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Mac Ubuntu Dual Boot

Mac Ubuntu Dual Boot

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Dual Boot Mac + Linux

Really Easy Installing Ubuntu alongside OS X (Dual Boot, no rEFIt)
Edit by techflat Idea taken from http://www.isriya.com/node/1804/ubuntu-on-macbook-air-~

Note: This worked under OS X Leopard, it could work on Tiger but I haven't tried that. The site from where the idea was taken talked about installing Ubuntu on a MacBook Air but it made sense and the installation seemed very easy and straight forward. After trying the suggestion, it worked fine. The installation was made on a system with OS X Leopard already installed and up to date. Because of the nature of the installation, I think it could work on all MacBook models and on all MacBook Pro models with Leopard installed. So, here are the steps: 1. Boot into OS X Leopard

2. Use BootCamp to partition the drive, the size depends on your needs but 10GB should be fine, 9 for the ext3 partition and 1 for the swap one. (There is a manual on how to use BootCamp to install Windows, the steps are very similar except the Windows install part, so if you need to know how to partition

the drive with BootCamp, this is a good resource: http:// manuals.info.apple.com/en/Boot_Camp_Install-Setup.pdf) 3. Restart the computer with Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop CD inserted (64-bit or 32-bit version), just when the computer starts keep pressed the C key (that's for booting from the CD). Stop pressing the key when the screen goes black. ~-(Strange behavior I got: Holding the key for too long made the keyboard and mousepad unresponsive) 4. Boot Into the live CD, Click on 'Install' icon on the desktop. Select the appropriate language, select 'Keyboard Layout' as 'Macintosh', select 'Manual' partitioning, then 'Forward'. 5. BootCamp will have created '/dev/sda3' which should be roughly the size of the partition you created. Write down the exact size of the partition and the size of the free space made by BootCamp because using this space left for your partitions "could harm" MacBook's partition table. Select 'dev/sda3' and delete it by clicking 'Delete Partition'. This should now be 'free space'. (Note: IF someone can verify that using the free space left by
BootCamp doesn't matter, please edit this part)

6. Select the 'free space' and click 'New Partition'. Set the size of the partition in wich Ubuntu will be installed leaving the free space for the swap partition if needed plus the free space that you wrote down before. Set the formatting to occur at the end. Format it as an 'ext3' type partition and set the 'Mount Point' to '/'. Click OK. (Note: After finishing partitioning, the free space left by
BootCamp should be the same)

7. Select the free space and click 'New Partition'. Format it as a 'swap' type partition and select the size needed. Set the formatting to occur at the end. Click OK. (Note: After finishing
partitioning, the free space left by BootCamp should be the same)

8. Now click 'Forward'. 9. Set your user settings and click 'Forward'. Click 'OK', and 'Install'. 10. When installation is complete, reboot. Important: When using this method, Ubuntu will not be selected by default on boot. Nor it will be selectable by default; that means that if you don't press anything, the computer will boot on OS X Leopard. To be able to select wich system to use at boot, just after the system starts, keep pressed the Option (Alt) key, then, two images will appear, representing both OS' installed; select the one you need to use. The image called Windows is Ubuntu, a small price for an easy install. For more information on installing specific components, take a look at the menu on top of the page.

Installing Ubuntu alongside OS X (Dual Boot)

Note: This is for a MacBook Pro with OS X already installed 1. Install the rEFIt Boot Menu from (http://refit.sf.net). 2. Use BootCamp to partition the drive (if using Tiger, don't bother burning a Windows boot CD; if using Leopard, it won't ask you). 3. Restart the computer with Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop CD inserted (64-bit or 32-bit version). rEFIT should recognize the CD and

give you option to "boot Linux from CD". Scroll to this option using the down arrow or click on it with your mouse. 4. Boot Into the live CD, Click on 'Install' icon on the desktop. Select the appropriate language, select 'Keyboard Layout' as 'Macintosh', select 'Manual' partitioning, then 'Forward'. 5. BootCamp will have created '/dev/sda3' which should be roughly the size of the partition you created. Select 'dev/sda3' and delete it by clicking 'Delete Partition'. This should now be 'free space'. 6. Select the 'free space' and click 'New Partition'. Set the size to approximately 1 GB less than the total amount of free space. Format it as an 'ext3' type partition and set the 'Mount Point' to '/'. Set the formatting to occur at the beginning. Click OK. 7. This should leave approximately 1 GB of free space. Select this free space and click 'New Partition'. Format it as a 'swap' type partition. Set the formatting to occur at the beginning. Click OK. 8. Now click 'Forward'. This will give some scary warnings about FAT 32 not being partitioned correctly. Click 'Ignore' and proceed with the install. After being prompted for a user and computer name, check to make sure that the formatting is occurring at partitions #3 and #4 and click 'Install'. 9. Set your user settings and click 'Forward'. Before installing, click on 'Advanced' and change '(hd0)' to '(hd0,3)' . Click 'OK', and 'Install'. 10. When installation is complete, reboot into Ubuntu Linux OS. Go to 'System' > 'Administration' > 'Software Sources'. In the 'Third-Party Software' tab, check them. In the 'Updates' tab, check 'Pre-releases Updates' and 'Unsupported Updates'. Click 'Close' and 'Reload'.

11. Go to 'System' > 'Administration' > 'Update Manager' hit 'Check', 'Install Updates' and restart. 12. Read the following Video section for choosing which video driver to use. To adjust Fans speed in OS X install: http://homepage.mac.com/ holtmann/eidac/software/smcfancontrol2/index.html To access Linux partition in OS X see: http://fuz2y.blogspot.com/ 2008/04/how-to-mount-ext3-partition-on-os-x.html

Preparing to Install Ubuntu alongside OS X & Windows Vista (Triple Boot)

Note: This is for a MacBook Pro with OS X & Windows Vista allready installed 1. Install the rEFIt Boot Menu from (http://refit.sf.net). Also to access Linux partition in Vista install 'Ext2 IFS': http:// www.fs-driver.org/download.html And to access OS X partition in Vista install 'Mac Drive': http:// www.mediafour.com/products/macdrive/ To ajust Fans speed in Vista install "inputremapper" before the leopard dvd drivers: http://www.olofsson.info/index.html? inputremapper.html

To ajust Fans speed in OS X install: http://homepage.mac.com/ holtmann/eidac/software/smcfancontrol2/index.html To access Linux partition in OS X see: http://fuz2y.blogspot.com/ 2008/04/how-to-mount-ext3-partition-on-os-x.html

Ubuntu Installation (Triple Boot - Vista)

1. Startup your laptop with Ubuntu Desktop CD inserted into the drive. 2. In rEFIt menu, choose to boot the Ubuntu CD. 3. Select English as the language to be used. 3. Select the 2nd option, the one that says : "Install Ubuntu" 4. After the loading, on the install screen, select the O.S. Language (English) and hit "Forward" button, then select your country location. 5. On the Keyboard layout, choose your keyboard language, and on the other window select the variant Macintosh (mine is Portugal Macintosh), and test the typing if you want. 6. On the "Prepare Disk Space" menu, select the 1st option: "Guided - Resize SCSI3 (0,1,0), Partition #3 (sda) and use Free Space", and with your mouse select the desired partition size (I set mine to 80% Windows Vista & 20% Ubuntu), and hit "Forward" button. 8. On "Migrate Documents and Settings" menu, just hit "Forward".

9. On "Ready to Install" menu, select "Advanced..." and select to install Grub boot loader to the last partition "/dev/sda4" and hit "OK" button, and then hit "Install" button to begin the installation process. 10. After the installation as finished, hit "Restart Now" button, it will exit the installer and eject your CDROM, then press "Enter" key to restart. After the reboot, select the Linux icon on rEFIt to boot into Ubuntu. 11. Don't forget not to install the ATI accelerated graphics drivers, that is auto-detected by Hardware Drivers application, we'll cover the installation of the latest and official ATI drivers on the next section. 6. Go to 'System' > 'Administration' > 'Software Sources' and check all boxes on the "Third party software", and also on the "Updates" tab. Then hit "Close" button to reload the sources. 7. Go to 'System' > 'Administration' > 'Update Manager' and check and install the new updates.

Preparing to Install Ubuntu alongside OS X & Windows XP (Triple Boot)

1 - Make sure you use Leopard and have it updated (10.5.2).

2 - Start BootCamp and create a partition for Windows XP (15G is enough). 3 - Don't install it through Bootcamp. 4 - Insert Windows CD and reboot holding C when you hear the beeping sound. 5 - Windows installation should start, follow the usual installation process of Windows. 6 - If it reboots during installation, you press ALT during reboot so that you can pick Windows installation. 7 - After Windows is installed, insert your Leopard DVD and it should install all your Apple drivers and stuff. 8 - Update your Apple Software (there will be an option on the start menu to do so). 9 - Update Windows XP.

Ubuntu Installation (Triple Boot - XP)

1 - Now that Windows is installed, get back to MacOS, we are going to install Linux now. 2 - Start Disk Utility and create a new partition on Machintosh HD, name it Linux

3 - Insert Linux CD and reboot holding C 4 - On Linux installation, delete the partition you created (Linux) because its HFS, and set it as ext3 and mount /. Don't need to create swap (I know its going to warn you, but ignore it). 5 - At the last step of setup, click advanced because you need to change where GRUB is going to be installed, choose sdaX (which X is your Linux partition). 6 - Let it install Ubuntu. 7 - Get back to MacOS, install rEFIt, reboot and run the partition manager of rEFIt, which should take care of every detail of booting for each OS. 8 - Reboot and that's it.

Video

The following only applies to the 1st and 2nd Generation MacBook Pro models. If you are using a 3rd Generation MacBook Pro (Santa Rosa), see MacBookPro SantaRosa Guide. You have 4 choices for the video driver: 1. The default vesa driver, which is automatically installed

2. The fglrx driver, ATI Proprietary, which is automatically detected in the Hardware Drivers and installs if selected, supports 3D acceleration, but note that it is not the most recent version 3. The most recent fglrx driver, ATI Proprietary, witch fully supports 3D acceleration, we'll cover the manual installation procedure ahead 4. The open source radeonhd driver, the current version does not support 3D acceleration, that will also be covered the manual installation procedure ahead To disable auto screen brightness buggy adjustments, go to System > Preferences > Power Management > General Tab > at the Extras, and uncheck the "Use ambient light to ajust LCD brightness" option.

3. fglrx (ATI Proprietary)
Using Synaptic, completely remove any packages containing "fglrx" in their name. If using 64bit make sure to collect package "ia32-libs" and " libGL.so.1" before proceeding! 3.1. If running 64-bit Ubuntu, do this:

sudo apt-get install ia32-libs libGL.so.1

3.2. To install latest ATI driver (ATI 8.4 / FGLRX 8.47.6) with 3D acceleration support do this:

cd ~/Desktop mkdir ATI cd ATI sudo apt-get update sudo rm /usr/src/fglrx-kernel*.deb sudo apt-get install build-essential fakeroot dh-make debhelper debconf libstdc++5 dkms linux-headers-$(uname -r) wget -c --no-check-certificate https://a248.e.akamai.net/f/ 674/9206/0/www2.ati.com/drivers/linux/ati-driver-installer-8-4x86.x86_64.run sudo sh ati-driver-installer-8-4-x86.x86_64.run --buildpkg Ubuntu --autopkg gksu gedit /etc/default/linux-restricted-modules-common

3.3. Add "fglrx" to the line "DISABLED_MODULES" File: /etc/default/ linux-restricted-modules-common
DISABLED_MODULES="fglrx"

3.4. Install the new fglrx debs
sudo dpkg -i --force-overwrite xorg-driver-fglrx_8.476*.deb fglrx-kernel-source_8.476-0*.deb fglrx-amdcccle_8.476-0*.deb sudo apt-get install -f

3.5. Configure the driver:

Note: Before you carry out this step you must reboot your machine ( sudo shutdown -hr now ) Or else the fglrx driver will not be in use on xorg.conf and using the aticonfig options will cause a memory dump and not intialise the Driver properly.
sudo aticonfig --initial sudo aticonfig --overlay-type=Xv

Note: If configuring the driver fails, go to Step 3.9, and use my xorg.conf file 3.6. 3D desktop effects (Compiz Fusion)
sudo apt-get install git git-core compiz-dev compizconfigsettings-manager emerald fusion-icon

Go to System > Preferences > Sessions and add "fusion-icon" to the Startup 3.7. Restart again (sudo shutdown -hr now); CTRL+ALT+BACKSPACE wont work correctly! 3.8. Verifying
fglrxinfo

display: :0.0 screen: 0 OpenGL vendor string: ATI Technologies Inc. OpenGL renderer string: ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 OpenGL version string: 2.1.7415 Release

glxinfo | grep direct

direct rendering: Yes 3.9. Here's my /etc/X11/xorg.conf file > my.xorg.conf If you get errors concerning "LibGL.so.1", or if OpenGL games fail to start, then the application is searching for libGL in the wrong place. You can create a symbolic link to libGL by running this command:

sudo ln -sf /usr/lib/libGL.so.1.2 /usr/lib/libGL.so.1 sudo ln -sf /usr/lib32/libGL.so.1.2 /usr/lib32/libGL.so.1

Note: See http://wiki.cchtml.com/index.php/ Ubuntu_Hardy_Installation_Guide for more info if needed! Note: Use ATI Catalyst Control Center > Applications > Accessories > to change any of this mods(such as clone, single, big desktop) or to change screen resolution or to disable/enable monitors. Also see this guide that concerns video playback issues with Compiz Fusion : http://wiki.compiz-fusion.org/VideoPlayback

4. radeonhd (Open Source)
You can choose between the stable version (only available in 8.04) from the official repository or the latest (unstable) version from a PPA repository.

8.04 from official repository (stable version)

a. Make sure you have not installed the fglrx (ATI proprietary) driver (check under System -> Administration -> Hardware Drivers). b. Open a terminal and install the radeonhd driver:
sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-radeonhd

c. The driver is not automatically selected by the xorg server. Then, edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf and change the line
Driver "ati"

with
Driver "radeonhd"

d. Reboot. You are now using the open source radeonhd driver.

8.04 from unsupported PPA repository (latest version)
The backported version for 8.04 can be found at: https:// launchpad.net/~tormodvolden/+archive Installation is simple: a. Make sure you have not installed the fglrx (ATI proprietary) driver (check under System -> Administration -> Hardware Drivers). b. Open System -> Administration -> Software sources. Go to "Third Party Software" tab click Add and add one of these line: For 8.04:
deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/tormodvolden/ubuntu hardy main

and enable it. c. Open a terminal and install the radeonhd driver:

sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-radeonhd

Make sure you are installing version 1.2.1 or later and not the 1.1.0 (8.04) version found in the official repository. Else redo step 2. d. You can now disable the repositories enabled in step 2 if you don't want any more updates from that repositories. e. The driver is not automatically selected by the xorg server. Then, edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf and change the line
Driver "vesa"

with
Driver Option "radeonhd" "AccelMethod" "ShadowFB"

Note that currently the ShadowFB AccelMethod is recommended over XAA (the default from 1.2.0) and EXA, which are also supported but are a lot slower in current code. f. Reboot. You are now using the open source radeonhd driver.

Screen Colors

MacBook Pros can use a program called xcalib to emulate the screen coloring calibration of OS X. This isn't available in the Ubuntu repositories, so you'll have to download it and compile it.

sudo apt-get install libxxf86vm-dev libxext-dev wget -c http://www.etg.e-technik.uni-erlangen.de/web/doe/xcalib/ xcalib-source-0.8.tar.gz tar -zxvf xcalib-source-0.8.tar.gz cd xcalib-0.8/ make xcalib sudo mv xcalib /usr/local/bin/ sudo chmod 755 /usr/local/bin/xcalib sudo mount -t hfsplus /dev/sda2 /mnt #(this mounts the mac partition [/dev/sda2] on /mnt) sudo cp /mnt/Library/ColorSync/Profiles/Displays/* /usr/local/ etc

Then, do an "ls /usr/local/etc" and note the name of the profile (for the next step). Finally, add the following line to the end of either /etc/gdm/Init/ Default (for standard Ubuntu/Gnome) or /etc/kde3/kdm/Xsetup (for Kubuntu/KDE), before the final "exit" statement:

/usr/local/bin/xcalib "/usr/local/etc/<insert name of profile here>"

Restart X (Ctrl-Alt-Backspace) and your Mac OS X color profile will load as X starts.

Sound / Audio & Microphone

1. Double click on the Volume icon (it opens Volume Control), Select Edit > Preferences > enable Master, PCM, Front, Surround, Capture, Capture 1, Input Source, Mux, and Mux 1. 2. In Playback TAB -> Increase the volume to 100% and unmute (Master, PCM , Front, Surround). 3. In Recording TAB -> Unmute all and set 'Capture' and 'Capture 1' Volume to 95% and 'Mux' and 'Mux 1' to 50% of volume(higher results on static) 4. In Options TAB -> Set Input Source as: 'Mic' 5. Right-click on the volume applet and choose Preferences. Select "PCM" as the device to control. 6. Open the Sound preferences (System-Preferences-Sound in GNOME). Select "PCM" as the device to control.

Wireless

The MacBook Pro uses an Atheros wireless chipset that is not compatible with the current stable MadWifi driver. However, the prerelease version of the driver is compatible, but is unstable in

some cases. With proper installation and some modifications, it is adequate for everyday use. However, the Atheros HAL is binary and is not considered open-source software. To install the prerelease MadWifi drivers, you can chooose to use daily snapshots or Subversion. Using Subversion (be patient with the checkout, it may take a while):
sudo apt-get install build-essential subversion automake autoconf svn co http://svn.madwifi.org/madwifi/trunk madwifi cd madwifi make sudo make install sudo sed -i~ 's/^exit 0/modprobe ath_pci\nexit 0/' /etc/rc.local sudo sed -i~ 's/^exit 0/modprobe wlan_scan_sta\nexit 0/' /etc/ rc.local sudo sed -i~ 's/^exit 0/iwpriv ath0 bgscan 0\nexit 0/' /etc/ rc.local

At this point the driver is installed and should work and the internal wifi will be enabled after reboot. Alternatively, you can skip the reboot and use these commands to insert the driver into the running kernel:
sudo modprobe ath_pci sudo modprobe wlan_scan_sta sudo iwpriv ath0 bgscan 0

Finally, the MadWifi driver will prevent you from resuming after suspend-to-ram. To fix this, edit /etc/default/acpi-support and add the ath_pci driver to the MODULES variable, like so:

# ... MODULES="ath_pci" # ...

Temperatures & Fan Speed

Hard Disk Temperature

sudo apt-get install hddtemp

Select 'Yes', then 'OK', and 'OK' again.

CPUs Temperature

add this to /etc/rc.local :

modprobe coretemp sensors -s

To install lm-sensors and sensors-applet type in terminal :

sudo apt-get install lm-sensors sensors-applet

Right Click in the main panel menu and 'Add to Panel...' the 'Hardware Sensors Monitor', then right click on Hardware Sensors Monitor applet and go to 'Preferences' > 'Sensors' and Enable > 'hddtemp' > '/dev/sda', and also Disable > 'libsensors' > temp2 to temp11 .

Manual Fan Speed Control

It is not recommended to set the fan speed manually, because the Linux kernel automatically adjusts the fan speed proportionally to the CPU temperature. If you really need to set it manually, this is the method to use. This method does not carry over through a reboot, so rebooting the computer reverts the fans to automatic speed. This assumes you have already installed applesmc.

sudo modprobe applesmc echo applesmc | sudo tee -a /etc/modules

Copy the files to your home dir: fan_speed1 , fan_speed2 , fan_speed3 And to execute: gksu bash ~/fan_speed1 (...2 or 3)

To see the fan speed, Enable 'Left Side' and 'Right Side' in the Sensors Applet Preferences. This way, you have three different configurations of fan speeds to use for different activities. It is recommended to set the fans to a minimum of 3500RPM (fan_speed1). When you are doing CPUintensive activities, set the fans to 4000RPM (fan_speed2) or even 5000RPM (fan_speed3).

Reducing Power Consumption

PowerTOP is a program that monitors a Linux system and gives suggestions on reducing power consumption. To install PowerTOP, enter this command in a terminal (there is also an updated version on UbuntuBackports):

sudo apt-get install powertop

PowerTOP should be run as root to have detailed informations, so use the following command to run it:

sudo powertop

Keyboard Fixes

The MacBook Pro Keyboard doesn't have a Alt GR / Right Alt key, so there is no way to type Third Level Keys, such as "@" and "[" (these vary from country to country). Here is a solution: Go to System > Preferences > Keyboard. On the Layout Options tab, select "Third Level Choosers" and check "Press Enter key on keypad to choose 3rd level". Now you can use the Left Enter key (on the MacBook Pro keyboard) as a Alt Gr Key to access these Third Level Keys. Alternative: Select form System > Settings > Keyboard > Layout > Model "MacBook Pro" and function keys should work. Also, buttons F11 and F12 simulate 2nd and 3rd mouse buttons. Left Enter simulates Alt Gr button.

Right / Middle Clicking

Go to System > Preferences > Keyboard > Accessibility tab > General - and enable "Allow to turn accessibility features on and off from the keyboard" Go to System > Preferences > Keyboard > Mouse Keys tab > and enable "Allow to control the pointer using the keyboard"

Create a text file as ~/.xmodmap containing the following text (Note: This sets Right Apple key as Right mouse click and Left Enter Key as Alt Gr key)

keycode 116 = Pointer_Button3 keycode 108 = ISO_Level3_Shift

Add a call to xmodmap to your startup applications (System > Preferences > Sessions) [example]:

xmodmap /home/fuz2y/.xmodmap

Restart X (Ctrl+Alt+Backspace) for the changes to take effect, and load the xmodmap. You can use xev in order to see the keycodes associated with each key. Alternative: Select form System > Settings > Keyboard > Layout > Model "MacBook Pro" and function keys should work. Also, buttons F11 and F12 simulate 2nd and 3rd mouse buttons. Left Enter simulates Alt Gr button.

Function Keys

Pommed is a daemon to support extra keys on apple computers. These include the brightness, eject, volume and others. Releases of Pommed 1.8 or up fully support the MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards. It can be installed with this command:
sudo apt-get install pommed

You can check your pommed version number with this command:
pommed -v

The default behavior on Apple keyboards is to have the top row keys primarily function as media keys (brightness, volume, etc), and have the expected function keys (F1, F2, etc) accessible with using the fn keys. To reverse this behavior, edit the pommed configuration file with this command:
sudo gedit /etc/pommed.conf

Change the value of fnmode to "2", and save. At any time, you can change this value back to "1" to return to the default behavior.

Touchpad Fixes

Edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf and replace : Sections "InputDevice" • Identifiers "Synaptics Touchpad"

• .. • .. EndSection With :

Section "InputDevice" Identifier Driver Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option "Synaptics Touchpad" "synaptics" "SendCoreEvents" "Device" "Protocol" "LeftEdge" "RightEdge" "TopEdge" "BottomEdge" "FingerLow" "FingerHigh" "MaxTapTime" "MaxTapMove" "SingleTapTimeout" "MaxDoubleTapTime" "LockedDrags" "MinSpeed" "MaxSpeed" "AccelFactor" "TapButton1" "TapButton2" "TapButton3" "RTCornerButton" "true" "/dev/psaux" "auto-dev" "10" "1200" "10" "370" "10" "20" "180" "220" "100" "180" "off" "1.10" "1.30" "0.08" "1" "3" "2" "0"

Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option Option EndSection

"RBCornerButton" "LTCornerButton" "LBCornerButton" "VertScrollDelta" "HorizScrollDelta" "HorizEdgeScroll" "VertEdgeScroll" "VertTwoFingerScroll" "HorizTwoFingerScroll" "SHMConfig"

"0" "0" "0" "20" "50" "0" "0" "1" "1" "on"

To disable the touchpad while typing, configure syndaemon to startup when you login. To make syndaemon start up by default each time you login, add it to the list of Startup Programs in System > Preferences >Sessions. Add the following command:
syndaemon -t -d

Log out and back in to see the changes.

WebCam ( iSight )

The internal iSight now requires firmware from the AppleUSBVideoSupport (found in OSX) file to be loaded in userspace. A let of tools has been developed to accomplish this. A HOW-TO has been posted here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php? t=764616

Access OS X, Windows Partition & Network Shares

To do so edit /etc/fstab , here's what you need to add :

#... ################################################################ ########### ## Macintosh ############################################################## /dev/sda2 /media/Macintosh hfsplus rw,exec,auto,users 0 0 ################################################################ ########### ## Windows ################################################################ /dev/sda3 /media/Windows ntfs defaults,uid=1000 0 0

Then do the following in terminal:

sudo gedit /etc/nsswitch.conf (change the line "hosts: file dns ..." to "file dns wins ...")

sudo aptitude install winbind samba smbfs sudo mkdir /media/Macintosh sudo chmod 755 /media/Macintosh sudo mkdir /media/Windows sudo chmod 755 /media/Windows

And to apply:

sudo umount -a sudo mount -a

Allow Writing to HFS+ (OS X) Partitions

The hfsplus drivers for Ubuntu cannot handle journaling, and thus can't write to HFS+ partitions with journals, though they can still be read. To allow writing, journaling must be disabled in OS X. However, please note that this may increase the risk of filesystem corruption, even in OS X itself. To disable journaling, use diskutil in a terminal in OS X (this can also be done with the installation media), replacing / for the desired volume if applicable:

sudo /usr/sbin/diskutil disableJournal /

With this change, the partition will be writable in Ubuntu, and will automatically be mounted to allow writing. However, if the drivers detect any filesystem corruption, writing will be disabled. This can be remedied by either booting into OS X, which will attempt to repair the damage, or (in hardy) running fsck.hfsplus, found in the hfsprogs package in universe.

Apple Remote Control

Apple's Remote Control is working by default in Ubuntu 8.04, but only allows you to control the Volume. So here's the tweaks to get it working on with other applications:

sudo apt-get install inputlirc lirc lirc-x

At the prompt select apple's mac mini ir. And edit /etc/rc.local and add:

/etc/init.d/inputlirc start /etc/init.d/inputlirc restart

Then go to > System > Preferences > Sessions , and add the following to the Startup list by this order:

/usr/bin/irexec $HOME/.lircrc /usr/bin/irxevent $HOME/.lircrc

Note: $HOME = your home directory. Must be written out, e.g. / home/janedoe To make it work on the startup you have to change the file access mode so that the user can run it, but it still executes in root mode:

sudo chmod +s /usr/bin/irexec sudo chmod +s /usr/bin/irxevent

Then to create the .lircrc file in your home dir do this:

gedit ~/.lircrc

Here's my lircrc_file , select all and copy to ~/.lircrc Reboot for it to work!
sudo shutdown -hr now

Apple Wireless Keyboard

• Reboot your system

Right the bluetooth icon in the menu bar Select preferences Goto the service tab Check "input service" Click on "Add" Select the bluetooth keyboard that should appear Click on connect A balloon should appear asking for a PIN: enter whatever you want (0000 works just fine) and validate • On the bluetooth keyboard type the same PIN and press enter • You should now be able to use your keyboard

• • • • • • • •

Desktop Tweaks
Fonts like Mac OS X

By default, Ubuntu uses a style of font rendering different than that used on Mac OS X. You may prefer fonts similar to those on Mac OS X, and you can have these on Ubuntu by doing the following: 1. Open the Appearance preference panel (System-PreferencesAppearance) 2. Click Fonts, and click on Details..., on Hinting select the "Slight" option.

Troubleshooting

Bootsplash fix
I experienced a blank screen during booting and shutdown (with a C2Duo-15"-MBP). After searching the web and messing around with the vga=XXX kernel parameter without success, I found the following procedure to help: Edit file
/etc/usplash.conf

and replace the resolution there with your display's actual resolution (for the 15" this is 1440 by 900) It should look like {{{xres=1440 yres=900 }}} After editing, enter
sudo update-initramfs -u -k `uname -r`

Happy Booting!

Battery state not working
I had a problem with the acpi value of my battery. It was due to a hardware problem.

To solve it : • • • • • • Shut down your Computer Disconnect the AC Adapter Remove the computer's battery Press the power button for 5 seconds Insert the battery and reconnect the AC Adapter Turn your computer on

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