints. • • The straight attribute blends the transitional surfaces from one section straight to the next. Figure 4: Dimensioning Parallel Blend Sections Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8. the dimensioning scheme is important. Therefore.

1. starting with three default datum planes. 2. Click Empty in the NEW FILE OPTIONS dialog box. Create a new part. create three default datum planes. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Protrusion. Pag e 8 . Method In Exercise 1. 5. This is an effective technique to use for common sections. you create a Swept Protrusion. Leave the default Straight in the ATTRIBUTES menu and click Done .For University Use Only . EXERCISE 1: Creating Parallel Blend Features Task 1. you will be able to create Parallel Blends and Simple Sweeps.PRT. especially if they are complex.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal By the end of this lab. create a parallel blended protrusion. 4. Pro/ENGINEER allows for you to create blends as protrusions or cuts. Do not use the default template. As with any model a good foundation is the use of three default datum planes. 3. Create a new part named PARALLEL_BLEND. Since this is the first solid feature in the model.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 2. 3. you create a Parallel Blend by first retrieving a section to be used for subsections. Pick DTM3 as the sketching reference and click Okay for direction. 4. 1. Click Datum > Plane . Click Blend > Solid > Done . In Exercise 2. Task 2. As the base feature. Accept all of the defaults in the BLEND OPTS menu and click Done .

Click in the SCALE ROTATE dialog box. Select BLEND. as will the SCALE ROTATE dialog box at the top right 4.SEC and click OK . 1. Close the REFERENCES dialog box. Click File > Import > Append to Model . Task 3. Define DTM2 as the orientation reference.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 6.For University Use Only . For the Scale option. 7. Figure 5: Placing the First Section Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8. For Rotate leave the default [0. A small section will appear. 5. Pick the center point of the section. 2.0 ] value. 3. DTM1 and DTM2 as section references are placed. type [3. 7. Zoom in (about 4 X 4 grid squares) at the intersection of DTM1 and DTM2. Click the Refit icon Place center point of section at intersection of DTM1 and DTM2. move and place it so that your vertical and horizontal centerlines snap to DTM1 and DTM2 respectively. Retrieve the first section from disk and place it.0 ] and press <ENTER>. Click Top and pick DTM2 as the reference plane. 6.7 . .

Retrieve the same BLEND. type [1. The three sections should look as shown in figure below.0] and press <ENTER>. 4. Use the same sketch again for the third section of the blend assigning it a scale factor of 2. but a different scale value. For Scale.0] as the rotating angle. 4. Add the second section to the sketch using the same sketch. 3. 1. Retrieve the same BLEND. Pag e 8 .8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1. Leave the default [0. Click Sketch > Feature Tools > Toggle Section . 6.For University Use Only .SEC section again. This time assign a scale factor of [2.SEC section again. 5.0]. Click in the SCALE ROTATE dialog box. 2. 2. Task 5. Change the view to default. Notice the first subsection turns gray. Click Sketch > Feature Tools > Toggle Section . Place the sections so that the centerlines are coincident with the previous section centerlines.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. 3. 5.

1. Click Sketch > Done . 4. The blend should look as shown in the figure below except the dimensions will not be visible. Define the feature.9 . 3. Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8.For University Use Only . 2. Click OK . Type [20. 5.0] as the depth for the second section and press <ENTER>. Type [30.0] as the depth for the third section and press <ENTER>.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 6: Creating the Third Section Task 6.

Click Redefine . 3. Save the file and close the window. Change the attributes to smooth. Change the shape of the transitional surfaces from a straight transition to a spline transition.For University Use Only . Redefine the blended protrusion. Note the transitions between the subsections where Pro/ENGINEER used straight lines to attach the vertices of the subsections. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 7: Completed Blend Task 7.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pag e 8 . 2. Finish the definition. Click Attribute > Define > Smooth > Done . then pick a surface on the blend feature. Click OK . 4.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 8: Straight and Smooth Surfaces Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8.11 .

Sketch an open trajectory section consisting of a line. Pag e 8 . 3. then click Okay for the direction of viewing the sketching plane (view the yellow side). 3. Define the sketching plane as DTM2 using the default direction. Define DTM3 to point towards the bottom of the monitor.PRT.For University Use Only .1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . A sweep is a two-part sketch: the trajectory is first and the cross-section follows. 5. 4. 1. Create a part. Uncheck Use the default template option in the NEW dialog box and select Empty in the NEW FILE OPTIONS dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating a Simple Sweep Protrusion In this exercise. Pick DTM2 . Place the correct dimensions. Click Sketch Traj from the SWEEP TRAJ menu. Use a sketched trajectory. 2. a tangent arc. Click Sweep > Solid > Done . 2. starting with default datum planes. Sketch the trajectory on DTM2 using DTM3 as the bottom reference. Click Feature > Create > Protrusion . Check to see if DTM3 and DTM1 are the default references and close the REFERENCES dialog box. Take note of the area of the section at the sharp corner of the trajectory. Click Bottom and pick DTM3 as the reference. Task 2. Task 1. 6. Create the base feature protrusion as a Sweep. Click . Click Sketch and choose the commands to sketch the entities. and then two lines. 1. 4. Create a new part named SWEEP. you create a Sweep.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Lines Line Arc Fillet Figure 9: Showing Dimensions 7. 1. Sketch an inverted T cross-section. as shown in Figure 10.For University Use Only . located at the start point. The system has placed you in another Sketcher mode session. When you have completed the trajectory. Note that the centerlines provided by the system at the start point of the trajectory. The system defines the sketching plane as a plane normal to the trajectory. or click the checkmark. Task 3. You may want to turn the sketcher grid off.13 . Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8. click Done from the SKETCH pull down menu. Sketch the cross-section of the sweep.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Start point is Figure 10: Sketching an Inverted “T” The default view looks as follows: Start point Trajectory Cross-section Figure 11: Default View Pag e 8 .1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Click OK to complete it. 4. Figure 12: The Completed Sweep Note: The sweep feature is rounded where there was an arc in the trajectory. Save the file and erase it from memory. Sw eep s and B lend s Pag e 8.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. The sweep should look as shown in figure below. and mitered where there was a corner (nontangent segment) in the trajectory. Complete the section. 3. Click Sketch > Done or click the checkmark. Finish the feature.For University Use Only .15 .

• • • • Pag e 8 .For University Use Only . you always have to define its trajectory and its cross-section. Sweeps can either add or remove material depending on whether they are defined as protrusions or cuts. The Parallel Blend feature can have either a straight attribute or a smooth attribute. When defining a Swept Feature. you learned that • Parallel Blends and Swept Features illustrate Pro/ENGINEER’s ability to generate forms of solid geometry other than simple extruded or revolved type features. A Parallel Blend is created from a single section that contains multiple contours called subsections.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Like parameters. Page 9-1 .Commercial Use Prohibited Module Relations Previously.For University Use Only . Describe the four different types of Relations pertaining to a model. Delete and update invalid Relations in a model to suit changes to its design intent. you will be able to: • • • • • Define Relations. Relations are a way of capturing design knowledge and intent. Change the relation and you change the model. Create Relations that allow your child features to drive their parent features. Re-order Relations after first creating them. they are used to drive models. Objectives After completing this module. you have learned that the parametric nature of Pro/ENGINEER gives the designer powerful control over his design by creating geometry based on variable dimensions.

or among assembly components. Relations capture design relationships within features or parts.) Figure 1 represents a simple relation between the two dimensions of a rectangular feature.For University Use Only . where d0 is always twice the size of d1. to define values for dimensions in parts and assemblies. specifying the location of a hole in relation to the edge of a part. and to act as constraints for design conditions (for example.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES DEFINING PARAMETRIC RELATIONS Relations (also known as parametric relations) are user-defined equations written between symbolic dimensions and parameters. Relation: d0 = 2*d1 Figure 1: Part Relation Pag e 9 . Relations can be used to control the effects of modifications on models. thereby allowing users to control the effects of modifications on models.

These relate different component parameters to one another using a coding symbol to designate different components. Feature relations: These relate parameters specific to one feature in These relate specific pattern parameters within a the model. Part relations .These relate different feature parameters to one another in a single part. Pattern relations: pattern. /*hole centered in plate d5=d2/2 d6=d3/2 Part relations Hole centered in plate Feature relations Cam slot shape driven by relation Assembly relations Bracket centered on Figure 2: Different Relation Types Rel at io n s Pag e 9.3 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Types of Relations There are four types of model relations: • • • • Assembly relations .For University Use Only .

Skim through these elements.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Table 1: Elements of Relations Relation Types: Equality: d0=2*d1 Constraint: d1>= 2. p1.25) d12 = 1. Relations allow one feature to drive another.67 Comparison: if (d4>. In a traditional parent/child relationship it is the parent feature which always takes precedence (whether in dimensioning or regeneration).67) Character string parameter (i. p2.For University Use Only . etc. Parametric relations allows you to craft your model in such as way as to reverse the parent/child hierarchy. Pag e 9 . 32-A24-67B) Yes or no parameter Model note parameter Using Relations Relations enable you to capture sophisticated levels of design intent for your models.e.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Representing Relations: Types and Symbols The table below presents the various elements that you can include in relations. They are an integral part of any advanced design of parts and assemblies. 3..5 else d12=1 endif Dimension Symbols d# – Part dimensions d#:# – Dimensions in Assembly mode rd# – Reference dimensions sd# – Sketcher dimensions Tolerance Symbols tm# – Minus tolerance tp# – Plus tolerance tpm# – Plus/minus tolerance Instance Symbols User Parameters Integer parameter for instances in each direction of a pattern: p0.e.. You can take advantage of this unique capability and use child features to drive their parent features. They will get more meaningful to you when you start using them later on. Numeric parameter (i.

For University Use Only . Rel at io n s Pag e 9. you could write a relation that drives the placement of the hole so that it is centered top to bottom: /*center hole top to bottom d5=d2/2 Figure 3: Plate Showing Parameters You could then write another relationship to keep the hole centered from left to right: /*center hole left to right d6=d3/2 Once you have added these relations. Pro/ENGINEER automatically centers the hole in the plate and retains it at the center.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Relations: An Illustration In the Figure 3. even when you modify the height or width of the plate later on.5 .

6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Symbol . You can change the symbolic name of a dimension by using Modify and DimCosmetics. It is also good practice to comment your relations using the /* to document the design intent of the relations. the order that you enter them in is important. Order of Relations Pro/ENGINEER evaluates relations in consecutive order.For University Use Only . If not. the system evaluates the relations and checks to see if all of them are still valid. You should always test your relations to be sure that they function correctly. Do not wait until the end of the design process.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 4: Relations that Drive Hole Location Tips & Techniques: It is good practice to add a relation as soon as you realize that you need it in your design. Therefore. Pag e 9 . it issues a warning. During regeneration of the model.

Relations can be deleted or edited using the Edit Rel option. Design intent is captured by reversing the order of relations. are added in that order. d5 = d4 and d4 = d2/2.For University Use Only . Figure 6: Model Regenerated with Relations Sorted Rel at io n s Pag e 9. the relations do not capture the desired intent. The two relations.7 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES The following figure illustrates the consequences of entering relations improperly: Relations added: d5=d4 After first regeneration Figure 5: Reordering Relations The design intent is to center the hole on the plate. After the first regeneration of the model. The final regenerated model looks is shown in Figure 6.

Pag e 9 . You can click to either delete the relation or comment it out. If you have to modify or delete a relation because of a design change or an error. Whenever Pro/ENGINEER encounters invalid relations during regeneration. The editor that your system uses depends on the type of workstation that you have.8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . it automatically highlights the problem and prompts you to correct it. This may invalidate existing relations in the model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Design Changes As a design cycle progresses.For University Use Only . the design intent of a model tends to change. you can edit the relation in the model using a system text editor.

PRT Rel at io n s Pag e 9. and add number parameters to them. 2.9 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this lab. EXERCISE 1: Creating Relations Task 1. you learn how to create relations and how to manipulate their defining parameters. feature. Method In Exercise 1. Center the straight hole on top of the rectangular base solid 1. you create parameters that control features using relations. Change to wireframe display. Open RELATIONS. you create relations to capture the design intent of a part. In Exercise 2.For University Use Only .PRT. Figure 7: Symbolic Dimensions of RELATIONS. test the relations.

resolve it by clicking Relations > Edit Rel . 3.. Start adding a relation. Type [/* center hole front to back] followed by <ENTER>.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. The hole should move to the center of the block. Toggle between the numeric and symbolic values. 5. Press <ENTER> on a blank prompt line to finish adding relations. Test the two relations by modifying the base feature width and 1. 4. For the second relation. Click Regenerate .1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 6. depth. 2. The dimensions appear in their symbolic form (i. Note If your relation contains an error. 2. Task 3. Type [d6 = d4/2] followed by <ENTER>. d4. Task 4. Pick the block to display its symbolic dimensions. 6. 5. d5. 4. Enter a comment to describe the function of the relation. 3. Pick the hole to display its dimensions.e. Click Done from the MODEL REL menu. d6). Pick the rectangular base. Task 2. 1. enter comment [/* Center hole left to right] followed by <ENTER>. Click Add from the RELATIONS menu. Pag e 9 . 2. Click Relations from the PART menu. 1. Click Modify from the PART menu. Click Switch Dim from the RELATIONS menu. Type [d5 = d2/2] followed by <ENTER>.

0 ] 4. Pick each dimension. 6. 2. Pick the width of the block and change it to [70.0].25. Pick the hole feature. 3. Press <ENTER> on a blank line. Identify the symbolic name given to the hole diameter (d7). Regenerate the model. 5. Click Relations from the PART menu. Click Modify from the PART menu. 5. Change the base back to the original dimension values. Task 6. 5. Type an appropriate comment.0 ] from [50. Confirm that the two locating dimensions are 35 and 45. Modify the depth dimension. Pick the depth of the block and change it to [90. Show the dimensions of the hole. Task 7. Click Modify from the PART menu. Click Done from the MODEL REL menu. Add a relation that limits the diameter of the hole to be less than or equal to 11. 2. Click Add from the RELATIONS menu. Rel at io n s Pag e 9. Regenerate the model. 1. 1.For University Use Only . 7. Pick the diameter dimension and type [15].0 ] from [50. Pick the straight hole to display its dimensions. 3. Task 5. 4. 2.11 . 4. Test the relation by modifying the diameter dimension. Type [d7 <= 11. 3.0 ]. Regenerate the model. and type [50.25]. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3.

Type [Y] to continue the regeneration. 5.1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1. 2. 2. Task 9. Note the warning in the information window. Click Last Set > Done from the RESUME menu. pick the hole then the diameter dimension and type [10.For University Use Only . Figure 8: The Resumed Hole Pag e 9 . and click Done . Continue the regeneration regardless of the warning. Regenerate the model.0]. Close the window.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Click Feature > Resume . then close it. 3. 1. Retrieve only the last set of features that were suppressed. Modify back to a smaller diameter. 6. Click Relations > Show Rel . Task 8. 4. Resume a hole and counterbore that were previously suppressed. Review the relations via the information window. Click Modify.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating Parameters for FeatureControl Pro/ENGINEER allows for you to create parameters that can control features via relations. 6. 3. 5.10] followed by <ENTER>. Type [/*control the counter bore depth] followed by <ENTER>. Define a real number so the depth can vary infinitely. 7. Click ADD. Enter a relation to have the conterbore as deep as the hole minus the thread depth. 8. Type [d23 = depth_ratio*d22] followed by <ENTER>. Start to add a relation. 3. Task 2. Rel at io n s Pag e 9. Add a parameter to the model then control the counterbore depth using the parameter. 1. Click Add Param . Press <ENTER> on an empty line. Pick the surface of the counterbore hole.13 . Type [. Type [depth_ratio] in the message area followed by <ENTER>. 5. Task 1. Click Real Number . Click Relations from the PART menu. Click Part Rel from the MODEL REL menu. 2. 2. Click Done from the MODEL REL menu. Regenerate the model.For University Use Only . 4. 1. 4.

1. Click Regenerate . 3. 3. 2. Increase the total depth of the hole. Edit the ratio parameter to change the relationship between the counterbore and hole. Click Set Up from the PART menu. Click Done from the DIM COSMETIC menu. 2. Task 6.For University Use Only . 1. Click Symbol . Click Modify and pick on the counterbore hole. then click Done from the MODIFY menu. Task 5. Regenerate the model. Click the depth dimension and type [30].1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . then type [cbore_depth]. 1. Click Modify > Dim Cosmetics . then select the counterbore hole.5]. Leave the default part and click Modify. 4. Pick the depth dimension and type [entire_depth]. 6. 3. Click Setup > Parameters > Info from the MODEL PARAMS menu. Inspect the parameter in the model using various methods. Pick depth dimension of the counterbore. 5. Click Symbol and pick the counterbore hole. Select DEPTH_RATIO and type [. Click Done from the PART SETUP menu. Task 4. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 3. 4. 2. Change the symbolic name of the entire depth of the hole and the counterbore depth to document the design. Pag e 9 . Test your relation . 5. then click Parameters from the PART SETUP menu.

4. 5. Click Done from the PART SETUP menu. 7. Rel at io n s Pag e 9. Save the model and erase it from memory.15 . Also notice that the new symbolic names are now displayed. 6. Notice that the system lists the relations you have defined along with the parameters. Click Close > Done . Click Relations > Show Rel .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. 3. Read the information window.For University Use Only . then click Close .

invalid or conflicting relations are highlighted by prompts for resolution. Relations can be intelligently used to make child features the drivers of their parent features. The ordering of relations is crucial in capturing design intent as Pro/ENGINEER evaluates relations in consecutive order. During model regeneration. • • • • • Pag e 9 . Feature Relations. There are four different kinds of relations: Assembly Relations.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module you learned that: • Relations are user-defined mathematical equations composed of symbolic dimensions and parameters.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . which capture design relationships within a part or among the many component parts of an assembly. Part Relations.For University Use Only . The user should always plan ahead in such as way as to make relations an integral part of the design of parts and assemblies. and Pattern Relations.

Establish dependence among various copied features. Page 10-1 . often a need arises for duplication. Specify different location options for the Copy feature.For University Use Only . Implement patterns with three different options—Identical.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Duplicating Features: Patterns and Copy When creating complex parts and assemblies. you will be able to: • • • • • Duplicate existing features using two different methods— Patterning and Copying. The design intent in these cases specifies identical features or parts to be placed at separate locations in the same model. Differentiate between Dimension Patterning and Reference Patterning. Varying. and General. Objectives After completing this module. This module shows you how to duplicate features using Pro/ENGINEER.

This pattern type is only available if the leader feature for the new pattern references the leader feature of the existing pattern. Pag e 1 0. The system automatically groups all entities belonging to a pattern together in the model tree for ease of selection. • • • • A created pattern behaves as a single feature. you reference an existing pattern to define the locations of the new instances.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . you increment existing dimension values of the leader in one or two directions to specify the pattern instances. and the system automatically updates the whole pattern. The pattern is parametric. the system assigns the dimension value of the pattern leader to all instances in the pattern. If you use the second direction.For University Use Only . you can create multiple instances of a single feature that is referred to as the pattern leader. Therefore. Types of Patterns Dimension Patterns With dimension patterning. you can change pattern parameters and regenerate. the system takes all instances that are created by the first direction and increments them in the second direction. Benefits of Patterning The patterning method of feature duplication offers numerous benefits. There are two ways to define the instances in a pattern: • • Increment the leader’s dimensions.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES CREATING A PATTERN By creating a pattern. Reference an existing pattern. Modify the dimensions of the pattern leader. If you do not increment a dimension value. Reference Patterns With reference patterning.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pattern Options There are three patterning options: Identical. Table 1: Patterning Restrictions Regeneration Speed Identical Varying General Fastest Moderate Slowest Varying Instances No Yes Yes Allowing Instance Intersections No No Yes 1st 1st 1st I II III Figure 2: Pattern Parameters Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. which are represented in Table 1. and General.3 . Identical Varying General Figure 1: Pattern Options Pro/ENGINEER places certain restrictions on pattern options.For University Use Only . Varying.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES I II III Figure 3: Pattern Parameters A B 1st 1st 2nd 2nd Figure 4: Pattern in Two Directions Pag e 1 0.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

However. or rib). Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0.5 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES A B Figure 5: Pattern in Two Directions Rotational Patterns of Sketched Features To create a rotational pattern for a hole. cut. you must increment an angular dimension using radial placement. for a sketched feature (such as a protrusion.For University Use Only . you must create an internal datum plane at an angle.

For University Use Only .6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 6: Rotational Pattern of a Sketched Feature Pag e 1 0.

For University Use Only . so the pattern results may not be consistent. A sketched centerline has no direction associated with it. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 7: Rotational Pattern of a Sketched Feature Note: Do not use a sketched centerline to create the rotational dimension.7 .

This option is available when you select New Refs .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES THE COPY FEATURE The Copy feature allows you to create new features by copying existing features to a new location. xxxx.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . All Feat – Selects the features to copy from a different model. Same Refs Mirror Move – Mirrors the features about a planar surface or datum plane.prt.For University Use Only . Copies that you create using the FromDifModel and FromDifVers options are automatically independent. Specifying Location To click a location for the copy. You must specify a location for the copy. This option is available when you select Mirror or Move . – Specifies rotation and/or translation.prt. select one of these options from the COPY FEATURE menu: • • • • Click – Selects features to copy from the current model. You can retain each reference or click an alternate. click one of these options from the COPY FEATURE menu: • • • • New Refs – Specifies new feature references. Pag e 1 0. – Selects all features in the current model. This option is available when you select New Refs or Same Refs . and then establish dependence or independence for the copied feature’s dimensions. Choosing Features To select which features to copy. FromDifModel – Selects the features to copy from a different version of the current model (for example.5).3 when the current model is xxxx. use the Independent option. FromDifVers Establishing Dependence To make the copied feature dimensions independent of their parent dimension. – Retains the same feature references. pick the features to copy.

Model before Copy Operation 3.9 . Same Ref copy 1. Mirror copies Figure 8: Instances of the Copy Feature Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. Original model 4 New ref copy 5. you can make the entire section or individual dimensions independent by clicking Modify and Make Indep . When you create a dependent copy. depend on the parent feature for their values and click the Dependent option.For University Use Only . The system adds a Merge reference to the Model Tree. you can mirror all of a model’s geometry about a plane without creating new features.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES To specify that copied feature dimensions (that you have not changed). Move copy Completed Model 2. Tips & Techniques: If you use the Mirror Geom option instead of Copy .

you master the Copy feature. In Exercise 4. and Rotational Patterns of sketched features. you create a dimension pattern. you will be proficient in creating generic Dimension Patterns. Reference Patterns.For University Use Only . Method In Exercise 1. EXERCISE 1: Creating a Dimension Pattern Model before pattern and modification Completed model Figure 9: Dimensional Pattern of a Cut Pag e 1 0. you create a reference pattern and a rotational pattern respectively. In Exercises 2 and 3. To produce the end result. You will also be able to duplicate features and parts using the Copy feature.1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal By the end of this lab. you pattern the cut and then modify the angle of the slot.

Click File > Open . Click Varying from the PAT OPTIONS menu. Using patterns allows for you to duplicate features easily.PRT and click Open . type [4] as the incremental value between pattern members. 1. Change to hidden line display. Create a varying pattern of cuts. Click Done from the EXIT menu. 4. Task 2. you should use the varying option. 2. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 1. 1. Pick the 10 dimension describing the location of the cut on the model. Increment the 10mm dimension for the first direction 4 units. Click Done from the EXIT menu.For University Use Only . Create a total of 12 cuts in the pattern.11 . Do not add a second direction to this pattern. Select DIM_PATTERN. Type [12] as the total number of instances in this direction. Tips & Techniques: You can access the FILE OPEN dialog box by clicking the Open icon on the toolbar 2. Click the Hidden Line icon from the toolbar. When creating a pattern that will intersect different surfaces on the model. 3. Click Feature > Pattern and pick the cut. You have created the pattern. then click Done . but not intersect itself. Not all the instances of the cut on the model will intersect the end surface like the first cut does. Open an existing part to be used for creating a pattern. Open the dim pattern part model. At the prompt.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 10 Varying Pattern Task 3. Pag e 1 0. Making changes to the first instance of a pattern will modify the other instances. Regenerate the model. 2. 1. 3. Pick the cut. Save the model and erase it from memory. Pick the 45-degree dimension and type [-45] as the new value.For University Use Only . Modify the angle of the leader to change the angle of the entire pattern. Click Modify.1 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

consider the amount of time you are saving because you did not have to create these features separately. Try modifying the parametric dimensions to observe how the pattern updates. and pattern the square slot by referencing the hole pattern.For University Use Only . To create the end result.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating a Reference Pattern In this exercise. create the square slot on the leader feature. Model at start Figure 11: Reference Pattern Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0.13 . you create a reference pattern using the part shown in Figure 11. you pattern the hole. As you create these features.

3. click Done from the EXIT menu. Pick the 20 dimension and type [20] as the new value. Select an appropriate reference plane.For University Use Only . Create a square cut on the leader feature of the pattern. 6.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 4. Create an identical pattern of holes in two directions. 6. Click Done from the PAT OPTIONS menu to accept Identical . Click the Hidden Line icon from the toolbar. click Done from the EXIT menu. Leave the default One Side . Reference patterns use other patterns to determine their location. Click Okay from the DIRECTION menu to make cut into the solid. Click Extrude > Solid > Done . 7. 4. Click Create > Cut . 8. 1. so that you can create a reference pattern of it. 2. 2. Specify the axis A_1 as a reference. Type [3] as the total number of instances. Click Pattern from the FEAT menu and pick the hole to pattern.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 1. 5. Open file REF_PATTERN. Task 3. 5. Now pick the 10 dimension and type [20]. Since this is the only dimension that you are going to increment in the second direction. Pick the top surface of the protrusion as the sketching plane. 2. Delete the current references. 3. 1. 1. Since this is the only dimension that you are going to increment in the first direction. Click Done .PRT. Task 2. Type [2] as the total number of instances in this direction. Pag e 1 0.

5] as the depth value. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. 8. 7. Modify the width to 10mm. 2. Click OK . The model regenerates automatically. Sketch vertical and horizontal centerlines passing through axis A_1. Exit from sketcher. Click .15 . Sketch the section shown in Figure 12. 1. Sketch a square centered on axis A_1 making sure Intent Manager makes the assumption of equal line lengths and symmetry. Remove the material to the inside of the cut. 3. 6. 5. Click Done to accept the Blind default. Work on the leader figure shown. so that it can act as the reference feature later. Change the depth value.For University Use Only . Type [2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. Complete the feature. Figure 12: Section for Slot 4.

Create a reference pattern of the cut feature. Pag e 1 0. 1. 2. In the Model Tree. Define the pattern using the leader reference.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 5. Save the part and erase it from memory.For University Use Only . Click Ref Pattern > Done .1 6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . hold the right mouse button down over Cut id 1205 and select Pattern in the pop-up menu. 3.

Click Open . you create a datum “on the fly” and use an angular datum as the sketch’s reference plane to act as the controlling dimension of the pattern. Note: You are going to use the blower part later in an assembly. 1. so be sure to save it. Turn on the environment display of the axes if they do not appear on the screen using the toolbar.For University Use Only . Turn on the environment display of the datum planes if they do not appear on the screen using the toolbar. Task 1. 3. Select BLOWER. Retrieve the model and setup the environment for creating the first protrusion. Click File > Open > Project . The base feature has already been defined for you in another directory.17 . Figure 13: Blower Base with Dimensions Shown Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. To create the radial pattern.PRT. 2. Open the part model called blower.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating Rotational Patterns of Sketched Features In this exercise. you pattern blower fins radially about a part’s central axis.

Create the rotational pattern of blower blades. Pick the top face of the disk as the sketching plane for blower blades. 11. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Protrusion . Click Bottom from the SKET VIEW menu.1 8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click Angle . Create a datum plane through the center axis. Click Okay. Type a value to define the angle. 5. Extrude one side of the sketching plane. 4. Specify the references as the outer edge of the circular protrusion and the datum you just created. 2.For University Use Only . Leave the default One Side. Make sure that the bottom straight edge has a constraint of perpendicular to the outer edge of the base protrusion. 1. Create a horizontal/vertical reference plane for sketching. then pick axis A_1. Click Make Datum from the SETUP PLANE menu. then modify the dimensions to change the size of the model. with an angle associated with it. 7. 8. Create the datum at an angle to DTM3. Make sure you do not specify DTM3 or DTM1 as a reference. Define the orientation reference as the bottom. Done. 3. then pick DTM3 . you should sketch your sections large. Start defining a solid protrusion. 10. Tips & Techniques: To help aid you in your sketching. Click Enter Value and type [30]. Pag e 1 0. Start the definition of the internal angled datum. Define the shape of the protrusion and create the first blade.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 2. 6. Click Through . Click Extrude > Solid > Done . 9. Accept the default direction of creation. and click Done . Sketch the section as shown in Figure 14.

Section Make Datum for horizontal reference Figure 14: Sketch of Blower Blade Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0.For University Use Only . Add the dimensioning scheme as shown in Figure 14. Type [73. Tips & Techniques: Click OK from the dialog box after all elements have been defined by using the middle mouse button.5] as the protrusion depth value.19 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 12.

For University Use Only . By creating protrusions using an internal angled reference plane. 6. Type [6] as the number of instances. 3. Pattern angle Original angle Figure 15: Pattern of Blades Pag e 1 0. Do not create instances in the second direction. 4. 2. Create 6 instances of the pattern. you can now use the datum dimension to create a radial pattern. Create a varying pattern since the blades will not intersect themselves. then press <ENTER>. Use the angle of the datum plane to orient the part as the pattern creation direction. Click Pattern and pick the blade protrusion. Pattern the blower blade protrusion in one direction using a varying pattern. 1. Do not define any other dimensions to increment. Click Done from the EXIT menu. Click Done . Pick dimension 30 . 7.2 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 5. Define the increment value to be 60 degrees. Start the creation of the pattern. Type [60]. Click Varying > Done .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 3.

Click Feature > Create > Solid > Protrusion .For University Use Only . The system will select the edge as a specified reference and start the creation of a circle. Click an appropriate orientation reference. 5. 9. Create a protrusion. and One Side from the ATTRIBUTES menu. 12. determine which instance is the leader. 4. Create the blower top. delete references then sketch without defining references. thus constraining to lie on that edge. Drag the mouse so that the circle snaps to the outer edge reference. Accept the default direction for creating the protrusion.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. Using the MODEL TREE. Expand the pattern. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. 7. 10. Note which protrusion highlights. The design calls for the air to flow into the blower from the top but to have support for the blades. Select the first protrusion from the expanded list. Click the + symbol before Pattern (Protrusion) entry. Define the sketching plane as the top surface of the leader. 3. Pick the outer circular edge of the base protrusion. 1. Click Extrude > Solid > Done from the SOLID OPTS menu. Tips & Techniques: It is always good practice to reference the lead feature of a pattern when referencing pattern instances. Click Close > OK . Define the protrusion as extruded on one side of the sketching plane. 6. 8. Sketch a concentric circle to the base solid feature using the flyout icons. 2. If necessary. Click the middle mouse button to exit from creating circles. Click View > Model Tree Setup > Highlight Model .21 . 11. Click icon to repaint the screen whenever needed.

Click Feature > Create > Solid > Cut . 14. 5. Extrude the cut one side of the sketching plane.00] as the new value. Start the creation of a cut feature. 3.2 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Figure 16: Adding the Top Protrusion Task 5. 6.For University Use Only . Define a cut to allow the air to pass into the blower. Sketch a circle with the center on the intersection of the two datums. 7.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 13. Sketch on the top surface of the blower. Model regenerates. Click Extrude > Solid > Done from the SOLID OPTS menu. Exit from sketcher. Modify the diameter. Use the Default orientation.5] as the blind depth value. Click . 2. Click One Side > Done from the ATTRIBUTES menu. Click OK . 15. Define the references as DTM1 and DTM3. Pag e 1 0. Type [80. Type [2. 1. Refer to figure below. 4.

Sketch on the bottom surface of the blower using an appropriate orientation reference. Click UpTo Surface > Done from the SPEC TO menu. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. 1. Specify the depth. Click OK to finish.For University Use Only . Exit from sketcher. 10. Click . Click Extrude > Solid > Done from the SOLID OPTS menu. and One Side > Done from the ATTRIBUTES menu.23 . Click Create >Solid > Protrusion . Figure 17: The Sketched Cut Task 6. Remove the material to the inside of the section. 9. 3. Add a mounting boss using a solid protrusion. 2. Pick the under side of the top protrusion. Start the creation of a solid protrusion.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 8. The blower model needs a mounting boss located on the bottom of it. 11. 12. Extrude the protrusion on side of the sketching plane.

Press <ENTER>. then pick the axis line. Type [30] as the new value. Click OK . Click Feature > Create > Solid > Hole . 5. 7. Pick the center axis as the primary reference. Using the default datum planes as references. click Thru All > Done . Modify the diameter. 2.2 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . Capture the design intent of being coaxial to the boss. Figure 18: Circular Boss Task 7. In the depth one option. 5. Type [15] as the diameter value. Add a mounting hole through the circular boss you just created. 1. Type [25] as the new value. 3. 9. Pag e 1 0. sketch a circle section with its center at the intersection of the datums. 8.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Click Blind > Done to specify the depth. 6. Define the hole with a straight taper in the HOLE dialog box. Click Sketch > Done . 4.

Click File > Erase > Current . 1. You have now completed the blower model for your project lab. Click File > Save . Build the feature. Figure 20: The Completed Blower Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. 7. 2. Pick the top surface of the boss as the placement plane.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 6. Save the model. Figure 19: Placing the Hole Task 8. Finish by saving the model and erasing it from memory.25 . Erase the model from memory.

as shown in Figure 21.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 4: Copying Features In this exercise.2 6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Model before Copy operations Finished model Figure 21: Copying Features Pag e 1 0.For University Use Only . you duplicate existing features on the model by copying.

1. Task 2. The selection you make will be based on you design intent. Click OK . Click Dependent > Done . then make the copy independent of the parent slot. then press <ENTER>. 3. type [75. 8. Start the copy operation. type [0.00]. then press <ENTER>. 2. Click Feature > Copy. Pro/ENGINEER supplies you with various options to duplicate features in a mode. Modify the length of the slot. Modify the length of the slot back to 125.00. Use the existing references that the current feature has. and regenerate.27 . 9. Pick the slot. Click Modify and pick the parent slot. For Dim 1. Experiment with modifying dimensions.00 dimension. 2. Click Done .For University Use Only . Define the copy as dependent on the original. 7. Click Done from the SELECT FEAT menu. 6. Pick the 65-inch dimension and the 45-degree angle (Dim 1 and 3). Pick the 125. For Dim 3.00] . Change the display to hidden line. 4. type [410. Click Same Refs . 2.00] as the new value. Create a dependent copy of the lower right slot.PRT. as described in the previous step.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 1. Click Done . Task 3. Complete the copy. Open the part file FEATURE_COPY_MIRROR. You can make copies either independent or dependent. 5. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. 1. 1. Retrieve an existing model and copy some of the features. Return to the higher level menu.

Break the dependency between the two slots. Pick the copy. then click Section from the MAKE INDEP menu. 2. You have the ability to mirror the entire model by using various options. Modify the 45-degree angle of the parent slot. Save the model and erase it from memory. Click Mirror > All Feat > Independent from the COPY FEATURE menu.00]. Mirror all of the features to complete the part using Copy. Change the angle of the parent slot to back to 45 degrees. Task 4. Pag e 1 0. Type [30.For University Use Only . 3. Change the copy so that its entire section is independent of the parent slot. then click Done . Mirror about DTM1 to create independent copies of all of the features in the model. Note that the angle of the copy does not change because you broke the dependence of that dimension when you modified it to create the copy. The model should now appear as shown in Figure 21. 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. All of the copy’s dimensions are now independent of the parent slot. 5. Pick DTM1. Pro/ENGINEER allows you to break the dependency between copied features to support design change. 4. 6.2 8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1. Click Make Indep from the MODIFY menu. Click Copy from the FEAT menu.

Varying. There are three Pattern options: Identical. the angular dimension must be incremented using radial placement. you learned that: • • • • • Duplication is important for capturing design intent and Pro/ENGINEER enables it through Pattern and Copy.29 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.For University Use Only . Patterning is of two kinds: Dimension Patterning and Reference Patterning. Du p l icat in g F eat u re s: Pa t t e rn s an d Co p y Pag e 1 0. Dependence/Independence can be established between copied entities. and General. In the Rotational Pattern for a hole.

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or Manufacturing modes.For University Use Only . Page 11-1 . Objectives After completing this module. Sheetmetal. Moreover. corresponding drawings also reflect any changes that you make to a model (such as the addition or deletion of features and dimensional changes) in Part. Pro/ENGINEER associates drawings with their parent models. The model automatically reflects any dimensional changes that you make to a drawing. Assembly. you can create drawings of all Pro/ENGINEER models or import files from other systems. the system updates other drawing views accordingly. you will be able to: • • • • Describe the different types of drawing views in Pro/ENGINEER Create a production drawing for an existing part model Explore the associativity that exists between a model and its drawing Create dependency between certain drawing views. In addition.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Drawings and Views Using Drawing mode within Pro/ENGINEER. All model views in the drawing are associative: if you change a dimensional value in one view.

assign an associated model. The first view must be a general view. you can reorient it during placement. Types of Views The five primary view types available in the VIEW TYPE menu (illustrated in figure below) are: • • Projection – An orthographic projection of an object as seen from the front. the system uses values that you specify for the height and width of the drawing sheet. top. Pag e 1 1. You also have the ability to assign a predefined company format. Note: You should always use default datums to orient a general view. select the sheet size. Auxiliary – A view created by projecting 90 degrees to an inclined surface. Adding Drawing Views After selecting a format or specifying a sheet size. and specify an orientation: • • • With a portrait orientation. right. With a landscape orientation (the default setting).2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . datum plane. or along an axis. you can add views to your drawing using the Views option. This dialog box gives you multiple options in which you can.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS Creating a Drawing After selecting Drawing from the NEW dialog box and assigning it a name the NEW DRAWING dialog box will open. the system uses the larger sheet dimension as the height and the smaller one as the width.For University Use Only . With a variable orientation. When first placed. or left. it appears in the default view orientation. the system uses the larger sheet dimension as the width and the smaller one as the height. The format that you select will automatically define the sheet size and orientation. Using the ORIENTATION dialog box.

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• •

– A view that you orient and is not dependent upon any other view for its orientation.
General Detailed – A view that you create by taking a portion of an existing view and scaling it for dimensioning and clarification purposes. The boundary for the detailed view can be a circle, ellipse (with or without a horizontal or vertical major axis), or a spline. Revolved – A planar area cross-section revolved 90 degrees about the cutting plane line and offset along its length.

Figure 1: The Five Main Types of Views Specifying How Much of the Model Is Visible

Using other options in the VIEW TYPE menu, you can specify how much of the model is visible in the view, as shown in the next figure. • • • •
Full View Half View

– Shows the entire model.

– Shows only the portion of the model on one side of a datum plane.
Broken View

– Removes sections from large objects between two points and moves the remaining sections close together.

Partial View – Shows only the portion of the view that is contained within a boundary.

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Figure 2: Specifying How Much of the Model to Make Visible

Adding a Cross Section
To determine if the view is of a single surface or has a cross-section, use these VIEW TYPE menu options: • • •
Section No Xsec

– Displays a cross-section for a particular view. – Does not display a cross-section. – Displays only the selected surface of a particular view

Of Surface

orientation. The following figure illustrates the various types of cross-sectional views that you can create using the XSEC TYPE menu.

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Figure 3: Cross-Sectional Views

Manipulating Views
Using various options in the VIEWS menu, you can:

Move Views
Use the Move View option. You can move general and detailed views anywhere on the sheet, but you can move projection, auxiliary, and revolved views only along their line of projection.

Delete Views
Use the Delete View option. Parent views—views used to create projection views—cannot be deleted. Instead, they have to be erased with the Erase View option. Restore erased views using Resume View .

Change Display Modes
Use Disp Mode option to display views independently of the Environment dialog setting such as Wireframe , Hidden line , and No Hidden . For example, show some views with hidden lines and others with no hidden lines. Any views that you establish with this option remain at the same setting regardless of any changes that you make to the ENVIRONMENT dialog box settings.

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Modify Scale Values
Certain views you can place using the Scale option. Those views have their own scale parameters that you can change using the Modify option. When you modify them, only those views and their children change; the change does not affect the other views in the drawing.

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LABORATORY PRACTICAL
Goal
The goal of this lab is to enable you to create drawings of solid parts, experiment with VIEWS and DETAIL menus, and explore the associativity between drawings and part models.

Method
In Exercise 1, you create a drawing of a Gear Part. You will explore various options available with the VIEWS and DETAIL menus. Then you modify the drawing in different ways and regenerate to explore its associativity with the solid Gear Part.

EXERCISE 1: Creating a Drawing
In this exercise, you create a drawing of a solid part. Take this opportunity to experiment with the VIEWS and DETAIL menus to become more familiar with the functions that are available with each. After you set the views, you return to Part mode and create a feature on the gear part. You then retrieve the drawing to view an example of the associativity between the drawing and the part model.

Second view

Third view First view

Fourth view

Figure 4: Gear Part Drawing

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Task 1. Create a landscape A size drawing called gear and associate it to the gear part model. 1. Click File > New from the pull-down menus. In the NEW dialog box, click Drawing , type [GEAR], and click OK . 2. Do not use a template. 3. Select EMPTY from the SPECIFY TEMPLATE section. 4. Click Browse in the CREATE DRAWING dialog box, and select GEAR.PRT as the name of the Default Model. 5. Click Landscape as the orientation. 6. Specify the sheet size. Select A from the STANDARD SIZE dropdown list. 7. Click OK to finish. Task 2. Create and orient the first view of the gear model using a general view. 1. Click Views from DRAWING menu. The system automatically prompts you to create a general view. Accept the default values Full View, No Xsec, and No Scale. Click Done from the VIEW TYPE menu. 2. Pick a location for the general view. Do not be too concerned with the placement; you can move the view later. 3. Place the view in the orientation shown in Figure 4 and as detailed in the following steps. 4. Select ORIENT BY REFERENCE from the TYPE drop-down list. 5. Select DTM3 for Reference 1. 6. Leave the default Top. Select DTM2 as top for Reference 2. If you make a mistake, click Undo . 7. Click OK to finish view creation. Task 3. Move the general view that you just created.

1. Click Move View from the VIEWS menu.

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2. Pick the view to activate it; then pick a new location for it. Experiment with moving the view. Finally, position the view toward the left side of the sheet. Task 4. Add the second view, shown in Figure 4, as a projection view using the general view as its parent. 1. Click Add View from the VIEWS menu. 2. Pro/ENGINEER defaults to projected views after defining the first general view; use the defaults to define the view. Leave the defaults of Projection, Full View, No Xsec, and No Scale. 3. Click Done . 4. Place the projection view by picking a location above the first view near the top of the sheet. Pro/ENGINEER automatically bases the orientation on the general view’s orientation. Task 5. Add the auxiliary view, in Figure 4, with a cross section displayed. This part has a previously created cross section through it. 1. Click Add View > Auxiliary > Full View > Section > No Scale > Done . 2. Define a cross section through the entire view. Click Full > Total Xsec > Done . 3. Pick a location to the lower right of the first view to place the cross section view. 4. Use DTM4 as the plane to setup the view orientation. When the system prompts you to pick an edge of, axis through, or datum plane as the front surface on the main view, pick DTM4. It was defined through the main axis and normal to the small hole axis. Note:
Do not concern yourself with the view location; you can move it later.

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Task 6. The system also allows you to use cross sections that have been defined in part mode. The gear contains the cross section, C, that you can use for this view. 1. Use the predefined cross section C. Leave the default Retrieve and pick C from the XSEC NAMES menu. 2. Specify a view in which to display the cutting arrow. Pick the first general view you created. Note:
You can create cross sections in the drawing if you have a license for the optional add-on module Pro/DETAIL.

Task 7. Change the cross-hatching to improve its display on the drawing. 1. Exit to the highest level menu. Click Done/Return from the VIEWS menu. 2. Change the cross-hatching. Click Modify > Xhatching . 3. Pick the cross section view. Click Done Sel . 4. Change the spacing. Click Spacing > Half > Half . 5. Change the angle of the cross hatching to be horizontal. Click Angle from the CROSS XHATCH menu, then click 0 . 6. Complete the modification. Click Done .

Figure 5: The Modified Cross Hatching

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In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R

Pick the vertical left edge of the gear. 2. Select DTM2 as top for Reference 2. Click Disp Mode from the Menu Manager. 6. 1. 11. Click OK from the ORIENTATION dialog box. 10. Pick the upper left view: then pick the lower middle view with the cross section. 3. 12. 4. Click General > Scale > Done . 1. Add another view as an isometric . Select DTM3 for Reference 1. Type [. If you make a mistake. Leave the default Top. Click View Disp . Change the display of the projected and auxiliary view.75. 3. Type [30] for the angle followed by Apply. Scale the view to . D raw ing and Vi ew s Pag e 1 1. 13. Type [45] for the angle followed by Apply.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 8. Click Views > Add View . the last general view. Click Angles from the TYPE drop-down menu 8. 9. Finish the orientation. leaving the other defaults. Click Orient By Reference from the TYPE drop-down list. 7. Task 9. Change the display of hidden and tangent edges from the default settings.11 . Click Edge/Axis from the REFERENCE drop-down list. Click Done Sel . Click Horizontal from the REFERENCE drop-down list.75] followed by <ENTER>. 5. click Undo . Pick a location toward the upper right of the drawing to place the view. Orient the model so that datum 3 is parallel to the screen. 2. and the auxiliary view so that they do not have any hidden lines. Change the projected view in the upper-left corner. Change the display of views.

500 located immediately after SCALE in the lower left corner of the screen. Modify the scale value for the sheet.For University Use Only . Change the display back to hidden line. Pro/ENGINEER bases their placement on the first view.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Change the environment display to wireframe. 4. Note: The upper left view is projected and the cross section view is an auxiliary view. Pick the view and move to new a location. Reposition the projected view. Notice that there is no change in the display of the views. Click the two views followed by Done Sel . click Hidden Line > Tan Solid > Done . Click Done/Return to return to the highest menu. Click the the toolbar.1 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Now. Task 11. 6. Save the drawing file. therefore. Click the icon from the toolbar. 2. Change the display of the isometric and general view to display tangent edges as solid and hidden lines. Projected and auxiliary views are children of their parent view. Pag e 1 1. you cannot move them independently of the lower left view. Set the display settings to not display hidden lines and display tangent edges as solid. Click No Hidden > Tan Solid > Done from the VIEW DISP menu. 3. 1. icon from Task 10. 2. Place the view using the left mouse button.625]. Click Move View in the VIEWS menu and select the projected view (denoted as Second View in Figure 4). 7. Click Modify and select the sheet scale value 0. 5. Type [. Do not erase the drawing. Experiment with moving these view types 1.

2. 1. Click Open from the FILE pull-down menu. Activate the GEAR DRAWING window again. Click File > Close Window . 4. Create a feature on the gear part to view the associativity between the part model and the drawing. since you are going to delete it later.PRT. Save before erasing both files from memory. Retrieve the gear part into a working window.DRW.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 12. Pro/ENGINEER does not automatically save to disk any change that you have made to the model. Close the GEAR PART window.PRT. If the model changes the drawing will automatically update. GEAR. Task 13. Note that the hole appears in all of the views. Erase the drawing and the part without saving the hole feature.DRW is used again in the next exercise. 3.For University Use Only . then select GEAR. Click Erase > Current > Select All > OK .DRW. 4. D raw ing and Vi ew s Pag e 1 1. A simple way to revert back to the last saved version is to erase the model from memory without saving. Recall that the drawing is fully associative to the part model. 2. Activate the DRAWING window and select GEAR. 5. Create a straight hole on the flat surface of the slot feature. 1. Note: You can choose the dimension and attributes of the hole. 3. The system erases the gear drawing. Delete the hole feature. Return to the gear part Click Window and select GEAR.13 . Click Window and select GEAR.

Detailed. Default datum planes should always be used to orient the first general view. and Revolved. Cross sections can be created in part mode or drawing mode during view placement. Half View.For University Use Only . Views can be moved and deleted. Broken View. General views are not dependent on any other view. The principle of associativity works between solid part models and their drawings. View types have four further sub-options: Full View. Auxiliary. General views can be in any orientation and placed using the default view.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . their display modes can be changed and scale values modified. you learned that: • • • • • • • • • There are five primary Drawing View types: Projection. and saved views from part mode. and Partial View. Pag e 1 1. General views can have their own scale.

For University Use Only . notes. you learn about the Detailing of these drawings. In this module. Objectives After completing this module. mold makers. tables. and other production personnel. Investigate the associativity of the drawing to the part by modifying dimensions on the drawing. Page 12-1 . and geometric tolerances. you will be able to: • • Create a production drawing that will detail dimensions.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Additional Detailing and Associativity You have learned about the importance of creating Drawing Views of solid part models. This Detailing is important as a method for communicating design intent to machinists.

additional dimensions in the drawing will need to be created to convey additional information.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES CAPTURING DESIGN INTENT Detailing the Drawing Once the views are created on a drawing. – Shows the dimensions of a selected feature. they are fully modifiable and changes are immediately reflected in the model.For University Use Only . in some cases as in manufacturing. showing the dimensions are usually just a click of a button. in this module you will learn how to place Feature Dimensions and Driven Dimensions. likewise. Creating Feature Dimensions Feature dimensions are created in the actual part and assembly models. the system automatically updates the drawing and reflects the changes. This associativity allows fast and efficient design development. – Shows all dimensions of a selected view.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . In the drawing. Feature Dimensions have many options: • • • Show All View – Shows all dimensions for the model. they only appear in a single view to prevent double dimensioning. Two Types of Dimensions Though there are several types. However. Therefore the redundancy of designer and draftsman duplicating the same dimensions is eliminated. When you make changes to the model in Part or Assembly mode. Drawing and Solid Model: Need for Consistency Once the driving dimensions in the drawing are in place. Feature Pag e 1 2. any changes that you make to the model in Drawing mode become immediately visible on the model in other modes.

Preview When showing dimensions using the SHOW/ERASE dialog box. Part – Shows the dimensions of a selected part. you can delete them from a drawing. The options for preview are as follows: • • • • Select to Keep – Allows you to select specific dimensions that you want to be kept shown after exiting the dialog box. Addit ional D eta iling and A ssoc iati vity Pag e 1 2-3 . – Allows you to select specific dimensions that you do not want to remain shown. However.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • Feature & View – Shows all dimensions of a selected feature in a selected view. the system defaults to previewing the dimensions that are shown. click Create from the DETAIL menu and Dimension from the DETAIL ITEM menu. Modifying and Deleting Driven Dimensions In contrast to feature dimensions. Creating Driven Dimensions Dimensions that you actually create in Drawing mode are known as Driven dimensions. Select to Remove Accept All – Shows all of the dimensions that have been shown after exiting the dialog box. – Shows the dimensions of a selected part in a selected Part & View view. Erase All – Discards all the selected shown dimensions. you cannot modify driven dimensions in a production drawing because their values are based on the part model.For University Use Only . Manipulating Dimensions Once you have displayed dimensions in a drawing. you can use options in the DETAIL menu to manipulate them in various ways: • • Use Move Text to relocate the dimension text along the dimension or leader elbow line. To create them. then pick the desired geometry. Use Mod Attach to locate dimensions of rounds and chamfers on another reference of the same feature.

Use Break to break an extension line. use the following format: • • • Dimensions – &d#. and text styles. where # is the parameter ID (for example.For University Use Only . Use Align to align dimensions. where xxxxx is the symbolic name of the parameter. User-defined parameters – &xxxxx. Use Flip Arrows to flip arrows inside or outside the extension lines. To specify parameter information. To change a dimension value in a Parametric Note. text justification. Instance number – &p#. Creating Drawing Notes Use the Note option in the DETAIL ITEM menu to create drawing notes by either typing them in or pasting from a text file. Parametric Notes When you include a dimension or parameter in a note. The NOTE TYPES menu allows you to specify leaders.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . choose Modify from the DRAWING menu and select the value. it is referred to as a Parametric Note. where # is the dimension ID. &p0). Pag e 1 2. Use Clip to clip extension lines to a selected location.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • • Use Switch View to move a dimension to another view.

then Addit ional D eta iling and A ssoc iati vity Pag e 1 2-5 . Retrieve the gear drawing GEAR. Click Show/Erase in the DETAIL menu. EXERCISE 1: Detailing the Gear Part Drawing Task 1. In the SHOW/ERASE dialog box. you will retrieve the gear part drawing that you started earlier. manipulate its dimensions and create notes. icon. first click the select View in the SHOW BY options. test associativity. you will create additional detailing and.For University Use Only .DRW. once again. To begin the detailing process. 1. show the model dimensions. Method In Exercise 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal In this lab. 3. Figure 1: Gear Drawing with Dimensions 2.

you can change the extension line lengths of dimensions. Click Apply > Close . as well as flip arrows. Pick the left view. 7.6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . Task 2. Move the dimensions. 6. Click Flip Arrows from the DETAIL menu and pick the appropriate dimensions. Click Done Sel .66 dimension and move the cursor to another location. Click Move in the DETAIL menu. 4. Close the dialog box. 5. Pick another dimensions and move them to other locations. 2. Click Done/Return in the TOOLS menu. 5.For University Use Only . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Accept all of the shown dimensions. then click Done Sel . Pick the 76. Change the location of the text with respect to the leader lines. Task 3. Clean up the display of dimensions. 2. Some of the arrowheads of the dimensions in the lower left vieware outside the extension lines. Now pick the lower left general view on the screen. 1. 9. 6. Click Move Text from the DETAIL menu. Note By right-clicking Move . Note Recall that you cannot delete a driving dimension from a drawing. Click Tools > Clean Dims in the DETAIL menu. Pag e 1 2. Repaint the screen. 3. Clear the Create Snap Lines check box. 8.

13. then click Apply > Close . 4. Pick the projected view in the upper left-hand corner of the drawing. Click Done Sel . Return to the DETAIL menu. 12. 2. Addit ional D eta iling and A ssoc iati vity Pag e 1 2-7 . From the DRAWING window right-click to select Modify Item . 6. 14. Click Done/Return . 5. 1. Click the icon to remove the display of datums.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. Pick the two extra 6. Erase extra dimensions in the drawing 1. Save the drawing. 11. Click Show . 9. 4. 5. Click View and pick on the section view. Click Show/Erase > Erase in the DETAIL menu. 10. 2.2 dimension and click Switch View from the MENU MANAGER. Choose Done Sel from the GET SELECT 1 menu.3mm dimensions and click Done Sel from the GET SELECT menu. Enable the display of dimensions for the section view and clean up their display. Task 5. Pick the section view. Click Tools > Clean Dims . 3. Pick the 30. Close the SHOW/ERASE dialog box. 3. Repaint the screen. Click the icon. Clean the dimensions of the section view. Click the icon. Switch the 19mm dimension to the projected view using the same operation. 8. 7. Or you can click Accept All .

Add another note for the radius value of the round.For University Use Only . 5. 1. Task 7. display the round radius dimension in the section view. Click Done/Return from the NOTE TYPES menu. symbol:d26). Specify attachment for the note. 2. Create a parametric note that displays the value of the pin hole diameter. Task 6. if necessary. Click Create > Note . Pick the ∅ symbol from the SYMBOL PALETTE window. Click Leader > Normal Ldr > Make Note leaving alone all the other defaults from the NOTE TYPES menu. Continue to the next line. pick the edge of the small hole as the entity to which the system should attach the note. 4. Press <ENTER> twice to finish. 1. Enter the text to come after the symbol. 3. 2. In the cross section view. Using a similar technique. 7. Look at the lower right or cross section view and identify the symbolic dimension representing the diameter of the small hole (for example. Use Query Sel . 8. then type [ONE PLACE]. Complete the note. Press <ENTER> once.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r . 6. 9.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Note The system allows for notes to be displayed with the parametric dimension within the text. Pick a location for the note All of the dimensions and parameters change to their symbolic form. This allows the note to automatically update with changes in the dimensions. Type [&d26 DRILL THRU] in the message area. Pag e 1 2.

Addit ional D eta iling and A ssoc iati vity Pag e 1 2-9 . Save the drawing and erase both the gear drawing and gear part from memory. 2. 1.For University Use Only . Click Move > Move Text and Mod Attach to adjust the final position of any dimension or note. Experiment with moving the two notes.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 8.

Switch View . Clip . Dimensions can be manipulated using the options in the DETAIL menu such as Move Text .For University Use Only . Break . and Align . Two types of dimensions exist: Feature Dimensions and Driven Dimensions. Flip Arrows . Drawing notes can be created to provide other information and for documentation. drawing labels. Modifications on Production Drawings are reflected in the part and assembly models.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. and drawing parameters. you learned that: • • The majority of dimensions included on the drawing come from the part model. Mod Attach . This ensures consistency between the most recent changes in the drawing with the original model. pattern instance parameters. Parametric Notes can include special symbols. • • • • Pag e 1 2. model dimensions.1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / En g i n e e r .

But once these complex parts are in place. they have to be assembled in ways that work.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Module Creating Assemblies Pro/ENGINEER is ideal for feature-based design and a cumulative building up of successive parts. Objectives In this module. Page 13-1 . you will learn to • • • Create assemblies. Creating workable assemblies and machines is the desired end result and the most important aspect of learning to work with Pro/ENGINEER. Explore associativity in the context of creating assemblies. Modify assemblies.

• • • • Always begin an assembly with a base component.For University Use Only . Figure 1: Assembly Default Datum Planes Pag e 1 3.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Consider how you might break down the assembly into separate subassemblies. you must constrain components by selecting surfaces and features. Add the first part or subassembly onto the default assembly datums. a component that you are unlikely to remove from the assembly later on. Begin your assembly with default datums.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES OVERVIEW To create an assembly model.

The following is a list of the most commonly used constraints: • – Normal vectors of selected surfaces point in opposite directions and become co-planar. Figure 2: A Model’s Surface Normal Vectors Constraint Options Placement constraints create a parent/child relationship between the already assembled components and the new component being added to the assembly. As a 3-D solid modeler. Pro/ENGINEER can distinguish between the outside surface and inside surface that comprises every solid model.For University Use Only . Mate C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-3 . Careful consideration is advised in choosing constraint types and references.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES The Surface Normal Vector A surface normal vector is an imaginary vector that is perpendicular to the model surface.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 3: Mate Constraint • – Normal vectors of selected surfaces point in opposite directions and are offset by a specified negative or positive value. Mate Offset Offset Figure 4: Mate Offset Constraint • – Normal vectors of selected surfaces point in the same direction and are made co-planar. Align Note: Pro/ENGINEER does not associate any direction to the alignment of an axis.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Align will also make two axes co-axial. Pag e 1 3.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 5: Align Constraint C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-5 .For University Use Only .

6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Align Offset – Normal vectors of selected surfaces point in the same direction and are offset by a specified negative or positive value. Offset Figure 6: Align Offset Constraint • Orient – Selected surfaces.For University Use Only . utilizing their normal vector. Figure 7: A Usable Reference for Orient Constraint Pag e 1 3. point in the same direction and are parallel.

Set up space claims in the assembly for components prior to assembly. C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-7 . as shown in figure below.For University Use Only . you add more constraints than is necessary in order to capture additional design intent.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • Insert – Selected cylindrical surfaces of revolution become co-axial. Change the placement of a component. you can: • • Create datums on the fly. Component Placement Throughout the design cycle. Surfaces of revolution Figure 8: Insert Constraint Packaging or Under-Constrained Components Packaging allows you to: • • • Add components to an assembly without adding all its necessary constraints Add the model to the assembly without defining the true location of that component. Over-Constrained Components When you over-constrain a component. These surfaces do not need to be full 360-degree cylinders.

which includes assembling components into the subassembly. the system limits the scope of those changes through the MOD ASSEM menu options listed below: • • • Mod Dim allows you to modify any dimension in the assembly. which includes modifying dimensions. redefining existing features. Mod Part allows you to modify parts in the assembly. Pag e 1 3. as well as most operations that you can perform at part level. adding new features. – Inserts a component in between two components in the regeneration cycle of the assembly. ASSEMBLY MODIFICATION Since Pro/ENGINEER is associative.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • Place multiple components using patterns. Insert Mode Reroute – Changes the external references that a component has for constraints. However. Suppress Resume – Resumes components in the assembly model. you should use caution to avoid creating unwanted parent/child relationships between the part and the assembly. – Temporarily removes components from the assembly. • Note When creating part features at the assembly level. Mod Subasm allows you to modify any subassembly in the top-level assembly. Changing Design Intent of the Assembly • • • • • • Reorder – Changes the order in which the system regenerates components in the assembly. allows you to modify only the top-level assembly Mod Assem dimensions.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . you can make changes to all components in sub-assemblies while working in the assembly. Delete – Removes components or assembly features from the assembly model.

the placement fails when you retrieve that assembly. but the assembly is not in RAM.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Saving the Assembly When you save an assembly.For University Use Only . Note: If you rename a part in an assembly. Creating Exploded Views Using the Explode option in the View pull-down menu. If you try to do so. Pro/ENGINEER enables extraction of this information using the Info pull-down menu. OTHER ASSEMBLY OPTIONS Extracting a Bill of Materials A Bill of Materials (BOM) is a breakdown of sub-assemblies and components and their quantities. the system automatically saves any changes that you made to any of the parts in that assembly. Note You cannot assemble components in an exploded view. C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-9 . the system asks you to unexplode the assembly using the Unexplode option in the View pull-down menu. you can create exploded views of the assembly model.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 9: Unexploded Machine Assembly Figure 10 Exploded Machine Assembly Pag e 1 3.For University Use Only .1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

you will assemble existing components. allowing the system to update their locations correctly when you modify them. Method In Exercise 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal This exercise demonstrates how to create and modify workable complex assemblies. and add features that will capture design intent.For University Use Only . modify specific parts. EXERCISE 1: Create and Modify an Assembly Note: Keep in mind that the way you assemble components captures your design intent. Figure 11 Completed Base Subassembly C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-11 .

then click Open . Click File > New . 3. It is a good practice to start all assemblies with three default datum planes. Setup the assembly to use millimeter units.PRT. Select BRACKET. Start assembling the bracket part onto the assembly datums using the part datums. Click Set Up > Units. . Click Set > OK > Close . Align ASM_FRONT to DTM3 (yellow to yellow) Align ASM_TOP to DTM2 (yellow to yellow) Align ASM_RIGHT to DTM1 (yellow to yellow) Figure 12: Assembling the Bracket (Bracket Moved for Clarity) Pag e 1 3. Note: You may need to turn the datum display back on to see the datum planes. Click Done .1 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Make sure Use default template is checked. 1. Create a subassembly using three parts. > millimeter Newton Second > Set.For University Use Only . Click Assembly and type [BASE] as the name. 1. 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 1. Click Component > Assemble . 2. Task 2.

Task 3. Pick the datum ASM_RIGHT on the assembly. Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box. Click Align from the CONSTRAINT TYPE drop-down list. 4. Task 5.Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Tips & Techniques: To pick the datum planes easily. 2. Pick DTM3 on the bracket model.For University Use Only . 4. Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box. Pick DTM1 as the first datum on the bracket (you may need to use Query Sel ). C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-13 . click Move in the ASSEMBLY CONSTRAINT dialog box to move the model to one side. Tips & Techniques You can select the Yellow side by using the middle mouse button. 3. Align DTM3 and ASM_FRONT together using their yellow sides. 1. Again use the default align constraint. 3. Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box. Define the first alignment constraint between DTM1 of the part and ASM_RIGHT of the assembly. 2. Click Place when finished moving. 5. You select the red side using the right mouse button. Pick ASM_TOP from the assembly model. Task 4. 1. Pick the yellow side. : 1. Align DTM2 and ASM_TOP together using their yellow sides. Pick DTM2 on the bracket part. Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box. The system automatically starts adding another align constraint.

Pag e 1 3. 3. 4. Click Yellow from the DATUM ORIENT dialog box.PRT from the OPEN dialog box. Read the prompt in the message area. Click Component > Assemble . 4. Open the bushing part. Click Insert from the CONSTRAINT TYPE drop-down list. 2. Click Open . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Insert the bushing into the bracket using the revolved surfaces on the models. The default constraint type is Automatic. Select OK . Begin to assemble the bushing part to the bracket part. Task 6. Pick ASM_FRONT on the base assembly. 1. Pick on the outside cylindrical surface of the bushing part (Figure 13). Insert references Mate references Figure 13: Assembly of the Bushing Task 7. 5. Finish the placement of the bracket.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . then select BUSHING. Pick on the inside revolved surface of the slot on the bracket part.

Click Mate from the CONSTRAINT TYPE drop-down list.For University Use Only . Read the message area prompt. 1. 1. 6. Click Add from the COMPONENT PLACEMENT dialog box 5. Task 9. Repaint the screen. Remove the option to make assumptions about the orientation of a model and add a third constraint so that the key on the bushing lines up with the d slot in the bracket. Pick on the planar flange surface on the bushing. 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 8. 2. 3. 3. Pick on the flat surface of the bushing. Click Accept when the proper surface highlights. Figure 14: Default Orientation of Bushing (Datums Removed for Clarity) 4. Click Allow Assumptions . Pick the back surface of the bracket using Query Sel . C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-15 . Click Orient from the TYPE drop-down list. Mate the lip on the bushing to the back of the bracket.

then select RING. Click the Accept . Click Make Datum . Note: Pro/ENGINEER issues a message in the dialog box as well as the message area when it considers a model to be fully constrained. Assemble the ring part to the bushing part by using the constraints. Task 11. 3. 2. 5. Click Assemble . Repaint the screen. Define an internal datum plane through the D-slot surface.PRT.For University Use Only . Turn off the display of the datum planes using the icon in the toolbar. Read the prompt. Click OK from the dialog box. 6. 1. the click Click Done from the DATUM PLANE menu. Finish the placement. 1. 2. Pag e 1 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 10. icon until the surface highlights in red. Select through using Query Sel .1 6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 4. Make the flat on the bushing face upward by choosing Red . The arrow is currently facing downward (the yellow side). pick over the top of the D-slot. Assemble the ring model. Zoom in on the bushing model so that you can see the snap ring grove more clearly. 3.

2.For University Use Only . Click File > Close Window . Setup the assembly to use millimeter units. Click Insert and pick the two revolved surfaces. Create three default datum plane features. Add an insert constraint between the inner revolved surface of the snap ring and the small revolved surface of the recess in the bushing. Use the Orient option to position the tabs on the ring as desired. Create a new assembly called machine consisting of the base subassembly and the remaining three parts. Complete the placement of the ring. 8. 3. Task 12. Orient the tabs so they match the orientation of the flat of the bushing. Add a mate constraint between the front side surface of the groove and the back side of the snap ring. Click File > New . Click Mate and pick the two planar surfaces. Click File > Save from the pull-down menu. C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-17 . 5. 7. Click Set Up >Units > millimeter Newton Second > Set > OK > Close .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Insert references Mate references Figure 15: Constraints for Assembling Base with Ring 4. 6. 9. Click Assembly and type [MACHINE] as the name. Close the Main Window. Click OK . Uncheck Use default template option. 1.

make sure layers are set to be shown. 5. Check allow assumptions box in the bottom of the dialog box. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 13. Assemble the shaft component by following the constraints used in Figure 16 to control the location of parts in the assembly. Pag e 1 3. Task 14. 3. Assemble the MASTER_SHAFT part into the machine assembly. then select BASE. Read the one-line help in the message area when you move the mouse over Query Sel . 6. and Accept icons in the Query Bin dialog box.ASM. Insert the shaft into the hole in the bushing. Assemble the base assembly into the machine assembly using the datum planes.1 8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . 2. Align offset the end of the shaft that has the hole closer to the end with the front of the bushing part using a value of 60mm as the offset value. Tips & Techniques: You can access the Query Sel option by using the mouse. 1. Click Component > Assemble . If datum planes are not visible. Assemble the base subassembly to the machine assembly by using the Align constraint. Also read the on-line help when highlighting the Next Item . 2. 4. This reduces the parent/child dependency verses using part model geometry in the assembly. Orient one of the default datum planes going through the axis of the shaft by creating a datum that goes through the axis of the bushing at an angle to the flat on the bushing.

2. Figure 18 Assembled Crank C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-19 . Add the crank part to the assembly by using the assembly constraints. Assemble the crank part.For University Use Only . Insert the crank into the shaft. Figure 17: Assembling the Crank Part to the Machine Assembly 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 16: Assembling Base with Shaft Task 15.

Pick the bracket part. Task 18.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. 3. The system says it is fully constrained. Type [50. Assemble the gear component to the machine. 2. Click Feature > Create . 1. Assemble the gear part into the assembly using constraints similar to those that you used for the crank part. Click Modify from the ASSEMBLY menu. Figure 19 shows the modified bracket. 1. Pick the base feature to display the dimensions.2 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pick the 25 dimension. accommodate a change in the design intent by modifying the bracket width. 4. Task 16. 4.0]. Pag e 1 3. Add a simple edge round to the bracket with a 20mm unit radius. 1. While working at the assembly level. 6. Regenerate only the part model. then press <ENTER>. 5. Save the assembly. but orient the back of the crank with the end of the shaft. Click Mod Part from the ASSEM MOD menu. Task 17. 2. 2.For University Use Only . Align the small hole on the crank with the small hole on the shaft by picking the axes. Create a new part feature. Accommodate another change in the design intent by adding an edge round on the two top edges of the bracket.

2. 3. Read the entire INFORMATION WINDOW. 1. Click Close from the INFORMATION WINDOW 4. C reat ing As sembl ies Pag e 1 3-21 . 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 19: Modified Bracket Task 19. Click OK . Close the working window. Generate a Bill of Materials for this assembly. Click BOM from the INFO pull-down menu. Click File > Erase > Not Displayed .For University Use Only . use the scrollbar if necessary. Erase all models that are not displayed.

Components of an assembly can be deliberately under-constrained or over-constrained.For University Use Only . You can create exploded views of assemblies.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. Over-constraining occurs to capture additional design intent. Sometimes this is necessary to capture the higher level design intent by creating part geometry in the context of the assembly. Modifying parts at the assembly level is adopting a top-down approach to design. There are various constraint options for adding new components to an assembly. You can extract a Bill of Materials of an assembly. Since Pro/ENGINEER is associative.2 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Packaged or under-constrained components are usually added to assemblies to get a spatial feel for the completed assembly. • • • • • Pag e 1 3. Once the look is right. you learned that: • • • • Assembly creation has to begin ideally with base components and these usually are the Default Assembly Datums. the component can be fully constrained. you can make changes to all components and sub-assemblies while working in an assembly.

Resume suppressed features Page 14-1 .. parts (in an assembly). selecting. such as displaying or blanking. such as features. Re-work existing parent/child relationships using the suppress feature.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited Module Layers and Suppression Layers provide a means of organizing model items. Manipulate layer display status. and suppressing. datum planes. Control data with the suppression functionality provided by Pro/ENGINEER. you will be able to: • • • • • • Create layers for a given model. Associate items to a layer. and even other layers. These operations primarily include ways of showing the items in the model. Objectives After completing this module. so that you can perform operations on those items collectively.

plotting. even other layers. components in an assembly. You can still create additional layers using two methods. • • • Working Rules • • If you use a default template. You can have as many layers as you need or none at all.For University Use Only . • • CREATING LAYERS Selecting the Object The active object is the model in which you actually create the layers and make changes. A single item can be associated with multiple layers. Using layers. Pag e 1 4. For example.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES DEFINING LAYERS Functionality • Layers provide a means of organizing object items into related groups to avoid confusion They allow you to perform certain collective operations on groups of items such as features in a part. Pro/ENGINEER automatically associates the different features of a model to specific default layers. The first is through the Config file and the second is by using the def layers command from the Layer pull-down menu in the LAYERS dialog box. if you select the top-level assembly as the active object. draft items on a drawing. you can control the information that the system displays on the screen Layers enable certain actions as deletion. you can associate only items from the top-level assembly to a top-level assembly layer. The principle is to associate those items to a layer that exist at the layer level.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . and suppression for certain items.

3 .For University Use Only . Creating Layers • • • • Pro/ENGINEER identifies layers by name only. you can associate items to and remove them from selected layers.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Note: In Drawing mode. as well as copy them or switch them from one layer to another. Using options in the LAYER dialog box. you can associate items to them. L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. you can define a new layer by clicking the Once you have typed one layer name you can create multiple new layers by simply typing a new name and pressing <ENTER>. Associating Items to a Layer Once you have created layers. After you have established the active model. You can express the name in numeric or alphanumeric form. you can select either the model or the drawing as the active model. using a maximum of 31 characters.

Setting the Display Status of a Layer One of the main reasons that you would organize items using layers is to control the kind of information that the system displays on the screen for that particular object. and coordinate systems. Blank selected layers from the screen by removing them. or select from the MODEL TREE Pick a datum point. Pick a datum curve. Pick a datum plane. Pick detail items. You can perform the following procedures. Pick nametags for datum planes. You can select or create a layer in the native model. When text tags are blanked.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Table 1: Item Types Component (Assembly mode only) Feature Select component parts and/or assemblies. axes. Creates a layer hierarchy with sub-layers. Pick a feature. or ignore the selection of that item. Click All Instances or Individual in the LAYER COMP menu. Select a layer. All of Type – Specifies a feature type from the ALL FEATURES menu. the system identifies the native model for the item. as illustrated in Figure 1: • • Show selected layers on the screen. Click the following feature options in the LAY FEAT menu: • • • • Curve Quilt 2-D Items Text Select – Specifies the particular feature. Pick a quilt. points. Click Sel By Menu.For University Use Only . Range – Specifies a range of features.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pag e 1 4. Point Datum Plane Layer Solid Geometry Note: If you attempt to associate an item to a layer that does not exist in the active model. Feat/Child – Specifies a feature and all of its children. Blanks all solid features of the part.

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NOTES

• •

Isolate selected layers by displaying them on the screen and removing all non-isolated layers from the screen. Hide components associated to the selected layer by displaying them entirely as hidden lines when working in Hidden Line mode, or remove them from the screen when working in No Hidden mode (in Assembly mode only). The Hide display status has no effect when the environment setting is Wireframe .

Figure 1: Layer Display Dialog Box

Not all layer items are available for manipulation in every Pro/ENGINEER mode.

Note:
Pro/ENGINEER does not save the display status of a layer by default when it saves the object. The next time that you retrieve the object, the display status reverts back to Show for all layers. If you want to save the display status with the object, you must click Save Status from the LAYER DISPLAY dialog box.

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Manipulating Layer Display Status
In Figure 3 you create layers in Part mode and Assembly mode, associate items to them, and vary the display status of the items. In Part mode, you have a protrusion and three datum planes. • • • • • Create the layers PROT, DATUM_A and DATUM_B. Associate the protrusion to the PROT layer. Associate datum plane A to the DATUM_A layer. Associate datum plane B to the DATUM_B layer. Do not associate datum plane C to any layers.

In Assembly mode, you have three components (A, B, and C) and two assembly datum planes.

Create layers COMP_B, COMP_C and ADATUM_A. Associate component B to the COMP_B layer. Associate component C to the COMP_C layer. Associate assembly datum plane A to the ADATUM_A layer. Do not associate component A and assembly datum plane B to any layers.

• • • •

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Part Mode

Assembly Mode

D

E

Figure 3: Illustration of Layer Display Status

• • • • • •

A – All layers have a display status of Shown . B – PROT: Blank ; DATUM_A: Shown ; DATUM_B: Blank C – PROT: Shown ; DATUM_A: Shown ; DATUM_B: Isolate D – All layers have a display status of Show . E – COMP_B: Blank ; COMP_C: Show ; ADATUM_A: Blank F – COMP_B: Isolate ; COMP_C: Show ; ADATUM_A: Show

SUPPRESSION FUNCTIONALITY
• • • Suppression temporarily removes a feature or component from the model The system does not regenerate the item, and the model appears as if you had never created the item. When you suppress items, you can resume them at a later date. Suppress differs from delete in that it is not permanent.

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Using Suppression
• • • • To simplify the model To reduce regeneration time To reduce screen repaint time To use design alternatives

Suppressing Parent/Child Relationships
If you suppress a feature or a component that has children and do not select the children as well, Pro/ENGINEER requires you to do one of the following: • • • • • Reroute the child references. Change the dimensioning scheme of the child. Suppress the child. Suspend action on the child until you regenerate the model. Freeze the component (in Assembly mode only).

Saving and Resuming Suppressed Features
You can save a model with suppressed features and/or components. When you retrieve or regenerate it, Pro/ENGINEER informs you that it has suppressed items. When you resume or regenerate suppressed features, the system returns them to their original location in the feature list. You can resume them by selecting them from the MODEL TREE window or using one of the following options in the RESUME menu: • • • •
All

– Resumes all items that are currently suppressed. – Resumes items by layer. – Resumes the last group of suppressed items.

Layer

Last Set Feat ID

– Resumes items by specifying the feature ID of the item.

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LABORATORY PRACTICAL
Goal
This laboratory is intended to demonstrate the practical application layers and suppression.

Method
In Exercises 1 and 2, you learn to control the information that the system displays in a part model and an assembly model. You learn to use layers to control the display of the datum planes and axes of the part in Exercise 1, as opposed to turning their display off. In Exercise 3, you suppress a feature in a part. In Exercise 4, you experiment with suppressing a component in an assembly.

EXERCISE 1: Using Layers in Part Mode

Figure 5: Layer Crank Part

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Task 1.

Retrieve the crank part; then shade and spin the model.

1. Change the working directory to LAYER_SUPPRESS 2. Erase all models in the memory. 3. Open the layer crank part. Click then click Open . Note:
If the model does not have the datum planes and axes displayed, display them using the environment icons.

. Select LAYER_CRANK.PRT,

4. Shade the model if it is not already. Task 2. Create two layers called DATUMS and AXES.

1. Repaint the screen. 2. Click the icon, then click Default . icon.

3. Click View>Layers and click the 4. Type [DATUMS], then click Add . 5. Type [AXES], then click OK . Task 3.

Associate the default datum planes to the datum layer.

1. Select the Datums layer from the layers list. Make sure the Axes layer is not highlighted. Clicking a layer name toggles that layer for action. 2. Click the icon.

3. Click Datum Plane from the LAYER OBJ menu. 4. Select DTM1, DTM2, and DTM3 from the MODEL TREE, then click Done Sel > Done Return

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Task 4.

Associate the axes of the part to the axes layer.

1. Unselect layer Datums and select layer Axes . 2. Click the icon and click Feature .

3. Click Query Sel . Pick the A_1 boss protrusion. Accept the selection. 4. The A_5 axis was created as a result of the cross hole in the boss. Click Query Sel . Pick the cross hole in the boss. Accept the selection. 5. The A_2 axis was created as a separate datum feature. Click Query Sel . Pick axis A_2 . Accept the selection. 6. Click Done Return from the MENU MANAGER menu. Task 5. Use the LAYER dialog box to see what features you have associated to the layers. 1. Click Show > Layer Items . 2. Click Tree > Expand >All . Task 6. Change the display status of the two layers you just created.

1. Click Axes and Datums in the LAYERS dialog box icon, then click the .icon. The system no longer 2. Click the displays the datum planes and axes on the screen, but they still exist. You can verify this by using the MODEL TREE. 3. Close the Layers dialog box.. 4. Save the model. and close the window Note:
Pro/ENGINEER does not save the display status of the layers unless you click Save Status prior to exiting the LAYERS dialog box.

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Figure 6: Layer Display Status Set to Blank

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L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. 1.For University Use Only . 4. Open the PINION. you use layers to control the information that the system displays in the assembly model to make it easier to manipulate. Type [CRANK].Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Using Layers in Assembly Mode In this exercise. 2. Figure 7: Layers Assembly Task 1. Type [GEAR]. 3. and press <ENTER>.ASM. Click View>Layers and click the icon. you can control the display of these components on the screen without affecting the actual model. then click OK . By associating components to layers.1 3 . Open an existing assembly and define two layers at the toplevel assembly called crank and gear.

1. Click the icon to repaint the screen and turn off the datum planes and axes. 11. 3. Repeat the steps above to associate the gear part to the gear layer Task 3. Click Component from the LAYER OBJ menu. 6. Select the crank and gear layers. as shown in Figure 8. Click the icon. The system no longer displays the layer crank and layer gear components on the screen. 7. 9. Click Done Sel > Done/Return > Done/Return . 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 2. then select LAYER_CRANK. 10.PRT. Associate the crank part to the CRANK layer and the Gear part to the GEAR layer. 8. Click the icon.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Finish the association. Figure 8: Layers Blanked from Display Pag e 1 4. Click Individual from the LAYER COMP menu.For University Use Only . 5. Blank the crank and gear layers. . Unselect the GEAR layer and select the CRANK layer. Click Sel By Menu .

Task 6.1 5 . Repaint the screen. 1. Click Top Level > Apply. 1. The system displays the component on the screen again. Task 5. Click the 2. 1. 3. Click View > Layers . Click the icon from the tool bar L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. Set the gear model to hidden line display. Click Info > Feature List . Click Gear in the LAYERS dialog box. Click the icon from the LAYERS dialog box. Determine the effect that other environment settings have on the Hidden Line setting for the layer. 2. 4. 5. 3. icon from the toolbar. Read the information window and close the information window and the FEATURE LIST dialog box. Verify that the components still exist.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4.

Pag e 1 4.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 9: Hidden Line Display Mode 2.1 6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click the icon from the toolbar.

Determine the status of the datums layer. 3.For University Use Only . If the eye icon next to the layer name is gray. Click the + icon next to DATUMS. L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. Click Show > Layer Items .1 7 . 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 10: No Hidden Display Mode Note The icons next to the layer names in the dialog box indicate the current status of the layers. Notice all the models have a layer called DATUMS. then some of the layers of the same name in assembly sub-components have varying display statuses set Task 7. Expand the datums layer items. 1. 2. Open the LAYERS dialog box. but only some of them are blanked.

Pick the three assembly level datum planes in the PINION. If the datums and axes are not visible.ASM. 1. Select the datums layer and click 4. Click the 3. 4. Repaint the screen. but does display the assembly datums. then click Done/Return from the LAYER OBJ menu. 2. 1. Pag e 1 4. 2. You have the ability to effect the display of layers within all levels of the assembly. as well as associate items at any level. 5. Repaint the screen.1 8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click the icon.ASM. Complete the association. Task 9. Change the display of all the part level datum planes. 3. Click . The system no longer displays the datum planes of the parts on the screen. Set both layers back to Shown . then click OK 3. 2. Click Done Sel . Add the layer called Datums at the top level and associate the default datums of the assembly. Click the icon from the LAYERS dialog box icon. 1. Select all the entries under Datums. Type [asm_ datums]. Task 10. Click the icon. All components and their datums should be visible again.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 8. check the environment icons in the toolbar.For University Use Only . except IN_LAYER_BASE.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 11. Erase the assembly from memory and all associated objects. or any of the associated components. 4. Figure 11: Top-Level Default Datum Planes L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. 1. Save the display status of the datum planes for the next time that you retrieve the assembly.For University Use Only . Click Save Status from the LAYERS dialog box.1 9 . 3. 2. Save the assembly. Click Close .

Note the amount of time that the system requires to update the geometry. For this design you only need the threads for mass property calculations. Pag e 1 4.For University Use Only . Click Modify and pick the boss protrusion. and not for other operations. 3. Suppress the complex thread cuts. Task 2. therefore. 1.2 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .PRT with Threaded Notes Task 1. each hole has a cut that represents the threads.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Suppressing in Part Mode In this exercise. it requires a great deal of time to retrieve and regenerate it. note the amount of time the system uses to retrieve the part. Figure 12: PLATE.PRT. Retreive an existing model and modify the circular protrusion which comes before the helical threads in the regeneration list 1. 2. In Figure 12. Open the part named PLATE. Select the pattern of cuts from the MODEL TREE. 2. Click Feature > Suppress . you suppress a feature to make it easier to retrieve and regenerate the part. Modify the height of the circular boss to 10mm. Pick the 5 dimension and type[10]. Regenerate the part.

Change the height of the circular boss back to 5. Figure 13: Thread Cuts Suppressed L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. 4. 3. Click Done Sel from the GET SELECT menu.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Note that the cuts are no longer in the model. Verify this by checking in the MODEL TREE. Regenerate the part. Click Done from the FEAT menu. Once a feature is suppressed. Save the model and erase it from memory. Note that the system updates the model much faster now.2 1 . Test the speed that the system regenerates the model without the threads in the model. Pro/ENGINEER does not consider it as existing in the model.For University Use Only . then type [5]. Click Modify and pick the 10 dimension. 4. 1. Click Done from the SELECT FEAT menu. Task 3. 2.

Open the SECOND_PINION. Assemble a model to replace the crank.ASM.For University Use Only . Task 2. Suppress the crank components in the assembly to see what the assembly will look like with a different crank part.PRT Pag e 1 4. Click Assemble and double click HAND_CRANK. Note that the system no longer includes the component in the assembly. 2. 3. 1.2 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1. you experiment with different design alternatives in your assembly by suppressing components to make it easier to view the new components. You can assemble different components to test their compatibility with an assembly design. Click Suppress and pick the crank part. Click Done Sel > Done .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 4: Suppressing Components in Assembly Mode In this exercise. Click Component from the ASSEMBLY menu. Error! Figure 14: Alternate Components Task 1.

Click Done from the SELECT FEAT menu. then click OK . You can define different sets of components to be suppressed. and double click the WHEEL_CRANK. Click Suppress . 6. 3. 9. Suppress the wheel crank component. Finish the placement Task 5. Suppress the third crank model and resume the original one 1. Click Align from the CONSTRAINT TYPE drop-down list. Pick axis A_1 of shaft model. 7. Constrain the wheel crank to the end of the shaft. 3. 5. Select the HAND_CRANK using the MODEL TREE. Task 4. Click Done from the SEL FEAT menu to complete the operation. Finish the placement. Leave the default Align for the second constraint.PRT 2. With components suppressed you can easily switch between representations of the assembly to test which one is the most plausable. Read the message in the message area. Pick axis A_3 of shaft model. L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4. Pick axis A_1 of hand crank model. 4. Task 3. Pick axis A_5 of hand crank model. 5. Suppress the hand crank model.2 3 . Click Assemble . Align A_1 of wheel crank with axis A_1 of shaft model 4. Click Align from the CONSTRAINT TYPE drop-down list. 2.For University Use Only . Click Suppress and pick the wheel crank part. Align axis A_5 of wheel crank model with axis A_3 of shaft model. 8. 1. 1. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2.

Resume the suppressed components. Select Suppressed Objects and click OK 4. In the MENU MANAGER. Right mouse click the LAYER_CRANK.2 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click View > Model Tree Setup> Item Display 3. List the suppressed components in the MODEL TREE. A suppressed model is still associated to the assembly. Pag e 1 4. Save the model and erase it from memory. 1. Click Delete > Clip 3. then permanently delete them from the assembly.PRT entry in the MODEL TREE. Select only the hand crank part from the MODEL TREE. 5. and select Resume from the pop-up menu. Tips & Techniques: You can use the MODEL TREE to delete suppressed features or components without resuming them first. Click Done Sel > Done . 6. Change your working directory back to the INTRO_PROE_300 directory.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Resume the original layer crank component. Task 6. 4. click Component > Resume > All > Done 2. Suppression temporarily removes a component from the assembly.For University Use Only .

Any number of layers can be created. Suppressed features can be resumed. Suppressed features can effect the parent/child relationship.2 5 . L a y e rs a n d S u p p res io n Pag e 1 4.For University Use Only . you learned that: • • • • • • • The Layers feature is designed for greater flexibility of models and less clutter. Items have to be deliberately associated to specific layers of a model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. The display status of a layer can be set to Hidden Suppression of features in a part and of components in a model leads to greater maneuverability in design.

Commercial Use Prohibited .For University Use Only .

In this module. Objectives After completing this module.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Additional Datum Features Pro/ENGINEER allows for creating datum features other than datum planes. These additional datum features include datum axes. Page 15-1 . datum curves. Employ additional datum features as robust references for solid geometry. you will be able to: • • • Describe all available additional datum features in the software. Create additional datum features using different methods. datum points. and datum coordinate systems.For University Use Only . you learn how they are created and why they should be used.

and A_3 . the model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES ADDITIONAL DATUM FEATURES Datum features are mass-less. As aids for the creation of other datum features. and are used as: Uses • • • As centers of coaxial holes. Point on Surface Tan Curve – Created tangent to a datum curve or at the end point of a model’s edge. Thru Cyl Two Planes Two Pnt/Vtx – Created at the intersection of two planes. A_2 . Methods of Creation • • • • • • • • Thru Edge – Created through a straight edge of the model. – Normal to a selected surface with linear dimensions to two references. As references for assembly constraints. – Created through the “imaginary” center of any surface of revlolution. Datum Axes Datum axes appear as dashed yellow lines that often have nametags such as A_1 . – Created through two datum points or two vertices of – Goes through a point normal to the surface.For University Use Only . Normal Pln Pnt Norm Pln – Normal to a selected surface and though a datum point. nonsolid features that can be used as references and as parents to solid geometry. Pag e 1 5. All datum features serve the purpose of construction type geometry.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

They can be straight or curved. Methods of Creation • • • • • • • Sketch – Uses sketcher functionality to create the curve on a flat – Creates a curve at the intersection of two surfaces.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Datum Curves Datum curves appear on the model as orange lines. Used as references for assembly constraints. Uses • • • • As trajectories for swept features. Methods of Creation • On Surface – Creates a point on a selected surface using linear dimension to two references Ad d i t io n a l D at u m F e a t u re s Pag e 1 5. To measure features of a model. To aid in surface creation. Surf Thru Points Projected Formed – Projects a 2D curve onto a solid surface. The formed curve preserves the length of the original curve. From Equation – Creates a curve based of mathematical equations.3 . and be open or closed loops. 2 Projection – Creates a projected datum curve from two sections on non-parallel sketching planes. Datum Points Datum points appear as small yellow “x ”s on the model. Intr . Used when creating holes that are placed on point. To help define the shape of assembly skeletons.For University Use Only . surface. – Transfers a datum curve onto a surface as a formed curve. with name tags such as PNT1 Uses • • • Help in creating datum curves and datum axes. – Create a curve through a series of datum points.

z).4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . References for assembly constraints. ½ ½ Offset – Places a point on the curve offset at a distance from a planar surface. Pnt + 2Axes – Origin at the intersection of two axes. – Origin at a datum point.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • On Vertex – Point is defined at a vertex on the solid model – Points are defined offset from a coordinate system using Cartesian. Methods of Creation • • • • 3 Planes – Origin at the intersection of three planes. Datum Coordinate Systems Datum Coordinate Systems appear yellow on the model and usually have nametags. Pag e 1 5. Uses • • • Ability to define a zero position for datum points read in from file.y. cylindrical. vertex. Length Ratio – Places a point on the curve as a percentage of the overall length (0. Field Point – Places a free-floating point on a selected reference such as a surface or a curve. Orientation for manufacturing procedures.0 are the start and end points of the curve). or origin of another datum coordinate system. • ½ Actual Length – Places the point using the actual arc length distance of the curve. straight edges or straight datum curves. Each axis on the coordinate system is also labeled (x. such as CS1 . 2 Axes Default – Origin at the first vertex of the base feature. or spherical coordinates Offset Csys At Center On Curve – Creates a point at the center of an arc or a circle – Creates a point along a datum curve or model edge with the following dimensional options.0 and 1.

EXERCISE 1: Creating Additional Datum Features Task 1. y. z position has been defined. Create a new part and define the control points for the handle.16.0. Click the 2. [0] for y. [0]. Since we already have a coordinate system. 3. Click Cartesian as the coordinate type. [0] at the prompt. [16]. 3.[0] for z. Pick the PRT_CSYS_DEF coordinate system. [16]. you will be able to create and use all the additional datum features you have learned about in this module in a solid model.0. [0] at the prompt. z data for the other points. enter in the x. Once the first datum point’s x. 1. Method In Exercise 1.0. Then you create datum points and a datum curve to create a door handle. you start with the default datums and a datum coordinate system included in any new part. we will create points at x. Task 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal By the end of this lab. y. z positions relative to it. 1. icon and click Offset Csys .0. Create a second datum point at 4.For University Use Only . Create a fourth datum point at 0.5 . Enter [4]. Ad d i t io n a l D at u m F e a t u re s Pag e 1 5. 2. 1. 4. y. Task 3. Create a third datum point at 4. Create a new part with the name DOOR_HANDLE. Enter [4]. [0] at the prompt. Enter [0]. Click Enter Points and type [0] for x.16.

Click Single Rad. 1. Define a specific radius that the curve will take through each 1.For University Use Only . 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Click Done Sel > Done .0]. The part should look like Figure 2. click Thru Points > Done . Type [1. Click OK to finish the feature Pag e 1 5. 3. 2. type <ENTER> on a blank line. icon. Click Done to complete the feature. The order the points are created does matter because the curve will connect them in that order. Create a datum curve through these points.6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Once the coordinates of the last point have been entered. and select PNT1. point. Click the Task 5. Figure 2: Datum Points Task 4.

Figure 3: Final Solid Geometry Ad d i t io n a l D at u m F e a t u re s Pag e 1 5. 4. 2. Define a 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 6. centered at the intersection of the centerlines. then click Select All > Done > Okay . Click Select Traj > Curve Chain . 5. Click OK to finish the feature. The final part should look like Figure 3. 1. The trajectory is the datum curve that you created. 3.0 inch diameter circle as the cross-section.7 . Create a swept protrusion as the door handle geometry. Click Feature > Create > Protrusion > Sweep > Done.For University Use Only . Pick the datum curve.

they can be deployed frequently when creating solid geometry. you have learned that • • • • • • Additional Datum features are convenient and hassle-free features that aid model creation. Pag e 1 5. Datum Points are used as references for assembly constraints and to place holes on point when they are created. Datum Axes are created for all types of revolved features.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. Datum features are mass-less and non-solid. Datum Curves often aid in surface creation using sketcher functionality. Datum Coordinate Systems are used for orientations in manufacturing procedures. therefore. and extruded circles.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . holes.

Page 16-1 . you will be able to: • • • Add a Draft feature to an existing part.For University Use Only . Rib and Sketched Holes.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Additional Advanced Features This module introduces Pro/ENGINEER’s advanced features including Draft. Describe and create Counterbores and Countersunk Holes. Objectives After completing this module. Define and create a Rib.

For example. You can add it to individual surfaces or to a series (loop) of surfaces. you can add a draft angle between -30° and +30° to a cylindrical.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Creating a Draft Feature • To make it easier to remove a part from a mold. Pag e 1 6. you can create several features to deform or alter the existing surface of a part by tweaking.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SURFACE DEFORMATION In Pro/ENGINEER. planar. then specify a neutral plane. you can use a Draft feature. or splined surface on the molded or cast part. you must select a surface or surfaces to draft. to add a taper of a specific angle to a surface. The intersection of the neutral plane with the draft plane determines where the draft surface pivots. Figure 1: Molded or Cast Part To create a draft feature.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Axis of rotation Neutral plane Draft plane Figure 2: Selection of Draft Plane and Neutral Plane • Before entering the draft angle. you can draft the surfaces first and then fillet the edges. Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-3 . You can only draft surfaces that are formed by tabulated cylinders or planes. Reference 10 Figure 3: Reference Plane and Draft Angle Note You cannot draft surfaces with fillets around the edge boundary. select or create a reference plane from which the draft angle measures from a 90-degree perpendicular. however. The system provides you with a green arrow and a highlighted surface to assist you.

4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pro/ENGINEER automatically defines the geometry. you can add additional features such as Ribs and Sketched Holes.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES OTHER FEATURES To create complex geometry.For University Use Only . Creating a Rib • • A rib is a special type of protrusion designed to create a thin web that is attached to a part. The system creates it symmetrically about the selected sketching plane. Pag e 1 6. as shown in Figure 4. A rib always has to be sketched as an open section in a side view. Open section aligned to both ends Half of thickness to both sides of sketching plane Figure 4: Rib Section Aligned to a Planar Surface • If you align the endpoint of the section to a cylinder.

For University Use Only . Figure 6 Creating a Standard Hole Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-5 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Section aligned to cylindrical surface Conic surface Figure 5: Rib Aligned to a Cylinder Creating Standard Holes Based on Units You can create standard holes based on engineering measurements by selecting the Standard Hole radio button in the HOLE dialog box. Then the HOLE dialog box appears as shown below.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Creating Counterbores and Countersunk Holes We have discussed creating a Hole as a Pick-and-Place feature that can be created with many depth options. ½ You must sketch them as a closed section. Pag e 1 6.6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . ½ In the sketch. Countersunk holes. using the Sketched Hole option. This allows the creation of Counterbores. However. ½ They must have one sketched entity normal to the centerline. sketched holes have the following restrictions: ½ They are always blind and one-sided. you must include a centerline as an axis of revolution. which the system aligns with the placement plane. Figure 7: Sketched Hole • To create a sketched hole. sketch a section and then place the hole onto the part using the same options that you would use for a straight hole. instead of creating the default flat-bottomed holes. you can use a sketched revolved section to define the Hole. However.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 8: Sketching a Sketched Hole Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-7 .For University Use Only .

2. Specify surfaces to draft using the loop surfaces.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 4. 2. This time. you learn how to create a rib. Method In Exercise 1. you create a neutral plane draft. pick the same face and the hexagonal shaped edge.PRT. Exercise 3. you learn how to create a sketched hole. Task 2. 3.For University Use Only . 1. EXERCISE 1: Creating a Neutral Plane Draft Feature Task 1. Pag e 1 6. accept the default No Split and Constant attributes. Retrieve a sample part and specify attributes for draft.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal This laboratory exercise introduces the creation of draft features. Click Done to accept the Neutral Pln default. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Tweak > Draft . Open DRAFT1. In the ATTRIBUTES menu. 1. In Exercise 2. Click Include > Loop Surfs once again. In model design. one of the final steps usually is adding draft wherever needed. Click Include > Loop Surfs and pick the upper face and the outer edge as shown in Figure 9.

2. 5. Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-9 . Task 3. Pick the same upper surface of the part once again. Pick this face again. and then pick this hexagon. 3. Click Done to finish the selection of the draft. Note that the draft on the other loop is in the opposite direction from the loop inside the hexagonal cut. 4. Specify a neutral plane to define where the draft surfaces pivot. and then select this edge. Click Use Neut Pln .For University Use Only . 1. Include the cylindrical boss and its hole to be part of the draft feature you just created. Type the draft angle as [-5].Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES First pick this face. Figure 9: Selecting the First and Second Draft Surfaces 3. Click Preview .

Once again. pick this face. Figure 11: Selecting the Cylindrical Boss and Hole as Draft Surfaces Pag e 1 6. 7. Pick the top surface of the boss and then the outer edge as shown in Figure 11. pick this face. click Loop Surfs . First. pick the same top face of the boss but this time pick the edge of the hole. 8. click on the Draft Srfs element and the Define button. Second. and then pick this edge.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 10: Completed Draft on Boss and Hole 6. Now. Click Loop Surfs again. 10. and then pick this edge. 9.1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . In the DRAFT dialog box.

Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-11 . Click Done and Preview . Note To maintain the robustness of a model. it is always good design practice to include all features before defining the draft.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 11.For University Use Only .

Create the rib with a width of 10mm.For University Use Only . feature. Sketch the section as shown in Figure 12. Figure 12: Rib Section 6. Create the rib sketching on DTM3 and using DTM2 as the top. Click Done from Sketcher.1 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . drag the Insert here icon to be before the draft. 8. 2. 5. Pag e 1 6. 4. Eliminate the current references. 7.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating a Rib Task 1. Specify the top of the block and the silhouette edge of the cylinder as references. Insert a rib to support the cylindrical boss before the draft 1. Click Flip >Okay to flip the arrow inside the section. Click Create > Rib > Done . In the model tree. 3.

For University Use Only . Change the default dimensions to the correct dimensions shown in Figure 13 and regenerate. Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-13 . Pick DTM3 as a dimensioning reference. Pick the front surface of the cylindrical protrusion.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Creating a Sketched Hole Task 1. 5. click the Sketched button. In the HOLE dialog box. Sketch a vertical centerline and then a closed loop of lines. When finished. click Done to exit from Sketcher. Sketch the section as shown in Figure 13 Figure 13: Sketched Hole Section 4. boss. 6. Task 2. 3. 2. Create a hole. 2. Create a sketched hole and place it on the side of the cylindrical 1. 1. Place the radial hole on the side of the cylinder.

5] for the distance. 4. 7. 8. Now cancel the insert mode. Click OK or the green checkmark. Save the model. Type [12.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3.For University Use Only . 6. Type [90] for the angle. Pick the top of the cylindrical boss for the second dimensioning reference. Pag e 1 6. Figure 14: The Finished Model 5.

you learned that: • • • • Existing part surfaces can be deformed or changed using Draft features. By creating Hole features using the Sketched Hole option. A Rib is a protrusion designed to create a thin web that is attached to a part. A Rib is always sketched as an open section in a side view—the system creates it symmetrically about the selected sketching plane.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. you can create counter-bores and countersunk holes instead of flat-bottomed holes.For University Use Only . Addit ional A d van ced F eatu r es Pag e 1 6-15 .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited .

Page 17-1 . Enter the Resolve Environment and understand its capabilities.For University Use Only . Describe various approaches to changing the design of a model to resolve its feature failures.Commercial Use Prohibited Module The Resolve Environment Feature regeneration failures are an inevitable side effect of associativity and parametric modeling. Mastery of the fundamentals of the Resolve Environment is essential in order to become a truly proficient user of Pro/ENGINEER. Diagnose problems. In order to effectively correct these situations Pro/ENGINEER provides the Resolve Environment. you will be able to: • • • • • Enumerate the various kinds of failures encountered during regeneration. Perform a quick fix on a failed feature. Objectives After completing this module. Effective use of Resolve mode allows the user to tweak existing features and parameters rather than recreating them to achieve the required design intent.

The failed feature and all subsequent features remain un-regenerated. Pro/ENGINEER displays an explanation of the problem in the Message Area. Pag e 1 7. you can address the failure problem using any of the following methods: • • Undo all of the changes that you have made since the last successful regeneration. Entering the Resolve Environment As soon as a regeneration failure occurs.For University Use Only . You have violated a relation constraint.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES TYPES OF FAILURES Failures usually occur because a feature gets changed and the effected change conflicts with other features. where the following occurs: • • • • • The File pull-down menu is unavailable and you cannot save the model. Using the Resolve Environment Tools Once you have entered the Resolve Environment. The current model displays only the features that have regenerated up to the point of failure. The assembly constraints for a component are invalid. These types of failures occur due to the following reasons: • • • • • • You create new features that are unattached and have one-sided edges. An assembly you retrieve cannot open the required models that are included in the assembly. You resume a feature that now conflicts with another (such as having an edge round and a chamfer on the same edge). The feature intersection is no longer valid because dimensional changes have moved the intersecting surfaces. Pro/ENGINEER brings you into the Resolve Environment. Diagnose the cause of the model failure using the current (failed) model or the backup model. Pro/ENGINEER displays the RESOLVE menu options in the Menu Manager and a diagnostics window.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Diagnosing the Problem When you use the Resolve Environment. the model itself still remains problematic. even if you undo the change. Undoing Changes Rather than attempt to resolve the problem. Specifying a Model When you diagnose the problem or change the model. Pro/ENGINEER shows all features in their pre-regenerated state. the system saves a copy of the current model to disk with the name regen_backup_model####. it is always good practice to interrogate the model to determine what has caused the model failure. Otherwise. you can simply undo the step that brought you into the Resolve Environment. you can work on the current failed model or a backup model. To interrogate the model. If you use a backup model.prt prior to each regeneration. However. For example. The undo approach is most appropriate in those cases in which you either did not intend to make the change or you want to fix the problem in the model without using the Resolve Environment tools. if the feature fails because of the change that you have made. this may not be the best choice in some cases. The system gives you many diagnostic tools to perform an investigation.For University Use Only . you can use the FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window to display the following information: The Reso lve En vi ronm ent Pag e 1 7-3 . it uses the last version of the current model saved on disk prior to the failure. Change the failed model or a backup model using standard part or assembly functionality. so that you can modify or restore dimensions of the features that are not displayed in the current model. If you select the Regen Backup option from the Environment dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • Attempt a quick fix of the problem using shortcuts for performing standard operations on the failed feature only. Note: Keep in mind that the Resolve Environment tools are designed to resolve failures in order to allow you to build more robust models. and removes the file when you exit the Resolve Environment.

the state at the end of the last successful feature regeneration.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • A description of the current model and backup models. Hints on resolving the problem. Delete it with its children. Reroute it. if it exists: • • • • Modified dimensions. You can then choose to roll the model back to one of the following: the failed feature (for the backup model only). Information concerning the failed feature. Invalid geometry of the failed feature.For University Use Only . you can use the Investigate option to obtain the following information about the current model or the backup model. Suppress the failed feature along with its children. All references for the failed feature in the model. you can perform the following operations on the failed feature only: • • • • Redefine it. Performing a Quick Fix on the Failed Feature Using the QUICK FIX menu. Pag e 1 7. Figure 1: Failure Diagnostics Window If you need to investigate the problem further.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . or a specified feature. All modifications and changes. the feature just before the failed feature.

If you suppress features using the QUICK FIX menu. you should investigate the cause of the failure before continuing with the part design. relations. as necessary. As you change a model in the Resolve Environment. or modify relations. Restore dimensions. Display the PART SETUP menu to perform additional part set up procedures. you can change any feature or component to solve the regeneration problem. Add. Changing the Model Using the FIX MODEL menu. or all of these to their values prior to the failure. Specifically. consider any parent/child relationships that exist between features and components to avoid changing the intent of the model itself. however. If you do not make any corrections.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Note: When you make changes in the Resolve Environment. you may not be able to resume the feature later in the design. Modify dimensions using the standard MODIFY menu. to regenerate the model.For University Use Only . you can use any of the following approaches: • • • • • • Use the FEAT menu to perform feature operations on the model. The Reso lve En vi ronm ent Pag e 1 7-5 . they can affect the failed feature or another specified feature. parameters. Regenerate the model again. delete.

Click Info > Feature List . 2. Method: In this exercise. as shown in Figure 2. which causes other features to fail.6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Click Info > Regen Info . Pick the second protrusion feature of the model. Pag e 1 7. 2. Open the feature list. Note that the system regenerats the two chamfers after the two protrusions. Insert after the second protrusion. 1. Regenerate the model in steps. Insert an edge round on the bottom edge of the model. Click Beginning from the START OPT menu. Click Feature > Insert Mode > Activate . 5. 3. Add the rounds after the second (triangular) protrusion. Use the Feature List and Regen Info options to determine how the chamfer part was built. You then investigate and resolve the problem in the Resolve Environment. Review the Information Window and close it. Click Continue to regenerate feature by feature. you add features to a part. 4. You will not see datum planes if you have them off. EXERCISE 1: Resolving a Failure Task 1. Or use the click and drag. Pro/ENGINEER allows you to insert features into the regeneration list before other features. Note that the system no longer displays the chamfers. Retrieve the chamfer part.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal: The general goal of this lab is to make you comfortable with regeneration failures and give you the skill to be able to successfully navigate the resolve environment. 1. Task 2. Start from the beginning and step through the model.

7. Pick the round using a surface chain. Pick all the highlighted edges to round.0] followed by <ENTER>. Click Surf Chain from the CHAIN menu. Define it as a constant edge chain round. 9. Click Query Sel . Create a simple edge round. then click Done from the CHAIN menu. Figure 2: The Resolve Model 3. Click OK . Leave Simple the default. Pick the bottom hidden surface. Click Select All from the CHAIN OPT menu. Enter a radius value. 6. 8. 5. then click Accept . 4. Click Feature > Create > Solid > Round . Then click Done from the ROUND TYPE menu. Leave Constant and Edge Chain the defaults.For University Use Only . Complete the round feature. Type [2. The Reso lve En vi ronm ent Pag e 1 7-7 . and click Done from the RND SET ATTR menu.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Round these four edges. Insert after this protrusion.

Click Insert Mode > Cancel to exit insert mode. Close the window. Click Resolve Hints and review Pro/ENGINEER’s suggestions for resolving the problem. The round feature that you created removed these edges. note the regeneration status of the two chamfers. When the system asks you if you want to resume the features that it suppressed when activating insert mode. click Close . Diagnose the model’s problem. Pag e 1 7. 11.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Close the window. Also. When you have finished showing the missing references. Navigate through the window of the missing chamfer by clicking on each item and showing references. type [yes ]. Click Feature Info and review the Failed Feature Info. and click Show Ref from the INVESTIGATE menu. 6. 12. it regenerated successfully and the chamfer failed. Note: The edge references for the chamfer appear on the screen. Click Feature List from the INFO pull-down menu.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 10. Click Close to exit the INFORMATION window. Click Overview and review the Resolve Feature Overview. Task 3. Note that the system created the round feature after the second protrusion. but they are no longer part of the model. 1. 3. 5. Review all of the information provided in the FAILURE DIAGNOSTICS window. The references for the chamfer feature no longer exist because the system replaced them with the round feature that you created in insert mode. 2. Because it regenerated prior to the chamfer. Click Investigate from the RESOLVE FEAT menu. 4. Pro/ENGINEER places you in the Resolve Environment because it cannot regenerate the chamfer feature.For University Use Only . Close the window. Accept the default Current Modl .

Click Yes from the YES/NO menu to exit the Resolve Environment. Resolve the failed feature by removing the failed chamfer feature from the part model. Click Quick Fix from the RESOLVE FEAT menu. Save the model and erase it from memory. 1. Recall that the quick fix option for resolve only works on the failed feature. Read the prompt. Click Info > Feature List .For University Use Only . Note that the chamfer feature is no longer part of the model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. Again review the feature list. 2. The Reso lve En vi ronm ent Pag e 1 7-9 . then click Delete from the QUICK FIX menu.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. Failures usually occur due to design changes in certain parts after an extensive model has been built up. suppressing.For University Use Only . Pro/ENGINEER provides a Resolve Environment to rectify failed features. • Pag e 1 7.1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . redefining. A failed model can more permanently fixed by using the FIX MODEL menu. The Failure Diagnostics window in the Resolve Environment displays accurate and specific information regarding particular failures. and deleting a feature along with its children are some of the “quick fixes” that can be performed on a failed feature. you learned that: • • • • • It is not uncommon for models to fail due to problems in design. Rerouting.

and assemblies. parts. Obtain regeneration information. you learn to retrieve information. you will be able to: • • • • Obtain different types of information regarding features. you have learned to stipulate information to the system. In this module.For University Use Only . While creating models. Calculate mass properties for a model. Use Model Analysis options to calculate clearance and interference. Page 18-1 .Commercial Use Prohibited Module Information Tools Providing Pro/ENGINEER with correct information to create complex designs is an important skill. Objectives After completing this module. Retrieving specific information for model analysis and for manufacturing purposes is another crucial skill.

and reference dimensions in an INFORMATION WINDOW. The system lists regenerated and suppressed features. you can obtain information about a particular feature in PART. and entire models. Obtaining Information about the Assembly Using the Component option in ASSEMBLY mode. This option is particularly useful because it allows you to observe the design of a part. For this. all coordinate systems. suppression order. cross-sections. how its parent/child relationships and parameters were formed. Obtaining Regeneration Information Using the Regen Info option.For University Use Only . feature ID. Obtaining Information about a Specific Feature Using the Info Feature option. name. and DRAWING modes. assembly components. you can list all features in the model in their regeneration order and obtain the feature number. Pag e 1 8.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODEL DESIGN INFORMATION It is good design practice to determine the way a model was built before making any modifications and additions to it. you can obtain information about how a component was assembled. Pro/ENGINEER provides useful tools to extract information about individual features. Using Feature List .2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . and assists you in determining if poor design practices were used to create it. you can access information about every feature on a part. and regeneration status for each. you can step successively through the regeneration of the part—starting from a specified feature or from the beginning—in the current order of creation. ASSEMBLY. type. Accessing Information about Part Features Using the Model option. regeneration.

For University Use Only . it displays the full pathnames of the objects. In the INFORMATION WINDOW. However. In a mass properties calculation. Info rm atio n Tool s Pag e 1 8. You must recalculate the mass properties to see the effect of model changes. and cross-sections. Note: By default. MEASUREMENT. you can compute mass properties for parts. Analyze the model through measurement. Tips & Techniques: The system lists only the names of the objects in the Information Window. INTERFERENCE. the system does not include the mass of suppressed features or suppressed components in any assembly. the system displays the names of the components in a hierarchical structure to show how they were assembled. assemblies. AND MASS PROPERTIES With Pro/ENGINEER’s ANALYSIS pull-down menu you can: • • • • Add engineering information to a model.3 . along with their object-types and version-number suffixes. if you set the configuration file option DISPLAY_FULL_OBJECT_PATH to yes. mass properties do not automatically update when you make changes to the model. Check interference.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES You can also use the Model option to access information about selected assembly components. Calculating Mass Properties Using the Model Analysis option. Calculate mass properties.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Calculating Clearance and Interference Using the Model Analysis option. and entities Perform a global clearance check to find all pairs of parts or subassemblies with clearances less than a specified clearance distance Perform a global interference check to find all interfering pairs of parts or subassemblies.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . you can perform these checks on your model: • • Calculate volume or interference between pairs of any combination of subassemblies. cables. parts. surfaces. • Pag e 1 8.

5.PRT. 8. EXERCISE 1: Using Information Tools Task 1. 10. feature by feature. Click Show Dims . 1. 3. Click Analysis > Model Analysis . Scroll through the feature list in the INFORMATION WINDOW dialog box. Task 2. Click Info Feat to obtain information about the feature to see how it was created. Determine mass properties for the model. 4. then close.For University Use Only . you learn to use information tools to calculate measurements. Click Info > Model . Complete the regeneration. Click Info > Regen Info . Click Continue until the first solid feature appears. Click Beginning from the Menu Manager.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal The goal of this lab is to enable you to elicit information that determines how a part was created. Click Continue to step through the regeneration of the part.5 . 1. 9. 2. Interrogate the regeneration cycle of a gear part . Open GEAR_COUNTERWEIGHT. 6. Info rm atio n Tool s Pag e 1 8. Method In Exercise 1. Click Close in INFORMATION WINDOW. 7.

6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Pag e 1 8.For University Use Only . Pick the gear edge as shown in Figure 1. click Area from the TYPE drop-down list. 2. 3. The length of the edge appears in the message area of your screen and also in the RESULTS area of the dialog box. 3. Scroll down the INFORMATION WINDOW and close it when you are done. accepting all the default options in the MODEL ANALYSIS dialog box. 3. In the MEASURE dialog box. Measure the length of the gear edge feature. Close the MASS PROPERTIES dialog box. Measure the model. Pick this edge to measure the length. The mass properties information displays. Task 3. Click Curve Length in the TYPE drop-down list. Click Analysis > Measure 2. 4. The value for the surface area appears in the RESULTS area of the dialog box. Figure 1: Measuring Surface Area and Curve Length Task 4. 5. Click Info in the MODEL ANALYSIS dialog box. Click Compute . 4. First pick this surface to calculate the surface area. Pick the front cylindrical surface. 1.

Info rm atio n Tool s Pag e 1 8. Save the model and close the model window. Click Distance from the TYPE drop-down list. The system measures the distance between vertices and displays it in the message area and in the Results area of the dialog box. Click Vertex from the FROM drop-down list. Pick this vertex first. Click Close .For University Use Only . 2. Select Vertex from the TO drop-down list 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 5. Pick the second vertex as shown.7 . 7. 6. Pick the vertex as shown in Figure 2. Figure 2: Measuring Distance 8. 3. 4. Pick this vertex second. Measure the distance between two vertices: 1.

In a part you can measure. and entities to reduce the amount of calculation time needed to perform a global interference check among all components. cables. length of curve edge. you have learned that: • With Pro/ENGINEER you not only provide information to the system while building models but you can also retrieve information for analysis or manufacturing purposes. You can access information about any specific part to learn how it was built feature by feature using the Regen Info option You can calculate mass properties for parts.For University Use Only . and surface areas. assemblies. You can calculate interference between pairs of any combination of subassemblies. • • • • • Pag e 1 8. and sections using the Model Analysis option. distances between vertices.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . parts. among other things. In any model you can obtain information about any specific feature. surfaces.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.

Page 19-1 . Objectives After completing this module. you will be able to: • • • • Locate configuration files on a network. This module teaches you how to modify Pro/ENGINEER ’s working environment. Create a working session of Pro/ENGINEER that is completely different from the default session. Configure the toolbar and Model Tree.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Configuring Pro/ENGINEER You can configure Pro/ENGINEER either to create a company-wide standard or to suit your own individual needs. Create map keys.For University Use Only .

SUP file locks out any duplicate entries in your local CONFIG.SUP from the directory <LOADPOINT>/TEXT (the directory from which you install Pro/ENGINEER). display formats. These options are set. other configuration files cannot overwrite them. The default name for the Pro/ENGINEER configuration file is config. This file can be used to establish customized company standards for all of your Pro/ENGINEER users. as shown in Figure 1. By editing configuration files. ½ Establishing the location of directories that contain library items. that is. However. Configuration Files Pro/ENGINEER can read in configuration files from several areas.For University Use Only . calculation accuracy. When starting Pro/ENGINEER. the number of digits used in Sketcher. ½ Submitting project objects.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . ½ Establishing default measurement units for new parts (such as millimeters instead of inches).PRO configuration files. Pag e 1 9. if a particular option is present in more than one configuration file. The file can include settings for tolerance. Every entry in the CONFIG.pro. it first reads in a protected system configuration file called CONFIG. it uses the latest value.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES CUSTOMIZING PRO/ENGINEER • • • • A configuration file allows you to customize your environment. you can set company standards for: ½ Storing formats. etc.

The CONFIG. The CONFIG. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9.PRO file in your home directory.PRO file in your start-up directory. The following figure shows the PREFERENCES dialog box. Note For a complete listing of configuration file options and defaults.PRO file in the LOADPOINT directory. Default values built into the software.3 . refer to the Introduction to Pro/ENGINEER User’s Guide.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 1: Possible Locations of Configuration Files on a Network Pro/ENGINEER reads in configuration files from the following directories in this order: • • • • The CONFIG. using the Preferences option in the UTILITIES menu. Editing Configuration Files You can edit configuration files during your working session.

4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pag e 1 9.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 2 Preferences Dialog Box Note Configuration files are not automatically loaded after editing.For University Use Only . They have to be loaded by clicking Utilities > Preferences Creating Mapkeys • • A Mapkey is a keyboard macro that you can create using the Mapkeys option in the UTILITIES pull-down menu. A mapkey performs a series of picks when you type only one or two keystrokes.

CONFIGURING THE TOOLBAR Adding Icons to Existing Toolbars All pull-down menu options can be associated with easy-to-use toolbar icons. run. you can create new icons and add them to existing toolbars The CUSTOMIZE dialog box includes a list of existing pull-down menu options on the left with corresponding icons on the right. and save mapkeys to a configuration file.5 . delete. To do this.For University Use Only . you can simply drag the associated icon of your choice onto the toolbar. modify. This is illustrated in Figure 4. As you go down the menu options on the left. The RECORD MAPKEY dialog box allows you to create.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 3: Mapkeys and Record Mapkey Dialog Boxes • • The MAPKEYS dialog box lists each mapkey that is in session and provides a description of its function. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9.

such as $F1.6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Pull-down Menus and Mapkeys You can create a separate pull-down menu for the Mapkeys you newly defined. Pag e 1 9.For University Use Only . This file automatically loads when Pro/ENGINEER is started the next time. This option creates a file called CONFIG. This allows the use of the mouse to select your mapkey definitions. Quick keys.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 4: Setting Toolbar Icons Saving the Settings • • • Save your changes to toolbars by using the Automatically Save To option in the CUSTOMIZE dialog box.WIN in the same directory that the file resides in. are of course valid still for the mapkey.

Paste a copied icon image. Most importantly.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Tips & Techniques: Name keystrokes so that you can easily remember what they refer to. complete with a configurable interface and search engine Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9. Copy the icon image. THE MODEL TREE The Model Tree is a powerful tool to organize and manipulate active objects." Associating New Icons for Mapkeys Mapkeys have a default icon associated with them but you have the option to change the icon. Choose a button image from a predefined list.7 .For University Use Only . the Model Tree is an information tool as well as an interactive operations tool. The modifying options include the ability to: • • • • • • Delete the icon. you can modify the displayed icon. With the CUSTOMIZE dialog box open. Edit the icon image with an icon editor. An example is "sd” for “Cosmetic Shade. Show the text associated to the icon.

failed. ½ Feature number ½ Feature ID. – displays new model parameters affecting the entire Model Params model.For University Use Only . ½ Feature type ½ Feature name • • • Layers – provides the status of layers. or suppressed). you can also configure it to maintain predefined and customized columns that correspond to items in the tree. unregenerated. Feat Params – displays new parameters affecting a feature. Pag e 1 9. as shown in Figure 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 5: Model Tree Display In addition to using the MODEL TREE tool to display features. Some commonly used columns are: • Info – provides information regarding: ½ Status (regenerated. frozen.8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

9 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 6: Model Tree Columns Dialog Box The Model Tree Columns dialog box is available with the VIEW menu Model Tree Setup option.For University Use Only . Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9.

you will develop a configuration file and a toolbar to customize the Pro/ENGINEER working environment. 1. 2. Pag e 1 9. Open BUSHING. In Exercise 2. Method In Exercise 1.PRT. EXERCISE 1: Setting Up a Configuration File Task 1.1 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Start a new Pro/ENGINEER session. In Exercise 3.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES LABORATORY PRACTICAL Goal By the end of this lab. 3. Click Utilities > Preferences . you will be able to optimize your Pro/ENGINEER interface to suit your day-to-day needs. Shade and spin the model. The system displays the PREFERENCES editor. you will create a mapkey to help increase efficiency. you will utilize the MODEL TREE to create and modify geometry. Create a new configuration file in the local directory and edit it.

All available options are now grouped according to the area of the system they impact. In the VALUE drop-down list. The default value is YES. Scroll down the list and select spin_center_display . 5. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9. then begin altering the default values to tailor the working environment to suit your prefences. 3. click No > Add/Change . which means the spin center will always be displayed when Pro/ENGINEER is launched. In the SORT drop-down box. select By Category. Clear the Show only options loaded from file box. View some of the options. 4. There are hundreds of configuration settings in Pro/ENGINEER.For University Use Only . In the SORT drop-down box. 1. All of the options are now listed with the current value that is in effect listed in the VALUE column.1 1 . select Alphabetical . 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 7: Editing the Configuration File Task 2.

This option is added to the list of changed settings for this session of Pro/ENGINEER. When the option is fully listed. Only the options you have changed from the default settings will be listed. press <ENTER>. the system is trying to complete the option for you. click YES > Add/Change . type: [spin_with_part_entities].Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 8: Selecting a Configuration File Option. Note: As you are typing. Pag e 1 9. In the OPTION box. It presents the first option in the alphabetic list that meets your criteria. Check the Show only options loaded from file box.1 2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 5. 6. 4. 7. In the VALUE drop-down list.For University Use Only .

Task 4. In the TYPE KEYWORD box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 9: Second Option Added Task 3. 1. One option is found. Scroll to the left to read the Description of the option. Select visible_message_lines . Look for an option that will prompt you to save any "unsaved" data when you exit Pro/ENGINEER. Click Find Now . Add additional options using a Keyword Search. In the PREFERENCES dialog box click Find . select the option. In the CHOOSE OPTION area. type [message]. 4. Click Find Now .For University Use Only . 3. Repeat this process to search for an option to add more lines to the message area of Pro/ENGINEER. 2. type: [exit]. 5. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9.1 3 . 1. Click Add/Change . 3. 2. 7. Notice the default value of YES in the SET VALUE box. 6. In the TYPE KEYWORD box.

PRT. 14. 15.pro]. 6. 9. Since you modified the bushing but did not save it. Click File > Exit to save the file and exit the editor. Exit the system by clicking File > Exit > Yes . 12. Press <ENTER> to save the part. Modify a feature. Click File > Exit . Click . Click Add/Change > Close . Task 5. Click Regenerate to update the geometry.12 dimension. you are presented with the option to save the model. 1. This is a result of the change to the spin_with_part_entities option. In the NAME box. Restart Pro/ENGINEER. 10. 11. Notice that the datum planes remain displayed during spinning. 8. Task 6.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Click Apply > Close . 3. Pag e 1 9.00]. Select visible_message_lines in the PREFERENCES dialog box and type [5] in the VALUE box. 2.For University Use Only . Click OK > OK . Pick the center hole of the bushing. Click Modify. type [10. 5.1 4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Start a new session of Pro/ENGINEER and open BUSHING. Pick the 19. type [config. Verify that the changed settings are currently in effect. Save the changes to the settings such that they will be in effect every time Pro/ENGINEER is launched. Notice that the message window has been expanded to list five lines. Spin the part using the mouse. 13. Some settings will require a software restart to be active 1.

6. Type [Feature Name] as the NAME. 1.PRT 2. Create a mapkey that will rename a feature. Type [fn] as the KEY SEQUENCE. 8. Define a mapkey to develop . Click OK . Click Save leaving the default name CURRENT_SESSION. 3. Pick on the hole feature in the model. Close the RECORD MAPKEY dialog box Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9. 3.For University Use Only .PRO. Open CRANK. 7. Type [Shaft_bore ] 4. 2. Task 3. Type [Name a feature for easy identification] for DESCRIPTION. Click Done . 3. Click the checkbox or press <ENTER> 5. 1.1 5 . Task 2. Click Record . Record the mapkey. Click Stop in the RECORD MAPKEYS dialog box. 4. Click Setup > Name . Select Pause for keyboard input . 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 2: Creating a Mapkey Task 1. 5. Click New in the MAPKEYS dialog box. 1. 9. Click Utilities > Mapkeys .

click on the smiley face. Pick on the boss and type [boss ] as the new name. In the CUSTOMIZE dialog box. 2. 1. then click <ENTER> 4. Click Modify Selection > Choose Button Image . 3. Pag e 1 9. as shown below: Figure 10 Inserting Erase Icon into the Standard Toolbar Task 6.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 4. 1. 2. Drag and place the icon next to the OPEN icon on the SAVE toolbar. You will notice the new names you have given to the model features. Customize your toolbar to include an icon for the [fn ] mapkey you created. select Mapkeys in CATEGORIES to highlight it. Note The system will automatically save the changes the CONFIG. then click Description . 2. You can change the directory that the file is saved to. 1. In the PICK MAPKEY ICON dialog box. 3. 3. 4. Learn to include an icon onto your toolbar. Test your new mapkey. pick 5. Read the description. Click Info > Feature List . In the MAPKEYS area of the dialog box. Task 5. Click Utilities > Customize Screen . Type [fn ].WIN file to your working directory. Now click and drag it from the dialog box onto your toolbar. Select the third icon from the right.1 6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only .

Leave the option to automatically save the file and click OK . A part of your customized toolbar could look like this: Figure 11:Customized Toolbar Feature Name mapkey icon 3. then click Yes . 2. 1.For University Use Only . Notice the entry at the bottom of the dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Task 7. Click the newly added Erase Current icon from the toolbar. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9. Finish the definition of the toolbars. Erase the current testing model from memory.1 7 .

Regenerate the part. Pag e 1 9. then click Modify 3. Suppress a feature from the MODEL TREE . then click Suppress . 4. 1.0] as the new value.1 8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Right-click Hole id 166 in the MODEL TREE. 1. Use the MODEL TREE to modify some dimensions of a model. 2. Pick R5 on the model and type [4.For University Use Only . Right-click Round id 200 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES EXERCISE 3: Configuring the Model Tree Task 1. Open the GEAR_COUNTERWEIGHT. Figure 12: Model Tree as an Information Tool Task 2.PRT.

Task 4. Add layer status. Select Layer > Layer Status from the TYPE drop-down list.. 2. Show the suppressed features in the model. Add columns to the model tree to customize it. Click View > Model Tree Setup > Item Display . Click View > Model Tree Setup > Column Display . Figure 13: Model Tree Columns Dialog Box Task 5.1 9 .For University Use Only . Click and right-click to resume the hole and DTM4. 3. Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9. 1. Task 3. Click >> to move it to the DISPLAYED column. The system now displays the suppressed features in the MODEL TREE with a black box next to the feature icon. 1. 1. symbolizing that the feature is suppressed. Resume the two features.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Click OK in the WARNING dialog box to confirm. 2. Select FeatID from the NOT DISPLAYED column.

Select the Layer Status row and type [10] as the new WIDTH value. then increase the size of the MODEL TREE window so that you can see these columns. Click >> to add it to the CURRENT column. 3. Save the settings for the MODEL TREE to be used again at a later date. Click OK to save. Task 7. Click OK . 4. Click Utilities > Model Tree Settings > Save . Pag e 1 9. Use the default name so that it will be loaded automatically the next time Pro/ENGINEER is started in this directory.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. 2. Task 6. 3. Select the FeatID row and type [3] as the new WIDTH value. Save the model and erase it from memory. Click OK .2 0 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Change the column format to decrease the size for feature id to 3 and layer status to 10. 1.For University Use Only . 3. 2. 1. Click View > Model Tree Setup > Column Display .

Co n f i g u r i n g P ro / E N G I NEE R Pag e 1 9.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module. of frequently used series of steps in the design process. The MODEL TREE can be used as an effective information tool with many customizable columns. or macros. You should first load the CONFIG. you learned that: • • • • • • The Pro/ENGINEER environment is customizable. You can create mapkeys.PRO file in order to configure your environment. New pull-down menus can be created. New toolbars and toolbar icons can be created to associate with the mapkeys you create.For University Use Only .2 1 .

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited .

assemblies and drawings. Recapitulate the uses of Pro/ENGINEER as a parametric tool in parent/child relationships. design intent is the one thread that connects all the various techniques for creating parts.Commercial Use Prohibited Module Modeling Philosophy Throughout this training course. Objectives After completing this module.For University Use Only . Recapitulate the ways to change design intent. while raising certain other points that need elaboration. List the advantages of Pro/ENGINEER’s associativity. Capturing design intent by various methods is the core of Pro/ENGINEER’s modeling philosophy. Page 20-1 . Describe the nature and uses of Relations. This module recapitulates some of the salient points about design intent that have been covered thus far. you will be able to: • • • • • Describe the steps in recording the design criteria for a new model.

you should record the design criteria for the model that would include: • • • Order of features Base feature Feature duplication • • • Feature form Feature type Depth Figure 1: Considering the Model Using Pro/ENGINEER as a Parametric Tool • • One of the major facets of the parametric nature of Pro/ENGINEER is the ability to generate parent/child relationships.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES THE DESIGN INTENT Recording Your Design Criteria Before you commence model creation.For University Use Only . Pag e 2 0.2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . You can also use Pro/ENGINEER to interrelate feature dimensions by creating relations without creating parent/child relationships. Creating Parent/Child Relationships Methods The following are some of the ways in which you can create parent/child relationships among features: • Specifying the sketching/placement plane.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • Orienting the reference plane.For University Use Only . Defining depth. Relations for Optimizing Design If you have developed good parent/child relationships along with a welldefined parametric behavior of the model. parts. A multitude of objectives can be met this way. features leads to easy regeneration while reducing the effort needed in designing complex machines. relations can elevate as well as optimize certain design criteria. Behavioral Modeler With Behavioral Modeler you have the ability to perform an iterative analysis of your design by developing a Design Study. Note You can document the modeling intent by commenting the relation and changing the symbolic name. Using Relations Relations allow you to create a relationship between features or components in an assembly without creating a parent/child relationship in which child features control their parents. Find a set of values of specified parameters that optimize the design based on some criteria while satisfying a set of design specifications using an Optimization study. Dimensioning and specifying references. You can: • • • Determine the dependency between a design specification and a model parameter or dimension using a Sensitivity Analysis. Component constraints. Modeli ng Ph i losoph y Pag e 2 0-3 . Find a set of values of specified model parameters that satisfy a set of design specific criteria using a Feasibility study. Advantages of Pro/ENGINEER’s Associativity Creating Assemblies Associativity among drawings.

Redefine Changes the external references that features and components have in a model.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Creating Skeleton Parts You can also create parts at the assembly level.For University Use Only . Figure 2: Skeleton Example Using Engineering Notebooks Pro/ENGINEER allows you to generate a centralized location to capture. Pag e 2 0.4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Layouts and parametric relations can be stored and retrieved as necessary Changing Design Intent • • • • • – Changes any of the originally defined elements in features or defined constraints in an assembly. document. Insert Mode – Reorder – Changes the order of the regeneration of existing features in a part or components in the assembly. Reroute – Changes the regeneration cycle by allowing you to insert features or components into the regeneration cycle. You can also use these parts to define motion in an assembly. referred to as skeletons. Interchange Mode – Changes the design intent of an assembly by swapping one functionally equivalent model with another. and control the design intent of a product model. to capture the intent of the interrelationship between components in an assembly.

drawings. the behavioral modeler. Pro/ENGINEER’s feature-based. the Resolve Environment to solve regeneration problems—all in their own respective ways help in the overarching goal of capturing design intent and thus are essential components of Pro/ENGINEER's modeling philosophy. Information tool. Parent/Child Relationships in Assemblies and methods of specifying and altering them enables changes in intent. • • Modeli ng Ph i losoph y Pag e 2 0-5 . The capacity to introduce parametric relations while creating models is a special feature of the software that furthers the cause of design intent capture. parametric. and associative nature has many advantages in achieving the desired intent. engineering notebooks.For University Use Only . the ability to customize Pro/ENGINEER environment. you learned that: • • • Pro/ENGINEER’s modeling philosophy is driven by considerations of effectively capturing design intent.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODULE SUMMARY In this module.

For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited .

you will be able to: • Apply the concepts you have learned in this course to actual design projects. Objectives After completing this module. You should work through this project at your own pace as time permits.Commercial Use Prohibited Appendix Project Laboratory This module contains an extended project for you to do when you finish the specific module exercises. Feel free to discuss your progress with the instructor or your classmates.For University Use Only . Page A-1 . The purpose of this project is to allow you to work with a minimum of step by step instruction in order to reinforce the concepts you are learning in this class.

However. length = mm. if you would like to skip portions of the project. you create the motor part. In this project. snap ring part. Try to use the project components that you create during the course of the week to develop the project.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES INTRODUCTION Throughout the next few days you will design components for an assembly and document them through production drawings. there are supplied models that can be used to complete sections of the project laboratories. Snap rings Motor housing Cover Motor shaft 8SSHU KRXVLQJ Lower housing Blower Figure 1: Completed Project Pag e A. and upper housing part. lower housing part. Throughout the project. you will be working in the directory named project and units for all parts.For University Use Only . drawings and assemblies will be metric. The models develop a blower and motor assembly consisting of eight components.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

you also use relations to maintain the electronics support foundation (rectangular shaped protrusion) a constant distance from the back surface of the base feature. 2. Create the first solid feature.For University Use Only . You may want to extrude a 70.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES PART CREATION SECTION 1: Creating the Motor Part To follow the design intent of the motor part.00diameter circle to a blind depth of 90. measuring 82. you must build it using only those dimensions shown in Figure 2. Add a feature to represent the electronics support foundation.5 X 60.0. as shown in Figure 3 (with the height measuring 60.00.00 from the center of the motor). 3. along with holes. In addition. Figure 2: Dimensions for Motor Part 1. This foundation must be rectangular. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. You create the part using extruded sketched features. Create a new part named “motor”.3 .

Remember to change the dimension back to the original depth value of 90. as well as what type of feature you create.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 3: Electronics Support Foundation 4.For University Use Only .4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 7.0-diameter front protrusion feature to the model so that you can use it for a bolt flange. The 5.0-diameter hole feature to the back of the motor to use for the motor shaft. Pag e A. Add a 15. 8. Add the 100. Tips & Techniques: You should pay careful attention to your selection or creation of a datum plane for the section. Regenerate the part and test the relation by modifying the depth dimension of the base feature. Write a relation to cause the size of the electronics support (base feature) to change when the base feature depth changes. place the electronics support foundation a distance of 7.00-diameter and leave a 5. Assign it a 60. 5. Add a cut feature to the model so that you can remove material to receive an armature. Save the model and clear the window by erasing the part.0 wall thickness it the key to these selections. 6. as shown in Section A-A in Figure 2.5 away from the surface of the cylindrical base feature.0wall thickness at the back of the motor. To follow the design intent.

(Hint: Using the power of feature-based modeling.) P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Create the first solid feature. Figure 4: Lower Housing Part 1. Create a part named “lower_housing.5 . create the feature with an open section. if the diameter dimensions of the base support changes. Create a flange to bolt this part to another component in an assembly. the revolved cut must remain a specific distance from the side surfaces of the base feature so that the model maintains a specific wall thickness. You may want to extrude a 120diameter semicircle to a blind depth of 80.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 2: Creating the Lower Housing Part According to the design intent of the lower housing part.For University Use Only .” 2. Give the flange feature dimensions of 15 x 4.1 (see Figure 5). In addition. 3. the support feature and flange feature should change as well.

Figure 6: Lower Housing Base Support Pag e A. Add the base support feature to the model.For University Use Only . as shown in Figure 6 and Figure 7.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 5: Lower Housing Flange 4. Sketch the feature on the central datum plane and extrude the feature in both directions.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

Figure 8: Lower Housing Revolved Cut P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.7 .For University Use Only . Regardless of how the base feature changes in depth. Add a revolved cut feature to the model as shown in Figure 8. the wall thickness should remain 2.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 7: Lower Housing Base Support Section Note: In this figure.5. the sketched centerline is aligned to the silhouette edge of the cylindrical surface of the base feature. 5.

Pag e A.For University Use Only . After you have finished.8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 6. Cut away part of the front housing. save the model and erase the part from memory. as shown in Figure 9. Add a 30-diameter hole feature at the rear of the housing. Refer to Figure 4. Figure 9: Lower Housing Cut 7.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 3: Creating the Snap Ring Part Since the snap ring part is an “off-the-shelf” item.” 2. Figure 10: Snap Ring Dimensions 1. as shown in Figure 11.For University Use Only . Create a part named “snap_ring. it does not need a flexible design. Create a solid feature by extruding the outline of the snap ring.5mm Figure 11: Snap Ring Section P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. The part has a thickness of 1.9 . so you can create it with only two features.

save and erase the model. After you have finished.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. Add a 2-radius simple edge round as indicated. Round these edges.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Figure 12: Snap Ring Rounds Pag e A.

giving it a distance of 81. Figure 13: Upper Housing Dimensions 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 4: Creating the Upper Housing Part According to the design intent of the upper housing part. and you place the discharge on the model symmetrically back-to-front. centering the sweep about the base feature. you can avoid having to create an additional datum plane later.5 from the P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.11 .For University Use Only . 3. You use a swept feature to create a portion of the model geometry that represents the housing. Make the trajectory of the sweep a line and arc. the diameter dimension of the base feature drives the model. you create a blend feature to incorporate the widening characteristic of the discharge housing. Create a part named “upper_housing 2. Extrude a 120-diameter semicircle to a depth of 80. To complete the housing discharge geometry. Use a swept protrusion with the Free Ends attribute to create a portion of the housing discharge (Figure 14). By extruding the base feature on both sides of the sketching plane. Extrude on both sides of the sketching plane so that you can use the same sketching plane for the trajectory of the discharge housing.

and assigning a radius of 100 to the arc. Ensure that the sweep remains attached to the base feature at this location.For University Use Only . regardless of the diameter of the base feature.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES end of the line to the center of the housing. Locate the start point of the trajectory at the end of the line (notice the centerlines in Figure 16).1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Trajectory Section Figure 14: Completed Sweep Trajectory Start point Figure 15: Sweep Trajectory Section Pag e A. by aligning the endpoint of the arc to both the cylindrical and planar surfaces of the base feature (see Figure 15). Create the cross-section as a rectangle.

Create a straight parallel blend to complete the discharge of the housing.13 . (Hint: Use a centerline to denote symmetry in Sketcher mode).Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Section Centerlines (provided by system) Figure 16: Sweep Section 4. Create Section 1 of the blend using the edge of the sweep.5 for Section 2. Use only two sections with a depth of 57.For University Use Only . Section 1 Section 2 P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.

1 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 17: Blend Sections 5. Create a simple. Your part should look like Figure 18.For University Use Only . Figure 18 Blend Complete 6. edge chain round with a radius of 15 Your part should look like Figure 19 Pag e A.

As references. 8.15 . pick the edges where the swept protrusion intersects the first solid feature. create a simple edge round with a radius value of 40. Figure 20: Shell References P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Remove two hidden surfaces for the shell feature. as shown in Figure 19.For University Use Only . Create another simple edge round with a radius of 5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Pick this edge for the tangent chain of the 40 radius Pick this edge for the 5 radius Figure 19: Upper Housing Rounds 7. To improve airflow.

as shown in Figure 21. Remove these two surfaces as references: the end surface of the discharge diffuser (planar surface of the blended feature). create a coaxial hole. 10.For University Use Only . Make a 30-diameter hole in the back of the housing. Specify a value of 2. Make this feature similar to the flange on the motor part. and the bottom flat surface of the first solid feature.5-diameter cut in the front of the housing. create a datum axis.5 for the shell thickness. Axis .1-thick bolting flange.1 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Datum . Thru Cylinder and select the cylindrical surface of the base protrusion. You will learn more about datum axis in a later chapter. 11. Add a 04. as shown in Figure 21. Flange Hole Detail Figure 21: Upper Housing Flange and Cut 12. Create a shell feature. Pag e A. If an axis exists in the model. If the model does not have an axis.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 9. Note: To create a datum axis choose Create . Make a 97.

P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. After you have finished.17 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 22: Upper Housing 13.For University Use Only . as shown in Detail A in Figure 21. save the model and erase it from memory. Add a straight hole.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES CREATING ASSEMBLIES AND DEVELOPING PART MODELS To complete the parts for these assemblies. SECTION 1: Creating the Motor Assembly According to the design intent of the motor assembly. Figure 23: Exploded View of Completed Motor Assembly Pag e A. you can observe the associativity between the part. In this portion of the project. you can either use the models that you created previously or the models that are stored in a library which reflect the model at the end of the previous project. assembly. you only change the motor part in Part mode. As you complete this project. you modify the parts.1 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . When creating these assemblies and production drawings. create new features. you also start creating production drawings and assemblies. Although the models are not complete. placing the motor part as the first component. The stored models are indicated in parenthesis ( ). Note: You should attempt to use the models that you completed from the previous project lab. and add relations in both Part and Assembly modes. and drawing files. you fully constrain all part models into the assembly.

turn off the datum planes to make it easier to place the remaining component.For University Use Only . Assemble the motor part you created in the previous project lab (or beta_motor.19 . Create an assembly named “motor”. Figure 24: Motor Shaft Assembled into Motor Align inside surface of revolved cut of motor shaft with back surface of motor. Figure 25: Alignment References for Motor Shaft P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. After placing it in the assembly.prt) into the assembly (Figure 24 and Figure 25). 3. 2. Assemble the motor shaft part (beta_shaft.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 1.prt) to the default assembly datum planes.

Assemble COVER.prt) in a separate window. Create an assembly pattern to assemble the second snap ring into the assembly using “ref pattern” 11. Open the motor assembly.8 from the leader. as shown in Figure 26. 9. Create another snap ring groove in the shaft so that it does not slide into the motor. 10. Figure 26: Patterning the Groove 6.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. Pattern the first snap ring groove to create a second one 141.2 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Only create parent child references between the motor part and the cover.For University Use Only .PRT (beta_ring. Note that the snap ring groove now appears in the shaft. Save and close the shaft part model. Assemble SNAP_RING. 7. 8.prt) into the shaft groove (revolved cut) of motor shaft.PRT to the motor part. Retrieve the motor shaft part (beta_shaft. 5. Pag e A. Turn the datum planes back on.

prt). Modify the offset of the patterned grove and in the motor shaft part (beta_shaft.For University Use Only . Save the assembly.5. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Regenerate after the modification.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 27: Motor Assembly 12.21 . Change the distance to 127. Note that the patterned snap ring groove is positioned too far down on the shaft. 13.

prt). Create a radial pattern using three instances. When prompted for the dimensioning scheme. save the model and close the window. Create this hole first Figure 28: Radial Pattern of Holes in the Motor Pag e A.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 2: Concurrent Design of the Motor Housing The motor housing.2 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 1. When you have finished. Add a hole at an angle using radial placement. You can work concurrently between assemblies and parts in Pro/ENGINEER. 2. as well as most of the components of the assembly.For University Use Only . have not been completed. create a set of holes in the motor to match the ones that you are going to create in the cover. Retrieve the motor part (beta_motor. To prepare the motor for mounting holes. use a radial dimension.

prt (beta_lower. Assemble lower_housing.For University Use Only . Create an assembly named “blower. Create these features using the Modify in Assembly mode. 3.23 . Figure 29: Hole Dimension P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. In the next task. The lower housing was created without any holes in the mounting flange. create the hole in lower housing and pattern it in Assembly mode. 2. Modifying the part at assembly level. Create a straight hole on the flange with the dimensioning scheme shown in Figure 29.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 3: Creating the Blower Assembly According to the design intent of this assembly. several features are going to be missing. Note: Do not exit the FEATURE menu after creating the hole. 1.prt) to the three default assembly datum planes. you use the lower housing as the base component and assemble everything to it. As you place components into the assembly. you use Pattern from the same menu.

Mirror plane Offset from this surface for the blower . Mod Part . According to the design intent.5 to 65. Pag e A. Pattern the hole for a total of four (4) instances including the original.For University Use Only . choose Modify. Note: Do not exit the FEATURE menu after creating the pattern. Select the lower housing. then choose Feature .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 4. In the next task. use the part called beta_blower in the current directory. Note: In another project lab you will center the blower model inside the housing via a relation. 5. Figure 30: Mirror References Mirror protrusion and holes 6. 7. (If you did not finish the model. Change the dimension for the blower fins from 73. Exit the part modification menus.) Use a mate offset command with an offset value of 1 to place it with respect to the back of the lower housing.0 and regenerate the part.2 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . View the obvious interference between lower housing and blower by shading the model. If you exited the FEATURE menu. you use Copy from the same menu. Assemble the blower that part you completed in the “Patterns and Feature Copying” lesson. you should mirror the flange along with the pattern of holes to the other side of the model (as shown in Figure 30).

For University Use Only . 12. Save the part file and close the subwindow. Use Copy . Save the assembly and erase the window. Create the four holes by patterning them with an increment of 20. Activate the assembly window.25 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 8. Assemble the upper housing part (beta_upper. Figure 31: Upper Housing Copy Command Mirror protrusion and holes. Note that the assembly now reflects the changes that you made in Part mode. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Open the part so that you can make the changes in Part mode in a subwindow. Mirror to create the bolt flange and holes on the other side of the base feature. and aligning the front faces on both components. 11. 10. 9. The upper housing does not have a pattern of mounting holes on the flange. Fully constrain the component by mating the flange surfaces.prt) to the lower housing. aligning the central axis.

labeled as the third view in Figure 32.” Use a C-size sheet and associate motor. Add the front projected view.prt) with the drawing. 4.2 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . you do the detailing later.(: FIRST VIEW THIRD VIEW Figure 32: Placement of Views for Motor Drawing 2. Add the first general view. labeled as the second view in Figure 32.For University Use Only . Add the back projected view. Create a drawing named “motor. 1. In this portion of the project. Orient it to a side view of the motor model using the default datum planes. 3.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 4: Creating the Motor Part Drawing Although you have not completely finished the motor part. the views and dimensions update with changes to the part model regardless of whether you made the changes in Part. you now begin creating the production drawings. Assembly. In the drawing. Use No Scale to allow Pro/ENGINEER to determine the scale of the drawing. Pag e A. FOURTH VIEW FIFTH VIEW SIXTH VIEW 6(&21' 9. you set up the drawing views only. or Drawing mode.prt (beta_motor.

Tan Phantom . Add the cross-section view. 8. labeled as the fifth view in Figure 232.ASM model to the drawing using the dialog box.27 . No Disp Tan .For University Use Only . Change the display mode of the views. Add sixth view as a general view with a scale of 0. For the first.” Use a C-size sheet and associate the MOTOR. 11.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 5. FOURTH VIEW SECOND VIEW FIRST VIEW THIRD VIEW Figure 33: Placement of Views for the Motor Assembly Drawing P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. labeled as the fourth view in Figure 32. Change the display mode of the remaining views to No Hidden . change the display mode to Hidden line . 7. Add the top projected view. and fifth views. Create a drawing named “motor_asm. Save the drawing. third.drw. 10. Note: Once you set a view using Display Mode .75. it remains at that setting even if you change the Environment setting.. 6. 9.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 12. 14.For University Use Only . Pag e A. Choose No Scale . Place the second projection view. Place the third projection view. No Disp Tan . Place the fourth projection view. Change the display mode of all of the views to No Hidden .2 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 13. 15. Place the first general view. When you have finished. 16. save the model and erase all.

The cover part is incomplete. According to the design intent.For University Use Only . you then place the blower subassembly into the motor assembly.29 . Figure 34: Cover Modifications P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. analyzing mass properties for individual parts and whole assemblies. and investigating interference between components. After accomplishing these tasks. and add cooling slots to the top of the cover. you continue developing the models according to the design intent by adding more features to the parts. you write relations to prevent interference between components. as shown in Figure 34. you must create tabs to mount the cover to the motor part. In addition.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES MODEL INTERROGATION For this project.

3. Resume the suppressed features. the system removed the underside of the small cylindrical boss when you added the cooling fins. Figure 36: X-Section of Cover Before Reorder Pag e A. Pattern the slot for a total of seven (7) instances. 5. Material is removed due to feature order. 6. To make it easier to create the slotted cuts representing cooling slots. and note the difference on the model. and round on top of the base feature. suppress the protrusion.3 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . The second protrusion was originally sketched on the inside of the base feature. Reorder the cut and pattern after the first protrusion. including the original. Add the first slot. 4.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 1: Designing the Cover Part 1. Open the cover part. Figure 35: Cover Part 2.For University Use Only . as shown in Detail C of Figure 34. Note that in Figure 36. hole.

Add a protrusion that you can pattern rotationally.31 .For University Use Only . use an internal datum at an angle.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Reorder leaves material in place.0. Figure 37: X-Section of Cover after Reorder 7. Extrude to a depth of 5. For the horizontal or vertical reference plane. Sketch the open section shown in Figure 38. Open section P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. You can then use the associated angle to pattern later.

Create a co-axial straight hole on the leader tab. Pag e A. Reference pattern the straight hole. Create a datum axis through the cylindrical surface of the leader tab. 9. Figure 39: Cover Before Reference Pattern of Holes 12.3 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Angle from Make Datum Cylindrical surface for axis Figure 38: Rotational Pattern 8. Pattern the leader tab. Make the diameter 7. Make a total of three instances. save the model. 11. 10. Reference pattern the datum axis. incrementing the angle by 120 degrees.5.For University Use Only . When you have finished. including the original.

An open section will also work. 2. Open the motor part (gamma_motor. In this section of the project. Add a feature for the motor foundation.33 .prt).For University Use Only . 3. as shown in Figure 41.) P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. you create a support foundation on the cylindrical base feature. Figure 40: Changes to the Motor Part 1. Suppress all features. (Hint: Use a section that will not fill the central hole when it is resumed.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 2: Completing the Motor Part You have now determined the final design of the base support for the motor part. except for the first solid protrusion and the default datum planes.

Pattern the cut to include four (4) instances. Mirror the patterned cut features that are on the side of the electronics foundation to the other side. After you have finished. Figure 42: Side Cut 6.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 41: Motor Foundation 4. save the model and erase all. Pag e A. 5.For University Use Only .3 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Create a cut on the side of the electronics foundation. as shown in Detail A of Figure 40. including the original. Resume all suppressed features.

you also create a Bill of Materials (BOM) and calculate the mass properties of the components in the assembly.35 .ASM. (gamma_blower.asm) 2. 1.prt) blade from 65 depth to 73. In addition. Regenerate the assembly.For University Use Only . as shown in Figure 44.5. Click Modify. Choose the defaults shown in Figure 43. Toggle the results of the models by clicking on the arrows in the dialog box. Use the Model Analysis… option in the Analysis pulldown menu. Explode the assembly model so that you can see inside the model. Toggle between Figure 43: Modal Analysis Dialog Box 4. Retrieve BLOWER. you measure interference and create an assembly relation to prevent the blower part from interfering with the other components. Select Global Interference from the Type drop-down list in the dialog box.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION: 3: Completing the Blower Assembly To finish the assembly. Change the height of the blower parts (gamma_blower. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. 3. Mod Explode to change the position of the blower using a normal plane. Measure the interference between the members of the blower assembly.

For University Use Only . Modify the blade height again on the blower so it will fit within the lower housing of the model. Change the blade length to be distance you just measured minus the thickness of the top and base of the blower and a clearance.5. Measure . Distance and selecting the surfaces shown in Figure 44. Determine the distance that can be used for the blower.5 + 5) or 62. 7. Measure the distance from the back inside surface of the blower to the front inside surface of the blower using Analysis . 6. Pag e A.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Select this surface to define the Select these two surfaces Figure 44: Exploding the Assembly 5. Use the parameters shown in Figure 45. At the current values the distance is equal to 75 – (5 + 2.3 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Remember the distance value. Develop a relation that drives the blower to always be centered within the lower housing by driving the offset value.

Remember to use symbolic dimensions. you must control the wall thickness. Enter the parameter name in the relation to automatically create a number parameter in the model. Create a number parameter in the lower housing part. Write a relation that is equal to the length of the cut (cut_length = d1 – (d8+ d10)).prt) and close the window. d10:0. This intent was captured by driving the revolved cut off the dimension of 2.5 (shown as d8:0. Open the lower housing (or the gamma_lower.37 . and d9:0 in Figure 45) from all the edges of the surface of the model. 9. Save lower_housing. 10.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES BLOWER PART LOWER_HOUSING PART Figure 45: Symbolic Dimensions for Assembly Relations 8. According to the design intent. 11. Note that the lower housing part does not have any dimensions that control the inside dimension of the interior opening.prt (or the gamma_lower. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Activate the assembly window again.For University Use Only .prt) part in a subwindow. Choose Relations and pick the revolved cut and base protrusion to show their symbolic dimensions.

Drive the offset of the blower model within the lower housing so that they are equally offset. 13. (Hint: Use Sort Rels . Check the message area to see if the system displayed a warning. Pag e A. Save the blower and close the window. 14. Use the Info menu to create a BOM. Create another parameter in the blower model that represents the overall height of the blower including the base. you may have to regenerate twice. Regenerate the model. height = d1+d9+d18.For University Use Only . Click Analysis > Model Analysis to calculate the mass properties of the assembly. (example 7.63e-9 tonne/mm3 for steel) 17.3 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . When you have finished. 15.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 12. to automatically create the parameter height. blade and top. depending on the order in which you added the relations. Add the following relation. Open the blower part (or gamma_blower.) 16. Add the density values of your choice to the components. save the model. Enter a relation similar to d0:1 = (cut_length:0 .height:2)/2.prt) in another window.

and the appropriate axis on the motor. List suppressed components by choosing Show from the Tree pull-down menu and Suppress . Figure 46: Model Tree for Motor Assembly 5.” P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.asm) subassembly into the MOTOR.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 4: Finishing the Motor Assembly In this portion of the project. 1. Add an alignment constraint. While suppressing components. you finish the motor assembly by constraining the blower assembly into the motor assembly. Redefine the component constraints of the cover so that the mount holes align with the motor holes.asm) 2. 4.asm.ASM (gamma_blower. Retrieve the motor.ASM (or gamma_motor.asm) subassembly. 3. the system places you into the Resolve Environment because component references are missing. Assemble the BLOWER.39 . You also examine the difference between blanking layers in an assembly and suppressing components using the Model Tree tool. Use your own discretion when choosing the constraints. Pick the axis on the first hole of the tabs on the cover. Change the column display of Model Tree show Status and FeatID . (gamma_motor. Create a layer at the top-level assembly called “base_comp.

Suppress the motor component. Select the BASE_COMP layer. you cannot reroute or redefine them because they all reference the base component of the assembly. Unblank the BASE_COMP layer. Select the Blank icon.For University Use Only . Set all of the components (not the sub-assemblies) of the motor part to the BASE_COMP layer. but it is still listed in the Model Tree with the status of Regenerated .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 6. Repaint Figure 47: Set Display Dialog Box Note: Note that the motor part is no longer visible in the working window. 10. Pag e A. However. Blank the BASE_COMP layer. 7. Note: Pro/ENGINEER prompts you to select an option for the child components.4 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . as shown in Figure 47. Suspend all child components. 9. 8.

frozen. Save the model and erase all components. P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. 13. review the suppressed. This action causes the assembly to fail. Resume the motor part.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Note: Suspend is a temporary action. Once you have exited the Resolve Environment. Note that all frozen components automatically update in the Model Tree.For University Use Only . 11. To exit the Resolve Environment. As soon as the system freezes one component. 12. it only suspends components in place until the next regeneration. .41 . The system places you into the Resolve Environment because the child components have missing references. which in this situation occurs as soon as you choose Done/Return . and regenerated components listed in the Status column of the Model Tree. select Quick Fix and Freeze for all of the components. another component causes you to remain in the Resolve Environment because it is also missing references.

Create three sketched holes using a radial placement.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES FINISHING PARTS.4 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . 4. assemblies. You make these changes in Part mode. AND DRAWINGS Now you bring everything together by completing the parts. Front flange Figure 48: Changes to Motor Part SECTION 1: Developing the Motor Part According to the design intent. 3. you examine the associativity between all three modes of Pro/ENGINEER. Change the thickness of the front flange to 15. and drawings that you have been developing throughout this training course. 2. Delete the three holes on the front flange. Retrieve motor.prt). Pag e A. you increase the width of the front flange of the motor part and change the holes in the flange. The sketched section is detailed in Figure 49.For University Use Only . ASSEMBLIES. After documenting the motor part and motor assembly in production drawings. 1.prt (or delta_motor.

Save the model and close the window.For University Use Only .43 . P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 49: Sketched Hole Section Figure 50: The Completed Holes 5.

Single sketched line Datum offset dimension Figure 51: Rib Dimensions 2. No Split . See Figure 51 below for dimensions. Enter [ -10] as the draft angle.PRT (or delta_lower.For University Use Only . 1. you strengthen the cylindrical wall of the base feature by creating some ribs with draft features attached to them.4 4 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Retrieve LOWER_HOUSING. Create a neutral plane through the top edge of the rib. Create a draft feature on the two parallel sides of the rib.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 2: Finishing the Lower Housing According to the design intent. Pag e A. parallel to the base surfaces. Extract the body of the part from a mold. Build a rib between the cylindrical base feature and the foundation base. Use the neutral plane as the reference plane.prt). Accept the default attributes of Neutral Plane . and use Make Datum to create an offset datum as the sketching plane taking care of the offset direction. and Constant .

Figure 53: References for Copy of Rib and Draft Features P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A. Translate the features with reference to the front of the model by a distance of 3. After you have finished this task. Copy the rib and draft features to create two supports. save the model. Mirror plane Copy these ribs with the draft.45 . Use Move and select the attribute of Dependent . redefine the draft angle to -10 degrees. Mirror the ribs and draft features to the other side of the part.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Draft surfaces Figure 52: References for Draft Feature (surfaces meshed for clarity) 3.For University Use Only .00 4. If the mirroring operation fails because you cannot construct the geometry.

3. Because the assembly dimensions assist in describing the part. you modify the feature dimensions to show the full associativity of all of the models.DRW (or delta_motor_asm. The system automatically places you into the Resolve Environment.4 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Detail the drawing as shown in Figure 54.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES SECTION 3: Finishing the Drawing To finish the assembly and part drawings of the motor part.drw). 1. Pag e A. Use the Quick Fix option to redefine the placement constraints. Change the missing reference for the assembly to the axis of the sketched hole that you created earlier. Retrieve MOTORASM. most of the dimensions exist at the component level. In the assembly drawing. After you have finished the task. 4. Figure 54: Assembly Drawing. save the drawing and close the window. the only assembly dimensions are those that you use for offset constraints. Read the prompt in the resolve window. all of the dimensions are feature dimensions.For University Use Only . you must detail them. Keep in mind that most of the dimensions were created in Drawing mode. In the part drawing. they were created in Drawing mode. and add the ISO view in the corner. The system cannot place the cover because you deleted the holes from the motor part earlier. After detailing the motor drawing. 2.

Figure 56: Sheet 1 of the Motor Drawing P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.47 . change the default scale to . Detail the drawing according to Figure 56 and Figure 57.For University Use Only . When you have finished. Add additional views.drw if you did not complete the motor part or drawing from the previous project lab). Retrieve motor.7. Notice how the features you added to the motor part have automatically been added to the drawing. Figure 55: The Original Motor Drawing 6. save the model. and move the additional views to an added sheet on the drawing.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 5.drw file (or delta_motordrw.

Figure 58: Pattern Axis Circle Pag e A. then show the axis of the patterned holes. Notice that the axis circle does not appear around the patterned holes on the flange.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 57: Sheet 2 of the Motor Drawing 7. Change the setup file in the drawing so that radial_pattern_axis_circle is set to YES.4 8 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .

as shown in Figure 59. Create a dependant copy of the base using the move option translated 60 units from the surface.prt) foundation in the drawing so that its depth is 7. Regenerate the model. Copy this protrusion translated from this surface Figure 59: The Modified Base 9.For University Use Only . Add another protrusion to cap of the base with the dimensions shown in Figure 60. Modify the dimensions of the motor part (delta_motor. Retrieve the motor part into session and examine the changes to the part.5.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 8. Figure 60: The Completed Base P ro j e c t L ab o rat o r y Pag e A.49 .

Erase the models from memory and exit from Pro/ENGINEER. Pag e A.5 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Finally. assembly. retrieve motor drawing and notice how the changes are reflected. Retrieve the motor assembly (or the delta_motor.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 10. Save the drawing.For University Use Only .asm) and examine the changes to the assembly. and parts by saving the assembly drawing.

Commercial Use Prohibited Appendix Using PTC. Objectives After completing this module. Obtain help while performing a task. including the innovative changes in this release of PTC Help.Help PTC is continuing its commitment to provide integral internet/intranet enhancements through the i-series of software products. Page B-1 . you will be able to: • • Start the PTC Help system.For University Use Only .

and search capabilities Full certification of Internet Explorer 4. For more information. which features thousands of Suggested Techniques. 2. index. To Get Help on Tasks in a Dialog Box 1. PTC Help Features PTC Help offers: • • • • • A new help system with an integrated table of contents. PTC Help can be installed on a Web server.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES PTC HELP OVERVIEW PTC Help is integrated with fully functional. allowing access to PTC Help with a click of the mouse Expanded context-sensitive help in dialog boxes Also. thus reducing network traffic and enabling a LAN/WAN configuration. It is easy to locate a desired topic. Click on the right end of the main Pro/ENGINEER toolbar. please visit the PTC Technical Support Online Knowledge Database . Pag e B. highly flexible CAD/CAM and Data Management software available from PTC.For University Use Only .2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . allowing Web clients to access PTC Help without having direct mounts to file server machines.06 Web server installation capabilities Full context-sensitive help.0 and Netscape 4. The navigational topic contains a list of links to Help topics about tasks that you perform in the dialog box. Click anywhere inside the dialog box. You can get Help on your current task when you are working in a dialog box or with a menu by using one of the following three procedures. USING THE PRO/ENGINEER HELP SYSTEM The Pro/ENGINEER Help System (also called PTC Help) provides you with help topics that give you the information you need while you work. A navigational topic opens in a Help window. see the Technical Support Appendix.

Click the topic you want to read. The navigational topic contains a list of links to Help topics about that command. To Get Help on Commands on Vertical Menus 1. Figure 1 Staring PTC Help Usin g PT C. 2. 4. Click on the right end of the main Pro/ENGINEER toolbar.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 3. A navigational topic opens in a Help window. Click Back on the browser toolbar to return to the navigational topic and choose another topic. 3. To Get Help on Commands on the Pro/ENGINEER Menu Bar 1. Click a menu command. Click the topic you want to read. Help Pag e B. 2. GETTING HELP THROUGH THE PTC HELP SIDEBAR With the PTC Help Sidebar. 1. The navigational topic contains a list of links to Help topics about the command. Click a menu command with the right mouse button and hold the button down until the GetHelp window appears. A navigational topic opens in a Help window. you can browse the Contents or Index of the PTC Help System and get help anytime you are using Pro/ENGINEER. click Help > Pro/E Help System to display the Help home page (Figure 1). On the Pro/ENGINEER menu bar.3 .For University Use Only . Point to GetHelp and then release the mouse button.

Tooling Pro/CMM Using Additional Modules. Behavioral Modeling Extension Part Modeling Pro/ENGINEER Foundation Pro/ASSEMBLY Using Additional Modules. Advanced Surface Extension Pro/DETAIL Using Foundation Modules Pag e B. PTC HELP MODULE LIST There are four main branches in the PTC Help table of contents: Welcome. Click Contents to browse Help topics by functional area. Computer Aided Verification Pro/COMPOSITE Using Additional Modules. Machining Import Data Doctor Using Foundation Modules Mechanism Design Using Additional Modules. Consult the following list to find a particular module in the table of contents: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Associative Topology Bus-CADDS 5 Using Foundation Modules Associative Topology Bus-ICEM Using Foundation Modules Basic Assembly Using Foundation Modules Behavioral Modeler Using Additional Modules.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES 2. Advanced Pro/ASSEMBLY Extension Pro/CABLING Using Additional Modules.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . and Using Additional Modules. Behavioral Modeling Extension Configuration File Options Pro/ENGINEER Foundation Core Pro/ENGINEER Foundation Design Animation Using Additional Modules. or Search to find topics in both the Contents and the Index that match a word or phrase. Using Foundation Modules. Routed Options Pro/CASTING Using Additional Modules. Pro/ENGINEER Foundation. Behavioral Modeling Extension Expert Machinist Using Additional Modules. Index to view Help keywords for a specific domain.

Routed Options Pro/PROCESS for ASSEMBLIES Using Additional Modules. Tooling Pro/NC Using Additional Modules. Routed Options Pro/DIEFACE Using Additional Modules. Advanced Surface Extension Pro/VERIFY Using Additional Modules. Help Pag e B. Machining Pro/PHOTORENDER Using Foundation Modules Pro/PIPING Using Additional Modules. Advanced Pro/ASSEMBLY Extension Pro/PROCESS for MFG Using Additional Modules. Tooling Pro/ECAD Using Foundation Modules Pro/HARNESS-MFG Using Additional Modules. Computer Aided Verification Pro/WELDING Using Foundation Modules Sketcher Pro/ENGINEER Foundation Usin g PT C. Machining Pro/NC-SHEETMETAL Using Additional Modules.5 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Pro/DIAGRAM Using Additional Modules.For University Use Only . Routed Options Pro/INTERFACE Using Foundation Modules Pro/LEGACY Using Foundation Modules Pro/MOLDESIGN Using Additional Modules. Machining Pro/PROGRAM Using Foundation Modules Pro/REPORT Using Foundation Modules Pro/REVIEW Using Foundation Modules Pro/SCAN-TOOLS Using Additional Modules. Advanced Surface Extension Pro/SHEETMETAL Design Using Foundation Modules Pro/SURFACE Using Additional Modules.

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we also have Internet-based offerings that are designed to fit a customer’s individual needs. Through continuous improvement and our Quality Monitoring program. we have demonstrated our commitment to service by achieving Global ISO 9000 Certification for our Technical Support offerings. Page C-1 . Navigate the Knowledge Base. PTC Global Services is committed to continually improving service to our customers. you will be able to: • • • • Open a Technical Support Call. In addition to our telephonebased Technical Support. Objectives After completing this module.For University Use Only . We strongly believe that our commitment to support is unmatched in the industry. leveraging the Internet to provide availability on a 24 x 7 basis.Commercial Use Prohibited Appendix PTC Global Services: Technical Support PTC Global Services is committed to making the best possible resources available for customers. Register for on-line Technical Support. Locate contact numbers for support and services.

com/cs/doc/copen.com.For University Use Only . Germany. France.ptc.K.com or go directly to http://www.com/support/support.htm. Pag e C. U..Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES FINDING THE TECHNICAL SUPPORT PAGE Choose Support from the PTC Home Page http://www..support@rand.ptc.2 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . Please use the following format (or download the template from http://www.ptc. Singapore. OPENING A TECHNICAL SUPPORT CALL Opening a call via email PTC Customers Send email to cs_ptc@ptc.htm): FNAME: LNAME: FirstName LastName U. send your questions to tech.com with copen as the subject of the email. or CALLCENTER: Tokyo PHONE: CONFIG_ID: PRODUCT: MODULE: PRIORITY: DESC_BEGIN: description starts NNN NNN-NNNN x-NNNN NNNNNN X XX X description continues description ends DESC_END Rand Customers To open calls by email with RAND.S.

com/support/cs_guide/additional. by using the Pro/CALL LOGGER This application provides easy to follow instructions and returns a call number immediately upon submission of all information. visit the Rand Customer Service Web site at www. Sending Data to Technical Support If you want to send data to Technical Support please follow the instructions on the external PTC Web site http://www. The Technical Support Engineer will ask you for the following information to log a call: • • • • PTC Software Configuration ID Your name and telephone number PTC Product (module) name Priority of the issue Opening Calls on the PTC Web Site You can use the PTC Web site www.htm. For secure data you can request a Non-Disclosure agreement template from the Technical Support Engineer.ptc.com/support to open Technical Support calls 24 hours a day.rand. PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C. 7 days a week. To open calls through the Web with RAND.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Opening a Call via Telephone PTC Customers Call us directly by phone (refer to the Contact Information page for your Local Technical Support Center).For University Use Only .3 .com/cust_serv.ptc. When the call is resolved your data will be deleted by the Technical Support Engineer and will not be divulged to any third party vendors under any circumstances.

Support Engineer Update CD to customer Figure 1: Call / SPR Flow Chart Call Priorities: • • • • • Extremely Critical Critical Urgent – Work stopped – Work severely impacted – Work impacted Not Critical General Information Pag e C.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES CALL / SPR FLOW CHART AND PRIORITIES Call Customer question Telephone Call Web Call Tech SupportEngineer creates a call in the database Call is automatically created in the database Investigation Call Back and Investigation Support Engineer solves issue or reports it to Development (SPR) SPR Software Performance Report SPR fixed from Development Software Performance Report (SPR) SPR Verification through Tech.4 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only .

to open the registration form and enter your Configuration ID.com/support and click Sign-up Online .5 . Medium REGISTERING FOR ON-LINE SUPPORT Go to www. Pro/ENGINEER . High – Software issue that does not affect immediate work or a practical alternative technique is available.ptc. PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C.For University Use Only . Complete the information needed to identify yourself as a user with your personal details. To find the Configuration ID in Pro/ENGINEER.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Software Performance Report Priorities • • • Top Priority – Highly critical software issue that is causing a work stoppage. – Critical software issue that affects immediate work and a practical alternative technique is not available. Figure 2: On Line Support Registration Please write down your username and password for future reference. click Help > About for example.

the Technical Support Engineer assigned to your call will be notified automatically. FINDING SOLUTIONS IN THE KNOWLEDGE BASE The Technical Support Knowledge Base contains over 18. Technical Application Notes TAN. Figure 3: On line Service Options You can search our Knowledge Base using a Search-Engine.000 documents. Frequently Asked Questions FAQs and Suggested Techniques offer up-to-date information about all relevant software areas. If you add a comment. contact information such as the customer feedback line and electronic order of software and manuals are available. Our Online Support Applications controls the status of Calls (Call Tracker) and SPRs (SPR Tracker) and adds comments to these. Technical Point of Interest TPI. Limit the search by entering the PTC product/module and the search string. which are updated by our engineers. The Software Update Tool allows you to request the newest software updates for any PTC product. All FAQs and Suggested Techniques are translated in French and German.6 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only . Pag e C. Additionally.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES ONLINE SERVICES After you have registered you will have full access to all Online Tools.

For University Use Only . on how to use PTC software to complete common tasks.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Figure 4: Searching the Knowledge Database Definitions: TAN – Technical Application Note provides information about SPRs that may affect more than just the customer originally reporting an issue. FAQ PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C. TPIs are created by Technical Support to document the resolution of common issues reported in actual customer calls. Suggested Techniques – Frequently Asked Questions provides answers to many of the most commonly asked questions compiled from the PTC Technical Support database. TPI – Provides step-by-step instructions including screen snapshots. TANs also may provide alternative techniques to allow a user to continue working. – Technical Point of Interest provides additional technical information about a software product. but do not reference an SPR.7 . TPIs are similar to TANs.

8 In t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .htm Pag e C.com/support. go to www. this can help you by upgrading to a new PTC product or to a new release. 1.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES GETTING UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION To subscribe to our email service the Knowledge Base Monitor.com/webtracker/CustomerServicesWorldwide.ptc.rand. Click Technical Support > Online Support Applications > Knowledge Base Monitor . Figure 5: Knowledge Base Monitor Sign Up CONTACT INFORMATION Internet Rand Customers Rand Worldwide customers can visit the following Web site for phone numbers: http://rock.For University Use Only . 3. 2. Select the PTC product/module for which you want to get information. You will then receive a daily email with update information.

ptc. E-mail: • Phone: cs-feedback@ptc.Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES PTC Customers PTC Technical Support Worldwide Electronic Services These services are available seven days a week. Europe.com Technical Support Customer Feedback Line The Customer Feedback Line is intended for general customer service concerns that are not technical product issues. URL: • • E-mail: http://www.ptc. PTC has nine integrated Technical Support Call Centers in North America.ptc. or the Technical Support line as listed in the Phone and Fax Information sections below.com/cs/doc/feedback_nums.com/company/contacts/edserv. PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C.htm (Education) • • FTP: cs_ptc@ptc.com Numbers are listed at: http://www. and Asia.htm (Support) http://www.htm • Telephone For assistance with technical issues.com (for opening calls and sending data) cs-webmaster@ptc. 24 hours a day.com/support/index. contact the Electronic Services noted in the previous section.9 .For University Use Only . Our worldwide coverage ensures telephone access to Technical Support for customers in all time zones and in local languages.ptc.com (for comments/suggestions on CS Web site) • ftp.

and Documentation Requests): Within the U.For University Use Only .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES North America Phone Information Customer Services (including Technical Support.: • 800-477-6435 Outside the U.: • • 781-894-5332 781-894-5513 Maintenance: • 888-782-3774 Education: • 888-782-3773 EUROPE Phone Information Technical Support Phone Numbers: Austria Belgium Denmark Finland France Germany Germany) Ireland Israel Italy Luxembourg 1-800-409-1622 1-800-945-42-95 (All languages including Hebrew) 177-150-21-34 (English only) 800-79-05-33 0800-23-50 0800 29 7542 0800-15-241 (French support) 0800-72567 (Dutch support) 8001-5593 0800-117092 0800-14-19-52 0180-2245132 49-89-32106-111 (for Pro/MECHANICA® outside of Pag e C.1 0 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R . License Management.S.S.

For University Use Only .11 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Netherlands Norway Portugal South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland 0800022-4519 8001-1872 05-05-33-73-69 0800-991068 900-95-33-39 020-791484 0800-55-38-33 (French support) 0800-83-75-58 (Italian support) 0800-552428 (German support) United Kingdom 0800-318677 License Management Phone Numbers: Belgium Denmark Finland France Germany Ireland Italy Netherlands Norway Portugal Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom 0800-75376 8001-5593 0800-117-092 0800-14-19-52 49 (0) 89-32106-0 1800-409-1622 39 (0) 39-65651 0800-022-0543 8001-1872 05-05-33-73-69 900-95-33-39 020-791484 41 (0) 1-8-24-34-44 0800-31-8677 Russia/Eastern Europe 44 1252 817 078 Education Services Phone Numbers: Benelux France Germany Italy 31-73-644-2705 33-1-69-33-65-50 49 (0) 89-32106-325 39-039-65-65-652 39-039-6565-1 PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C.

Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES Spain/Portugal Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom 34-91-452-01-00 46-8-590-956-00 (Malmo) 46-8-590-956-46 (Upplands Vasby) 41 (0) 1-820-00-80 44-0800-212-565 (toll free within UK) 44-1252-817-140 Asia and Pacific Rim Phone Information Technical Support Phone Numbers: Australia China* Hong Kong India* Indonesia Japan Malaysia New Zealand Philippines Singapore South Korea Taiwan Thailand the respective string: China India Center. MTF8309729 MTF8309752 1800-553-565 10800-650-8185 (international toll free) 108-657 (manual toll free) 800-933309 000-6517 001-803-65-7250 97-2-48-55-00-35 0120-20-9023 1-800-80-1026 0800-44-4376 1800-1-651-0176 65-830-9899 00798-65-1-7078 (international toll free) 080-3469-001 (domestic toll free) 0080-65-1256 (international toll free) 080-013069 (domestic toll free) 001-800-65-6213 *Note: Callers dialing from India or China must provide the operator with The operator will then connect you to the Singapore Technical Support Pag e C.1 2 I n t r o d u c t i o n t o P ro / EN G I N E E R .For University Use Only .

13 .Commercial Use Prohibited NOTES License Management Phone Numbers Japan Hong Kong 81 (0) 3-3346-8280 (852) 2802-8982 Education Services Phone Numbers Australia China 61 2 9955 2833 (Sydney) 61 3 9561 4111 (Melbourne) 86-20-87554426 (GuangZhou) 86-21-62785080 (Shanghai) 86-10-65908699 (Beijing) Hong Kong India 852-28028982 91-80-2267272 Ext.For University Use Only .#306 (Bangalore) 91-11-6474701 (New Delhi) 91-226513152 (Mumbai) Japan Malaysia Singapore South Korea Taiwan 81-3-3346-8268 03-754 8198 65-8309866 82-2-3469-1080 886-2-758-8600 (Taipei) 886-4-3103311 (Taichung) 886-7-3323211 (Kaohsiung) ELECTRONIC SERVICES Up-to-Date + Information Worldwide ISO 9000 Certification Quality Control System = Maximum Productivity with PTC Products PT C Globa l Se rvic es: T echn ica l Suppo rt Pag e C.

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