P. 1
Dave's World; Alice's World

Dave's World; Alice's World

|Views: 40|Likes:
Published by goatkeeper
Why couldn't Dave's world and Alice's world live together, just for one beautiful afternoon?
Why couldn't Dave's world and Alice's world live together, just for one beautiful afternoon?

More info:

Published by: goatkeeper on Sep 30, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as ODT, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/19/2013

pdf

text

original

By Goatkeeper

              

       

Dave's World; Alice's World

                                               

Dave Powell's world was not Alice Caulkins' world. Even Dave’s 
wife Gail often said, “Hello! Dave! The real world, please. Where are  you?” But Alice Caulkins understood the real world. That's why she  had bought this property on the shore of Echo Lake. Her parents had  owned a summerhouse not far up the road. Alice had dreamed of owning  a similar house. She was at the same time fulfilling a childhood  dream as becoming a woman of property.  Alice and her husband Charlie had been lucky in their lives. He 

Paul Gigas

*******1

By Goatkeeper

had made good money in the car business. Charlie knew a thing or two.  But Dave Powell knew Joe Noyse and Jim Willis. Dave stayed up all  night with the mad.

 According to Dave Joe was less crazy than Jim. Joe bit and  scratched, while Jim preferred hitting. But their usual natures were  to act good. Dave was perplexed about what they expected to  accomplish when they fought. Though not exactly mute, neither of them  could speak very well. But the normal peoples' world involved sturm  und drang, why shouldn't the crazy peoples' world?  Most of the time Joe and Jim, both handsome young men, just acted  peculiar. Dave loved to take them out to show them off to the normal  world. If the boys expected something good to happen to them, Dave  thought that they acted better. Dave would take them to Walmart or  the mall or to the beach or the zoo. On a nice day he liked to take  them to the beach. Dave had never seen anyone act mean toward them.  Dave was convinced that the boys had a lot to offer the world.   Dave was working that Sunday with Tonya West. Tonya, a very  pretty young woman, wore a thong under tight jeans. Her eyes were a  perfectly clear blue azure, the color of the sky around mountains on  a clear, cold day. Sometimes she looked upwards and her eyes iced  over, as if she were wearing contacts, and the light was crossing  over the contacts. But she didn't wear contacts. Her life was mixed  up. She dreamed about Victoria's Secret underwear, tattoos and  piercings, but never got any. Dave thought that she must have too  many boyfriends. In Dave's world people hauled out the heavy  emotional iron because they possessed too much of a thing that they 

Paul Gigas

*******2

By Goatkeeper

might be better off with just a little of.  On this day in early August, high puffy clouds floated across a  spacious blue vault, and the mild wind was pleasing, and the sunlight  seemed to pour into you. The woods around Joe and Jim’s house on the  Bellville Ridge Road that morning was sun splashed and pristine. The  boys ran outside before breakfast and stood barefoot in the dew. They  rolled their eyeballs as if wondering what could be happening. Dave  thought they might be sick.  After breakfast Dave debated out loud whether the boys might like  to go to the beach today. They jumped into their swimsuits and then  they were waiting patiently beside the van while Dave and Tonya  packed up meds and the lunches.  But where were the passes into Bean River, the state park they  usually went to. The house manager told Tonya on the phone that the  passes must be in the top drawer of her desk. Tonya told Dave she  must be in bed with somebody doing something. Dave had an idea of  another place to go. But they were supposed to have a pass to Bean  River.  As they drove along, Joe kept sticking his big strong nose and  angular head out the window. He loved to feel the wind on his face.  Joe knew how to run the switch to lower the window, so it was  hopeless to fight with him. Meanwhile, Jim placidly observed the  world pass and he made soft, happy grumbles. Once Jim punched the  back of the seat because he thought they were going to Bean River and  Dave must be lost again. Dave turned around briefly in the driver’s  seat and explained to Jim that they weren’t going to Bean River but  to another place he’d like as well as Bean River. Dave could drive  Joe anywhere and he was always happy.  Dave thought that this beach on Echo Lake, where he used to bring 

Paul Gigas

*******3

By Goatkeeper

his own children, was still the town beach. How could Dave know that  it was now Alice Caulkins' Beach? Facts like that didn’t latch onto  Dave’s world very easily. The road widened out in front of the beach,  and there was a wide shoulder where Dave pulled over the van and  parked. Dave didn't notice the No Trespassing sign leaning against a  big tree. But Dave knew that the beach was down a mild slope from the  road, and the sand on the beach was a loose pale white, and the water  got deeper very gradually, and it was a fine beach to bring Jim and  Joe to.  Right away Joe waded into the water to his waist. He stood in the  warm water cooing and screeching happily. Jim sat down and started  digging in the sand with his toy shovel. As he dug, he snorted,  tossing back sand, some of which landed on his head. When his head  was all covered with muddy sand, he grinned from ear to ear and  barked loudly. Joe was in the water waving his arms in the sun. Dave  thought that it was great to see the boys acting so well.

When Alice Caulkins saw them coming down toward the beach and  ensconcing themselves there, she was very annoyed. This had not  happened lately, and she had imagined that the matter had been  settled. This beach was now a private beach, Alice's Beach. She was  further displeased when she noticed that they must be mental  patients, or something. Of all the places they could go, they would  have to end up in her back yard! And today Gretchen was coming down  from Portland with her latest husband and that bunch, and Alice’s son  Barry and Stella his wife and their kids, besides Alice’s two  daughters, Cheryl and husband, and Geraldine, a TV news anchorwoman, 

Paul Gigas

*******4

By Goatkeeper

who had not got married yet. Charlie was planning on setting up the  grill to cook dinner on the beach.  Charlie was polishing the boat. It was his chief happiness in  life. Alice pointed them out to him. Charlie shrugged and yawned and  rubbed in another puff of spray polish.  “What’s a few more?” He asked. Then he added, “On a beautiful day  like this.”  Alice watched them.  Those poor people had not been lucky in life, to put it mildly,  and she became disturbed. She did not see why she had to put up with  them at that moment with family coming, children and grandchildren,  and Geraldine, a professional woman, who had to be very careful whom  she was seen with. But not to get too excited about it, they seemed  to be having a good time in a harmlessly peculiar way. It would be a  while before anybody started to arrive. Perhaps she could hint to  them that they eventually must leave.  “Alice,” Charlie called, looking up to observe her striding off  the dock. “What now?”  “Oh just to remind them, that’s all.”  “Oh,” he grunted. “No hurry.”  “I know.”

Dave Powell stepped back from the water, and he sat down on a  nearby log. The hillside yonder across the lake was dappled with  green pastures and orchards. Some of the pastures were grown up in  corn. And the farm buildings far away looked fine and neat. Dave knew  some trim and well kept barns. He liked to do barn work part time. To 

Paul Gigas

*******5

By Goatkeeper

be in a warm barn on a cold winter morning before dawn and the cows  full of milk was good and happy work. So he was happy with good and  happy thoughts, but he could feel behind him a woman cruising, and  suddenly she was beside him.  She was a nice looking woman for being on in years. She was  dressed in a modest looking swimsuit. She looked strong and had  successfully kept the weight off. Dave stood up. She was tall. Her  breasts under the swimsuit top were perfectly oval. Dave wondered  about her breasts. Her face was fine and delicately pretty, but she  wore odd, white rimmed dark glasses. Dave thought her nose had been  fixed, too. She was tall enough so that when she tilted her head back  he could almost look up her nostrils. Her lips were parted and showed  even rows of white teeth, but she was not smiling.  "Hi," she said. “Where are you from?”  “Oh, down the road,” Dave said. Maybe he really didn’t want to  get into it, because if this were Peru town beach, which was what he  still thought, and he and the boys were from Bellville, they might  not be appreciated here, although he couldn’t remember a time when  anybody had cared.  “I don’t know if you know,” says Alice, “but this is my property  now. It doesn’t belong to the town any more. The town sold it to me.”  “Really,” Dave said.  “Yes. We’ve had a rough time. The people can’t get it into their  heads that the town doesn’t own this beach any more. They’ve trashed  our dock and they stole gasoline out of our shed.”  “That’s not good,” Dave agreed.  “Whose are those?” She said, nodding at Joe and Jim.  Jim had mud plastered all over his head by now, and Joe stood in  the water screeching and waving his arms in the sun.

Paul Gigas

*******6

By Goatkeeper

 “Oh, those are my boys,” Dave said, grinning. “And that’s my  wife, Pollyanna.”  Tonya, hearing this between Jim’s snorts, suddenly smiled  brilliantly.  Alice was studying Joe and Jim. Her exhausted fingertips took a  nap on her hips.  Alice’s dark glasses got a moist film on them.  “I’m sorry, but you have to leave,” Alice said. “But you can stay  till they are finished, then you have to leave.”  “Okay,” Dave said.  Then with a little groan of frustration Alice went away. She went  up through the pine trees and stopped on the dock to sit with Charlie  beside the speedboat. Charlie wore shorts which showed off powerful  legs. The speedboat was loaded with two powerful outboard engines.  Dave Powell thought the outboards looked like artillery pieces.  Then Dave observed the rest of the family was starting to arrive.  Soon little, healthy normal kids were running around. Jim caught  sight of the youngsters and he immediately wanted to play. Jim was  smiling at the kids gleefully. He had a soft heart for little kids  and he liked to help them dig in the sand. He could show them how to  dig a big hole. But kids were herded onto the dock, and kids and  grownups gathered in the protection of the outboards. Dave smiled at  them wistfully.

So Gretchen had arrived, and she was really enjoying herself. That  was clear to Alice. Gretchen’s mouth was infected with an ironic  grin, and she had never tried to get that nose straightened out. 

Paul Gigas

*******7

By Goatkeeper

Gretchen would swim naked. Actually take off all her clothes and swim  naked, when the lake was dark.  Gretchen used to call Alice “Queenie”. “Now Gretch,” Dad would  say, “she don’t have a tiara, does she?”  Hank, Gretchen’s oldest daughter by her first marriage to Mike  Wheeler, who had been in the construction business, was the absolute  spitting image of her mother: all scrawny body, sway and jump, big  ears sticking out of straight blond hair, and bumpy and crooked nose.  Hank was observing the situation in detail.   “Now what?” Hank said.  “We don’t know these people,” Alice said. “Stay up here for now.”  “But Auntie, I don’t want to. What’s the matter with them  anyway?”  Alice said, “They should be leaving soon.”  This put Gretchen into spasms of merriment. She shook her head  and laughed abruptly.  Alice thought, "who was that skinny little white haired bratty  man who seemed to be their leader? Damned him!"  Then young Joe Noyse ceased waving his arms and screeching happy  sounds and he was slowly wading in, and he waded in till he was in  water only knee deep, and he suddenly cocked his leg and peed a  solid, holy stream of yellow pee, his little wrinkled winky drooping  out the drawn up leg of his swimsuit, into the pure waters of Echo  Lake.  Alice exhaled a muffled scream.  The large family huddled behind the artillery pieces was now  mildly engaged.  Hank burst out laughing.  “Oh, Auntie, isn’t that sweet?” Hank said.

Paul Gigas

*******8

By Goatkeeper

 “I think not,” Alice said.  “Auntie, you don’t look well. You should sit down and take five  deep breaths.”  “Hanky,” Gretchen said. “Leave it.”  Alice Caulkins had put over her swim suit top a filmy, gauzy  blouse. She was a soldier now. The blouse fluttered behind her as she  raced off the dock. She went down toward those people, she prancing  through the trees, her dark glasses steaming.  Having arrived beside Dave, she said, “That’s it. You have to  leave.”  “Really!”  “Yes. There are children here, and this is impossible.”  “Well,” Dave said, nodding toward Tonya, “you’ll have to talk to  her. She’s the boss.”  So the woman hiked down to Tonya and Jim, gauzy blouse fluttering  out flat behind her like a flag to the winds of battle.  Eyes widening, Tonya slipped in front of Jim like a infantryman  defending all that is holy.  “You’re the boss?” Alice said. “I was just telling him…”  “He’s joking you. He’s a big joker.”  Jim, anxious to make a new acquaintance, looked at Alice merrily.  Jim loved people and cookies. He loved having plenty of both in his  life. “Ho!” He shouted, waving his arms and hopping on one leg.  “Oh,” the woman said. Suddenly doubtful about standing too close  to Jim, she turned and came back toward Dave. She said to Dave  grimly, “You’re hilarious.”  Dave was convinced that the boys brought everywhere they went  powerful meanings. But there is never enough time in everyday life  for philosophy. And that poor woman was in a big hurry.

Paul Gigas

*******9

By Goatkeeper

 “I’m sorry,” she said. “I have children. I have grandchildren and  this is my property. I cannot have those two around. You must leave.”  “Why?” Dave was sincerely puzzled.  “Oh, for crying out loud,” Alice said, walking away.  Dave was unhappy that the woman was aggravated by time. Joe and  Jim do not know very much about time because time is what normal  people do. Joe and Jim had their madness, and madness to the mad is  like time to normal people: a load and inevitability.  While Dave waded toward Joe, who had returned into the waist deep  water, Dave worried that this might not be pretty. He tried not to  seem in a hurry; he lied to Joe that they were going to another  place. Dave hated to lie, but the woman was watching. Dave pushed  gently, Joe pushed back, but Dave pushed again anyway. Slowly Joe  turned and began to walk out of the water. But Joe was crying as Dave  led him up to the van. Dave was amazed that Joe didn’t fight. Joe was  bawling as Dave strapped him in the van. Jim, still standing down by  the water, tried to slug Tonya. Then Jim sat down on the beach, and  Dave went down to help her pick him up. Once Jim was turned around  toward the van, he didn’t try to slug anyone any more, though he  started bawling too. In the van both Joe and Jim were bawling.  Now Tonya was staring at the world through icy eyes. “Shit, I  feel lousy,” she said. “I don’t know where.”  She got out of the van and began to throw up.  “Throw up!” Jim shouted. Jim knew about ten words to speak  clearly. Throw up was one of his favorite signs.  Leaning out the window, Joe honked loudly. He liked throw up,  too.  Tonya hushed the boys by waving her hand at them.  Meanwhile, Alice Caulkins was striding across her beach, but she 

Paul Gigas

*******10

By Goatkeeper

still seemed to be looking for something, as if to change her place  back to normal, sanctifying it from this aberration which had  happened.

The boys got Orange Soda with their pills and their lunch. The  soda cheered them up. Dave promised to try to get into Bean River.  One time he had managed to talk his way in without a pass. The  gatekeeper that day had a soft heart. During the ride the boys’ mood  seemed to improve. But the gatekeeper this day looked at Joe and Jim  and she was not impressed. She wore a game warden’s uniform. The  entrance fee was amazingly steep. Dave couldn't afford to take his  own family there any more.  On the drive home the boys were silent, rapt. The motion going on  outside used their attention. They don't want Dave to stop. But  sometimes bad luck happens. Dave wondered who thought enough of him  to give him this responsibility over the mad because on a really bad  day there might not be hardly any difference at all between him and  them.   “Shit. What’s gonna happen?” Tonya said.    “Don’t know,” he said, and he truly didn’t. After all these  years up all night with the mad, Dave thought that he ought to have  learned something for sure.   Dave pulled into the driveway and parked. Then he and Tonya stood  aside and waited. Joe wandered across the lawn and sat under a tree;  he bounced his soccer ball against his forehead and caught it. But  Jim went inside the house and started on his toys. At first he seemed  content to tear apart his toys. Then he got interested in the 

Paul Gigas

*******11

By Goatkeeper

television and the living room furniture. Tonya got too close and got  slammed by the back of a fist to the jaw. She groaned and wandered  away, rubbing her jaw. She always has a very quiet voice. It is a  skill she has inculcated in herself.  She said, “Jim this is not appropriate. You should not hit. It is  bad to hit.”  Dave thought that Jim should not get away with these outbursts.  Dave and Tonya restrained Jim. They gave up trying to be sweet about  it. Jim stopped and sat down on his butt, and he didn’t do anything  bad any more.  Tonya had a swelling under her right eye that was turning black  and blue. Joe had come inside, and Jim was sitting on the floor  listening to “The Lion King”.   Tonya started to cook supper while Dave washed up the boys. Jim  had soiled himself. Tonya ignored her bruise.  Dave said, “What did you think of that woman?”  “I don’t know,” she said. “I don’t think I would have done it.”  “I’ve never seen anybody do that before,” Dave said. “I mean, I  don't think I have.”  “Maybe.”  “Why? Have you?”  “No. I don’t think so.”  “But then, what do I know?” Dave said. “I don’t own anything. I  never had any money to buy anything with.”  “Me neither. I can understand, I guess. If I did own something.  Maybe.”  “But you wouldn’t have done it, right?”  “No,” she said slowly. “I don’t think so.”  “I don’t think that woman understood.”

Paul Gigas

*******12

By Goatkeeper

 “People have their property, Dave.”  “I know. I guess so. But I still wouldn’t have done it.”  Now Joe and Jim were quiet. They loved to eat, and they were  waiting for supper. If there could be supper all the time, the mad  would have less time to be mad. After supper it got hectic. Both Joe  and Jim were acting very badly. Night relief came in in the middle of  it. Nobody knew for sure what anybody was thinking by then. 

Alice sat on the dock till almost midnight. She remembered how the  summerhouse had been when she was growing up. She could not remember  when her parents had bought it. When she and Gretchen graduated from  college and were out on their own, her parents sold it. She  remembered very well leaving it for the last time. The evening was tepid and mild. The boat, rustled by the small  waves, softly scraped against the dock. The moon and stars were  bright enough in the clear sky to cast a shadowy light. The afternoon  also had been fine, finally, after those people had gone away. The  occurrence had certainly not been happy, but nobody had mentioned it.  After eating they had all tried water skiing. Then Charlie drove the  boat around the lake, giving everybody a ride. Alice's family had  looked toward her for leadership. The crazy peoples' shadows were  still in the trees. Alice thought wryly, "Maybe holy water would do."  She seemed to remember a better time when those sorts of people were  not around. Charlie came down and encouraged her to come inside into the  camper. He lay down and in thirty seconds he was snoring gently. It 

Paul Gigas

*******13

By Goatkeeper

took Alice a long time to go to sleep that night. This was Alice's  world.

Dave Powell forgot about Alice's Beach. The boys had settled down  before bed time. He told them the story of the little train that  could. "Whoo, whoo," they shouted. "Chuga, chuga, chuga," Dave said.  They had both been due for a big blow any way. Besides, Monday  morning he went over to Don Brice's dairy to help with the barn work.  Don's barn was big and well kept, and the cows were languid and fat.  He was happy just thinking about it. This was Dave's world.  

Paul Gigas

*******14

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->