P. 1
Assessement of High Valued NTFP of Jajarkot_finale

Assessement of High Valued NTFP of Jajarkot_finale

|Views: 713|Likes:
Published by khilendragurung4859
Assessment,High valued NTFP,Jajarkot,Nepal
Assessment,High valued NTFP,Jajarkot,Nepal

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: khilendragurung4859 on Oct 04, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/23/2013

pdf

text

original

Sections

ASSES SSMENT T AND P PROFILE E PREPA ARATIO ON   OF HIGH VALU UED   NON TIMBER FORE EST PRO ODUCTS S (NTFPs s)  OF   JA AJARKO

OT DIST TRICT 
 

Subm mitted to  We estern Uplands Pov verty Alle eviation P Project,  Nepalg gunj, Banke        Subm mitted by y  Khilendra Gurun ng & Dipe esh Pyaku urel  Jul ly 2010

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 
  We  acknowledge  support  of  Western  Uplands  Poverty  Alleviation  Project  (WUPAP)  for  providing  the  responsibility  to  carry  out  the  “Assessment  and  Profile  Preparation  of  High  Valued  NTFPs  of  Jajarkot  District”.  We  would  like  to  thank  Project  Coordination  Unit,  Nepalgunj for providing the necessary support while conducting the study.    We  take  this  opportunity  to  express  our  gratitude  to  Mr  Ramesh  Kumar  Adhikari,  Project  Coordinator, WUPAP and Mr Sanjeev Kumar Shrestha NTFP & Marketing Specialist, WUPAP  for  helping  in  outlining  the  study.  Coordination  of  Mr  Shrestha  with  field  staff  for  the  smooth running during the survey was exceptional. Similarly, we would like to acknowledge  the  continual  contribution  and  support  of  Local  Development  Fund  Board  (LDFB)  Jajarkot  team  namely  Mr  Prakash  Shahi  secretary,  Mr  Uday  Rana  and  Mr  Suraj  Niroula  for  their  support in one day consultation meeting in district headquarter.    We  would  like  to  thank  District  Forest  Officer  Mr  Devendra  Lal  Karna;  Assistant  Forest  Officers Mr Jiya Lal Yadav and Mr Uttim Sahu Teli; Rangers Mr Ajaj Ahmed Ansari, Mr Megh  Raj Paudel, Mr Lokmani Sapkota and Mr Ashok Khatri; and Mr Rishav Dev Khanal for their  assistance  in  selecting  the  VDCs,  management  of  field  visit  and  one  day  consultation  meeting in district headquarter. Forest Guard Mr Ganesh Bahdaur Karki assisted during the  field survey, for which we thank him.  We  are  thankful  to  the  government  officials,  district  level  political  leaders,  all  the  organizations  and  traders of Jajarkot who took time  out  of  their busy schedule to provide  with their valuable inputs and suggestions during the consultation meeting and in the field.    And finally, we are thankful to the people of Jajarkot who supported us during the field visits  by providing necessary information, accommodation and food.    Thanks    Khilendra Gurung  Dipesh Pyakurel    i   

   

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS 
  DFO:    FUGs:     GDP:    kg:   m:       District Forest Office/cer  Forest User Groups   Gross Domestic Production  Kilogram  Meter  Medicinal and Aromatic Plants   Nepali Rupees  Non Timber Forest Products  Rapid Vulnerability Assessment  Village Development Committees  Western Uplands Poverty Alleviation Project  Community Forests  Participatory Rural Appraisal  Matrix Preference Ranking 

MAPs:    NRs:    NTFPs:     RVA:     VDCs:     WUPAP:    CF:   

PRA:    MPR:     

 

 

ii   

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.......................................................................................................... i  ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ...................................................................................... ii  CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................... 1  1.1  1.2  1.3  1.4  Background  ................................................................................................................. 1  . Objectives .................................................................................................................... 2  WUPAP & NTFPs .......................................................................................................... 2  Study Area ................................................................................................................... 2 

1.4.1 District characteristics .............................................................................................. 4  . 1.4.2 Land Utilization ......................................................................................................... 4  1.4.3 Natural vegetation .................................................................................................... 5  1.5  2.1  Limitations ................................................................................................................... 6  Primary Data Collection .............................................................................................. 7  CHAPTER TWO: METHODOLOGY ........................................................................................ 7  2.1.1 Key informant survey and resource mapping  .......................................................... 8  . 2.1.2 Focus group discussion ............................................................................................. 8  2.1.3 Identification of NTFPs .............................................................................................. 8  2.1.4 Inventory of NTFPs .................................................................................................... 8  2.2  2.3  Secondary Data Collection .......................................................................................... 9  Data Processing and Analysis ...................................................................................... 9 

2.3.1 Frequency and relative frequency ............................................................................ 9  2.3.2 Density and relative density ................................................................................... 10  2.3.3 Prioritization of NTFPs ............................................................................................ 10  2.3.4 Rapid Vulnerability Assessment (RVA) ................................................................... 11  . 2.4  3.1  Report Writing ........................................................................................................... 11  Documentation of Plant Species ............................................................................... 12  CHAPTER THREE: FINDINGS .............................................................................................. 12  3.1.1 Distribution of Plant species in surveyed VDCs ...................................................... 12  3.1.2 List of plant species recorded in surveyed VDCs .................................................... 12  3.2  Assessment of NTFPs in Jajarkot ............................................................................... 18  3.2.1 Dhime VDC .............................................................................................................. 19  3.2.2 Ramidanda VDC ...................................................................................................... 19  3.2.3 Rokayagaun VDC ..................................................................................................... 19  3.2.4 Paink VDC ................................................................................................................ 19  3.2.5 Garkhakot VDC ........................................................................................................ 20  3.2.6 Kortang VDC ............................................................................................................ 20  iii   

3.2.7 Majhkot VDC ........................................................................................................... 20  3.2.8 Dasera VDC.............................................................................................................. 20  3.2.9 Sima VDC ................................................................................................................. 21  3.2.10 Bhur ....................................................................................................................... 21  3.2.11 Khagenkot ............................................................................................................. 21  3.2.12 Ragda .................................................................................................................... 22  3.2.13 Bhagwati ............................................................................................................... 22  3.3  3.4  3.5  4.1  4.2  5.1  5.2  5.3  5.4  5.5  5.6  5.7  5.8  6.1  6.2  6.3  6.4  6.5  6.6  6.7  6.8  6.9  6.10  6.11  6.12  6.13  Identification of Tradable NTFPs of Jajarkot ............................................................. 22  Prioritization of NTFPs ............................................................................................... 23  RVA of Tradable Species of Jajarkot .......................................................................... 25  Trade Value of NTFPs in Jajarkot ............................................................................... 26  Trading Pattern/ Market Chain of NTFPs .................................................................. 26  Comparative Analysis of Enterprise Modalities in Jajarkot ...................................... 27  Identification of Enterprise Modalities to be set up in Jajarkot ............................... 30  Potential Markets of Value Added Products ............................................................. 30  Requirements for Enterprise Success ....................................................................... 31  Challenges for Forest Based Enterprises ................................................................... 32  Value Addition Techniques ....................................................................................... 32  Processing Technology .............................................................................................. 32  Need Based Assessment for Enterprise set up in Jajarkot ........................................ 33  Kurilo (Asparagus racemosus) ................................................................................... 35  Allo (Girardinia diversifolia) ...................................................................................... 35  Timur (Zanthoxylum armatum) ................................................................................. 36  Kaulo (Persea odoratissima)...................................................................................... 36  Chiuri (Diploknema butyracea) ................................................................................. 37  Jhyau (Lichens) .......................................................................................................... 37  Samayo/Sugandhawal (Valeriana jatamansii) .......................................................... 38  Sajwan/Ratanjoto (Jatropha curcas) ......................................................................... 39  Padamchal (Rheum australe) .................................................................................... 39  Majitho (Rubia manjith) ........................................................................................ 39  Dhatelo (Prinsepia utilis) ....................................................................................... 40  Bael (Aegle marmelos) ........................................................................................... 40  Lokta (Daphne bholua, D. papyracea) ................................................................... 41  iv   

CHAPTER FOUR: TRADE VALUE AND TRADING PATTERN .................................................. 26 

CHAPTER FIVE: OVERVIEW OF ENTERPRISE MODALITIES TO BE SET UP IN JAJARKOT  ....... 27  .

CHAPTER SIX: NTFPs PROFILE ........................................................................................... 35 

6.14  6.15  7.1  7.2 

Bojho (Acorus calamus) ......................................................................................... 42  Rittha (Sapindus mukorossi) .................................................................................. 42  Conclusion ................................................................................................................. 44  Recommendations .................................................................................................... 45 

CHAPTER SEVEN: CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION ................................................ 44 

References........................................................................................................................ 46  Annex: List of Plant species recorded (Sorted by Common/ Local Names) .................... 48   

LIST OF TABLES 
Table 1: Surveyed VDCs .......................................................................................................................... 3  Table 2: Land Utilization of Jajarkot ........................................................................................................ 4  Table 3: Forest types (Broad Category) .................................................................................................. 5  Table 4: Matrix Preference Ranking  ..................................................................................................... 10  . Table 5: Criteria for RVA ....................................................................................................................... 11  Table 6: List of plant species documented in surveyed 11 VDCs .......................................................... 13  Table 7: List of NTFPs of the area.......................................................................................................... 22  Table 8: Matrix ranking of NTFPs in Jajarkot district (Most preferred species have high score) ......... 24  Table 9: RVA analysis of NTFPs in Jajarkot (Vulnerable species have low score) ................................. 25  Table 10: Marketing status/trade value of NTFPs in Jajarkot ............................................................... 26  Table  11:  Comparative  analysis  of  enterprise  modalities  on  market,  social,  technology  and  conservation criteria in Jajarkot  ........................................................................................................... 28  . Table 12: Potentiality for enterprise development in Jajarkot ............................................................. 30  Table 13: Potential markets for NTFPs products .................................................................................. 30  Table 14: Value addition techniques of NTFPs ..................................................................................... 32  Table 15: Processing technology and application ................................................................................. 33 

   LIST OF PICTURES 
Picture 1: Map of Jajarkot district with surveyed VDCs ............................................................ 3  . Picture 2: Dhatelo scrubland in Kortang .................................................................................. 20  Picture 3: Harvesting Bael at Bhur ........................................................................................... 21  Picture 4: Chiuri tree in Khagenkot .......................................................................................... 21  Picture 5, 6 and 7: Pictures of one day workshop at, Jajarkot ................................................ 23   

 

 

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION 
1.1  Background 
Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) consists of goods of biological origin other than timber  or fuelwood derived from forests, other wooded land and trees outside forests (FAO, 1999).  Non  Timber  Forest  Products  (NTFPs)  and  Medicinal  and  Aromatic  Plants  (MAPs)  collected  for  trade  make  an  important  contribution  to  the  household  economies  for  the  local  communities  residing  in  mountainous  areas  of  Nepal  (Edwards  1996).  In  some  rural  hilly  areas,  it  contributes  up  to  50%  of  total  annual  family  income.  NTFPs  sub‐sector  in  Nepal  contributes about 5% of national GDP out of total estimation of about 15% from the whole  forestry sector (CECI 2006). More than 100 types of plant species are harvested from wild  and traded to international market mostly to India; 95% of the NTFPs are collected from the  wild and 90% are exported to India in raw form.   The importance of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (MAPs) has increased progressively over  the  last  two  decades.  Herbal  remedies  are  increasingly  becoming  mainstream  consumer  products  manufactured  by  multinational  companies  amongst  other,  and  sold  in  super  market  chains  and  in  a  variety  of  other  outlets,  globally.  Food  supplements,  cosmetics,  fragrances, traditional cuisine, dyeing and coloring agents are just a few of the application  where medicinal, aromatic and dye plants are finding increasing use by the day.   For centuries, wild collection of these resources for trade has been possible without major  negative  effects.  However,  during  the  past  few  decades  these  resources  have  been  highly  exploited  for  trade,  owing  to  increasing  population  pressure  and  demand  from  the  international  markets  for  natural  products  (Edwards  1996,  Olsen  and  Larsen  2003).  As  a  result, large numbers of high valued plants have been considered as threatened throughout  the  entire  Himalayan  region.  The  high  Himalayan  regions  remain  most  vulnerable  to  over  harvesting  of  NTFPs  and  MAPs  for  trade  due  to  (a)  lack  of  regulatory  mechanism,  (b)  inadequate land for agriculture, (c) minimum chances of other income generating activities  and (d) relatively easier access to Tibet where the demand of Himalayan herbs is very high.   A wide variety of high valued traded NTFPs like Yarcha Gumba/ Keera (Cordyceps sinensis),  Samayo  (Valeriana  jatamansii),  Akasechuk/  Padamchal  (Rheum  australe,  R.  nobile),  Kaulo  (Persea  odoratissima),  Timur  (Zanthoxylum  armatum),  Rittha  (Sapindus  mukorossi)  etc  are  distributed from tropical to nival regions in Jajarkot district. Collection of these NTFPs is not  a regular practice among the local communities and it has been felt that communities are  quite unaware of the role of NTFPs in alternative income generation. Moreover, the small  amount of NTFPs transaction is not institutionalized and often governed by the traders from  Jumla.  Till date, inventory of traded species is not completed in any of the Community Forests (CF)  and government forests of Jajarkot, resulting the haphazard issuing of collection permit. The 

1   

collection  permit  should  be  issued  only  after  the  determination  of  stock  of  concerned  species to overcome the threat of overharvesting.    In this aspect, the proposed study aims to document the availability (plants per hectare) and  distribution pattern of high valued NTFPs in the surveyed VDCs of Jajarkot district. The study  will  also  look  after  the  prospects  of  community  based  forest  enterprise  and  its  linkage  to  market  through  product  promotion.  NTFPs  profile  development  for  highly  traded  species  will focus on the conservation and domestication of concerned species.  

1.2  Objectives 
The overall objective of the study was to explore availability of NTFPs in Jajarkot district and  its  prospects  for  enterprise  development  with  the  possibility  of  market  linkage,  in  consultation with the communities. Specific objectives were as follows:  To document the NTFPs of Jajarkot district.   To assess the availability and distribution of high valued NTFPs in Jajarkot district.  To prioritize NTFPs on the basis of trade value, availability and threat.  Profile preparation of high valued NTFPs.  To analyze the marketing status and trading pattern of high valued NTFPs.  To  identify  the  forest  based  community  enterprises  to  be  set  up  and  its  implementation models.  To visualize the NTFPs products that can be value added locally.  To provide recommendations for sustainable promotion of NTFPs in the district. 

1.3  WUPAP & NTFPs 
Western Uplands Poverty Alleviation Project (WUPAP) has given high priority for NTFPs and  MAPs  amongst  its  program  in  mid  and  far  western  developmental  region  and  initiated  its  cultivation  and  domestication  in  leasehold  forests.  Forest  user  groups  are  responsible  for  the cultivation of NTFPs, with WUPAP giving the technical and financial support and District  Forest  Office  providing  the  legal  support.  Cultivation  of  high  valued  NTFPs  in  leasehold  forests helps in maintaining the healthy population of important traded species in the wild  in  the  future.  WUPAP  is  also  providing  financial  and  technical  support  for  the  product  development, value addition at local level, exposure visits for potential entrepreneurs etc,  all for the conservation of forest resources in the wild.   

1.4  Study Area 
This  chapter  outlines  the  physical  characteristics  of  Jajarkot  as  a  whole.  The  study  was  undertaken  in  13  VDCs  (out  of  30  VDCs)  of  Jajarkot  district.  VDCs  were  selected  with  the  active  participation  of  District  Forest  Office  personnel.  Whole  district  was  divided  into  5  clusters  namely  eastern,  western,  northern,  southern  and  middle  clusters  and  2‐3  VDCs  were selected from each cluster except from middle cluster where only Dhime was selected. 

2   

Name  of  the  surveyed  VDCs  is  given  in  table  1  while  picture  1  gives  the  map  of  Jajarkot  district and surveyed VDCs. 
Table 1: Surveyed VDCs 

Clusters  East  West  North  South  Middle 

VDCs Khagenkot, Ragda, Bhagwati Garkhakot, Kortang, Dasera, Majkot Paink, Rakayagaun, Ramidanda Bhur, Sima Dhime

 
Picture 1: Map of Jajarkot district with surveyed VDCs 

3   

1.4.1 District characteristics  
Centrally  located  in  the  Bheri  zone  of  Mid‐Western  Development  Region  of  the  Nepal,  Jajarkot  occupies  approximately  1.5  percent  of  total  land  area  of  the  country.  Altitudinal  variation  ranges  from  610m  to  5412m  with  tropical  to  alpine  to  alpine  climate.  Annual  precipitation is 1868.5mm and mostly fed by monsoon rains. The district is surrounded by  Jumla and Dolpa in the North, Rukum in the East, Jumla, Kalikot and Dailekh in the West and  Surkhet in the South (picture 1). The district has 30 Village Development Committees (VDC).  Jajarkot  district  extends  from  81o46’12”  to  82o34’47’’  longitude  to  28o37'20’’  to  28o7'32’’  latitude.  

1.4.2 Land Utilization  
The cultivated area covers about 16.47%, forest  area covers approximately 54.04  percent,  and bush/shrub and grassland area covers about 24.50%. About 78% of the district area is  covered  by  forest,  scrubland  and  meadows  therefore  it  is  rational  that  the  district  is  reservoir  of  forest  based  NTFPs.  Similarly  3.44%  of  land  is  covered  by  ice  and  rocky  area  (table 2). 
 Table 2: Land Utilization of Jajarkot  

SN  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11 

Land use description  Forest land  Bush/shrub land  Grass land  Cultivated land  Landslide  Orchard Nursery  Ice/Rock  Ponds and lakes  Water bodies  Sandy area   waste/barren 

Area (sq. km) 1201.31 271.32 272.92 366.1 0.87 0.15 76.38 0.2 11.35 17.09 4.72

% distribution 54.04 12.22 12.28 16.47 0.04 0.01 3.44 0.01 0.51 0.77 0.21

Source: PDDP 2003.   

 

4   

1.4.3 Natural vegetation 
Vegetation in the Himalayas varies primarily with altitude, aspect and geographical settings.  The district harbors a number of forest types. Coniferous forest occupies the highest area of  forest  with  47%  cover,  followed  by  mixed  forest  (26.11  %),  hardwood  forest  (20.88  %).  Details of the forest type and area covered are given in table 3.  
Table 3: Forest types (Broad Category) 

SN  Forest type  1  Coniferous forest  2  Bush/shrub land  3  Grass land  4  Cultivated land  5  Landslide  Source: PDDP, 2003 

Area (Hectare)  63762.6 28323 35399 7624.8 5066 

% (in forest area)  47.02 20.88 26.11 5.62 0.37

Major components of forest are Sal, Saj, Khayar, Sisau, Okhar, Thingure Salla, Banjh, Khasru,  Talispatra and Bhojpatra. Major forest types recorded are:  Hill  Sal  Forest,  dominated  by  Shorea  robusta,  Terminalia  alata,  Acacia  catechu  and  Diploknema butyracea forests upto 1400m;  Chir  Pine  Forests  (Pinus  roxburghii)  along  the  planted  sites  and  few  naturally  occurring isolated patches, from 1000m to 2200m.  Mixed broadleaved forest (Asesculs indica‐Juglans regia‐Acer sp‐Quercus lamelossa)  between 2100m to 3000m;  Rhododendron Forest: Rhododendron arboreum is widely distributed forest of study  area.  R.  arboreum  is  dominant  vegetation  and  is  associated  with  Quercus  semecarpifolia.  Although  a  large  area  of  pure  forests  of  R.  arboreum  was  not  noticed,  it  was  recorded  in  the  mix  form  with  characteristics  of  Mountain  Oak‐ Rhododendron Forest and Mixed Rhododendron Forest.   Tsuga dumosa forest from 2300m to 3300m. T. dumosa was dominant in the forests  of Paink, Garkhakot, Rokayagaun and Ramidanda VDCs. Thick and dense forest of T.  dumosa  was  recorded  in  forest  of  these  VDCs,  within  the  altitude  of  2300m  to  2800m.   Quercus semecarpifolia forest between 2500m to 3400m, mostly on southern slope.  Abies spectabilis and Betula utilis forest above 3200m to 3550m. Ideally Betula utilis  should supersede the Abies spectabilis but alpine regions of Jajarkot are different as  Abies spectabilis delineate the timberline and alpine meadows.  Alpine meadows starts from 3600m and valuable NTFPs like Dactylorhiza hatagirea,  Cordyceps sinensis, Rheum australe etc are found in these meadows.  Cross verified from TISC, 2002.  5   

1.5 Limitations 
The present study is limited in a number of ways. Due to shorter period of time, it was not  possible  to  survey  the  whole  district.  Often  the  settlements  are  in  lower  elevation  and  survey has to be focused on high altitudes because alpine pastures and meadows are home  to  high  valued  NTFPs.  Due  to  the  unavailability  of  settlement  or  temporary  herder  shed  house in pastures, going to pastures for study and come back to settlement at night wastes  ample time. The study time was perfect for temperate species but a bit earlier for sub‐alpine  and  alpine  species.  Therefore,  it  was  difficult  to  identify  some  of  the  herbaceous  species  which were not in flowering stage.   Key  informants  who  would  have  been  able  to  provide  valuable  information  could  not  be  traced and local names provided are often misleading.    

 

6   

CHAPTER TWO: METHODOLOGY 
The  conceptual  framework  of  research  methodology  for  NTFP  profile  preparation  and  its  resource  mapping  is  shown  in  diagram  1.  The  study  was  carried  out  basically  in  an  exploratory  approach  in  order  to  document  the  NTFPs  and  ethno  botanical  knowledge  on  the use of NTFPs.  

Diagram 1: Conceptual framework of Methodology 

2.1 Primary Data Collection 
The primary information regarding the NTFPs distribution and ethno‐botanical use of NTFPs  were collected during the field work using PRA tools. Primary data collection was done by  following methods: 

7   

2.1.1 Key informant survey and resource mapping 
Information  about  the  availability,  current  status  and  use  of  NTFPs  were  collected  from  forest  user  groups.  Discussions  were  done  for  listing  of  available  NTFPs  and  their  identification and suitable site selection.  The  workshop  was  conducted  at  the  district  level  comprising  the  community  members,  traders,  concerned  stakeholders,  members  of  the  political  parties,  media  personnel  and  other  key  informants  in  Khalanga,  district  headquarter  of  Jajarkot.  The  objectives  for  the  conduction of workshop were:  Participatory assessment and information on the traded NTFPs,   Trading pattern/trading centers of NTFPs,   Existing NTFPs based enterprises in the district,  Potentiality  for  the  establishment  of  various  models  of  community  based  forest  enterprises in the district,  NTFPs having the potentiality of value addition at local level, 

2.1.2 Focus group discussion  
Discussion/interaction  was  held  with  the  villagers,  NTFPs  collectors  and  traders  to  discuss  about NTFPs collection, trading pattern, trade value at the local level.  

2.1.3 Identification of NTFPs 
NTFPs were identified visually on the basis of researcher's knowledge and consultation with  local  resource  persons.  Unidentified  species  were  identified  consulting  with  the  reference  literatures  Polunin  and  Stainton  1984,  Stainton  1988,  Manandhar  2002,  IUCN  2004,  Baral  and Kurmi 2006, Ghimire et al. 2008 etc. Documentation of all available NTFPs were carried  out according to Shrestha 1998 and Press et al. 2000. 

2.1.4 Inventory of NTFPs 
Inventory methods include two different steps; habitat identification and sampling.  a) Habitat identification   The  sampling  was  conducted  in  defined  habitats.  The  identification  of  NTFPs  habitats  was  done systematically by observing at each of the following characteristics.  Altitude  Forest type  Aspect  Slope  Plant abundance    8   

b) Sampling  Following  procedures  were  applied  for  the  inventory  of  NTFP  resources  by  sampling  techniques:  At least one vertical elevation line was taken from bottom to top of the habitat. The number  of elevation line depends on the habitat width, plant density, aspect and topography.   For  every  elevation  line,  horizontal  sampling  lines  were  set  up  at  100  m  elevation  intervals.  The sampling plots were set up along the horizontal line.  The plots were determined as 1 m × 1 m for herbs, 5 m × 5 m for shrubs and 10 m ×  10 m for trees (Raunkiaer, 1934).  Horizontal distance between two plots was 100 m.  Inventory forms were filled for every sampling plot. 

2.2 Secondary Data Collection 
Secondary  data  were collected  from  all  the  possible  documents  as  reports,  articles, maps,  official records, and other published and unpublished materials related to NTFPs assessment  and surveys.  

2.3 Data Processing and Analysis 
Data  obtained  from  the  field  were  analyzed  to  find  out  frequency,  relative  frequency,  density,  relative  density,  matrix  preference  ranking  (MPR),  rapid  vulnerability  assessment  (RVA), potentiality for value addition and market linkage, etc. 

2.3.1 Frequency and relative frequency 
Frequency  is  the  number  of  sampling  units  in  which  the  particular  species  occur,  thus  express  the  dispersion  of  various  species  in  a  community.  It  refers  to  the  degree  of  dispersion  in  terms  of  percentage  occurrence  (Raunkiaer,  1934;  Zobel  et  al.,  1987).  Frequency and relative frequency were calculated using the following formulae; 
Frequency = No. of quadrats in which species occured × 100 Total Number of quadrats studied

 

  Relative frequency is frequency of a species in relation to other species. 
Relative Frequency % = Frequency of a species × 100 Total frequency of all species

 

9   

2.3.2 Density and relative density 
Density expresses the numerical strength of the presence of species in a community. It is the  number  of  individuals  per  unit  area  and  is  expressed  as  number  per  hectare  (Raunkiaer,  1934; Zobel et al., 1987). 
Density Pl/ha = Total number of plant of any spcies × 10000 Total number of quadrat studied × area of quadrat

 

Relative density is the density of a species with respect to the total density of all species.  
Relative Density % = Density of individual species × 100 Total density of all species

 

2.3.3 Prioritization of NTFPs 
Matrix preference ranking (MPR) was used to find out most preferred NTFPs. By using this  tool, the most preferred NTFP species were identified from forests for the detail study. The  criteria of preference were made by the users, availability of the resources and potential for  value addition.  Moreover,  the  prioritization  criteria  of  other  development  organizations  like  NSCFP,  SNV,  ANSAB, BDS‐MaPS and matrix ranking criteria have been thoroughly examined to attain the  set objectives with proper justification.  
Table 4: Matrix Preference Ranking 

SN  1  2  3  4  5  6 

Criteria  Availability (Space)  Availability (Quantity)  Market demand   Market Value  Availability  of  Skilled  Manpower  Processing technology  

Scale and value  Range from 4‐1: Abundant (4)‐Very Scarce (1)  Range from 4‐1: Abundant (4)‐Very Scarce (1)  Range from 4‐1: High demand (4)‐Low demand (1) Range from 4‐1: High value (4)‐Very low value (1) Range from 4‐1: Present (4)‐Almost absent (1) 

7  8  9  10 

Manual/Local  technology  (4),  mechanical  (3),  expertise  required  (2),  sophisticated/foreign  technology (1)  Conservation status  Range  from  4‐1:  Did not  need  attention  (4)‐ Extremely Vulnerable(1)  Potential for cultivation  Value 4 or 0: Yes (4)‐No (0) Prospects  of  value  Value 4 or 0: Yes (4)‐No (0) addition at local level  Collection on annual basis Value 4 or 0: Yes (4)‐No (0)

Source: Adopted from Gurung and Pyakurel (2006)  

10   

2.3.4 Rapid Vulnerability Assessment (RVA) 
RVA method was used to collect information to identify species that may be at risk of over  exploitation.  It  was  developed  as  a  quick  way  of  collecting  both  scientific  and  indigenous  information about species and has been used to recommend whether or not that resource  species is suitable for harvest.   Four broad criteria viz ecology, life forms, parts used and harvesting methods was selected  for the RVA analysis.  Under the four criteria, there were 7 sub criteria. Score of 1 was given  to criteria which causes vulnerability to the species whereas 2 were given to those criteria  which  cause  less  vulnerability  to  the  species.  For  example,  Kaulo  reproduces  only  from  seeds, therefore score 1 will be given whereas Sugandhawal can be reproduced both from  seeds and from rhizomes, therefore score of 2 will be given. 
Table 5: Criteria for RVA 

Potential for sustainable use  Low abundance (1)  High abundance (2)  Slow growth (1) Fast growth (2) Ecology  Sexual  reproduction  only  Both  sexual  &  vegetative  reproduction  (1)  (2)  Habitat ‐ specific (1) Habitat ‐ non specific (2)  Life forms  Tree and shrub (1); Herb (2)   Parts used  Roots, rhizomes barks and bulbs (1); leaves, flowers , fruits (2)  Harvesting  Size/age classes not selected for harvesting (2); particular size/age classes  methods  selected for harvesting (1)  Source:  Watts  et  al.,  1996;  Cunningham,  1994,  1996a,  2001;  Wong  and  Jenifer,  2001  and  Gurung and Pyakurel (2006) 

Criteria 

2.4 Report Writing 
All the collected information will be compiled to prepare a comprehensive report on NTFPs  assessment of Jajarkot district.    

 

11   

CHAPTER THREE E: FINDING GS 
3.1 Do ocumentation of Plan nt Species  
3.1.1 Dis stribution o of Plant spe ecies in surveyed VDC Cs 
Survey  fo NTFPs/MAPs  was  concentrated  in  3  distinct ecological  regions  according  to  th or  t  he  altitude.  Altogether  13 VDCs we ere surveyed d during the e visit. Uppe er tropical to o sub tropical  as  ted  by  Kha agenkot,  Rag gda,  Bhagw wati,  Bhur,  Dasera  and Sima  VDC d  Cs;  zone  wa represent temperat te zone was   represented d by Dhime, Kortang and d Majhkot V VDCs; and sub alpine zon ne  was represented by Paink, Ramid danda, Raka ayagaun and Garkhakot V VDCs.  List of pla ant species r recorded fro om the 13 VD DCs of Jajark kot district is s given in an nnex 1. Highe er  number o of plant species was rec corded in Garkhakot VDC C with 142 species, follo owed by Pain nk  with  138 species,  Ro 8  okayagaun  w 133  species  and  D with  Dhime  with  120  species  (Diagram  2 2).  Due  to  limited  perio of  time,  it  was  not possible  to survey  the  whole  dis od  t  o  strict.  Dhime,  aun,  Garkha akot  and  Paink  were  th horoughly  su urveyed  therefore  highe number  o er  of  Rokayaga plants  w were  recorde from  those  VDCs.  M ed  Most  of  the  h high  valued NTFPs  and MAPs  wer d  d  re  incorpora ated despite e the limited d time frame e and other constraints r s. This was done primarily  by  visit  to  the  NTFPs  hot  spot or,  interv ts  view  with  v villagers,  col llectors  and village  level  d  and also wit th the refere ence from c collection pe ermit issued  by District  Forest Office.  traders, a Only low wer part of Bhagwati, Rag gda, Khagen nkot, Bhur, S Sima and Das sera VDCs w were surveye ed  therefore e these VDCs were repre esented by least numbe er of plant sp pecies. 
160 140 142 138 133 12 20 107 97 95 91 89 86

Number of Species

120 100 80 60 40 20 0

77

73

73

  Diagram 2 2: Number of f Plants recor rded in survey yed 11 VDCs. . 

3.1.2 Lis st of plant s species reco orded in su urveyed VDCs 
A  total  of  248 plant  species falling into 95 families were recorded o d from Jajark kot district.  It  should be noted that t not all the plants were e recorded in the quadr rat and furth her few of th he  ot documented because e they were not in flowe ering stage. T Therefore th he  herb species were no 12 

number of plant species will increase after the repeated survey. However, the research was  comprehensive  in  the  sense  that  all  the  NTFPs  (both  traded  and  non  tradable)  were  recorded and documented during the survey. List of documented plant species is given in  Table 6. Most of the plants were identified up to species level while few are indentified up  to genus level and some were left unidentified.  
Table 6: List of plant species documented in surveyed 11 VDCs  SN  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  Scientific Name  Abies spectabilis  Acacia catechu  Acanthopanax cissifolius  Acer caesium  Acer oblongum  Acer sp  Achyranthes bidentata  Aconogonum molle  Acorus calamus  Aegle marmelos  Aesculus indica  Agave cantula  Ageratum conyzoides  Ainsliaea latifolia  Albizia chinensis  Albizia julibrissin  Alnus nepalensis  Anacyclus sp  Anaphalis busua  Anemone rivularis  Anemone tetrasepala  Anemone vitifolia  Argemone mexicana  Arisaema costatum  Arisaema griffithii  Arisaema tortuosum  Arnebia benthami  Artemisia indica  Asparagus racemosus   Aster himalaicus  Astilbe rivularis  Bauhinia purpurea  Bauhinia vahlii  Benthamidia capitata  Berberis aristata  Berberis asiatica  Common/ Local Name  Gobre salla  Khayar  Dangdinge  Tilailo  Phirphire  Tilailo  Dativan  Thotne  Bojho  Bael  Pangar/Pangra  Kituki/ Ketuki  Gandhe  Sahadeva sahadevi  Kalo siris  Siris  Utis  Akarkara  Seto ghas  Kangarate     Kaptase  Thakal  Sarpa makai/ Banku  Sarpa makai/ Banku  Sarpa makai/ Banku     Titepati  Kurilo     Thulo ausadhi  Koiralo  Bhorla   Dimmur/ Dimmar  Chutro  Chutro  Family  Pinaceae  Leguminosae  Araliaceae  Aceraceae  Aceraceae  Aceraceae  Amaranthaceae  Polygonaceae  Araceae  Rutaceae  Hippocastanaceae  Agavaceae  Compositae  Compositae  Leguminosae  Leguminosae  Betulaceae  Compositae  Compositae  Ranunculaceae  Ranunculaceae  Ranunculaceae  Papaveraceae  Araceae  Araceae  Araceae  Boraginaceae  Compositae  Liliaceae  Compositae  Saxifragaceae  Leguminosae  Leguminosae  Cornaceae  Berberidaceae  Berberidaceae 

13   

37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80 

Berberis wallichiana  Bergenia ciliata  Betula alnoides  Betula utilis  Boehmeria rugulosa  Boenninghausenia albiflora  Bombax ceiba  Brassaiopsis sp  Butea minor  Calanthe tricarinata  Caltha palustris  Campylotropis speciosa  Cannabis sativa  Capparis zeylanicum  Chesneya cuneata  Cinnamomum glaucescens  Circium sp  Cirsium falconeri  Cissampelos pareira  Cleistocalyx operculata  Clematis alternata  Clematis buchaniana  Clematis montana  Coccinia grandis  Colebrookea oppositifolia  Colocasia fallax  Coriaria napalensis  Corydalis sp  Cotoneaster microphyllus  Cuscuta reflexa  Cynoglossum zeylanicum  Dactylorhiza hatagirea  Dalbergia sissoo  Daphne bholua  Daphne papyracea  Daphniphyllum himalense  Datura suaveolens  Debregeasia longifolia  Debregeasia salicifolia  Dendrobium aphyllum  Dendrophthoe falcata  Desmodium multiflorum  Dioscorea bulbifera  Dioscorea deltoidea 

Chutro  Pakhanved  Saur  Bhoj Patra  Dar/ Githa  Makhe mauro  Simal  Palouri  Bhujetro        Sakhino  Bhango     Chyali  Malagiri/ Sugandhakokila  Sungure kanda  Sungure kanda  Batulopate  Kyamuna  Junge lahera  Junge lahera  Junge lahera  Gol Kankri  Dhusure     Machhyan  Okhre ghas     Akashbeli  Kanike Kuro  Hatajadi  Sissoo  Lokhta  Lokhta  Rachan/ Rakchan  Dhature phul        Sungava  Ainjeru  Bakhre ghas  Gittha  Ban tarul 

Berberidaceae  Saxifragaceae  Betulaceae  Betulaceae  Urticaceae  Rutaceae  Bombacaceae  Araliaceae  Leguminosae  Orchidaceae  Ranunculaceae  Leguminosae  Cannabaceae  Capparaceae  Leguminosae  Lauraceae  Compositae  Compositae  Menispermaceae  Myrtaceae  Ranunculaceae  Ranunculaceae  Ranunculaceae  Cucurbitaceae  Labiateae  Araceae  Coriariaceae  Fumariaceae  Rosaceae  Convolvulaceae  Boraginaceae  Orchidaceae  Leguminosae  Thymelaeaceae  Thymelaeaceae  Daphniphyllaceae  Solanaceae  Urticaceae  Urticaceae  Orchidaceae  Loranthaceae  Leguminosae  Dioscoreaceae  Dioscoreaceae 

14   

81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124 

Diploknema butyracea  Dipsacus inermis  Drepanostachyum falcatum  Drymaria diandra  Elaeagnus parvifolia  Elsholtzia blanda  Elsholtzia eriostachya  Elsholtzia fruticosa  Engelhardia spicata  Eupatorium adenophorum  Euphorbia royleana  Euphorbia wallichii  Eurya acuminata  Fagopyrum diabotrys  Ficus neriifolia  Ficus semicordata  Fragaria nubicola  Ganoderma lucidum  Gaultheria fragrantissima  Gentianella sp  Geranium wallichianum  Geum elatum  Girardinia diversifolia  Gnaphalium affine   Hedera nepalensis  Hedychium spicatum  Heracleum candicans  Holarrhena pubescens  Hypericum uralum  Ilex excelsa  Impatiens sulcata  Imperata sp  Indigofera sp  Inula cappa  Ipomoea purpurea  Iris clarkei  Iris hookeriana  Jasminum dispermum  Jasminum humile   Jatropha curcas  Juglans regia  Jurinea dolomiaea  Lagerstroemia parviflora   Lantana camara 

Chiuri  Banmula  Nigalo  Abijalo  Gunyeli  Ban silam        Mauwa  Banmara  Syundi     Jhingano  Ban phapar  Dudhilo  Khanyu  Bhuin kafal  Chyau  Dhasingre/ Kalo angeri     Raklamul     Allo  Buki phul  Kathe lahero  Gai sarro     Indrajau/ Ban Khirro  Khareto  Thinke  Mujuro  Khar ghas     Gai tihare     Ninejadi  Ninejadi  Seto jai  Jai  Sajwan/ Ratanjoto  Okhar  Dhupjadi  Bot Dhayaro  Ban Phanda 

Sapotaceae  Dipsacaceae  Gramineae  Caryophyllaceae  Elaeagnaceae  Labiateae  Labiateae  Labiateae  Juglandaceae  Compositae  Euphorbiaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Theaceae  Polygonaceae  Moraceae  Moraceae  Rosaceae  Ganodermataceae  Ericaceae  Gentianaceae  Geraniaceae  Rosaceae  Urticaceae  Compositae  Araliaceae  Zingiberaceae  Umbelliferae  Apocynaceae  Hypericaceae  Aquifoliaceae  Balsaminaceae  Gramineae  Leguminosae  Compositae  Convolvulaceae  Iridaceae  Iridaceae  Oleaceae  Oleaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Juglandaceae  Compositae  Lythraceae  Verbenaceae 

15   

125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168 

Lilium nepalense  Lindera pulcherrima  Lobaria sp  Lonicera myrtillus  Luculia gratissima  Lycopodium clavatum  Lycopodium phlegmeria  Lyonia ovalifolia  Macaranga pustulata  Maesa chisia  Maesa macrophylla  Mahonia napaulensis  Mallotus philippensis  Mazus surculosus  Meconopsis paniculata  Melia azederach  Morchella sp  Morina sp  Morus alba  Murraya koenigii  Myrica esculenta  Neolamarckia cadamba  Neolitsea cuipala  Neolitsea pallens  Nepeta nervosa  Osbeckia stellata  Osyris wightiana  Oxalis corniculata  Paris polyphylla  Parmelia sp  Peperonia tetraphylla  Persea gamblei  Persea odoratissima  Persicaria capitata  Phoenix acaulis  Picea smithiana  Pinus roxburghii  Pinus wallichiana  Piptanthus nepalensis  Pleione hookeriana  Plumeria rubra  Polygonatum cirrhifolium  Polygonatum verticillatum  Potentilla fruticosa 

Khiraula  Fusure  Jhyau     Lukuli  Nagbeli  Nagbeli  Angeri  Mallato  Bilaune  Bhogate  Daruhaldi  Sindure/ Rohini  Tapre jhar     Bakainu  Guchi chyau     Kimu  Mitho nim  Kafal  Kadam           Chulesi  Nune/ Nundhiki  Chari amilo  Satuwa  Jhyau     Kathe kaulo  Kaulo  Raktanyaule jhar  Khajuriya  Juhule sallo  Khote salla  Rani salla        Galainchi/ Choya phul  Khiraunla  Khiraunla    

Liliaceae  Lauraceae  Lobariaceae  Caprifoliaceae  Rubiaceae  Lycopodiaceae  Lycopodiaceae  Ericaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Myrsinaceae  Myrsinaceae  Berberidaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Scrophulariaceae  Papaveraceae  Meliaceae  Morchellaceae  Dipsacaceae  Moraceae  Rutaceae  Myricaceae  Rubiaceae  Lauraceae  Lauraceae  Labiateae  Melastomataceae  Santalaceae  Oxalidaceae  Liliaceae  Parmeliaceae  Piperaceae  Lauraceae  Lauraceae  Polygonaceae  Palmae  Pinaceae  Pinaceae  Pinaceae  Leguminosae  Orchidaceae  Apocynaceae  Liliaceae  Liliaceae  Rosaceae 

16   

169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206  207  208  209  210  211  212 

Potentilla fulgens  Primula denticulata  Primula floribunda  Prinsepia utilis  Prunus cerasoides  Pyracantha crenulata  Pyrus pashia  Quercus glauca  Quercus lanata  Quercus leucotrichophora  Quercus semecarpifolia  Ranunculus brotherusii  Rheum australe  Rhododendron arboreum  Rhododendron barbatum  Rhododendron campanulatum  Rhododendron lepidotum  Rhus wallichii  Ribes orientale  Ricinus communis  Rosa macrophylla  Rosa sericea  Rosa webbiana  Roscoea alpina  Roscoea purpurea  Rubia manjith  Rubus ellipticus  Rubus hoffmeisterianus  Rumex crispus  Rumex hastatus  Salix babylonica  Salix calyculata  Salix sp  Sapindus mukorossi  Sapium insigne  Sarcococca hookeriana  Saurauia napaulensis  Saussurea sp  Selinum tenuifolium  Semecarpus anacardium  Shorea robusta  Sida rhombifolia  Skimmia laureola  Smilacina purpurea 

Bajradanti        Dhatelo  Paiyin  Ghangaru  Mayal  Phalant  Banjh  Banjh  Khasru     Aksechuk  Lali guras  Chimal        Bhalayo     Ander  Ban gulab  Ban gulab  Ban gulab        Majitho  Ainselu  Bhalu aainselu     Halhale  Bains        Rittha  Khirro  Telparo/ Fitfiya  Gogan     Bhutkesh  Bhalayo  Sal/ Sakhuwa  Balu  Chumlani    

Rosaceae  Primulaceae  Primulaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Fagaceae  Fagaceae  Fagaceae  Fagaceae  Ranunculaceae  Polygonaceae  Ericaceae  Ericaceae  Ericaceae  Ericaceae  Anacardiaceae  Grossulariaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Zingiberaceae  Zingiberaceae  Rubiaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae  Polygonaceae  Polygonaceae  Salicaceae  Salicaceae  Salicaceae  Sapiindaceae  Euphorbiaceae  Buxaceae  Saurauiaceae  Compositae  Umbelliferae  Anacardiaceae  Dipterocarpaceae  Malvaceae  Rutaceae  Liliaceae 

17   

213  214  215  216  217  218  219  220  221  222  223  224  225  226  227  228  229  230  231  232  233  234  235  236  237  238  239  240  241  242  243  244  245  246  247  248   

Smilax ferox  Smilax orthoptera  Smilax sp  Sorbaria tomentosa  Sorbus cuspidata  Species 1  Swertia angustifolia  Swertia chirayita  Symplocos pyriifolia  Symplocos ramosissima  Taraxacum officinale  Taxus wallichiana  Terminalia alata  Thalictrum foliolosum  Toona ciliata  Trifolium repens  Tsuga dumosa  Unidentified sp  Unidentified Tree, P10064  Unidentified Tree, P10065  Urtica dioica  Usnea longissima  Valeriana jatamansii  Vanda sp  Viburnum cylindricum   Viburnum erubescens  Viburnum grandiflorum   Viburnum mullaha  Viola wallichiana  Viscum album  Vitex negundo  Woodfordia fruticosa  Zanthoxylum armatum  Zanthoxylum nepalense  Zanthoxylum oxyphyllum  Zizyphus mauritiana 

Kukur daino  Kukur daino  Kukur daino        Ghagar  Bhale chiraito  Chiraito  Kholme/ Kharane  Dabdabe  Tukee phul  Lauth salla  Saaj  Bansuli  Tuni  Beuli  Thingure salla  Kamale        Sisnu  Jhyau  Samayo        Tite/ Asare     Malo     Hadchur  Simalee  Dhayaro  Timur  Boke timur  Lahare timur  Bayar 

Liliaceae  Liliaceae  Liliaceae  Rosaceae  Rosaceae     Gentiniaceae  Gentiniaceae  Symplocaceae  Symplocaceae  Compositae  Taxaceae  Combretaceae  Ranunculaceae  Meliaceae  Leguminosae  Pinaceae  Leguminosae        Urticaceae  usneaceae  Valerianaceae  Orchidaceae  Sambucaceae  Sambucaceae  Sambucaceae  Sambucaceae  Violaceae  Loranthaceae  Verbenaceae  Lythraceae  Rutaceae  Rutaceae  Rutaceae  Rhamnaceae 

3.2 Assessment of NTFPs in Jajarkot  
This  chapter  deals  with  the  study  on  the  population  parameters  of  traded  (or  valuable)  NTFPs  of  the  surveyed  13  VDCs.  As  the  study  focused  on  the  assessment  of  high  valued  NTFPs; population parameters of none traded and/or low volume/low valued NTFPs was not  assessed. 

18   

3.2.1 Dhime VDC 
Lokta and Allo are the most potential NTFPs for enterprise development in Dhime VDC. Both  Lokta and Allo were distributed abundantly in the higher altitudes of Dhime VDCs. Kalo Lokta  (Daphne papyracea) had density of 13136 individuals per hectare in the temperate forest.  Similarly, Seto Lokta (Daphne bholua) had density of 9225 individuals per hectare. Allo has  the density of 7067 individuals per hectare. Kaulo was available in the edges of agricultural  fields and was not abundant in the core forest region.   NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:  Titepati,  Kurilo,  Bhang,  Kalo  Lokta,  Seto  Lokta,  Nigalo,  Allo,  Okhar, Kafal, Kaulo, Majitho, Sisnu, Malo and Jhyau1.  

3.2.2 Ramidanda VDC  
Ramidanda  was  surveyed  between  1800m  to  2800m.  Lokta,  Allo  and  Lauth  salla  are  the  potential NTFPs and available evenly in the higher elevations of the VDC. Kalo Lokta had the  density of 9400 individuals per hectare, Seto Lokta had the density of 8000 individuals per  hectare, Allo had the density of 5333 individuals per hectare and finally Lauth salla had the  density  of  200  individuals  per  hectare.  Guchi  chyau  was  not  recorded  during  the  survey  because of the off season but secondary information reveals that it was available in the area.  NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:  Bojho,  Titepati,  Kurilo,  Bhang,  Kalo  Lokta,  Seto  Lokta,  Tarul,  Allo, Ninejadi, Okhar, Guchi chyau, Kafal, Satuwa, Dhatelo, Majitho, Lauth salla, Timur, Jhyau. 

3.2.3 Rokayagaun VDC 
Rokayagaun VDC was surveyed between 1800m to 3565m. Lokta, Allo, Bhutkesh and Bhang  are  the  potential  NTFPs  of  the  region.  Kalo  Lokta  had  the  density  of  8750  individuals  per  hectare, Seto Lokta had the density of 10667 individuals per hectare, Allo had the density of  6267  individuals  per  hectare  and  finally  Bhang  had  the  density  of  9091  individuals  per  hectare.  NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:  Bojho,  Titepati,  Bhang,  Kalo  Lokta,  Seto  Lokta,  Tarul,  Allo,  Ninejadi, Okhar, Guchi chyau, Kafal, Dhatelo, Majitho, Timur, Jhyau. 

3.2.4 Paink VDC 
Paink VDC was surveyed between 3565m to 1760m. Dhatelo was dominant NTFP along the  lower belt of Paink. It was abundant along the Sarughat River with the density of about 1000  individuals per hectare. Kalo and Seto Lokta were abundant in the temperate and lower sub  alpine region of Paink VDC. Both of them had the density of 10800 individuals per hectare.  Similarly, Allo had the density of 7500 individuals per ha.  NTFPs/MAPs of trade value: Bojho, Titepati, Bhang, Hatajadi, Kalo Lokta, Seto Lokta, Tarul,  Allo, Bhutkesh, Okhar, Kaulo, Guchi chyau, Kafal, Dhatelo, Majitho, Lauth salla, Timur, Jhyau.                                                         
 The list was given in common/local name so that the all the readers understand the report. Refer to annex 1  for corresponding scientific names. 
1

19   

3.2.5 Garkhakot VDC 
Garkhakot  VDC  was  surveyed  between  the  altitude  of  1650m  to  3600m.  Most  number  of  species was recorded from this VDC. A total of 130 species were recorded from Garkhakot  VDC.  Valuable  NTFPs  like  Samayo,  Hatajadi  etc  were  recorded,  but  their  density  was  very  low.  Lokta  was  potential  in  the  upper  elevation  while  Timur  and  Dhatelo  were  potential  NTFPs in the lower elevation (upper tropical to lower temperate). Density of Seto Lokta was  6675  ind/ha;  Kalo  Lokta  was  6843  ind/ha;  Allo  was  4827  ind/ha;  Timur  was  1200  ind/ha  and that of Dhatelo was 1400 ind/ha.  NTFPs/MAPs of trade value: Titepati, Simal, Bhang, Malagiri, Hatajadi, Kalo and Seto Lokta,  Nigalo,  Allo,  Sajiwan,  Okhar,  Kafal,  Khote  salla,  Dhatelo,  Kaulo,  Bhutkesh,  Lauth  salla,   Majitho, Samayo, Timur, Jhyau. 

3.2.6 Kortang VDC 
The  VDC  was  surveyed  from  1400m  to  2400m.  The  study  primarily  focused  on  the  availability  of  sub  tropical  NTFPs  in  Kortang  VDCs.  A  total  of  103  species  was  recorded  from  the  VDC.  Dhatelo  and  Timur were the most promising NTFPs for enterprise  development.  Dhatelo  and  Timur  co  dominates  the  second  storey  of  forest  in  few  parts  of  Korthang  VDC. Density of Timur was 1578 individuals/ha and  that of Dhatelo was 1183 individuals/ha. 

NTFPs/MAPs  of trade value: Titepati, Simal,  Bhang,  Kalo Lokta, Nigalo, Sajiwan, Okhar, Kafal, Khote salla, Dhatelo, Kaulo, Majitho, Timur, Jhyau. 

Picture 2: Dhatelo scrubland in Kortang

3.2.7 Majhkot VDC 
A total of 91 plant species were recorded in Majhkot VDC. Sub tropical region of the VDC was  surveyed  more  thoroughly;  therefore  temperate  species  of  Majhkot  VDC  was  not  represented  in  this  study.  Survey  was  done  between  the  altitudes  ranging  from  1000m  to  1700m. Shorea robusta was found up to 1400m in the hills of Majhkot. Dhatelo and Timur  were most promising NTFPs of Majhkot VDC. Density of Timur was 980 individuals per ha  and that of Dhatelo was 1120 individuals/ha.    NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:  Titepati,  Dar,  Simal,  Bhang,  Ratanjoto,  Sindure,  Kaulo,  Khote  salla, Dhatelo, Majitho, Timur, Jhyau. 

3.2.8 Dasera VDC  
Dasera VDC was surveyed least therefore represented by least number of plant species. Only  73  species  are  recorded  during  the  survey.  The  survey  was  confined  to  sub  tropical  region  (900m to 1850m). Lower part of the VDC is influenced by tropical vegetation. Chiuri was the  potential  NTFPs  of  the  VDCs.  It  is  generally  distributed  on  the  edges  of  agricultural  land,  20   

fallow  land  and  near  the  bank  of  river.  Its  density  is  low  and  as  low  as  320  individuals/  hectare was recorded from Dasera VDC.  NTFPs/MAPs of trade value:  Titepati, Koiralo, Dar, Simal, Bhang, Chiuri, Ratanjoto, Sindure,  Khote salla, Dhatelo, Majitho, Jhyau. 

3.2.9 Sima VDC 
Upper tropical and lower subtropical region of Sima VDC was surveyed. Only 72 species was  recorded from the VDC. Lower part of VDC is dominated by Shorea robusta. Bael and Chiuri  are  the  potential  NTFPs  for  enterprise  development.  Bael  had  the  density  of  400  individuals/ha, whereas Chiuri had 360 individuals/ha in Sima VDC.  NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:    Bael,  Titepati,  Koiralo,  Dar,  Simal,  Bhang,  Chiuri,  Ratanjoto,  Sindure, Khote salla, Dhatelo, Majitho, Jhyau. 

3.2.10 Bhur 
Tropical region of Bhur VDC was surveyed. Bael (Aegle marmelos),  Chiuri  (Diploknema  butyracea)  and  Khayar  (Acacia  catechu)  was  found potential for enterprise development. Bael was available on  forests and along the edges of river and cultivated or fallow lands.  The  fruit  is  yet  to  get  the  appropriate  attention.  Bael  had  the  density  of  338  individuals  per  hectare,  Chiuri  had  the  density  of  250  individuals  per  hectare  and  Khayar  had  the  density  of  167  individuals per ha.  NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:    Khayar,  Bael,  Titepati,  Koiralo,  Dar,  Picture  3:  Harvesting Simal,  Bhang,  Chiuri,  Ratanjoto,  Sindure,  Khote  salla,  Dhatelo,  Bael at Bhur  Majitho, Bayar, Jhyau. 

3.2.11 Khagenkot 
Upper  tropical  and  lower  sub  tropical  region  of  Khagenkot  VDC  was  surveyed  for  valuable  NTFPs.  Survey  was  concentrated  along  the  Thuli  Bheri  River. Chiuri and Khair were the potential NTFPs of  the  lower  parts  of  the  VDC.  Population  of  Chiuri  was 267 individuals per hectare and that of Khayir  was 129 individuals per hectare.   NTFPs/MAPs of trade value:  Khayar, Titepati, Dar,  Simal,  Bhang,  Chiuri,  Ratanjoto,  Khote  salla,  Picture 4: Chiuri tree in Khagenkot Dhatelo, Majitho, Bayar, Jhyau. 

21   

3.2.12 Ragda 
Upper tropical and lower sub tropical region of Ragda VDC was surveyed for valuable NTFPs.  Survey was concentrated along the Thuli Bheri River. Chiuri was the potential NTFPs of the  lower parts of the VDC. Population of Chiuri was 196 individuals per hectare.   NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:    Khayar,  Titepati,  Dar,  Simal,  Bhang,  Chiuri,  Ratanjoto,  Khote  salla, Dhatelo, Majitho, Bayar, Jhyau. 

3.2.13 Bhagwati 
Lower  sub  tropical  region  of  Bhagwati  VDC  was  surveyed  for  valuable  NTFPs.  Survey  was  concentrated along the Thuli Bheri River. Chiuri was the potential NTFPs of the lower parts of  the VDC. Population of Chiuri was 146 individuals per hectare.   NTFPs/MAPs  of  trade  value:    Khayar,  Bojho,  Bhang,  Dar,  Chiuri,  Ratanjoto,  Sindure,  Khote  salla, Dhatelo, Majitho, Jhyau. 

3.3 

Identification of Tradable NTFPs of Jajarkot  

This study was limited to document NTFPs that are already in trade or potential to trade. A  wide variety of NTFPs have been  recorded during the survey. Out of the 248 plant species  recorded,  only  38  are  NTFPs  of  trade  value  (Table  7).  They  have  been  used  in  traditional  medicines,  foods  and  other  purposes.  With  access  to  marketing  infrastructures,  many  of  traditionally used NTFPs can be traded commercially.   All the available NTFPs fall under following seven broad categories:  
Table 7: List of NTFPs of the area

SN  Category  1  MAPs 

2  3  4  5  6  7   

NTFPs Jhyau,  Sindure,  Bhutkesh,  Bojho,  Dar,  Dhatelo,  Guchi  chyau,  Hatajadi,  Kaulo,  Kurilo,  Lauth  salla,  Malagiri,  Ninejadi, Samayo, Satuwa, Simal, Timur, Titepati, Dhupjadi,  Pakhanved, Akarkara  Fibers  Bhang, Allo, Lokta Dyes  Majitho, Padamchal Bamboos, Rattans Vines  Nigalo Wild Food  Bael, Bayar, Chiuri, Kafal, Koiralo, Malo, Okhar, Tarul  Resins  Khote salla,  Others  Rittha,  Ratanjoto (Sajiwan)

 

22   

3.4 

Prioritization of NTFPs 

Ten  generic  criteria  were  selected  for  NTFPs  prioritization.  Table  8  presents  the  matrix  preference  ranking  of  fifteen  high  valued  NTFPs  which  were  compiled  according  to  the  outcome  of  consultation  meeting  and  as  per  the  market  demand  and  availability  within  Jajarkot district.   The weightage ranged from 1‐4 for each commodity, with 1 being the lowest and 4 being  the  highest.  However,  for  the  last  three  criteria  i.e.  possibilities  of  cultivation  and  domestication,  value  addition  at  local  level  and  collection  frequency,  the  weightage  was  given 0 or 4; 0 being no possibility and 4 with possibility.    Similarly,  weight  of  each  generic  criteria  ranged  from  1  to  5,  which  was  given  by  the  researcher  according  to  their  importance,  and  consultation  with  the  experts.  It  is  worth  to  mention  that  project  related  overriding  criteria  (WUPAP  focal  area)  lies  concurrent  with  potential  to  employment  generation  with  emphasis  on  the  involvement  of  pro  poor,  therefore value of 5 was given to this critieria.    Final  score  was  a  result  of  multiplication  of  score  of  generic  criteria  and  score  given  by  communities for each commodity for specific criteria.  

 

  Picture 5, 6 and 7: Pictures of one day workshop at, Jajarkot   

23   

Table 8: Matrix ranking of NTFPs in Jajarkot district (Most preferred species have high score)  Criteria →      NTFPs ↓    Kurilo  Allo  Timur  Kaulo  Chiuri  Jhyau  Sugandhawal  Ratanjoto (Sajiwan)  Aksechuk (Padamchal)  Majitho  Dhatelo  Bael  Lokta  Pashanved  Jatamansii  Satuwa  Rittha  Dhupjadi  Guchi chyau  Market Price (4)  Value addition  at local level (3)  Potential for  Cultivation and  Domestication  (5)  Trade value (4)  Technology (3)  Skilled  Manpower (2)  Collection  frequency (4)  Conservation  status (3) 

Availability,  Quantity (4) 

Availability,  Space (4) 

SN 

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19 

12  12  16  8  8  12  12  8  8  8  8  4  8  12  4  4  4  8  4 

4 16 12  12  16  12 8  12  8  4 8 12  12  12  4 4  8  8  4

16 16 12  16  8  16 16  4  16  4 4 4  16  8  16 16  8  16  16

16 12 8  8  4  16 8  4  16  4 4 4  8  8  16 16  4  16  16

8 4 6  6  6  8 4  6  4  8 4 6  4  6  6 4  6  4  4

12 6 3  12  9  6 3  3  9  3 6 3  6  3  3 3  3  9  3

6 3 9  3  9  6 3  12  9  12 9 9  3  9  3 3  12  3  3

20 20 20  20  20  0 20  20  20  20 20 20  0  20  0 20  20  0  0

12 12 12  12  12  12 12  12  0  12 12 12  12  0  12 0  0  0  0

12 12 12  12  12  12 12  12  0  12 12 12  12  0  12 0  0  0  0

118 113 110  109  104  100 98  93  90  87 87 86  81  78  76 70  65  64  50

The preference from above came from the deliberations of the workshop, consultation with NTFP experts, researcher’s knowledge, available  data and findings from the field.  24   

Total Score 

3.5 

RVA of Tradable Species of Jajarkot  

Rapid vulnerability assessment (RVA) analysis was carried out for the prioritized NTFP species  of the study area within Jajarkot. RVA was conducted on the basis of the following criteria: 1)  Ecology,  2)  Life  form,  3)  Parts  used  and  4)  Harvesting  method.  The  lower  the  score,  most  vulnerable is the NTFPs. On the basis of RVA analysis, the most vulnerable NTFP species were  Kaulo,  Jatamansii,  Satuwa,  Dhupjadi  and  Guchi  chyau.  It  was  observed  that  bark,  root,  rhizome  and  whole  plant  yielding  NTFPs  are  most  vulnerable  among  the  prioritized  NTFPs.  The details are shown in table 9 below:  
Table 9: RVA analysis of NTFPs in Jajarkot (Vulnerable species have low score) 

Growth rate 

Abundance 

Harvesting  methods  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  2  2  2  2  2  2 

Parts used 

Life form 

Habitat 

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19 

Kaulo  Jatamansii  Satuwa  Dhupjadi  Guchi chyau  Kurilo  Sugandhawal  Padamchal (Aksechuk)  Lokta  Rittha  Pashanved  Jhyau  Bael  Chiuri  Sajiwan  Allo  Timur  Majitho  Dhatelo 

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 2 2 2 2

1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 2

8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 10 11 11 12 12 13 13 13 13

 
 

 

25   

Score 

Criteria↓    SN    NTFPs→ 

Mode of  reproduction 

CHAPTER FOUR: TRADE VALUE AND TRADING PATTERN  
The  local  communities  of  the  study  areas  depend  on  subsistence  agriculture,  animal  husbandry  and  seasonal  migration  to  different  parts  of  Nepal  and  India  for  labor  work  for  their  livelihood  support.  However,  few  villagers  are  engaged  in  the  collection  and  trade  of  NTFPs as an additive source of income. 

4.1 Trade Value of NTFPs in Jajarkot  
The traded NTFPs/products and their trading pattern in the study areas are as follows  
Table 10: Marketing status/trade value of NTFPs in Jajarkot   SN  NTFPs  Products  Trade value, Kathmandu (NRs)  1  Allo  Raw, Semi processed  Dry bark: 80‐100/kg  Fiber: 350‐380/kg;   Cloth: 350/meter  2  Bael  Raw  5/kg  3  Bojho   Raw Rhizome: 15‐20/kg; Oil: 2800‐3000/kg 4  Chiraito   Raw, Crude form  375‐450/ kg  5  Chiuri Ghee  Raw  120/kg  6  Dhatelo  Raw Oil: 350/liter 7  Guchchi chyau  Raw  13000‐15000/kg  8  Handmade paper     10gm: 850/kori, 20gm: 1600/kori,   30 gm: 2800/kori 40gm: 3200/kori  9  Hemp fibers/ Hemp clothes  Fibre/ Cloths  Fibre: 70‐90/kg  Cloths: 300‐3500/meter  10  Jatamansi rhizomes  Raw  200‐240/kg  11  Jhyau  Raw/ Crude form  80‐100/ kg  12  Kaulo   Raw 15‐20/kg 13  Kurilo   Raw  200‐250/ kg  14  Lokta   Raw  80‐100/ kg   15  Majitho  Raw 40‐50 16  Malagiri  Raw  Seed: 80‐90/kg; Oil: 2100/kg  17  Padamchaal (R. australe)  Raw  Stem: 60‐80/kg;         Root: 120‐150/kg  18  Rittha  Raw  30‐40/kg  19  Satuwa  Raw 400‐500/kg 20  Sugandhawal   Raw/ Crude form  Rhizomes‐ 90‐100/ kg  Oil: 32000/kg  21  Timur   Raw/ Crude form  Seed: 60‐80/ kg;  Oil: 3500‐4000/kg 

4.2 Trading Pattern/ Market Chain of NTFPs 
Collectors → Village traders → Roadhead traders → District level traders  (Jajarkot Khalanga)  → Terai Traders (Nepalgunj)  26   

CHAPTER FIVE: OVERVIEW OF ENTERPRISE MODALITIES TO BE SET UP IN  JAJARKOT 
Forest  based  enterprises  exist  in  various  modalities,  which  can  be  outlined  in  aspects  of  ownership  structure,  linkages  to  raw  materials,  target  markets,  seasonality  of  operation,  technological  sophistication,  management  structure,  product  types  and  similar  characteristics.   On  the  ownership  dimension,  5  different  modalities  can  be  set  up  in  Jajarkot,  they  are  as  follows:  a) Sole enterprise,   b) FUG enterprise,  c) Consortium of FUGs enterprise,   d) Cooperatives and   e) Private limited company  In  terms  of linkages  of  raw  materials, economic  and  enterprise  activities  are  based on  raw  materials drawn from community forests and government forests of the district. 

5.1 Comparative Analysis of Enterprise Modalities in Jajarkot  
Using ranking scores at three levels (Good: 3, Fair: 2 and Poor: 1), a comparative analysis of  the proposed five enterprise modalities in Jajarkot was done as developed by ANSAB (2000),  Subedi  et  al.  (2002)  and  Gurung  (2007).  The  analysis  revealed  that  sole  ownership  is  not  necessarily  the  best  modality  in  the  forest  enterprise  sector.  Its  main  weakness  lies  in  the  organization for all kinds of issues and there are many risks.  Company  scored  the  lowest  of  the  other  modalities.  This  is  due  to  the  lack  of  institutional  mechanism,  such  as  with  FUGs,  to  ensure  linkages  with  support  services,  environmental  management and advocacy with DFO. On the other hand, companies scored higher than FUG  enterprises in the area of marketing because they can have better management capacity.  Cooperative  also  scored  less  than  FUG  enterprises  because  they  have  no  institutional  mechanism for advocacy with the DFO or for guarantying environmental management. They  also scored higher than FUG enterprises on marketing and on participation of woman.  FUGs  enterprise scored  less  on  marketing  because  of  the  lack  of  management  capacity  for  marketing.  However,  in  many  other  respects,  they  are  at  least  potentially  as  strong  as  the  other enterprise modalities.  In summary, if conservation of resource is the most important factor, and those criteria are  given additional weight, then the FUGs enterprise would score the highest.  On  the  other  hand,  if  woman’s  participation  is  the  most  important  and  if  this  ranking  is  weighted, then the cooperative modality would come out higher than the others.  27   

Table 11: Comparative analysis of enterprise modalities on market, social, technology and conservation criteria in Jajarkot    Enterprise modalities  Sole Enterprise  Market  No bargaining power  a. Price  unless organized into  a trade association  and even then it’s  difficult to guarantee  agreement on sale  price to buyers (1)  b.  Economy  of  Difficult to achieve (1)  scale  c.  Access  to  Difficult to organize  transport  (1)  d.  Access  to  Difficult to achieve   forward  linkage  (1)  and services  Environment  No positive impact  a. Biodiversity  can be guaranteed  and chances of  negative impact are  high without peer  pressure (1)  b.  Management  Needs good linkage  and monitoring  with FUGs and can’t  be ensured (1)  Factors  FUG Enterprise Potential for own  financing and therefore  for increased bargaining  power, but difficult to  reach agreement  amongst all members on  sale price to buyers (2)  Can be achieved (3)  Easy to organize (3)  FUGs Consortium Potential for own  financing and therefore  for increased bargaining  power, but difficult to  reach agreement  amongst all members on  sale price to buyers (2)  Can be achieved (3)  Easy to organize (3)  Cooperative Potential for own  financing and therefore  for increased bargaining  power, can also achieve  agreements amongst  members on sale price to  buyers (3)  Can be achieved (3)  Easy to organize (3)  Company Potential for own  financing and therefore  for increased bargaining  power and can also  easily reach agreement  on sale price amongst  shareholders (3)  Can be achieved (3)  Easy to organize (3) 

Management capacity is  Management  capacity  is  Management  capacity  is  Better  management  lacking to organize (2)  lacking to organize (2)  lacking to organize (2)  capacity to achieve  (3)  Potential for good  Good impact is only  More difficult to ensure  Good impact is only  achieved if increased  impact if participation of  participation but has  achieved if increased  all users is ensured and  potential for good impact  income results in  income results in  increased awareness of  conflicts are resolved (3)  (3)  increased awareness of  conservation (2)  conservation (2)  Can easily be organized  (3)  Can easily be organized   (3)  Needs good linkage with  FUG in order to be  possible and can’t be  ensured (2)  Needs good linkage with  FUG in order to be  possible and can’t be  ensured (2) 

28   

Social  There is no control  a.  Distribution  of  over equity (1)  income 

b.  Participation  of  Potential to be very  women  high if it’s a women  owned enterprise in  which women are  allowed in decision  making (3)  c. Impact of Policy  No advocacy power  with DFO (1) 

Potential to be  equitable if there is  transparency and good  participation in decision  making on CFUG funds  (2)  Potential for it to be  high, only if there is  support for participation  in decision making in  FUG committee (2)  Strong advocacy power  and potential support  from related  organizations (3)  Good access (3) 

By law‐guarantee, equity  and transparency with  distribution of dividends  but distribution of work  opportunities may not  always be equitable (3)  Potential for it to be high,  Can be very high in the  case of a women’s only  only if there is support  for participation in  cooperative (3)  decision making in FUG  committee (2)  Strong advocacy power  and potential support  from related  organizations (3)  Good access (3)  Little advocacy power if  it is community owned  cooperative (2)  Good access (3) 

Potential to be equitable  if there is transparency  and good participation in  decision making on FUG  funds (2) 

Equity is only ensured  through distribution of  shares. Influential share  holders can dominate  decision making (2)  Potential to be very high  in the case of a women’s  only company (3) 

No advocacy power with  DFO (1) 

Technology  Poor access (1)  a.  Access  to  value  addition  b. Sustainability  Very difficult to  ensure (1)  Total Score  (13) 

Good access (3) 

Can be ensured with  good management (3)  (29) 

Can be ensured with  good management (3)  (29) 

More difficult to ensure  continuing linkages (2)  (28) 

Can be ensured with  good management (3)  (28) 

29   

5.2 Identification of Enterprise Modalities to be set up in Jajarkot  
On  the  basis  of  the  resource  availability,  processing  technology,  communities’  willingness  and  market  linkage,  following  are  potential  NTFPs  for  enterprise  development  in  surveyed  areas. 
Table 12: Potentiality for enterprise development in Jajarkot  

SN  NTFPs/ Products  1  Lokta  bark,  Allo  fibre,  Hemp  fibre,  Sugandhawal,  Satuwa,  Chiraiyito,  Padamchal  2  Roots/rhizomes  of  Sugandhawal  and  Timur seeds  3  Timur,  Chirayito,  Sugandhawal, Satuwa   4  5  6  7 

Potentiality for enterprise development Collective  marketing  centre‐  A  cooperative  model  Processing of Valerian oil and Zanthoxylum oil

1. Establishment of multipurpose nursery; 2.  Commercial  cultivation  enterprises  in  private lands of the respective villages   Fruits of  Malo and Ainselu  Juice and herbal drinks making  Titepati  leaves,  Timur  leaves  and  Organic insecticides/pesticides making  barks, Angeri leaves, Bulu Ketuke   Seeds of Dhatelo, Pangar, Okhar  Edible oil expelling Allo and Hemp fibers  Fiber processing  and  clothes  weaving  enterprise  

5.3 Potential Markets of Value Added Products  
The  enterprise  models  and  the  NTFPs  products  to  be  value  added  are  designed  with  the  motive of markets linkage assurance focusing basically at the local level consumption.  
Table 13: Potential markets for NTFPs products 

SN  Specific products  1  Allo fiber/Allo thread  2  Crude  herbs  (Sugandhawal,  Chirayito, Padamchaal, Satuwa)  3  Edible oil  4  5  6  7 

Potential markets Clothes weaving enterprises of Kathmandu  Herbs and herbal products traders of Nepalgunj and  Kathmandu  Local  markets/  Household  level  and  Kathmandu  markets  Essential  oils  (Valerian  oil and  Various  essential  oils  traders/exporters  and  health  Zanthoxylum oil)  care herbal products manufacturers at Kathmandu   Herbal incense  Local markets/ Household level Juice (Malo and Ainselu)   Kathmandu markets Lokta bark/Lokta paper  Lokta  bark: Handmade  paper  enterprises  at  Majhkot  30 

 

Lokta  papers: Handicrafts  and  handmade  paper  exporters in Nepalgunj and Kathmandu   8  Organic insecticide/pesticides Farmers/ Household level 9  Seedlings  and  saplings  of  Other  VDCs  or  user  groups  for  cultivation  /  multipurpose herbs and NTFPs  Household level  10  Timur fruits  Traders  of  Jajarkot  Khalanga,  Surkhet,  Nepalgunj  and Kathmandu 

5.4 Requirements for Enterprise Success 
The success of the enterprises can be assessed according to the following dimensions:  a.  Raw  material  availability:  A  long  term  biologically  sustainable  supply  of  the  targeted  natural  product  in  sufficient  quantities  is  necessary  for  the  enterprise  activity  to  be  financially viable.  b.  Legal  access  to  and  control  over  the  natural  resources:  Collectors  should  be  able  to  manage natural products harvesting and incorporate the enterprise activity into their overall  forest  management  plans.  Enterprise  activities  must  comply  with  a  range  of  legal  requirements.  c.  Equitable  distribution  of  benefits:  If  community  members  do  not  feel  the  benefits  are  being  distributed  fairly  there  will  be  less  incentive  to  protect  the  natural  resources.  The  overall raw material source could become threatened as well as the commercial activity and  ecosystem’s biodiversity.  d.  Appropriate  processing  technology:  Is  the  technology  compatible  with  the  prevailing  infrastructure  and  human  resource  conditions  at  the  chosen  location?  Conditions  to  be  considered  include:  transport  and  storage  facilities;  equipment/machinery  availability;  power or fuel required for the processing activity and technical skills available.  e. Good management: People with knowledge of, and experience with managing proposed  activities should be available to run the enterprise or they should be closely involved in its  operations.  f. Commercial sustainability: Commercial sustainability is a simple concept. Sell the product  at a price and volume that covers all the costs associated with the natural product enterprise  with enough money left over as profit.  g. Access to capital: Startup capital and ongoing working capital is needed for the enterprise.  h.  Available  and  accessible  market  for  the  products:  Is  there  a  market  for  the  available  quantity  and  quality  of  product?  Is  there  adequate  demand  at  the  expected  selling  price?  Who will buy the product? 

31   

5.5 Challenges for Forest Based Enterprises  
Marketing  barrier  is  the  major  identified  challenges  for  the  NTFP  based  enterprises.  The  specific challenges are as follows:   Limited number of wholesalers and controlled price information.  Less developed market for many products and high price fluctuations.  Many  producers  with  small  quantities  of  products  receiving  only  a  small  portion  of  the total income.  Role and services of brokers and middlemen.  Lack  of  market  information;  current  marketing  channels,  amount  of  each  products,  price  variation  as  well  as  future  supply  and  demand  of  the  products,  processed  product, development and future price projection etc.  Most of the traders with an inadequate marketing knowledge and skills.  Limited access to availability of information and technology for product development.  Lack  of  marketing  infrastructure  like  storage,  transportation,  quality  testing  laboratory facilities, etc.  Difficulties in matching market requirements by suppliers due to several uncertainties  such  as  production  fluctuation,  decreased  collection  due  to  unfavorable  weather,  inconsistent  quality of products, lack of quality checking facilities, etc. 

5.6 Value Addition Techniques 
Value  addition  techniques  at  local  level  includes;  cleaning,  drying,  grading,  packaging  and  improved  marketing.  Commonly  practiced  methods  of  value  addition  of  NTFPs  and  their  techniques are presented in table 14. 
Table 14: Value addition techniques of NTFPs 

SN  Type of value  addition  1  Drying  2  3  4  5  Cleaning  Grading    Packaging  Improved trading 

Techniques Sun  drying: For  medicinal  herbs Shade  drying:  For  aromatic  plants  Cleaning  with  water  for  roots/rhizomes,  using  clothes  and  brushes for other parts  Grading on the basis of the quality Packaging in polythene bags ensuring free of moisture  Adopting collective bargaining

5.7 Processing Technology 
Simple and locally available technologies are more sustainable than the imported and more  sophisticated ones. Through the technological interventions there is a scope to improve the  quality, reduce the loss, increase the efficiency of operation and thereby reduce the cost.   32   

Technological  improvements  can  also  be  made  building  on  the  traditional  and  existing  technologies to match the current market requirement.  Few processing technology that can be adopted in Jajarkot are as follows: 
Table 15: Processing technology and application 

SN  1  2  3 

4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11 

Technology  Compacting  Debarking  Drying  (traditional  sun  drying,  fire  drying,  shade  drying  and  improved  solar drier)  Extraction of juice  Fiber extraction  Grinding and mixing  Oil expeller 

Examples of application Chiraito Lokta bark  All medicinal and aromatic plants 

Mallo  Allo, Hemp and Ketuke Herbal incense Fixed  oil  extraction  from  Pangar,  Okhar,  Dhatelo and Chiuri  Packaging  All  raw  NTFPs,  value  added  products  and  finished products  Paper making  Lokta bark  Steam distillation  Essential  oils  from  aromatic  plants  (Sugandhawal, Titepati, Bojho and Timur etc.)  Weaving  (Shuttle  loom  and  pedal  Allo/ Hemp clothes operated spinning)  

5.8 Need Based Assessment for Enterprise set up in Jajarkot 
The chain of steps for the establishment of community based forest enterprises in Jajarkot  include:  Yield estimation of the prioritized NTFPs in selected Community Forests  ↓  Selection of local motivators  ↓  Designation and preparation of worksheet for orientation to motivators  ↓  Orientation to local motivators  ↓  Identification of NTFPs collectors, local traders, and processors  ↓  Ranking of local collectors  ↓  Formation of collectors group  ↓  33   

Group discussion/ interaction/ motivation among motivators, collectors, traders,  processors, members of FUGs  ↓  Networking among FUGs/individuals  ↓  Capacity building/strengthening the concerned FUGs on institutional development,  governance/equity, fund mobilization, financial management, record keeping, benefit  sharing mechanism etc.  ↓  Training package on NTFPs promotion – time and technique of collection, local processing  technology, storage, quality control, packaging, labeling, cultivation of major NTFPs  ↓  Revisions in operational plan (OP) of concerned FUGs‐for the inclusion of enterprise  development activities in OP  ↓  Coordination with concerned government agencies and I/NGOs  ↓  Site selection (accessible site) for the modalities of enterprise other than sole  ↓  Assessment of the enterprise modalities – Sole/ FUG owned/ Consortium of FUGs/  Cooperatives/ Private Ltd. Co.  ↓  Threat/challenges/risk factor analysis  ↓  Visualization of output/expectations  ↓  Development of biological sustainable harvesting system – block rotation system preferable  for harvesting/ participatory monitoring system, cultivation of major traded NTFPs  ↓  Feasibility study on market, technology, equipments and availability of skill manpower  ↓  Identification of the enterprise modalities to be set up  ↓  Discussion among network members in different stages/steps (about objective, structure,  regulatory mechanisms, business plan, marketing strategy etc.)  ↓  Final meeting to discuss on common consensus and minuting of decisions  ↓  Preparation of work plan/division of work  ↓  Preparation of enterprise development plan/ business plan  ↓  Registration of enterprise in concerned government office  ↓  Management and conduction of pilot model enterprise      34   

CHAPTER SIX: NTFPs PROFILE  
A total of 15 species were selected for the profile preparation, as per the outcomes of one  day consultation workshop and field study and rigorous field survey. Thirteen species out of  15  were  ranked  high  on  Matrix  Preference  Ranking.  This  portion  deals  with  the  short  description of these plants, their availability in respected VDCs, their commercial uses and  traded parts. 

6.1 Kurilo (Asparagus racemosus) 
Kurilo  (Eng:  Asparagus;  Family:  Liliaceae)  is  a  perennial  much  branched,  spiny  climbing  shrub,  about  1.5m.  Roots  tuberous,  succulent,  30‐50cm  or  more  in  length,  found  growing wild in tropical and sub‐tropical parts. The plant is  rather  variable,  and  three  varieties  are  generally  recognized although not distinguished in trade. The plant  grows in 600‐2100m altitude.   Tuber of Asparagus is used in tuberculosis, hysteria, night  blindness, kidney and stomach problems. Asparagus tuber is traded wild from  Kurilo is sparsely distributed throughout study region. It was documented at Dhime, Paink,  Ramidanda and Rakayagaun VDCs. Over‐harvesting, combined with fodder use of this plant  was  responsible  for  depletion  in  the  wild.  The  sustainable  management  of  plant  requires  technical understanding of its cultivation and harvesting. Benefit oriented collection without  any regulatory or control mechanism is responsible for complete destruction of its natural  stand. Since there are very limited researches on cultivation of Asparagus in Nepal except a  limited research in Terai region, the potentiality of commercial cultivation and harvesting is  not clear. This had opened the room for research (in cultivation) where there were plenty of  natural stock in past. 

6.2 Allo (Girardinia diversifolia) 
Allo  (Eng:  Himalayan  Nittle,  Local:    Thulo  sisnu  or  Chalne  sisnoo,  Family:  Urticaceae)  is  annual  herb  with  contains  bristles  on  leaves.  The  stem  bark  contains  fibres  with  unique  qualities‐strength,  smoothness,  lightness  and,  when  appropriately  treated,  a  silk  like  lustre. Propagated by seeds or root offshoots. It grows wild under the  forest  canopy  between  1200  m  and  3000m  in  moist  and  shaded  areas.   Young leaves and inflorescence are cooked as a green vegetable. The  plant is considered useful for fever. Roasted seeds are pickled.   

35   

There  is  no  commercial  harvesting  of  Allo  except  for  domestic  use.  Mostly  poor  were  involved  in  collection  of  Allo  for  domestic  and  limited  commercial  purpose.  Inner  bark  of  stem furnishes fine silky fiber. People have for centuries extracted and spun these fibres to  weave strong and durable sacks, mats, porters’ headbands and fishing nets.  Allo is widely distributed in the study site with an excellent natural stock.  It was documentd  at Dhime, Garkhakot, Kortang, Majkot, Paink, Ramidanda and Rokayagaun VDCs. 

6.3 Timur (Zanthoxylum armatum) 
Timur  (Eng:  Nepal  Pepper,  Family  Rutaceae)  is  a  spiny  shrub about 3 m high, with corky bark and strong prickles  on  the  branches.  Leaves  stalked,  alternate,  slightly  winged,  with  stipular  spines  at  the  base.    Flowers  small,  whitish,  in  loose  clusters.  Seeds  solitary,  shiny  black.  Flowering  on  April  May  and  fruiting  on  July  November.  Propagated by seeds and branch cuttings.   Distributed throughout Nepal at 1100m to 2900m in open places or in forest undergrowth.  Timur was documented at Garkhakot, Kortang, Majkot, Paink, Ramidanda and  Rokayagaun  VDCs.  Fruits contain 2.5‐3% essential oil. It is traded in the name of Zanthoxylum oil.   It  is  highly  traded  NTFPs  and  stands  in  the  highest  rank  in  term  of  production  and  trade.  There is an excellent commercial potential of this plant from existing natural stock of forest  areas. But there is a need of systematic and scientific harvesting.  Harvesting is noted being  tradition but not necessarily be unscientific. People said they harvest it by hand picking and  using  sticks.  Some  people  cut  down  whole  tree  or  its  branches  to  make  collection  easier.  This tendency is found to be in increasing trend as resource is diminishing.  

6.4 Kaulo (Persea odoratissima) 
Kaulo  (Family:  Lauraceae)  is  a  medium  sized  evergreen  tree.  Leaves  stalked,  7.5  to  20cm  by  1.5‐4.8cm  wide,  lanceolate, acute or long pointed, narrowed towards the  base,  bright  green  above.  Flowers  yellowish  in  lax,  branched  clusters.  Fruits  purple  and  supported  by  persistent  perianth.  Flowering  in  March‐April.  Propagated by seeds.   Distributed at 1000m to 2000m in moist, open places. In  Jajarkot, it was found on the edges of agricultural and fallow lands. Kaulo was documented  at Dhime, Garkhakot, Kortang, Majkot, Paink and Rokayagaun VDCs of Jajarkot district.    36   

Kaulo bark (commercially known as Jiket Powder) is the highest exporting commodity of the  district. Jiket has the outstanding binding capacity and used in the manufacture of incense  stick by commercial and small scale industries.  

6.5 Chiuri (Diploknema butyracea) 
Chiuri  tree  (Eng:  Butter  tree;  Family:  Sapotaceae)  is  a  deciduous,  medium  size  tree  about  20m  high  native  to  Nepal. Leaves stalked, generally crowded near the ends of  branches,  oblong,  entire,  acuminate,  hairy  beneath,  glabrous  above.  Flowers  stalked,  crowded  at  the  ends  of  branches, yellowish. Fruit a berry, pear shaped, with one  or  two  seeds.  Flowers:  November‐January;  Fruits:  April‐ July. The plant propagates by seeds.   It grows mainly in the sub‐Himalayan tracts on steep slopes, ravines and cliffs at an altitude  of  300‐1500m  from  east  to  west  Nepal.  It  was  documented  at  Bhagwati,  Bhur,  Dasera,  Khagenkot, Majkot, Ragda, Sima VDCs of Jajarkot distirct.   The  main  product  of  the  tree  is  ghee  or  butter,  extracted  from  the  seeds and popularly known as "Chiuri ghee". Chiuri is one of the most  promising  species  for  its  promotion  as  a  source  of  livelihood  improvement of the people of Jajarkot district.  The  Chiuri  ripe  fruit  has  sweet  edible  pulp.  The  fruit  pulp  supplements  and  sometimes  substitutes staple food in the villages of Jajarkot. According to local key informants, Chiuri  juice is considered to make the body warm and possess intoxicating properties. Juice of the  corolla is boiled into a liquid which is used by the villagers as a syrupy sugar. Juicy pulp of  ripe fruits is eaten fresh. Juice of the bark, about 4 teaspoons, is given to treat indigestion.  The  juice  is  also  applied  to  treat  rheumatic  pain  and  boils.  Seed  oils  are  applied  for  headache, rheumatism, boils, pimples, wounds, chapped skin and burns.   The plant constitutes an important source of nectar and pollen for bees. Leaves are used as  plates and good fodder. Resin of Chiuri tree mixed with resins of Khirra (Sapium insigne) and  Katahar  (Artocarpus  heterophyllus)  makes  good  glue  used  for  trapping  birds  and  also  houseflies. The pulp syrup is mixed with tobacco and used in “Hookka”. The timber can be  used in construction and for furniture. 

6.6 Jhyau (Lichens) 
Jhyau (Eng: Lichen) is found in wide variety of habitats. They are commonly found growing  on  the  old  walls,  trunks,  and  branches  of  the  trees,  bare  ground  and  exposed  rocks.  It  prefers moist areas but also found in dry areas. There are more than 465 species of jhyau in  Nepal and are found in tropical to sub‐alpine zone depending upon species. Lichen is a dual  organism, i.e. mutual association of an alga and a fungus. Lichen plays an important role in  37   

ecosystem  and  is  considered  bio‐indicator  to  monitor  environmental  pollution.  It  is  used  in  reliving  from  menstrual  disorders  and  food  poisoning,  dyeing  silk  and  wood.   Two species of Lichens are currently in trade, Parmelia sp  and  Usnea  longissima.  Parmelia  was  documented  at  all  surveyed  VDCs  whereas  Usnea  longissima  was  documented  at  Dhime,  Garkhakot,  Kortang,  Majkot,  Paink, Ramidanda and Rakayagaun VDCs.  The species is reported distributed in most of CFs. A lower  estimate  of annual  trade  of  Lichen  from  Jajarkot  is  more  than 55 tones.   Harvesting  method  of  lichen  includes  manual  collection  from  forests.  As  mentioned  above,  the  species  is  abundant  in  branches  and  trunks  of  trees  in  the  moist  areas,  people  collect  either  cutting  branches or falling down tree if there is good stock of lichen. The practice is detrimental for  both forest and species. In the local level, there is no processing but people dry green lichen  before its marketing.  There is no researches on cultivation of lichen, if done, has not been practiced in Nepal. It is  prudent to conserve forest areas and set harvest quota to ensure sustainable harvesting.  

6.7  Samayo/Sugandhawal (Valeriana jatamansii) 
Samayo  (Eng:  Valerian,  Family:  Valerianaceae)  is  an  herb  of  about  50  cm  high  with  a  thick  rootstock.  Basal  leaves  long stalked, ovate, acuminate, dentate or sinulate, cauline  leaves  short  stalked,  opposite.  Flowers  are  tiny,  white  tinged  with  pink.  Flowering  March‐June.  Propagated  by  seed or root offshoots. Rhizome and lateral roots are parts  of commercial value.   Distributed throughout Nepal at 1300 m to 3300 m in moist, shady places but the gathering  of its rhizomes for sale is a cause of conservation concern. It is one of the major exporting  NTFP commodities of Jajarkot and is recorded from 8 out of 11 surveyed VDCs of Jajarkot.  About  100  MT  of  raw  Samayo  rhizomes  are  traded  raw  from  the  district  in  a  fiscal  year.  Sugandhawal  was  documented  at  Garkhakot,  Paink,  Ramidanda,  Rokayagaun,  Dhime,  Majkot, Kortang.  Despite  the  possibility  of  value  addition  at  local  level,  it  has  not  been  performed.  Value  addition (extraction of Valerian oil from roots and rhizomes of Samayo from simple steam 

38   

distillation method) within the district will add more profit to the collectors and traders. The  export of unprocessed rhizome from country is legally banned.  

6.8 Sajwan/Ratanjoto (Jatropha curcas) 
Sajiwan  (Eng:  Physic  nut,  Purging  nut;  Family:  Euphorbiaceae)  is  a  soft  wooded  tree  about    4m  high.  Leaves  stalked  blade  angled  or  three  or  five  lobed,  orbiculate,  glabrous  base  cordate.  Flowers  yellowish  in  cymes.  Seeds  oblong,  dark  brown,  smooth  oily.  Flowering  on  April‐October  and  fruiting  on  November‐January.  Distributed  throughout  Nepal  to  about  1300m  in  open  places, generally around villages.   Tender  shoots  are  cooked  as  vegetable.  The  cotyledons  serve  as  candles  for  villagers.  The  plant makes excellent hedge.  Seeds contain 20‐40% nonvolatile oil that is also used for lighting. Recently, the oil is used as  substitute to fossil fuel.   It  was  documented  at  Bhagwati,  Bhur,  Dasera,  Garkhakot,  Khagenkot,  Kortang,  Majkot,  Ragda and Sima VDCs. 

6.9 Padamchal (Rheum australe) 
Padamchal (Eng: Himalayan Rhubarb, Family: Polygonaceae) is  erect  robust  perennial  herb  with  thick  rootstock.  Stem  stout  hollow  and  branched  above.    Leaves  large  orbicular  or  broadly  ovate,  with  heart  shaped  base,  long  petioled,  upper  leaves  smaller.  Flowers  small,  dark  reddish  purple,  in  dense  terminal  panicles.  Flowering  occurs  in  June  July  and  fruiting  in  July‐  September.   It is endemic to the Himalayas and found distributed between 3200m and 4200m on moist  scrub,  open  rocky  slopes,  alpine  meadows  and  forest  margins.  It  was  documented  at  Garkhakot, Paink and Rokayagaun VDCs.   Rootstock is traded commercially. Petioles and rootstocks are collected for trade.  

6.10 Majitho (Rubia manjith) 
Majitho (Eng: Indian Madder, Family: Rubiaceae) is a herbaceous climbing perennial, with 4  angled  stems  and  branches,  with  unequal  stalked  leaves  in  whorls  of  4,  and  with  usually  reddish brown flowers in small clusters aggregated together in to a large branched cluster  with small leafy bracts. Leaves with hooked prickles on the veins beneath. Leaf stalk as long 

39   

as blade, with hooked prickles, stems with hooked prickles on angles.  Flowering occurs in June to October, fruiting in November‐December.    Majitho is endemic to the Himalayas and found distributed in open  forests  and  shrubland  between  1200m  to  3000m  altitude.  It  was  documented from the entire surveyed VDCs of Jajarkot district.  A  valuable  dye,  Manjith  is  obtained  from  roots  and  stems  and  is  traded  from  different  parts  of  Nepal.  Root  has  medicinal  properties  and is used to treat various ailments in remote hilly villages of Nepal.  Root  decoction  is  used  in  blood,  liver  and  menstrual  disorders,  fever,  cough,  chest  and  kidney  pain.  Root  is  also  used  as  tonic  and  astringent.  Root  paste  is  used  to  treat  skin  disease.  

6.11 Dhatelo (Prinsepia utilis)  
Dhatelo (Family: Rosaceae) is a deciduous shrub about 2 m  high,  branches  armed  with  stout  spines.  Leaves  stalked,  alternate,  6‐7  cm  long,  0.5‐3  cm  wide,  lanceolate,  acuminate, slightly serrate. Flowers stalked, white, in short  axillary  racemes.  Fruit  purple  when  ripe.  Flowering  on  February‐March, Fruits on April‐May. Propagated by seeds.  Seed  is  collected  and  grinded  to  extract  oil  of  food  and  cosmetic value.  Dhatelo is distributed throughout Nepal at 1300 m to 2900 m in sunny, open places. It was  recorded in 10 VDCs. It is also found along the riverbanks, in the edge of agricultural field  and in open forest areas. Dhatelo is a common plant of Karnali region and potential plant to  uplift  the  socio  economic  condition  of  marginal  people.  It  was  documented  at  Bhagwati,  Garkhakot, Khagenkot, Kortang, Majkot, Paink, Ragda, Ramidanda, Rokayagaun, and Dhime  VDCs  Dhatelo  oil  can  be  extracted  locally  and  can  be  used  either  as  substitute  of  conventional  cooking oil or traded of cosmetic purpose. The demand of Dhatelo oil is emerging with the  expanded market preference for natural products.  

6.12 Bael (Aegle marmelos) 
Bael  (Eng:  Bael  Fruit  tree,  Family:  Rutaceae)  is  a  deciduous  thorny  tree  about  15  m  high.  Leaves  stalked,  alternate, trifoliate, leaflets ovate to lanceolate. Flowers  white in sub terminal panicles. Fruits yellowish, globose,  with  woody  rind  and  sweet  pulp.  Flowers  March‐May,  fruits  March‐June  the  following  year.  Propagated  by  seeds and root offshoots.   40   

Distributed throughout Nepal from Terai to 1100m, apparently wild in open, dry places and  planted around villages.It was documented at Sima and Bhur VDCs of Jajarkot district.   Pulp of ripe fruit is eaten fresh or mixed with cold water to prepare juice. Government of  Nepal  has  launched  One  Village  One  Product  Program  and  is  supporting  Bael  products  in  Sindhuli  and  Bardiya  districts.  Similarly,  few  private  companies  are  involved  in  the  production of Bael juice. In Bardiya, communities collect Bael from community forests and  sold to Bael factory at Rs 4 per kg (PAC, 2010).   Leaves are offered to Shiva in religious functions and are also used as fodder, especially for  goats. The gummy substance around the seed is used as an adhesive. The root, stem, leaves  and fruit all have medicinal values. Juice of root is given for fever. Wood ash is applied to  swollen parts of the body. Juice of bark is used to treat diarrhea and dysentery. Leaves are  astringent, digestive, febrifuge and laxative. Fruits are astringent, digestive and used to treat  stomachic. 

6.13 Lokta (Daphne bholua, D. papyracea) 
Two  species  of  Lokta  (Eng:  Nepali  Paper  Plant,  Family:  Thymelaeaceae)  are  commonly  in  trade  in  Nepal,  Daphne  bholua  and  D.  papyracea.  D.  bholua  (Seto  Lokta)  is  erect  or  spreading evergreen or deciduous, less branched shrub, found  within  the  altitude  of  1800‐3100m.  Leaves  elliptic  to  oblanceolate,  entire  dull  green  leathery,  with  very  sweet  scented white flowers flushed externally pink or purplish. Fruit  ellipsoid, black when ripe.   D.  papyracea  (Kalo  Lokta)  is  evergreen,  much  branched  and  found  within  the  altitude  of  1500m  to  2100m.  Leaves  dull  green  narrow  lanceolate  to  oblanceolate  leathery  leaves  and  with  scented  white  or  greenish  white  flowers  borne  in  terminal clusters with persistent hairy bracts. Fruits small and  fleshy, orange colored at first and later deep red when fully ripe.  Lokta is found distributed more gregariously in the moist conifer and temperate Himalaya.  Both  Kalo  and  Seto  Lokta  were  available  at  Dhime,  Ramidanda,  Rokayagaun,  Paink  and  Garkhakot  VDCs.    Kalo  Lokta  was  documented  from  Kortang  also.  The  plant  is  reported  in  higher  density  in  the  study  area  and  it  has  good  potential  for  future  harvesting  and  processing.   There is not commercial harvesting of Lokta (except in Majkot) and domestic use is not so  intense. Some people harvest it by cutting immature plants randomly without retaining the  sufficient numbers for future supply and regeneration. The existing stock may be affected by 

41   

the increased disturbances in forest ecosystem as the plant requires unique environments  to thrive.   Inner bark of Lokta is commercially harvested for the manufacture of Nepalese handmade  paper. Handmade  paper  from Lokta is the fifth highest exporting commodity amongst the  handicraft sector.  

6.14 Bojho (Acorus calamus) 
Bojho  (Eng:  Sweet  Flag,  Family:  Araceae)  is  a  perennial  herb.  It  is  semi‐aquatic,  aromatic  herb  with  creeping  rhizomes,  growing  wild  and  also  cultivated.  The  plant  thrives best in marshy and moist places. The plant is grown  in  clayey  loams  and  light  alluvial  soils  of  river  banks  and  streams.    It  has  been  cultivated  in  some  villages  in  study  region  for  domestic  use  only.  The  dried  rhizomes  are  considered  to  possess  anti‐spasmodic,  carminative  and  anthelmintic  properties,  and  are  used  for  the  treatment  of  host  of  diseases  such  as  epilepsy  and  other  mental  ailments,  chronic  diarrhea  and  dysentery,  bronchial  catarrh,  intermittent  fevers  and  glandular  and  abdominal tumors.   Bhojo  was  documented  at  Ramidanda,  Paink,  Bhagwati,  Khagenkot,  Ragda,  Rokayagaun,  Dhime and Garkhakot VDCs. It can be infer that the plant is poorly distributed, mostly near  human  settlements  and  water  sources.  However,  the  plant  has  a  high  potentiality  for  commercial cultivation in selected areas.  

6.15 Rittha (Sapindus mukorossi) 
Rittha (Eng: Soap nut, Family: Sapindaceae) is a deciduous  tree,  reaching  height  of  25m.  It  is  one  of  the  most  important trees of tropical and sub‐tropical regions of Asia.  The bark of Rittha is shinning gray and fairly smooth when  the  plant  is  young.  Rittha  leaves  are  long  stalked  odd  pinnate.  Ritha  flowers  during  summer.  The  flowers  are  small and greenish white, polygamous and mostly bisexual  in  terminal  thyrses  or  compound  cymose  panicles.  These  are  sub‐sessile;  numerous  in  number  and  at  times  occur  in  lose  panicles  at  the  end  of  branches.  The  fruit  appears  in  July‐August  and  ripens  by  November‐December.  These  are  solitary globose, round nuts 2 to 2.5 cm diameter, fleshy, saponaceous and yellowish brown  in color.   The species is widely grown in upper reaches of the Indo‐Gangetic plains, Siwaliks and sub‐ Himalayan tracts at altitudes from 200m to 1500m. It was documented from Bhur VDC. 

42   

The dried fruit of Ritha is most valuable part of the plant. Its fleshy portion contains saponin,  which  is  a  good  substitute  for  washing  soap  and  is  as  such  used  in  preparation  of  quality  shampoos, detergents, etc. Skin  of  the fruit is highly  valued by the rural  folks as a  natural  produced  shampoo  for  washing  their  hair.  Ritha  foliage  can  be  used  as  cattle  fodder.  The  fruit  is  of  considerable  importance  for  its  medicinal  value  as  well.  Ayurvedic,  Unani  and  Tibetan systems of medicine consider it to be useful for treating a number of diseases like  common cold, pimples, epilepsy, constipation, nausea, etc. It is also used as expectorant and  anthelmintic in small doses.   There  is  limited  trade  of  this  species,  mainly  due  to  low  production.  Though  not  have  immediate  market  potential,  this  plant  needs  to  be  conserved  and  cultivated  for  use  and  potential.    

 

43   

CHAPTER SEVEN: CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION  
7.1  Conclusion  

Jajarkot  harbors  rich  diversity  of  NTFP  resources  due  to  wide  altitudinal  variation.  Considering  the  fact,  WUPAP  commissioned  the  “Assessment  and  Profile  Preparation  of  High Valued NTFPs of Jajarkot District”. The survey was conducted in 13 out of 30 VDCs of  Jajarkot  distirct,  covering  east,  west,  north,  south  and  middle  zone.  The  study  was  concentrated to three distinct ecological zones: tropical and sub tropical, temperate and sub  alpine.   A total of 248 species falling under 95 species were recorded from 13 surveyed VDCs. 142  species  were  recorded  from  Garkhakot  VDC,  followed  by  Paink  with  138  species.  Most  of  the  high  valued  NTFPs  and  MAPs  were  incorporated  despite  the  limited  time  frame  and  other  constraints.  The  research  was  comprehensive  in  the  sense  that  all  the  NTFPs  (both  traded and non tradable) were recorded and documented during the survey.  Out of 38 listed NTFPs, Lokta, Allo, Samayo, Kaulo, Timur, Dhatelo, Chiuri and Bael are the  most  promising  NTFPs  of  the  district  and  holds  tremendous  potentiality  for  enterprise  development. Jhyau are collected from the entire VDCs and traded raw.   Most of the local communities of the study areas are unaware about the use and benefits of  NTFPs available in the nearby forests and their farm lands except for fuelwood, timber and  fodder.   Resource assessment of NTFPs in Jajarkot district using the inventory parameters revealed  that there are tremendous potentialities for the cultivation, harvesting, value addition and  marketing of prioritized NTFPs. The local communities are more curios for the promotion of  NTFPs which would support their livelihood.    Enterprise  development  potentialities  assessment  in  Jajarkot  revealed  that,  there  are  immense  potentialities  of  enterprise  set  up  for  the  product  lines  as  edible  oil  expelling,  herbal  drinks/juice  making,  organic  insecticide/pesticide,  cultivation  of  NTFPs,  collective  marketing  centre  for  crude  herbs  and  NTFPs  and  essential  oils  extraction  (Valerian  and  Zanthoxylum oil) in various locations of Jajarkot  district.  For  genesis,  operation  and  growth  of  forest  based  enterprise  in  Jajarkot;  a  biologically  sustainable  harvesting  mechanism  should  be  prepared  for  each  community  forests,  leasehold  forests  and  government  forests.  Moreover,  some  factors  that  contribute  to  or  hinder  the  genesis,  operation  and  growth  of  enterprises  should  be  taken  into  account.  These include: awareness raising, technical assistance, financial support, marketing support,  marketing  outlets,  community  characteristics,  natural  resource  base,  technology,  policy  factors, enterprise consequences and natural resource conservation. 

44   

In  conclusion,  the  communities’  motivation  towards  entrepreneurship,  institutionalization  of user groups (FUGs) and regulatory mechanisms for sustainable harvesting of NTFPs would  definitely create the income generating opportunities and would assist in the conservation  of biodiversity, and reduction of poverty in Jajarkot district. 

7.2 

Recommendations 

Local communities play crucial role for the conservation and sustainable utilization of NTFPs  in  Jajarkot  district.  Conservation  and  sustainable  management  are  the  ever  raised  issues,  but  why  and  how  to  conserve  and  manage  are  the  big  questions  challenging  ever.  Therefore,  following  steps  are  recommended  for  addressing  conservation  and  livelihood  issues of local communities in Jajarkot:   1. Awareness  programs  (workshops,  exhibitions,  exposure  visits,  and  demonstration  of  the  products)  on  the  importance  of  NTFPs;  conservation  and  sustainable  utilization,  cultivation and harvesting at local level need to be conducted.  2. Capacity  building/strengthening  the  concerned  FUGs  on  institutional  development,  governance/equity, fund mobilization, financial management, record keeping, benefit  sharing mechanism etc. should be initiated.  3. Field  based  training  package  on  NTFPs  promotion;  time  and  technique  of  collection,  local  processing  technology,  storage,  quality  control,  packaging,  labeling,  and  cultivation of major NTFPs should be conducted.  4. Development  of  biological  sustainable  harvesting  system;  block  rotation  system  preferable  for  harvesting/  participatory  monitoring  system  should  be  prepared  for  each user groups.   5. Detailed  assessment  of  the  potential  enterprises  that  can  be  set  up  in  the  district  should be conducted in collaboration with various user groups.  6. Feasibility study on market linkage, technology transfer, equipments and availability of  skill manpower should be conducted for each product line.  7. Micro‐credit  facilities  should  be  provided  for  the  initiation  of  small  scale  enterprises  and  financial  and  operational  support  should  be  provided  for  the  medium  scale  consortium enterprise/ cooperative model.  8. Initiation  for  the  management  and  conduction  of  pilot  model  enterprise  preferably,  herbal incense, juice making, essential oil production, Lokta for paper making and Allo  and Hemp processing for weaving clothes.  9. Formation  of  committee/  organization  for  providing  necessary  technology,  seeds/seedlings to farmers.  10. Establishment  of  marketing  information  system  (MIS)  on  NTFPs  at  Jajarkot  Khalanga  and Paink VDCs.  11. Formation  of  collective  marketing  centre/  cooperative  for  marketing  NTFPs  /  NTFPs  products in Khalanga.  45   

   

References 
Baral S. R. & Kurmi, P. P. (2006). A Compendium of Medicinal Plants in Nepal. Mrs Rachana  Sharma, Kathmandu, Nepal.  CECI,  2006.  Synthesis  of  Seminar  Presentation  and  Discussions,  First  National  Trade  Show  and  Seminar  on  Herbs,  Herbal  Products  and  Spices,  12‐14  November  2005.  Published  by  CECI March 2006.  Cunningham,  A.  B.  1994.  Integrating  Local  Plant  Resources  and  Habitat  Management.  Biodiversity and Conservation. 3. pp 104‐115  Cunningham, A. B. 1996 a. People, Park and Plant Use: Recommendations for Multiple Use  Zones  and  Development  Alternatives  around  Bwindi  Impenetrable  National  Park,  Uganda. People and Plants Working Paper no 4. UNESCO, Paris. pp 58.   Cunningham,  A.  B.  2001.  Applied  Ethnobotany:  People,  Wild  Plant  use  and  Conservation.  People and Plants Conservation Manual. Earthscan.     Edwards,  D.  M.  1996.  The  trade  in  Non  Timber  Forest  Products  from  Nepal.  Mountain  Research and Development 16 (4): 383‐394.   FAO,  1999.  Towards  a  Harmonized  Definition  of  Non  Wood  Forest  Products.  Unasylva.  50  (198). pp 63‐64.   Ghimire S.K., Sapkota I.B., Oli B.R. and Parajuli‐Rai R. 2008b. Non Timber Forest Products of  Nepal  Himalaya:  Database  of  Some  Important  Species  Found  in  the  Mountain  Protected Areas and Surrounding Regions. WWF Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal.    Gurung, K. and Pyakurel, D. 2006. Identification and Inventory of Non Timber Forest Products  (NTFPs)  of  Manaslu  Conservation  Area.  A  report  submitted  to  National  Trust  for  Nature Conservation / Manaslu Conservation Area Project (NTNC / MCAP), Gorkha.  IUCN, 2004. National Register of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants. IUCN Nepal.  Larsen,  H.  O.  1999.  Commercial  collection  of  Nardostachys  grandiflora  D.C.  in  Chaudabise  Valley,  Jumla  district,  Nepal.  Local management  systems and  sustainability.  A  M  Sc  dissertation  submitted  to  Department  of  Economics  and  Natural  Resources,  Royal  Veterinary and Agricultural Society.   Manandhar, N.P. 2002. Plant and People of Nepal. Timber Press, Portland, Oregon, USA. 

46   

Olsen,  C.S.  and  Larsen,  H.O.  2003.  Alpine  medicinal  plant  trade  and  Himalayan  mountain  livelihood Strategies. The Geographical Journal. 169 (3): 243‐254.  PDDP  2003.  Resource  Mapping  Report:  Jajarkot  District.  LGP/PDDP  Bridging  Phase  Programmme, NEP/02/032, District Development Committee, Jajarkot.   Polunin,  O.  and  Stainton,  A.,  1984.  Flowers  of  the  Himalaya.  Oxford  University  Press.  New  Delhi.  Press,  J.  R.,  Shrestha,  K.  K.  and  Sutton,  D.  A.,  2000.  Annotated  Checklist  of  the  Flowering  Plants of Nepal. The Natural History Museum, London.  Raunkair, C. 1934. The life forms of Plants and Statistical plant geography. Oxford.   Shrestha, K., 1998. Dictionary of Nepalese Plant. Mandala Book Point, Nepal.  Stainton,  A.,  1988.  Flowers  of  the  Himalaya,  A  Supplement.  Oxford  University  Press.  New  Delhi.  TISC  2002.  Forest  and  Vegetation  Types  of  Nepal.  Tree  Improvement  and  Silviculture  Component, TISC Document Series No. 105. Kathmandu, Nepal  Watts, J., Scott, P. and Mutebi, J. 1996. Forest Assessment and Monitoring for Conservation  and Local use: Experience in three Ugandan National Parks. pp 212‐243. In; Recent  Wong,  W.  and  Jenifer,  L.G.  2001.  Resources  Assessments  of  Non‐  Wood  Forest  Products:  Experience and Biometric Principles. Non‐Wood Forests Products Series‐13. FAO  Zobel, D. B., Jha, P.K., Behan, M. J. & Yadav, U. K. R. 1987. A Practical Manual for Ecology.  Ratna Book Distributors, Kathmandu, Nepal.      

47   

Annex:  List  of  Plant  species  recorded  (Sorted  by  Common/  Local  Names)
Common/  SN  Local Name  1  Abijalo  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  Ainjeru  Ainselu  Akarkara  Akashbeli  Aksechuk  Allo  Ander  Angeri  Bael  Bains  Bajradanti  Bakainu  Bakhre ghas  Balu  Ban gulab  Ban gulab  Ban gulab  Ban Phanda  Ban phapar  Ban silam  Ban tarul  Banjh  Banjh  Banmara  Banmula  Bansuli  Batulopate  Bayar  Beuli  Bhalayo  Bhalayo  Bhale chiraito  Bhalu aainselu  Bhango  Scientific Name  Drymaria diandra  Dendrophthoe  falcata  Rubus ellipticus  Anacyclus sp  Cuscuta reflexa  Rheum australe  Girardinia diversifolia  Ricinus communis  Lyonia ovalifolia  Aegle marmelos  Salix babylonica  Potentilla fulgens  Melia azederach  Desmodium  multiflorum  Sida rhombifolia  Rosa macrophylla  Rosa sericea  Rosa webbiana  Lantana camara  Fagopyrum diabotrys  Elsholtzia blanda  Dioscorea deltoidea  Quercus lanata  Quercus  leucotrichophora  Eupatorium  adenophorum  Dipsacus inermis  Thalictrum foliolosum Cissampelos pareira  Zizyphus mauritiana  Trifolium repens  Rhus wallichii  Semecarpus  anacardium  Swertia angustifolia  Rubus  hoffmeisterianus  Cannabis sativa  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  Bhogate  Bhoj Patra  Bhorla   Bhuin kafal  Bhujetro  Bhutkesh  Bilaune  Bojho  Boke timur  Bot Dhayaro  Buki phul  Chari amilo  Chimal  Chiraito  Chiuri  Chulesi  Chumlani  Chutro  Chutro  Chutro  Chyali  Chyau  Dabdabe  Dangdinge  Dar/ Githa  Daruhaldi  Dativan  Dhasingre/  Kalo angeri  Dhatelo  Dhature phul  Dhayaro  Dhupjadi  Dhusure  Dimmur/  Dimmar  Maesa macrophylla  Betula utilis  Bauhinia vahlii  Fragaria nubicola  Butea minor  Selinum tenuifolium  Maesa chisia  Acorus calamus  Zanthoxylum  nepalense  Lagerstroemia  parviflora   Gnaphalium affine   Oxalis corniculata  Rhododendron  barbatum  Swertia chirayita  Diploknema  butyracea  Osbeckia stellata  Skimmia laureola  Berberis aristata  Berberis asiatica  Berberis wallichiana  Chesneya cuneata  Ganoderma lucidum  Symplocos  ramosissima  Acanthopanax  cissifolius  Boehmeria rugulosa  Mahonia napaulensis  Achyranthes  bidentata  Gaultheria  fragrantissima  Prinsepia utilis  Datura suaveolens  Woodfordia fruticosa  Jurinea dolomiaea  Colebrookea  oppositifolia  Benthamidia capitata 

48   

70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109 

Dudhilo  Fusure  Gai sarro  Gai tihare  Galainchi/  Choya phul  Gandhe  Ghagar  Ghangaru  Gittha  Gobre salla  Gogan  Gol Kankri  Guchi chyau  Gunyeli  Hadchur  Halhale  Hatajadi  Indrajau/ Ban  Khirro  Jai  Jhingano  Jhyau  Jhyau  Jhyau  Juhule sallo  Junge lahera  Junge lahera  Junge lahera  Kadam  Kafal  Kalo siris  Kamale  Kangarate  Kanike Kuro  Kaptase  Kathe kaulo  Kathe lahero  Kaulo  Khajuriya  Khanyu  Khar ghas 

Ficus neriifolia  Lindera pulcherrima  Hedychium spicatum  Inula cappa  Plumeria rubra  Ageratum conyzoides  Species 1  Pyracantha crenulata  Dioscorea bulbifera  Abies spectabilis  Saurauia napaulensis  Coccinia grandis  Morchella sp  Elaeagnus parvifolia  Viscum album  Rumex hastatus  Dactylorhiza  hatagirea  Holarrhena  pubescens  Jasminum humile   Eurya acuminata  Lobaria sp  Parmelia sp  Usnea longissima  Picea smithiana  Clematis alternata  Clematis buchaniana  Clematis montana  Neolamarckia  cadamba  Myrica esculenta  Albizia chinensis  Unidentified sp  Anemone rivularis  Cynoglossum  zeylanicum  Anemone vitifolia  Persea gamblei  Hedera nepalensis  Persea odoratissima  Phoenix acaulis  Ficus semicordata  Imperata sp 

110 Khareto  111 Khasru  112 Khayar  113 Khiraula  114 Khiraunla  115 Khiraunla  116 Khirro  Kholme/  117 Kharane  118 Khote salla  119 Kimu  120 Kituki/ Ketuki  121 Koiralo  122 Kukur daino  123 Kukur daino  124 Kukur daino 

Hypericum uralum  Quercus  semecarpifolia  Acacia catechu  Lilium nepalense  Polygonatum  cirrhifolium  Polygonatum  verticillatum  Sapium insigne 

Symplocos pyriifolia  Pinus roxburghii  Morus alba  Agave cantula  Bauhinia purpurea  Smilax ferox  smilax orthoptera  smilax sp  Asparagus  125 Kurilo  racemosus   Cleistocalyx  126 Kyamuna  operculata  Zanthoxylum  127 Lahare timur  oxyphyllum  Rhododendron  128 Lali guras  arboreum  129 Lauth salla  Taxus wallichiana  130 Lokhta  Daphne bholua  131 Lokhta  Daphne papyracea  132 Lukuli  Luculia gratissima  133 Machhyan  Coriaria napalensis  134 Majitho  Rubia manjith  Boenninghausenia  135 Makhe mauro  albiflora  Malagiri/  Cinnamomum  136 Sugandhakokila  glaucescens  137 Mallato  Macaranga pustulata  138 Malo  Viburnum mullaha  139 Mauwa  Engelhardia spicata  140 Mayal  Pyrus pashia  141 Mitho nim  Murraya koenigii  142 Mujuro  Impatiens sulcata  Lycopodium  143 Nagbeli  clavatum  144 Nagbeli  Lycopodium 

49   

145  Nigalo  146  Ninejadi  147  Ninejadi  Nune/  148  Nundhiki  149  Okhar  150  Okhre ghas  151  Paiyin  152  Pakhanved  153  Palouri  154  Pangar/Pangra  155  Phalant  156  Phirphire  Rachan/  157  Rakchan  158  Raklamul  Raktanyaule  159  jhar  160  Rani salla  161  Rittha  162  Saaj  Sahadeva  163  sahadevi  Sajwan/  164  Ratanjoto  165  Sakhino  166  Sal/ Sakhuwa  167  Samayo  Sarpa makai/  168  Banku  Sarpa makai/  169  Banku  Sarpa makai/  170  Banku  171  Satuwa  172  Saur  173  Seto ghas  174  175  176  177 

phlegmeria Drepanostachyum  falcatum  Iris clarkei  Iris hookeriana  Osyris wightiana  Juglans regia  Corydalis sp  Prunus cerasoides  Bergenia ciliata  Brassaiopsis sp  Aesculus indica  Quercus glauca  Acer oblongum  Daphniphyllum  himalense  Geranium  wallichianum  Persicaria capitata  Pinus wallichiana  Sapindus mukorossi  Terminalia alata  Ainsliaea latifolia  Jatropha curcas  Campylotropis  speciosa  Shorea robusta  Valeriana jatamansii  Arisaema costatum  Arisaema griffithii 

178 Siris  179 Sisnu  180 Sissoo 

Arisaema tortuosum  Paris polyphylla  Betula alnoides  Anaphalis busua  Jasminum  Seto jai  dispermum  Simal  Bombax ceiba  Simalee  Vitex negundo  Sindure/ Rohini  Mallotus philippensis 

Albizia julibrissin  Urtica dioica  Dalbergia sissoo  Dendrobium  181 Sungava  aphyllum  182 Sungure kanda  Circium sp  183 Sungure kanda  Cirsium falconeri  184 Syundi  Euphorbia royleana  185 Tapre jhar  Mazus surculosus  Sarcococca  186 Telparo/ Fitfiya  hookeriana  187 Thakal  Argemone mexicana  188 Thingure salla  Tsuga dumosa  189 Thinke  Ilex excelsa  190 Thotne  Aconogonum molle  191 Thulo ausadhi  Astilbe rivularis  192 Tilailo  Acer caesium  193 Tilailo  Acer sp  Zanthoxylum  194 Timur  armatum  195 Tite/ Asare  Viburnum erubescens  196 Titepati  Artemisia indica  197 Tukee phul  Taraxacum officinale  198 Tuni  Toona ciliata  199 Utis  Alnus nepalensis  200    Anemone tetrasepala  201    Arnebia benthami  202    Aster himalaicus  203    Calanthe tricarinata  204    Caltha palustris  205    Capparis zeylanicum  206    Colocasia fallax  Cotoneaster  207    microphyllus  Debregeasia  208    longifolia  Debregeasia  209    salicifolia  210    Elsholtzia eriostachya  211    Elsholtzia fruticosa  212    Euphorbia wallichii  213    Gentianella sp  214    Geum elatum  215    Heracleum candicans  216    Indigofera sp 

50   

217     218     219  220  221  222  223  224  225  226  227  228  229                                  

230     231     232    

Ipomoea purpurea  Lonicera myrtillus  Meconopsis  paniculata  Morina sp  Neolitsea cuipala  Neolitsea pallens  Nepeta nervosa  Peperonia tetraphylla  Piptanthus  nepalensis  Pleione hookeriana  Potentilla fruticosa  Primula denticulata  Primula floribunda  Ranunculus  brotherusii  Rhododendron  campanulatum  Rhododendron  lepidotum 

233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242

                             

243    244    245    246    247    248   

Ribes orientale  Roscoea alpina  Roscoea purpurea  Rumex crispus  Salix calyculata  Salix sp  Saussurea sp  Smilacina purpurea  Sorbaria tomentosa  Sorbus cuspidata  Unidentified Tree,  P10064  Unidentified Tree,  P10065  Vanda sp  Viburnum  cylindricum   Viburnum  grandiflorum   Viola wallichiana 

 

51   

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->