P. 1
Zena's Life in the Hands of Politicians

Zena's Life in the Hands of Politicians

|Views: 3|Likes:
Published by Steve Baron
According to the NZ Kidney Foundation, over 80% of people with Chronic Kidney Disease
are unaware they have the condition. Around 600 people throughout New Zealand are on
a waiting list for a transplant, often waiting for up to five years.
According to the NZ Kidney Foundation, over 80% of people with Chronic Kidney Disease
are unaware they have the condition. Around 600 people throughout New Zealand are on
a waiting list for a transplant, often waiting for up to five years.

More info:

Published by: Steve Baron on Oct 02, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

Zena's Life in the Hands of Politicians (519 words

)
According to the NZ Kidney Foundation, over 80% of people with Chronic Kidney Disease are unaware they have the condition. Around 600 people throughout New Zealand are on a waiting list for a transplant, often waiting for up to five years. I'd like to tell you about one sufferer that lives here in Cambridge. I'll call her Zena (not her real name) because she is indeed a Warrior Princess. For a good part of her life Zena has suffered from renal failure and relies on kidney dialysis twice a week. She never complains or seeks sympathy, even after spending days in hospital close to death after a vein ruptured? causing copious blood loss. Yet shortly after this life threatening episode she could be seen in her garden tending to the plants and smiling, just because she was happy to be alive. Zena's life is not in the hands of doctors, it is in the hands of politicians. While the government is tinkering with the current system and looks likely to offer live donors a weekly payment to see them through recovery, there will continue to be a shortfall. This problem could be fixed quite simply, by establishing an open market for organ sales, however repulsive some may find that. Simple economics will tell you that when there is a shortage of something there needs to be more incentive to increase supply. This usually means offering suppliers more money. Putting it bluntly, there just aren't many altruistic people left these days who are prepared to give for nothing when it comes to total strangers. Tinkering with legislation surrounding the wishes of deceased people who have ticked the box on their drivers license won't help much either. Quite often a person may die a long distance away from a hospital or their kidney may be badly damaged due to an

accident. Economically speaking, it makes financial sense to find ways to fill the gap. It costs $85,000 on average over the first three years for a kidney transplant, which is half the cost of kidney dialysis and sufferers have a far better chance of survival. People should not fear organ snatchers waiting to pounce, so they can harvest much needed organs. The reality is that this just would not happen. Certainly, strict legislation would have to be put in place, but someone can't just simply turn up at the nearest hospital with a snatched organ requesting a transplant. There is an intricate process that would have to be followed. An open market for organ donation does not mean only the rich would benefit. The rich already benefit from better healthcare so if this argument was to be used then surely rich people would have to be restricted from private healthcare as well. Even so, it would have to be the responsibility of a central organisation to decide who receives transplants, regardless of wealth. We can no longer allow our politicians to let loved ones die. Pressure must be put on them to fix the problem once and for all. Steve Baron is a Cambridge based independent journalist and author whose articles are published throughout New Zealand. steve@betterdemocracy.co.nz

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->