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9030241022_fabric Care Labelling

9030241022_fabric Care Labelling

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12/18/2010

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SYMBIOSIS CENTER FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

FABRIC CARE LABELLING

ISO 3758:9001 AND ISO 3758:2005

PRIYASHREE RAI ITBM 2009-11 PRN : 9030241022

3 4 4 11 12 2 3 4 5 6 • Why care label symbols? Different care labeling systems: European Care Labeling International Care labeling system-GINETEX (According to ISO 3758:1991) Overview: ISO 3758:1991 vs ISO 3758:2005 ISO 3758:2005 Care Symbols References About Care Labels 2 . 2 Care Labels: A brief history. One key revision. No. Two key goals. 1 Topic About Care Labels • • • • Page No.Index Sr. The next step: A move toward symbols.

acrylic and automatic washing machines came along. in turn.Care Labels: A brief history. Something which the entire apparel industry was all for as well. This exemption. [1] The next step: A move toward symbols. simplify and unify the care label language and provide more specific. New fibers and new technology have created a vast array of apparel and textiles . allows manufacturers to use certain care symbols in place of written instructions to communicate a method for cleaning. make care labels more beneficial and informative for consumers. So in 1972. First. others the economy of machine washing. Long before polyester. Requiring care labels actually accomplished two very important goals. the FTC made a number of revisions to its Care Labeling Rule based upon findings that many consumers considered care labels to be incomplete. [1] Two key goals. it would be considered unfair and deceptive for manufacturers or importers to sell items without care labels. Originally proposed in November 1995 and then refined over the following 15 months. [1] One key revision. care labels assured that consumers knew how to safely clean their clothes so that they retained their appearance and performance over time. the FTC is introducing a "conditional exemption" to its Care Labeling Rule. it helped consumers make buying decisions based upon the care method required. Now. From this time on. for the first time. At the same time.each designed to look beautiful and to stand up to the test of time. the Federal Trade Commission introduced the Care Labeling Rule which. The Rule was also intended to make care labeling compliance easier for manufacturers which would. In January 1984. often damaging both the apparel's beauty and long-lived nature. 1997. Unfortunately. required manufacturers to label their clothing with instructions for at least one safe cleaning method for the garment. The rule was amended to clarify care labeling requirements. But those days are long gone. which begins July 1. consumers could easily identify a wool or cotton garment and successfully clean it without a care label. Some people prefer the convenience of dry cleaning. this exemption is designed to 3 . detailed information for consumers. inaccurate and inconsistent. consumers had no way of knowing just how to properly clean these items.

This is still a goal of the FTC. This means that apparel manufacturers will now be able to use the same care label on garments offered for sale in any or all of these countries. You should keep in mind. that the upcoming conditional exemption stops short of creating a global standard for care labeling.further simplify and unify care labels. without knowledge of the language. [1] Why care label symbols? One of the major reasons behind the introduction of care label symbols is to harmonize American clothing labeling regulations with those of Canada and Mexico. Additionally. making them more helpful to consumers. there's been growing concern among manufacturers that the higher cost of larger labels are being reflected in higher apparel cost. And consumers will be able to make purchase decisions based upon care requirements. this move to care label symbols can help satisfy another consumer demand which is to decrease the size of care labels. It's just that the FTC does not believe the system of symbols set up by the International Standards Organization (ISO) and known as Ginetex is as comprehensive as those developed by the ASTM. Lately. Using symbols in place of words is a simple tactic for saving both space and money. and follow appropriate care instructions. In fact. [1] Different care labeling systems: • American Care Labeling System (According to American society for testing and materials (ASTM)) • European Care Labeling System (According to ISO 3758:2005 and managed by GINETEX ) • Japanese Care Labeling System 4 . Efforts to harmonize the ASTM and ISO care symbol systems are expected to continue. the intent is that the new symbols will become standard in all countries participating in the North American Free Trade Agreement. however. The symbols to be used have been developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM).

[3] International Care labeling system. The textile care labeling symbols are managed by Ginetex (International Association for Textile Care Labeling).) • • Australian Care Labeling System (In English wording) Chinese Care Labeling System (According to GB/T 8685-2008) [3] European Care Labeling Individual technical committees of the European Union and International Standards Organisation reviewed existing care label standards and have created a unified system under the ISO scheme which is published as ISO 3758:2005.• Canadian Care Labeling System (The Canadian standard for care labeling has been revised. the GINETEX care labeling system (or international care labeling system) mainly uses symbols to provide care instructions. amber. bleaching. The new version has symbols in black and white replacing the previous “traffic light” colors of green. 5 .GINETEX (According to ISO 3758:1991) Internationally. Ginetex has 16 member countries. and red. The symbols are registered as international trademarks. therefore. many countries follow different care instructions and have different laws and rules governing the same. With an aim to promote voluntary care labeling on international basis. The International Association for Textile Care Labeling (GINETEX) had. the national committees of which administer the right to reproduce these symbols in their countries. drying. ironing and professional textile care. developed a language-independent care labeling system in 1975. The system consists of five basic symbols and their full descriptions are shown in the following. A correct care label for European countries is required to consist of five symbols in the following sequence: washing. ISO 3758:1991 provides a code of reference for the use of these symbols.

WASHING Maximum temperature 95° C Mechanical action normal Rinsing normal Spinning normal Maximum temperature 95° C Mechanical action reduced Rinsing at gradually decreasing temperature (cool down) Spinning reduced Maximum temperature 70° C Mechanical action normal Rinsing normal Spinning normal Maximum temperature 60° C Mechanical action normal Rinsing normal Spinning normal 6 .Note: A cross on any of them means that the treatment shall not be used and a bar under the symbols indicates milder treatment is needed (broken bar indicates a very mild treatment).

Maximum temperature 60° C Mechanical action reduced Rinsing at gradually decreasing temperature (cool down) Spinning reduced Maximum temperature 50° C Mechanical action reduced Rinsing at gradually decreasing temperature (cool down) Spinning reduced Maximum temperature 40° C Mechanical action normal Rinsing normal Spinning normal Maximum temperature 40° C Mechanical action reduced Rinsing at gradually decreasing temperature (cool down) Spinning reduced Maximum temperature 40° C Mechanical action much reduced Rinsing normal Spinning normal Do not wring by hand 7 .

Maximum temperature 30° C Mechanical action much reduced Rinsing normal Spinning reduced Hand wash Do not machine wash Maximum temperature of wash 40° C Handle with care Do not wash. Be cautious when treating in wet stage BLEACHING Chlorine-based bleaching allowed Only cold and dilute solution Do not use chlorine-based bleach IRONING Iron at a maximum sole-plate temperature of 200° C Iron at a maximum sole-plate temperature of 150° C 8 .

and all and 1. 1. plus trichloroethylene trichloroethane Dry-cleaning in tetrachloroethylene. 1- monofluorotrichloromethane solvents listed for the symbol F Normal cleansing procedures without restrictions Dry-cleaning in the solvents listed in the previous paragraph Strict limitations on the addition of water and/or mechanical action and /or temperature during cleaning drying No self-service cleaning allowed and/or 9 .Iron at a maximum sole-plate temperature of 110° C Steam-Ironing may be risky Do not iron Steaming and steam treatments are not allowed DRY-CLEANING Dry-cleaning in all solvents normally used for dry-cleaning .this includes all solvents listed for the symbol P.

Dry-cleaning in trifluorotrichloroethane. flash point 38° C to 6O° C) Normal cleansing procedures without restrictions Dry-cleaning in the solvents listed in the previous paragraph Strict limitations on the addition of water and/or mechanical action and/ or temperature during cleaning and/or drying No self-service cleaning allowed Do not dry clean No stain removal with solvents DRYING Tumble dry possible Normal drying cycle Tumble dry possible Drying at lower temperature setting Do not tumble dry 10 . white spirit (distillation temperature between 150° C and 210° C.

labeling requirements had to expand to reflect updated practices.” which in 1991 had six symbols. • Natural Drying: “Natural drying” symbols are now included as an annex to the main document. Tub Graphics: There are also modifications to the drawings of bar lines under the tub graphics for washing processes. Prompted by newer technologies and new fibers. some modified from the previous addition. The following represent a sample of the differences between the 1991 drawing and the 2005 drawing: [2] • [2] 11 . and oxygen/non-chlorine bleaches. • Bleaching: While in 1991 it was sufficient to state “chlorine-based bleaching. The current standard now refers to it as “professional textile care” and lists eight symbols. finishes and materials.” now bleaching encompasses more alternatives: chlorine bleaches or oxidizing bleaching agents. beyond the three tumble-drying symbols which remain the same. The following is a summary of the major changes. and three new ones added to incorporate professional wet cleaning.Overview: ISO 3758:1991 vs ISO 3758:2005 There also have been a number of revisions made to the care labeling requirements of ISO 3758 last year. • Dry Cleaning: Changes have also been made to “dry cleaning. ISO 3758:2005 should be consulted for specific requirements and revised graphics. This necessitated changing the symbols to represent these choices.

namely: washing. bleaching. bleaching. professional textile care.New Old New Old The International Association for Textile Care Labelling (GINETEX) has announced that it will change the sequence order of its care label symbols to harmonize with those in the 2005 version of ISO 3758. professional textile care. This will create a global practice of listing the five symbols in the order of consumer practice.) The change is now in effect. ISO 3758:2005 Care Symbols [3] 12 . (GINETEX member countries are currently using the sequence: washing. ironing. but industry and the textile trade will have a transitional period of eighteen months (until the end of 2007) in which to make the conversion. drying. Textiles – Care Labelling Code Using Symbols. tumble drying. ironing.

com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:oAZdnMF4NUJ:www.pdf+is+ginetex+care+labelling+in+accordance+to+ISO %3F&hl=en&gl=in&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESh4RvgHWNL3BZ3XoN9ROYRq9Q81bNgVs wX4HGnnuVnJoj0R5ctGd23AVObpCzG2PbsXQYXv7ntPJDkuG6aZRIcU7SJXA6hp21_K BPJQg9LLCMBy89VbtJshbNEiT9kzHxfAjkDo&sig=AHIEtbQRvYzQ-a1JdvIiNH3RVQshKN4-A 13 .com/carelabel/ [3] ISO 3758:2005 retrieved from http://docs.com/reach-ccr/regulation_updates/43296.com/uploadedFiles/Intertek/Divisions/Consumer_Goods/Media/PDFs/Ser vices/Low%2520Res %2520CompleteCareLabelling.intertek.References [1] Overview: ISO 3758:1991 vs ISO 3758:2005 retrieved from https://www.google.bureauveritas.iaaqaservices.html [2]About Care Labelling retrieved from http://www.paxar.

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