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Computer Science Booklet

Computer Science Booklet

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  • PROF. DR. ALTAF ALI G. SHAIKH
  • LIST OF EXPERT IN THE SUBJECT OF IT. CS & SE
  • Structure of BS Programs
  • COURSE CONTENTS
  • Course Name: Introduction to Computing
  • Reference Material:
  • Course Name: Programming Fundamentals
  • Course Name: Object Oriented Programming
  • Course Name: Discrete Structures
  • Course Name: Operating Systems
  • Course Name: Database Systems
  • Course Name: Introduction to Software Engineering
  • Course Name: Computer Communication and Networks
  • Course Name: Human Computer Interaction
  • Course Name: Senior Design Project
  • Course Name: Calculus and Analytic Geometry
  • Course Name: Probability and Statistics
  • Course Name: Linear Algebra
  • Course Name: Electromagnetism
  • Course Name: English-I (Functional English)
  • Course Name: English – II (Technical and Report Writing)
  • Course Name: English – III (Communication Skills)
  • Course Name: Islamic & Pakistan Studies
  • Course Name: Professional Practice
  • Scheme of Studies for Bachelor Degree Computer Science Program
  • Sample Scheme of Study for BS (CS) 4–year Program (8 Semesters)
  • Computer Science – Core Courses (18 credit hours)
  • Course Name: Computer Organization and Assembly Language
  • Course Name: Theory of Automata and Formal languages
  • Course Name: Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • Course Name: Artificial Intelligence
  • Course Name: Computer Architecture
  • Course Name: Compiler Construction
  • Computer Science – Supporting Courses (9 credit hours)
  • Course Name: Multivariable Calculus
  • Course Name: Differential Equations
  • Course Name: Numerical Computing
  • Computer Science – Elective Courses (21 credit hours)
  • Course Name: Digital Image Processing
  • Course Name: Digital Signal Processing
  • Course Name: Computer Vision
  • Course Name: Software Engineering
  • Course Name: Data Communication
  • Course Name: Distributed Computing
  • Course Name: Data and Network Security
  • Course Name: Wireless Networks
  • Course Name: Telecommunication Systems
  • Course Name: System Programming
  • Course Name: Distributed Database System
  • Course Name: Entrepreneurship
  • Course Description and Profiles:
  • Core Courses:
  • Course Name: Advanced Theory of Computation
  • Course Name: Advance Algorithm Analysis
  • Course Name: Advance Operating System
  • Course Name: Advance Computer Architecture
  • Course Name: Parallel and Distributed Computing
  • Course Name: Control Systems and Robotics
  • Course Name: Real Time Operating Systems
  • Course Name: Advanced Networking
  • Course Name: Network Security
  • Course Name: Topics in Computer Networking
  • Course Name: Network Administration
  • Course Name: Network Performance Evaluation
  • Course Name: Theory of Programming Languages
  • Course Name: Advanced Compiler Design I
  • Course Name: Advanced Compiler Design II
  • Course Name: Intelligent User Interfaces
  • Course Name: Multimedia Database
  • Course Name: Rich Internet Applications
  • National Curriculum Revision Committee Software Engineering
  • Software Engineering Degree Programs
  • Curriculum for BS Software Engineering — BS (SE)
  • Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering: BS (SE)
  • Domain Specific Elective Courses (6/133)
  • Course Name: Software Construction
  • Course Name: Software Requirement Engineering
  • Course Name: Software Design and Architecture
  • Course Name: Software Quality Engineering
  • Course Name: Software Project Management
  • BS (SE) - Software Engineering Courses (Electives)
  • Course Name: Software Metrics
  • Course Name: Software Engineering Economics
  • Course Name: Information System Audit
  • Course Name: Business Process Automation
  • Course Name: Design Patterns
  • Course Name: Software Testing
  • Course Name: Formal Methods
  • Course Name: Introduction to Soft Computing
  • Course Name: Data Warehousing and Data Mining
  • Course Name: Data Security and Encryption
  • Course Name: Discrete Structures–II
  • Course Name: Theory of Automata and Formal Languages
  • Course Name: Analysis of Algorithms
  • Course Name: Computer Graphics
  • Course Name: Artificial Neural Networks
  • Course Name: Bioinformatics
  • Course Name: Computational Linear Algebra
  • Course Name: Mathematical Tools for Software Engineering
  • Course Name: Operations Research
  • Course Name: Simulation and Modeling
  • Course Name: Ethics and Professional Practices for Computing Professionals
  • MS (SE) – Core Courses Course Name: Requirement Engineering
  • Course Name: Software System Architecture
  • Course Name: Software System Quality
  • Elective Courses Course Name: Software Engineering Laboratory
  • Course Name: Research Study
  • Course Name: Software Case Tools & Applications
  • Course Name: Software Engineering Ontologies
  • Revision of BS Program in Information Technology
  • MS Program in Information Technology
  • Course Name: Introduction to Database Systems
  • Course Name: Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies
  • Course Name: Fundamentals of Information Technology
  • Course Name: Web Systems and Technologies
  • Course Name: Multimedia Systems and Design
  • Course Name: System and Network Administration
  • Course Name: System Integration and Architecture
  • Course Name: Technology Management
  • Course Name: Organizational Behaviour
  • Course Name: Information Systems
  • Course Name: Communication Systems Design
  • Course Name: Information Security
  • Course Name: Communication Technologies
  • Course Name: Database Management
  • Course Name: Knowledge-Based Systems
  • Course Name: Data Warehousing
  • Course Name: Information Retrieval
  • Course Name: Advanced Database Management Systems
  • Course Name: Telecom Management
  • Course Name: Information Security and Assurance
  • Course Name: Information Technology Infrastructure
  • Course Name: Distributed Databases
  • Course Name: Advanced Topics in Databases
  • Course Name: Information Technology Architecture
  • Annexure - A
  • English I (Functional English)

CURRICULUM OF

COMPUTER SCIENCE, SOFTWARE ENGINEERING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

BS MS
(Revised 2009)

HIG HER

IO EDUC AT N

IO SS N C O M MI

HIGHER EDUCATION COMMISSION ISLAMABAD

1

CURRICULUM DIVISION, HEC
Dr. Syed Sohail H. Naqvi Prof. Dr. Altaf Ali G. Shaikh Miss Ghayyur Fatima Mr. M. Tahir Ali Shah Mr. Shafiullah Khan Executive Director Member (Acad) Director (Curri) Deputy Director (Curri) Deputy Director

2

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction………………………………………………………… 2. Computing …………………………………………………………. Computer Science Software Engineering Information Technology 3. Structures for BS Programme……………………………………… 4. Course Contents (Computing-Core Courses)……………………. 5. Computer Science Curricula – 2009……………………………… BS in Computer Science ………………………………………. MS in Computer Science………………………………………. 6. Software Engineering Curricula - 2009 ………………………… BS in Software Engineering MS in Software Engineering ………………………………… 7. Information Technology Curricula - 2009 …………………………. BS in Information Technology MS in Information Technology…………………………………. 8. Annexures – A, B, C, D & E………………………………………… 6 16

17 19 26 31 54 72 106 114 124 143

3

new ideas and information are pouring in like a stream. and will require the completion of 130-136 credit hours. For the purpose of curriculum revision various committees are constituted at the national level. According to the decision of the special meeting of ViceChancellor‘s Committee. imperative to update our curricula regularly by introducing the recent developments in the relevant fields of knowledge. 2009 at the HEC Islamabad revised the curriculum in the light of the unified template. DR. The joint National Curriculum Revision Committee for Computer Science. comprising of senior teachers nominated by universities. The engineering degree will devote 65-70% of the curriculum towards engineering courses. The revised draft curriculum is being circulated for implementation in the concerned institutions. the Federal Government vide notification No. respective accreditation councils and stake holders. therefore. and to fulfill the needs of the local industries. The new Bachelor (BS) degree shall be of 4 years duration. Software Engineering and Information Technology in a meeting held on June 12-13. degree awarding institutions. the curriculum of a subject must be reviewed after every 3 years. In pursuance of the above decisions and directives. By looking at the curriculum one can judge the state of intellectual development and the state of progress of the nation. appointed the University Grants Commission as the competent authority to look after the curriculum revision work beyond class XII at the bachelor level and onwards to all degrees. The world has turned into a global village.PREFACE Curriculum of a subject is said to be the throbbing pulse of a nation. D773/76-JEA (cur. SHAIKH Member Academics August 2009 4 . It also aimed to give a basic. R&D organizations. In exercise of the powers conferred by sub-section (1) of section 3 of the Federal Supervision of Curricula Textbooks and Maintenance of Standards of Education Act 1976.). It is. PROF. ALTAF ALI G. universities and other institutions of higher education. A committee of experts comprising of conveners from the National Curriculum Revision of HEC in Basic. Applied Social Sciences and Engineering disciplines met in April 2007 and developed a unified template to standardize degree programs in the country to bring the national curriculum at par with international standards. the Higher Education Commission (HEC) is continually performing curriculum revision in collaboration with universities. dated December 4th 1976. broad based knowledge to the students to ensure the quality of education. certificates and diplomas awarded by degree colleges. and 35--30% to non Engineering courses.

IN DRAFT STAGE FINAL STAGE FOLLOW UP COLLECTION OF EXP NOMINATION UNI. UNI. QUESTIONNAIRE CONS. HEC BACK TO STAGE-I PREP. FINALIZATION OF DRAFT BY NCRC COMMENTS PRINTING OF CURRI. INDUSTRY & COUNCILS APPRAISAL OF 1ST DRAFT BY EXP PREP. R&D. OF CURRI. Preparation REC. OF DRAFT BY NCRC REVIEW IMPLE. Abbreviations Used: NCRC. PREP. LI R&D HEC Recommendations Learning Innovation Research & Development Organization Higher Education Commission 5 . OF NCRC. OF FINAL CURRI. UNDER CONSIDERATION CURRI. COL. Vice-Chancellor’s Committee Experts Colleges Universities ORIENTATION COURSES BY LI. EXP.CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT STAGE-I STAGE-II STAGE-III STAGE-IV CURRI. National Curriculum Revision Committee VCC.

it is vital for its curricula to maintain currency with the latest developments in the filed. Higher Education Commission (HEC) is investing substantial effort in improving and promoting higher education in the domain of curricula development and research. NCRC-SE and NCRC-IT) worked independently in their respective domains through extensive interaction and consensus of national and international experts in the field. Accordingly. All three committees (NCRC-CS. All three committees developed a final report pertaining to the design. Moreover. structure and courses details of BS. The following committees were constituted by HEC involving the respective expert faculty members both from public and private sectors throughout the country:     National Curriculum Revision Committee-Computer Science (2009)-NCRC-CS National Curriculum Revision Committee-Software Engineering (2009)-NCRCSE National Curriculum Revision Committee-Information Technology (2009)-NCRCIT Joint National Curriculum Revision Committee (Computer Science.National Joint Computing (Computer Science. final meetings were held to finalize the recommendations in their respective domains. Computing Curricula Development-An Ongoing Activity Computing is a dynamic and fast expanding field. MS and PhD programs. Software Engineering and Information Technology) Curriculum Committee (NJCCC) Introduction I. the same were also submitted to the various respective departments of universities for their review and feedback. 6 . Accordingly. It is important to mention here that various delegates from international software industry including Microsoft and Oracle also participated in our meetings. The reports delivered by theses committees were sent to the experts of international repute abroad for their evaluation and recommendations. Software Engineering and Information Technology)-2009-JNCRC-CSSEIT All committees held their preliminary meetings (except JNCRC) to establish the respective first draft of curriculum.

Software Engineering and Information Technology)-2009 was held on June 12-13. 7 . Software Engineering and Information Technology. 2009 at Higher Education Commission. To integrate the work of all three committees under the umbrella of Computing and to identify commonalities and differences among all three disciplines. The major objectives of the meeting include the following:  Unification among curricula of Computer Engineering and Information Technology Science. Islamabad. Software It is essential that consistent standards should to be maintained across all three curricula. Software Engineering and Information Technology from both public and private sector institutions were invited nationwide to participate in the meeting.  Curricula Revision Strategy The international scientific and professional bodies including Association of Computing Machinery (ACM).Subsequently. and Joint ACM and IEEE Curriculum Task Force has already established Computing as an origin and basis for family of disciplines including Computer Science. The following participants attended the meeting and contributed significantly to establish a model to structure all degree programs on the basis of Computing in a systematic manner. Software Engineering and Information Technology)-2009 A two-day meeting of the Joint National Curriculum Revision Committee (Computer Science. the following committee was constituted to develop a model to unify all the curricula and create systemic structures to maintain consistency of certain level in all the degree programs: Meeting of Joint National Curriculum Revision Committee (Computer Science. Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE). All senior faculty members and experts in the domains of Computer Science.

Shangrila Road. Prof. CS & SE Sr. Department of Computer Science. Muhammad Sher. Associate Professor. Islamabad Dr. Department of Computer Science.K Brohi Road H-11/4. Dr. Prof. Aftab Maroof Professor National University of Computer & Emerging Sciences A. Name & Address Federal / Rawalpindi 1. Aftab Ahmed Chairman National Computing Education Accreditation Council (NCEAC) Director Foundation University Institute of Management & Computer Sciences Near Lalazar Colony Rawalpindi. Bahria University. Islamabad 2. College of Electrical & Mechanical Engineering (EME). Muhammad Yunus Javed. 8 . Islamabad. Associate Professor. Islamabad. International Islamic University. H-12. H-10 Campus. Naveed Ikram.LIST OF EXPERT IN THE SUBJECT OF IT. H-10 Campus. 6. Prof. 4. Sector E-8. Dr. Faculty Block-2. Dr. National University of Science and Technology. Professor. Faculty Block-2. Engr. International Islamic University. 5. 3. Dr. Muhammad Yousaf. Islamabad Dr. Department of Computer Science & Engineering.

14. Blue Area. Muhammad Ali Jinnah University (MAJU). Nazir A. Associate Professor. Aamer Nadeem Associate Professor M. Sangi. Assistant Professor. Professor. Sector H-8/1. National University of Sciences and Technology. Principal Engr. Islamabad. Abdul Qadir.7. 9. 9 .O. Arshad Iqbal. Islamabad Dr. H-12. Farhana Shah. Convener NCRC IT Professor / Director. Rawalpindi Dr. Islamabad Dr. Professor. Munir Hussain Naveed. Sharifullah Khan. The Mall. Dr.A. Dr. School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences (SEECS). Shahid Nazir Bhatti Professor Deptt of Computer Science COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. Islamabad Dr. Fatima Jinnah Women University. PIEAS Nilore. Quaid-i-Azam University. Islamabad 8. Saeed Bhatti. Islamabad Mr. Rawalpindi Dr. 10. Jinnah University (MAJU) Blue Area Islamabad. 11. 15. Deptt of Computer & Information Science P. 30. 12. Prof. Allama Iqbal Open University. Department of Software Engineering. Department of Computer Science. Institute of Information Technology. Deptt of Software Engineering Foundation University Medical College New Lalazar. Dr. 13.

Head. Islamabad Prof. Faculty Block-2. Islamabad. Professor. Department of Computer Science. Islamabad 17. Prof. Jamil Ahmed Dean Iqra University Islamabad Campus H-10. Sector H-8/1. Dr. Deptt of Computer Science. 19. NUST School of Electrical & Computer Science. M. Mr. Prof. Dr. H-10 Campus.K. 30. National University of Computer & Engineering Science. Muhammad Nadeem Khokhar Professor. H-12. Deptt of Computer Science. Dr. Brohi Road. Head of Department Computing Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science & Technology. International Islamic University. 18. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. Syed Afaq Husain Professor & Chairman.16. Dr. Islamabad. Deptt of Computer Science. Air University E-9.T University of Engineering & Tech. Arshad Ali Shahid. Amir Hayat. H-11/4. Islamabad Dr. Blue Area Islamabad. Software Engineering & Information Technology. 10 . 19 20 21 Punjab 1. Professor. Islamabad Dr. Imran Saeed Assistant Professor Department of Computer Science. Mohammad Mahboob Yasin. Muhammad Ali Maud Deptt of Computer Engg & I. Lahore. A.

Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science & Technology 90-Clifton Karachi 11 2. Dr. Professor. Tech LUMS. Lahore Campus Block B. 4. Ferozepur Road. 7. Institute of Information and Communication Technology. 6. Professor & Chairperson. . Department of Computer Science. B. 5. Prof. I. Kazi Campus.2. Deptt of Computer & Information Technology. Deptt of Computer Science I. Convener NCRC Computer Science Professor & Director. Professor. Dr. Professor & Head of Deptt of Computer Science. Aftab Ahmed Malik. Imdad Ali Ismali. Univesity. Sindh 1. Sarmad Hussain. Shafay Shamail Chairman Deptt. Forman Christian College. Multan 3. Faisal Town. Lahore 54600 Dr. Of Computer Science & Info. Jamshoro Sindh Dr. National University of Computer & Engineering Science.T. Department of Computer Science. Syed Mansoor Sarwar Principal Information Technolgy (PUCIT) Punjab University Lahore. & Software Engineering Forman Christian College Lahore. Jerald Allan Kabell. Dr. Dr. Assistant Professor. Z. Iftikhar Hussain Shah. Lahore Dr. Sohail Asghar. Allama I. University of Sindh. Lahore.

Najmi Ghani Haider. Kazi Campus. Professor. Director. 10. Shah Latif Town. IBA Sukkur Airport Road. Dr. Info. Information Technology. Jamshoro Sindh Dr. Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science & Technology (Szabist). Associate Professor. Zubair A. Dr. Aqil Burney. IBA Sukkur Airport Road Sukkur. 12 . Shaikh. Professor. Karachi Dr. National Highway. Professor. Abdul Wahab Ansari. 5. Dr. Dr. Qamar Uddin Khand. FAST National University of Computer & Emerging Sciences. Deptt of Computer Science Institute of Business Management Korangi Creek Road Karachi-75190 Prof. Department of Computer Sciences. University of Sindh. Of Computer Science . Madad Ali Shah. Akram Sheikh. Tech University of Karachi Karachi. Deptt of Information Technology. Department of CS and SE Engineering. Mehran University of Engineering & Technology. Director Deptt.3. I. 8. Convener NCRC in SE Chairman. Karachi 4. Dr. 100 Clifton. HOD. Sukkur Dr. 6. Allama I. 9. Ejaz Ahmed Professor. Jamshoro Prof. Institute of Information & Communication Technology. 7.

12. Muhammad Amir Associate Professor Deptt. UET Peshawar.11. Asif Mehmood Gilani. Department of Information Technology & Computer Science. Of Computer & IT NWFP. Muhammad Ajmal Bangash. Tahseen Ahmed Jilani Assistant Professor Department of Computer Science. 5. Prof. Dr. Department of Computer Science. Assistant Professor. NWFP Prof. & Tech Karachi. Dr. Topi. Peshawar Dr. Prof. Of Electronic Engg. Dr. 3. Associate Professor. NWFP 1. 4. Topi – Swabi. Inayatullah Babar Chairman Deptt. Hayatabad. Abid Khan. Phase-V. Muhammad Ali. University of Karachi. 7/B-3. University of Peshawar. GIK Institute of Engineering Science and Technology. Abu Turab Alam College of Computer Science & Information System Korangi Creck Karachi. Dr. Dr. Prof. GIK Institute of Engineering & Technology. Dr. Peshawar. District Swabi 2. 13. 13 . Sir Syed University of Engg. M. Karachi Mr. Institute of Management Sciences.

Dr.Balochistan 1. Convener NCRC-CS Professor & Director. Engineering & Management Sciences. University of Peshawar 6 7 Dr. M. Dr. Balochistan University of Information Technology. Dr Farhana Shah . Aqil Burney. Rawalpindi & Dr. Institute of Information Technology Quaid-i-Azam University. Chairman and Director. FASTUniversity of Computer and Emerging Sciences Shah Abdul Latif Town. Jamshoro Dr. No 1 Topic CS-Curriculum-2009 Presentation By Dr. Muid Mufti. Faculty of Information & Communication Technology (ICT). Muhammad Abid. Prof. National highway Karachi Dr. S. Islamabad 14 . Dean. Convener NCRC-IT Director. Islamabad Prof. EME College NUST. Institute of Information & Communication Technology. Punjab University College of IT PU Old Campus. Lahore 2 SE-Curriculum-2009 3 IT-Curriculum-2009 4 Survey of the Latest Recommendation of ACM & IEEE Curriculum Task Force Regarding CSCurriculum Survey of the Latest Recommendation of ACM & IEEE Curriculum Task Force Regarding SECurriculum Survey of the Latest Recommendation of ACM & IEEE Curriculum Task Force Regarding ITCurriculum Survey of IT Industry Trends and What is Expected from Computing Programs in Pakistan? 5 Dr. ID Technologies. Convener NCRC-SE Meritorious Professor. Quetta The following was sequence of presentations made during the meeting: Sr. M. Department of Computer Science. University of Karachi. Director. Imdad Ali Ismaili. Mansoor Sarwar Principal. University of Sindh. Zubair A. Head. Abdul Hussain Shah Bukhari. Department of Computer Science. Shoaib Khan. Prof. Shaikh.

8 Software Industry Trends. 15 . Dr. Opportunities and Threats Resource person from PSEB 9 Curricula Revision Strategy Prof. Aftab Ahmed and Future Challenges Chairman National Computing Education Accreditation Council (NCEAC) Director Foundation University Institute of Management & Computer Sciences Near Lalazar Colony Rawalpindi.

Computing Requirements for Bachelor Degree Programs (Computer Science. Information Technology) Structure of BS Programs Name of Program # Category Computer Science Credit Hours 70 43 12 15 48 18 21 9 12 130 12 130 48 18 21 9 12 130 Software Engineering Credit Hours 70 43 12 15 48 Information Technology Credit Hours 70 1 Computing Courses Core Courses 43 Supporting Areas 12 General Education 15 2 Software Engineering Courses CS Core Courses 18 CS Electives Courses 21 CS Supporting Areas 9 Courses (Electives) 3 University Electives Total Credit Hours 16 . Software Engineering.

B.Structure of BS Program Common Areas in all BS Programs of Computer Science.8 Labs preferred in these courses. Supporting Area. However. Software Engineering and Information Technology Regarding Computing. Supporting Area Courses . General Education & University Elective Courses A.12 Credit Hours # 13 14 15 16 Co de MT MT MT PH PreReq Course Title Calculus and Analytical Geometry Probability and Statistics Linear Algebra Electromagnetism Credit hours 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 1 2 4 3 17 . implementation details are left upon the concerned Institutes. Computing-Core Courses – 43 Credit Hours # C o d e 1 3 3 4 4 2 PreReq Course Title Credit hours Proposed Semester 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1: Introduction to Computing 4 (3-3) 1 Programming Fundamentals 4 (3-3) 1 Object Oriented Programming 3 (3-0) 2 Discrete Structures 3 (3-0) 2 Data Structure and Algorithms 3 (3-0) 3 1 Digital Logic and Design 3 (3-0) 3 Operating Systems 4 (3-3) 4 Introduction to Database Systems 4 (3-3) 4 Introduction to Software 3 (3-0) 4 Engineering 1 6 Computer Communications and 3 (3-0) 6 Networks 1 8 Human Computer Interaction 3 (3-0) 7 Senior Design Project 6 (0-18) 7.

Urdu etc. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. Institutions may add more courses) # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Cod e MG MG MG MG SS PS SS SS PreReq - Course Title Financial Accounting Financial Management Human Resource Management Marketing Economics Psychology International Relations Foreign/Regional Language (French. 0) 3 (3. General Education Courses – 15 Credit Hours # 17 18 19 20 21 Co de EG EG EG SS SS PreReq Course Title English-I (Functional English) English-II (Technical and Report Writing) English-III (Communication Skills) Islamic and Pakistan Studies Professional Practices Credit hours 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 1 2 3 1 8 - - University Elective Courses – 12 Credit Hours (Not limited to the list below. Punjabi. 0) 6-8 18 . 0) Proposed Semester 4 5 6 7 6 7 7-8 9 SS - 3(3. 0) 3 (3.C. German. 0) 3 (3. Sindhi.) Philosophy Credit hours 3(3.

Basics of structured and Modular programming. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: None Objectives: This course focuses on a breadth-first coverage of computer science discipline. Algorithm definition. Computer Science: An overview of Computer Science. Computer graphics. 2. Binary numbers. History computer system. Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning. design. basic computing hardware. introducing computing environments. 9/e by Larry Long and Nancy Long. Graphical programming. Operating system. Reference Material: 1. 2002 / ISBN: 0130929891 3. and implementation. analyzing problem. testing programmes. Computers: Information Technology in Perspective. Course Name: Programming Fundamentals Credit Hours: 4 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Course Outline: Overview of computers and programming. Computer networks and internet. Programming paradigms and languages. Reference Material: 1. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: None Objectives: The course is designed to familiarize students with the basic structured programming skills. Prentice Hall. C language C. Problem Solving and Program Design in C / 6E Hanly & Koffman 19 . Schneider and Gersting.g. and programme development and testing. Basic Algorithms and problem solving. translation of algorithms to programmes. basic machine organization.COURSE CONTENTS Computing – Core Courses (43 credit hours) Course Name: Introduction to Computing Credit Hours: 4 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. An Invitation to Computer Science. Fundamental programming constructs. functions. arrays. Compiler. operating systems. AI. It emphasizes upon problem analysis. desktop publishing. Overview of Software Engineering and Information Technology. Course Outline: Number Systems. records. 2000 4. Boolean logic. control structures. Internet. designing solution. Social and legal issues. Overview of language for e. data types. general application software. development of basic algorithms. Introducing Software engineering and Information technology within the broader domain of computing. Sherer. Social issues of computing. Von Neumann Architecture. testing designed solution. files. algorithm designing. software applications and tools and computer usage concepts.

exception handling Reference Material: 1. virtual functions. derived classes. C How to Program. problem solving in OO paradigm. loop invariants. classes. Methods of Proof. proof by contradiction. inheritance and polymorphism. analysis and software development. Java How to Program. Kenneth H. methods. In this course more emphasis shall be given to statistical and probabilistic formulation with respect to computing aspects. 20 . I/O and file processing. Trees and Graphs. focusing on providing a solid theoretical foundation for further work. constructors and destructors. Course Outline: Introduction to logic and proofs: Direct proofs. Mathematical Induction and Recursion. iterative procedures. Course Outline: Evolution of Object Oriented (OO) programming. operator and function overloading. predicate calculus. 6TH edition. Sequences. C++ How to Program. Combinatorics. pigeonhole principle.Addison-Wesley | Published: 02/06/2009 ISBN-10: 0321535421 | ISBN-13: 9780321535429 2. Prepositional and predicate calculus. Elementary number theory. Further. Fundamental structures: Functions. Rosen. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Programming Fundamentals Objectives: The course aims to focus on object-oriented concepts. abstract algebra. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications. OO programme design process. cardinality and countability. Relations and functions. Reference Material: 1. Pigeonwhole principle. 7/E (Harvey & Paul) Deitel & Deitel ISBN-10: 0132222205 ISBN-13: 9780132222204 Publisher: Prentice Hall Course Name: Discrete Structures Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Objectives: Introduces the foundations of discrete mathematics as they apply to Computer Science. Optimization and matching. 6/E (Harvey & Paul) Deitel & Deitel ISBN-10: 0136152503 ISBN-13: 9780136152507 Publisher: Prentice Hall 2. ISBN-10: 0132404168 ISBN-13: 9780132404167 Publisher: Prentice Hall Copyright: 2007 Course Name: Object Oriented Programming Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2. Sets. probabilistic methods. OO concepts and principles. relations (more specifically recursions). Formal logic. this course aims to develop understanding and appreciation of the finite nature inherent in most Computer Science problems and structures through study of combinatorial reasoning. Mcgraw Hill Book Co. tree and graph structures. objects and encapsulation. 2006. 5/E (Harvey & Paul) Deitel & Deitel.

different data models. Problems of cooperative processes. Addison-Wesley Pub. b-trees. Course Name: Database Systems Credit Hours: 4 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Prentice-Hall Publishers. Ralph P. File systems. Database design.. Silberschatz A. External Fragmentation. Relocation. Synchronization. Course Outline: History and Goals. Process and CPU management. 3. concurrency control and recovery techniques. 2000. Kernel and User Modes. RDBMS. 21 .. Busby & Ross. Discrete Mathematics. Course Name: Operating Systems Credit Hours: 4 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Introduction to concurrency. Prentice Hall Publishers. Course Outline: Basic database concepts. Richard Johnsonbaugh. Lab assignments involving different single and multithreaded OS algorithms. Deadlocks. Kolman. 4. indexed files. Modern Operating Systems. Structured Query language. Protection. Tanenmaum A. & Galvin P. Scheduling and dispatch. The course primarily focuses on relational data model and DBMS concepts. 2008. Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics: An Applied Introduction. Transaction processing and optimization concepts. Evolution of multi-user systems.. Physical database design: Storage and file structure. I/O systems.S. Memory management and virtual memory. 1985. 2008. Peterson. Paging and Demand Paging. Applied Operating Systems Concepts. 2004. Grimaldi. Small Group Project implementing a database.C. J. Discrete Mathematical Structures. Co. 2. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: None Objectives: To help students gain a general understanding of the principles and concepts governing the functions of operating systems and acquaint students with the layered approach that makes design. implementation and operation of the complex OS possible. functional dependencies and normal forms. files with dense index. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: The course aims to introduce basic database concepts. 3rd Edition. Relational data model and algebra. 4th edition. Security and Protection.L. Entity Relationship modelling. Secondary storage. Introduction to distributed operating systems. Database security and authorization. database efficiency and tuning.2. Multithreading. data storage and retrieval techniques and database design techniques. Reference Material: 1.. 7TH edition. 7th Edition. files with variable length records.

Encoding. Database Systems 8E. Co (2009). Data Link Protocols (HDLC. Function-Oriented Design.J. Course Outline: Analogue and digital Transmission. Roger Pressman. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Object Oriented Paradigm/Programming Objectives: To study various software development models and phases of software development life cycle. Patterns. AddisonWesley. Requirements Engineering. TCP/IP) and Protocol Standards. Inter-networking. Co. Noise. process management. (2004). Network security issues. Network system architectures (OSI. Media. Object-Oriented Design. Course Outline: Introduction to Computer-based System Engineering. Reference Material: 1. Transport layer protocols TCP/IP. Protocol design issues. labs or projects involving implementation of protocols at different layers. 22 . Software Engineering 8E by Sommerville Addison Wesley. Analogue & digital transmission. Switched and IP Networks. Project Management. Software Design: Architectural Design. TCP/IP).Connolly and P. C. Network models (OSI. Routing. McGraw-Hill. Flow Control. UDP. 2. R. Local Area Networks and MAC Layer protocols (Ethernet. Emphasis is given on the understanding of modern network concepts. PPP).Reference Material: 1. UML modelling. Addison-Wesley Pub. Asynchronous and Synchronous transmission. Token ring). Bridging. Multiplexing. 2006 2. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: None Objectives: To introduce students to the concept of computer communication. Assignments and projects on various stages and deliverables of SDLC. ISBN: 0-201-74153-9. Fundamentals of Database Systems. Course Name: Introduction to Software Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2. Requirements Specifications. Quality Assurance. 2009 Course Name: Computer Communication and Networks Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2.Date. Database Systems: A Practical Approach to Design. Software Specification. Error Control. Software Engineering: A Practitioner's Approach /7E. change control. Addison Wesley Pub. 3. Programming exercises. Network Layers. Introduction to advanced issues: Reusability. System Modelling. Software Prototyping. Implementation and Management 5E.Begg. Elmasri and Navathe. software development and testing are introduced through hands-on Team Projects. User Interface Design. The concepts of project management. 5/E. Processes & Configuration Management.

A. 5/E. Introduction to design basics. 3/E Alan Dix. University of Birmingham ISBN-10: 0130461091 ISBN-13: 9780130461094 Publisher: Prentice Hall 2.Reference Material: 1. standards and models. Course Structure: Lectures: 0. Finlay. evaluation techniques. Russell Beale. Labs:1 Prerequisites: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: This course introduces the human issues of usability and its importance. Computing Dept. Resources: 1. Course Outlines: The Human. 23 . Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction. University of Maryland ISBN-10: 0321197860 ISBN-13: 9780321197863 Publisher: Addison-Wesley Course Name: Senior Design Project Credit Hours: 6 Data Base Systems. Data and Computer Communications By William Stallings Published by Macmillan Pub. Topics include Usability Design principals. task analysis. Abowd. pervasive and ubiquitous applications. It describes guidelines for use of different media and interface styles. HCI in software process. Human-Computer Interaction. Purdue University ISBN-10: 0136061273 ISBN-13: 9780136061274 Publisher: Prentice Hall 3. Software Project Management in Practice by Jalote. Introduction to Computer Networks /4. Design rules. pervasive and ubiquitous applications. Co. Pankaj. plan and develop a real and substantial project related to computer science. Prentice Hall 2003 2. evaluation techniques. Georgia Institute of Technology. prototyping. Introduction to specialized topics such as Groupware. Resources: 1. Computer and Interaction. conceive. Gregory D. Computer Architecture Objectives: The software project involves research. Lancaster University Janet E. It provides an opportunity to the students to crystallize their acquired professional competence in the form of a demonstrable software product. Tanenbaum. Usability paradigm and principles. University of Maryland Catherine Plaisant.. S. 4/E Ben Shneiderman. Comer. Universal design and User support and Computer Supported Cooperative Work. Computer Networks and Internets. 2008 Douglas E. 8th Edition 2006 Course Name: Human Computer Interaction Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2. Make oral and written project presentations. Groupware. It considers the implications of human understanding on the usability of computer systems and the importance of understanding the context of use. Labs: 6 Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Development. Leeds Metropolitan University.

John Wiley and Sons. laws of probability. Counting techniques. Calculus and Analytical Geometry. ―Probability & Statistics for Engineers & Scientists‖. 7th edition. measures of central tendencies and dispersion. Conditional probability and Baye‘s theorem with application to random variable (Discrete and continuous) Binomial. 7th edition. counting techniques. sample space. Limit and Continuity. and by Partial Fractions. probability and decision making. Definite Integral as Limit of a Sum. Course Name: Probability and Statistics Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Integral as Anti-derivative. Thomas Finny. 1993. Erwin Kreyzig. Swokowski. 6 th edition. by Parts. Box-Cox plots. 10th edition. Application to Tangent and Normal. Poisson. Calculus. William E. 5. Calculus. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. Taylor and Maclaurin Expansions and their convergence.Computing – Supporting Courses (12 credit hours) Course Name: Calculus and Analytic Geometry Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. presentation. Prentice Hall Publisher. 8th edition. 4. moments of frequency distribution. Simple Cartesian Curves. Application to Area. Maxima/Minima and Point of Inflexion. John Wiley & Sons Inc. use of elementary statistical packages for explanatory Data analysis. Geometric. Differentiation of Functions. Curve Tracing. Statistics in decision making. Boyce Richard C. Myers. Volume and Surface of Revolution. Derivative as Slope of Tangent to a Curve and as Rate of Change. Descriptive Statistics. Reference Material: 1. Howard Anton. Ronald Walpole. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Objectives: To introduce the concepts of data analysis. DeMoivre‘s Theorem and its Applications. Graphical representation of Data Stem-and Lead plot. Methods of Integration: Integration by Substitution. events. Course Outline: Introduction to Statistics. Symmetrical Properties. John Wiley and Sons (WIE). 2002. 1994. 24 . Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Objectives: To provide foundation and basic ground for calculus and analytical geometry background. 3. Estimation and testing of hypotheses. 2. Linearization. Negative Binomial Distributions. Functions and Graphs. Exponential Gamma and Normal distributions. Arc Length. 2008. Myers. Reference Material: 1. Regression and Correlation. Brooks/Cole Publishers. Olinick and Pence. John Wiley & Sons. Calculus and Analytical Geometry. Ye. Course Outline: Complex Numbers. Diprima. introduction to probability. ISBN: 0471093335. Indefinite Integration of Simple Functions.

semiconductors (intrinsic and extrinsic). BJT as a switch. Prentice Hall PTR. Bernard Kolman. Operations on matrices. Brett Coonley. BJT biasing circuits. Strang. power amplifiers. pMOS and CMOS inverters circuits. operations on system of equations. Cowan. 2007. Linear Algebra and Its Applications. Applications to Systems of Equations and to Geometry. pn junction. 2. David Hill. Cofactor and Inverse. solutions and study of their properties. G. Matrices & Determinants. Reference Material: 1. Metal oxide transistors. Howard Anton. David C. Gilbert Strang. 4. Reference Material: 1. Halliday and Krane. pn junctions as a rectifier. Linear Transformations. Labs: 1 Prerequisites: None Credit Hours: 3 Objectives: Introduction of Electronics Course Outline: Fundamentals of Semiconductor physics: Band theory. 9 th edition. University Physics. 9th edition. Rank. 2003. 2000. LED and LCD etc. Introduction to A/D and D/A conversion circuits. Solution of system of Linear systems. Chris Rorres. College Physics (6th and higher edition). Vector Spaces. Addison-Wesley. classes of amplifiers. orthgonality and least squares. Clarendon. Andrew BulmanFleming. Statistical Data Analysis. Linear Independence. 2. Course Name: Electromagnetism Course Structure: Lectures: 2. 4th edition. (10th and higher editions). Inner products. Course Name: Linear Algebra Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Strang's Linear Algebra And Its Applications. Q-point. Andy Bulman-Fleming. Lay L. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Objectives: To provide fundamentals of solution for system of linear equations. Resnick.. 3. Elementary Linear Algebra: Applications Version. Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications. 2nd edition. zener diode and voltage regulator. 2005. Transistors: Bipolar Junction transistors. Wiley. Freedman and Young. Lay. 2005 3. 25 .2. BJT amplifiers. clipper and clamper circuits. Course Outline: Vectors. nMOS. Singular Value Decomposition. matrix properties. Positive Definite matrix. 1998. Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences. Devore. Eigenvalue & Eigenvectors. Oxford. Brooks/Cole. Duxbury Publishers.

Professional Issues in Software Engineering. Definitions of Computing (software engineering. professional competency and life-long learning. It identifies key sources for information and opinion about professionalism and ethics. Course Outline: Historical. social. 26 .B Course Name: English – III (Communication Skills) Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Course Name: Islamic Annexure .C & Pakistan Studies Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3.Computing – General Education Courses (15 credit hours) Course Name: English-I (Functional English) Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. business practices and the economics of software.A – II (Technical and Report Writing) Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Course Name: Professional Annexure – D&E Practice Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3. Information Technology) subject areas and professional activities. social. misuses. intellectual property and software law (cyber law). and economic context of Computing (software engineering. professional ethics. economic. professional societies. uses.F. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Course Name: English Annexure . Computer Science. Students analyze. social responsibilities. Software house organization Resources: 1. and risks of software. information security and privacy. evaluate. Bott et al. Information Technology). Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Annexure . and professional issues related to the discipline of Computing. This course develops student understanding about historical. software related contracts. M. ethical. Computer Science. Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None Objectives: A Computing graduate as professional has some responsibilities with respect to the society. and assess ethical and professional computing case studies.

The following attended the meeting. Member Director. 1 Dr. Professor & Director. Jamshoro 2 Mr. Professor. Karachi Campus. Department of Computing.National Curriculum Revision Committee – Computer Science (2009) A three day final meeting of the National Curriculum Revision Committee of Computer Science. University of Karachi. Professor. pertaining to revising the curriculum for Computer Science degree programs developed in 2004 was held from February 17 th to 19th. Islamabad Science. Department of Computer Science. Head. The aims and objectives of the meeting were to discuss the deliberations and finalize the curriculum drafted by the committee of the last meeting held from 28th to 30th August. National Highway. Shah Latif Town. National University of Computer & Engineering Science. Aftab Ahmed Malik. 2009 at HEC regional Centre. Sector H-8/1. Department of Computer Science. Badar Sami. Sheikh. Department of Computer & Science. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. Department of Computer Science. Karachi 4 Prof. Karachi. Institute of Information & Communication Technology. Univesity. Dr. Amir Hayat. Mohammad Mahboob Yasin. Imdad Ali Ismaili. University of Sindh. University of Karachi. Karachi 6 Dr. Associate Professor. 2008. Islamabad 7 Dr. Department of Computer Science. Zubair A. Tahseen Ahmed Jilani. (NUST-SEECS) Member Member Member Member 27 . 30. Multan 5 Dr. Karachi Convener Secretary 3 Dr. NUST School of Electrical Engineering & Computer H-12. B. Z.

Road. Islamabad 9 S. Dean. Islamabad 13 Dr. H-11/4. Deptt of Computer Science & IT. Dr. Department of Computer Science. Lahore Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member 28 . Arshad Ali Shahid. Professor FAST National University. F. Dr.K. International Islamic University. Deptt of Computer Science. Sangi. Professor. Allama Iqbal Open University. Abu Turab Alam. Institute of Business Administration. Professor. Topi. Airport Road Sukkur 14 Dr. Professor & Chairman. Islamabad 18 Dr. Professor. Air University E-9. Faculty Block-2. District Swabi 11 Prof. Department of Computer Science. Zafar Nasir. Faculty of Computer Management Sciences. Karachi 12 Dr. Isra University. GIK Institute of Engineering & Technology. Iftikhar Hussain Shah. Hyderabad 15 Dr. Nazir A. Brohi Science. Karachi 10 Prof.C College.8 Dr. Professor. Madad Ali Shah. Imran Saeed Assistant Projector. Software Engineering & Information Technology. National University of Computer & Engineering A. Asif Mehmood Gilani. M. College of Computer Science & Information System. Islamabad 17 Syed Afaq Hussain. Department of Computer Science. H-10 Campus. Deptt of Information Technology. Asadullah Shah.

19 Mr. Farrukh Amin, Assistant Professor (CS), Institute of Business Management, Korangi Creek, Karachi 20 Meritorious Prof. Dr. S. M. Aqil Burney Chairman Department of Computer Science, University of Karachi 21 Dr. Sh. M. Wahabuddin Usmani, Associate Professor, Department of CS & IT, NED University of Engineering & Technology, University Road, Karachi

Member

Member

Member

The proceedings of the meeting started with the recitation from the holy Quran by Mr. Tahir Ali Shah and welcome address by Mr. Rafiq Rai (Director – HEC Karachi region). The house unanimously nominated and elected Dr. Imdad Ali Ismaili as Convener and Mr. Badar Sami as secretary of the committee. The Convener of the meeting Prof. Dr. Imdad Ali Ismaili informed the participants that the comprehensive report of previous meeting held on 28th to 30th August 2008 has been already circulated among all the members of the committee, universities and institutions to have feedback from them. The following programs were discussed by the participants of the meeting 1) BS (Computer Science) 2) MS (Computer Science) After detailed revision of the minutes of the previous meeting held on August 28th to 30th 2008, following recommendations were made for BS (Computer Science) program to achieve the desired objectives;

Revision recommendations regarding BS (Computer Science) program
1) Digital Logic Design should be a separate course of 3 credit hours instead of being part of ―Digital Logic & Computer Architecture‖ course and should be included in the ―Computing – Core‖. ―Computer Architecture‖ should be included in the ―Computer Science – Core‖ as a full 3 credit hour course in place of ―System Programming‖ and ―System Programming‖ may be placed in ―Computer Science – Elective‖ courses . 2) Digital Computer Logic should not have any pre-requisite

29

3) The credit hours for each course should be written using standard notations. 4) Discrete Structures be moved from ―Computing Core‖ to ―Computer Science – Required Supporting courses‖ 5) Contents of ―Electromagnetism‖ should be included in the contents of ―Basic Electronics‖ 6) Numerical Computing should be moved from ―Computer Science – Electives‖ to ―Computer Science – Core‖ and contents may be updated to include Symbolic Computing related topics. 7) Each ―Computer Science – Elective‖ area/group should comprise of at least four courses. Since the areas of ―Software Engineering‖, ―Multimedia‖ have less than 4 courses so more courses be included in those areas/groups. 8) New areas/ groups may be included in ―Computer Science – Electives‖ (like Entrepreneurship, Multimedia Computing etc.) 9) The committee members also emphasized the need of revising the contents of the courses of the schemes for BS and MS(Comptuer Science) and advised to update books and reference material.

30

31

Objectives/Goals 2. Industrial Challenges 7. Many changes were recommended in various sections of the curricula developed by this Committee in the last meeting held in August 2008. 32 . The structure and other details of the program proposed by the committee were designed inline to the recommendations of various leading bodies continuously in the quest to designing the educational programs of Computer Science and related disciplines. 1. Fast Changing Disciplines 4. general recommendation regarding the update and revise of the curriculum. # 1 Category Computing courses Computing – Core courses Computing – Supporting areas Computing – General Education Computer Science courses CS – Core courses CS – Electives CS – Supporting Area University Electives Total credit hours Credit Hrs 43 12 15 18 21 9 70 2 3 48 112 130 A complete detail of BS programme involving objectives. International Standards 6. Possible program design structure Almost all the members of the committee unanimously approved the proposed objectives of the program. The Committee finally agreed to the curriculum model presented in the following table. program structure. distribution of credits among various components of programme are discussed in the following pages. structure. Latest reports and recommendations of ―Computer Science Curriculum 2008: Interim Revision of CS2001 report‖ by Interim Review Task Force of ACM and IEEE Computer Society were mainly considered. Emerging Technologies 5.Curriculum for BS (Computer Science) Program: The same basis used in the last meeting held in 2004 were taken to revise the Curriculum of Computer Science. Strategies 3. These bodies include IEEE and ACM.

The curriculum must be structured to provide a balanced mixture of learning experiences to make the graduate capable of sound professional decisions. The programme should provide a broad understanding of the field via introducing concepts. The Computer Science curriculum is expected to provide environments to put into practice. The programme should provide professional orientation to prepare students for industry. and education at the research. They must be able to produce well-organized reports. 3. 2. The programme should be dynamic and flexible enough to maintain currency with the latest scientific and technological developments in the field. The basic intention of an academic programme in Computer Science is to develop the student‘s critical professional thinking and intuition. government. results. theory. As a result the graduate should be able to assume responsible positions in business. and conclusions for a complex task. Intensive education/training in focused areas of Computer Science is desirable. There is a need for curricula structures that are really able to grow as we put new demands on them. The following summarizes some key characteristics for consideration as a basis of a successful academic programme in Computer Science: 1. and planning levels. software and communication technologies have offered new exciting opportunities and challenges for creation of innovative learning environments for Computer Science and its curricula design. Computer Science graduates require special communication skills both orally and in writing. The programme should provide formal foundations for higher learning. 4.Objectives Recent developments in computer hardware. The curriculum is required to provide integration of all components and the foundations that allow accessing all of the new knowledge and technology to fulfil the vision of future. and techniques. The programme should also provide an excellent foundation for further formal learning and training. 7. 33 . development. 6. The challenge of getting all newly emerging technologies incorporated in to the curriculum is becoming pivotal for the effectiveness of curricula. The programme may encourage students to develop and use abstract models in addition to apply respective technology in practical situations. One of the key elements here is to prepare the graduates for the future. the principles and techniques learnt during the course of implementation of academic programme. 5. methods of solution. which clearly delineate objectives.

Electives .General Education CS . and Integrated Breadth & Depth-Based specializations.Core courses CS – Electives CS .Core courses 34 .Supporting courses Computing . The students are expected to learn theoretical and practical understanding of the entire field of Computer Science.Supporting courses University Electives University Electives CS . The programme shall comprise 8 semesters spread over 4 years with two semesters a year. which is most appropriate to their planned future career.Computing General Education CS . The following are relevant details: Minimum credit hours shall be 133 for BS (Computer Science) programme including computing related courses.Core courses Computing .Computing Supporting areas . The following is distribution of total credit hours. Depth-Based. The major area of specialization shall be incorporated in the structure.Core courses CS .Programme Structure The structure of a BS programme in Computer Science is proposed to meet the needs of students with formal computing experience and with established relevant skills.Supporting areas Computing . Each major area shall comprise of 4-6 courses. The proposed structure is dynamic and provides basis for various options including Breadth-Based. Credit hour Percentage 43 33% 12 9% 15 12% 18 14% 21 16% 9 7% 12 14% Course Group Computing . Student may choose a particular option.

Eligibility Criteria The eligibility criteria of the draft curriculum by the last meeting were opened for discussion in the House. Variety of programming languages systems and operating systems must be available. substantial library resources are important to support a rigorous graduate programme in information technology. General Recommendation Regarding Implementation of Programme Faculty level and orientation is vital for the successful implementation It is strongly recommended that the BS programme should be only implemented via experienced computer science faculty having formal education in Computer Science. the university shall define their selection criteria.Some clusters regarding Computer Science Electives are listed below: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) k) l) m) n) o) Networking Information Management Intelligent Systems Graphics & Visualization Software Engineering Web Engineering E-Commerce Multimedia Distributed Computing Security Languages and Translators Computer Architecture Systems Software Scientific Computing Soft Computing University Electives It was unanimously recommended that 18 credit hours shall require to be taken from the list of general elective courses. However. multimedia systems. The access to sate of the art computing and information technology is essential for creation of innovative learning environments. It was thoroughly discussed by considering all input streams of BS (Computer Science). computer networking and virtual reality or design automation require very special and dedicated computing facilities. Students 35 . Besides faculty and computing facilities. Dedicated computing facilities are essential for hands-on experience. The House unanimously recommended the eligibility criteria for admission to BS (Computer Science) as given: The candidates must have intermediate or equivalent qualification. Professional areas of specialization such as computer graphics. The university may add any number of courses to the general elective courses preferably other than Computer Science courses.

should have access to digital libraries and knowledge resources via Internet technologies. Related IT Curriculum Efforts There are various major curriculum efforts that relate to the Computer Science curricula: a) The IFIP (International Federation of Information Processing) Curriculum Reports b) The DPMA (Data Processing Management Association) Computer Systems Proposal c) The ACM (Association of Computing Machinery) Curriculum Task ForceCurriculum 2001 d) The ITAA (Information Technology Association of America) Report on IT Workforce Study 36 .

0) 3 (3.Core Courses (34 Credit Hours) Course Title # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Code CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS PreReq 1 2 21 3 2 - Programming Fundamentals Object Oriented Programming Data Structure and Algorithms Digital Logic Design Operating Systems Database Systems Introduction to Software Development Computer Communications and Networks 6. 1) Proposed Semester 1 2 3 3 5 5 6 6 7. Final year Project 26 3 Human Computer Interaction Computing – Supporting Courses (12 Credit Hours) Course Title Calculus and Analytical Geometry Probability and Statistics Linear Algebra Basic Electronics Computing – General Education Courses (18 Credit Hours) Course Title English-I (Functional English) English-II (Technical and Report Writing) English-III (Communication Skills) Islamic and Pakistan Studies Professional Practices Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies Credit hours 3 (2. 0) 3 (2. 1) 3 (2. 8 7 # 11 12 13 14 Code MT MT MT EL PreReq - Credit hours 3 (3. 1) 3 (2. 0) 3 (3. 7. 0) 3 (3. 1) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3.Scheme of Studies for Bachelor Degree Computer Science Program Computing courses Computing . 1) 3 (2. 1) Proposed Semester 1 2 3 2 7 1 37 . 1) Proposed Semester 1 3 2 1 # 16 17 18 19 20 21 Code EG EG EG PK SS CS PreReq -- Credit hours 3 (3. 1) 6 3 (2. 1) 3 (2. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (2. 0) 3 (3. 1) 3 (2. 0) 3 (2.

0) 3 (2. 0) 3 (2. 1) 3 (3. 1) Proposed Semester 4 5 7 8 6 7 # 30 31 Code ST ST CS PreReq 11 Multivariate Calculus 11 Differential Equations 11 Numerical Computing Credit Hours 3 (3. 1) 3(2. 1) 3 (2.Computer Science courses Computer Science – Core Courses (18 Credit Hours) Course Title # 22 23 24 25 26 27 Code CS CS CS CS CS CS PreReq 4 Computer Organization and Assembly Language 29 Theory of Automata & Formal Languages 3. 1) 3 (2.0) Proposed Semester 4 5 7 # 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 Code CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Are a CG V1 CG V1 CG V1 CG V1 SE 2 SE 2 LT 3 CC N4 CC N4 CC N4 Computer Science – Elective Courses (21 Credit Hours) –(Not limited to the list below) Course Title Computer Graphics Digital Image Processing Digital Signal Processing Computer Vision Software Engineering Advance Software Engineering Principles of Programming Languages Data Communication Distributed Computing Data and Network Security Credit hours 3 (2. 3) 3(3. 0) 5 4 6 6 7 38 . 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. Design and Analysis of Algorithms 29 29 Artificial Intelligence Computer Architecture 23 Compiler Construction Computer Science – Supporting Courses (9 Credit Hours ) Course Title Credit Hours 3 (2. 1) 3 (3. 0) 3 (2. 1) Proposed Semester 6 3 (3.

1) 3(2. 1) 3 (2. 1) 3 (2. 1) CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CA O6 WE 7 Microprocessor Interfacing Web Engineering System Programming Distributed Database Systems Data Warehousing Numerical and Symbolic Computing Operations Research Simulation and modelling Expert Systems Artificial Neural Network Fuzzy Logic 3 (2. 3) 3 (2. 1) 3 (2. 1) 7 5 7 7 6-7 SS 8 IM 9 IM 9 SIC 10 SIC 10 SIC 10 SO C 11 SO C 11 SO C 11 = = = = = = = = = 1 – CGV 2 – SE 3 – LT 4 – CCN 7 – WE 8 – SS 9 – IM 10 – SIC 11 – SOC Computer Graphics and Visualization Software Engineering Languages and Translators Computer Communication Networks Web Engineering Systems Software Information Management Scientific Computing Soft Computing 39 .42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 CS CS CC N4 CC N4 Wireless Networks Telecommunication Systems 3(2.

German. Hrs. 4 4 3 3 3 17 Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 40 Semester 2 Discrete Structures Object Oriented Programming Multivariable Calculus Probability and Statistics English-II (Technical and Report Writing Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15 Cr. Hrs. Punjabi.) Philosophy Credit Hours 3(3. 0) 3 (3. Hrs. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3. Hrs. 0) 3 (3. Urdu etc.University Elective courses Computer Science – University Elective Courses (18 Credit Hours) –(Not limited to the list below) # 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 Code MG MG MG MG SS PS SS SS SS PreReq Course Title Financial Accounting Financial Management Human Resource Management Marketing Economics Psychology International Relations Foreign/Regional Language (French. 0) 3(3. 4 3 4 3 3 17 Semester 3 Digital Logic and Design Data Structures and Algorithms Linear Algebra English-III (Communication Skills) Electromagnetism University Elective I Semester 4 Operating Systems Differential Equations Introduction to Database Systems Introduction to Software Engineering Computer Organization and Assembly Language . 0) Proposed Semester 4 5 6 7 6 7 7-8 6-8 Sample Scheme of Study for BS (CS) 4–year Program (8 Semesters) (130 Credit Hours) Semester-wise 4-Year Plan Semester 1 Introduction to Computing Programming Fundamentals Calculus and Analytical Geometry Pakistan Studies and Islamic Studies English-I (Functional English) Cr. Sindhi. 0) 3 (3. 0) 3 (3.

Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. 3 3 3 3 12 Compiler Construction CS Elective I Numerical Computing Design and Analysis of Algorithms CS Elective II University Elective IV Semester 7 Software Design Project I Professional Practices CS Elective III CS Elective IV Artificial Intelligence Semester 8 Software Design Project II CS Elective V CS Elective VI CS Elective VII 41 . Hrs. Hrs.Semester 5 Computer Communication and Networks Theory of Automata & Formal Languages Computer Architecture Human Computer Interaction University Elective II University Elective III Cr. 3 3 3 3 3 15 Semester 6 Cr.

4th ed. Interfacing with high level languages. 5th ed. Data Movement. NFAs. At the end of the course the students should be capable of writing moderately complex assembly language subroutines and interfacing them to any high level language. Stack and its operation. Manipulate and translate machine and assembly code. Theory of formal languages and use of various abstract machines as ‗recognizers‘ and parsing will be studied for identifying/validating the synthetic characteristics of programming languages. Kleene‘s theorem. 42 . Transducers (automata with output). Programme Control.COURSE CONTENTS For BS Computer Science Computer Science – Core Courses (18 credit hours) Course Name: Computer Organization and Assembly Language Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2. Arithmetic and Logic. Regular expressions/Regular languages. Objectives and Perspectives of Assembly Language. Patterson and John L. Describe actions inside the processing chip. Write a fully documented program. The Hardware/Software Interface. Reference Material: 1. 2006. Finite automata (FAs). Addressing Modes. Elsevier Publishers. Emphasis should be given to expose the low-level logic employed for problem solving while using assembly language as a tool. Course Outline: Finite State Models: Language definitions preliminaries. Introduction to Registers and Flags. Irvine. Stallings. 7th ed. Prentice HALL. Computer Organization and Design. Assembly Language for Intel-based Computers. Using an assembler of choice. 2008. Real-time application. Course Name: Theory of Automata and Formal languages Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Discrete Structures Objectives: The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical foundations of computer science through study of mathematical & abstract models of computers and the theory of formal languages. Some of the abstract machines shall also study as ‗Transducers‘. 3. Introduction to the Assembler and Debugger. Prentice Hall. Transition graphs (TGs). Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Digital Logic Design Objectives: The main objective of this course is to introduce the organization of computer systems and usage of assembly language for optimization and control. Discuss operations performed by an instruction set. Data and Control. Course Outline: Microprocessor Bus Structure: Addressing. by David A. Subroutines. Peripheral Control Interrupts. Hennessy. 2. Memory Organization and Structure (Segmented and Linear Models). "Computer Organization & Architecture". 2007.

TM encoding. and efficiency of algorithms. McGraw-Hill Professional. John Hopcroft and Jeffrey Ullman. Introduction to Automata Theory. Introduction to Languages and the Theory of Computation. 4. Graph algorithms. Heaps. MIT Press. Greedy approach. By John C. Chomsky‘s hierarchy of grammars Turing Machines Theory: Turing machines. Course Name: Design and Analysis of Algorithms Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Discrete Structure. Shortest paths. Reference Material: 1. 4th edition. Emphasis on the structure. H. 3. Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: Detailed study of the basic notions of the design of algorithms and the underlying data structures. Perception and reasoning . Algorithms in C++. Normal form grammars and parsing. Universal Turing Machine. Course Outline: Introduction. 2nd edition. An Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata. Theory of Automata. ISBN (13) : 978-81-224-2334-1. complexity. 2001. 43 .obtaining and creating information/knowledge to populate a computational representation. Hashing. Defining Computers by TMs. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Context sensitive Grammars. New York. McGraw-Hill. Kavier. By Peter Linz. Taking actions by using the knowledge of the environment and desired goals to plan and execute actions. Simplifying CFLs . Rivest. Derivations. C. Martin3rd edition. Leiserson. Asymptotic notations. Recursion and recurrence relations. Variations on TM. and R. Introduction to Algorithms /2E. 2005. T. NY. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. ISBN (10): 81-224-2334-5. NP complete problems. Decidability. 2001. 2002. Divide-and-conquer approach. E. Approximation algorithms. Eugene. String matching. Languages. Cormen.Pumping lemma and non regular language Grammars and PDA: Context free grammars. Modelling the environment by constructing computer representations of the real world. L. New Age Publishers. Sorting. 2. Post machine. derivation trees and ambiguity. Formal Languages and Computation. 2006 2. By S. Disjoint Sets. Network flow. Learning from past experience. P. Search trees. Robert Sedgewick Course Name: Artificial Intelligence Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Discrete Structures Objectives: This course studies four main objectives of AI. Several measures of complexity are introduced. Polynomial and matrix calculations. Dynamic programming. Addison-Wesley. and Computation.

Inference in First-Order Logic. and will know significant details of a number of important techniques commonly used. Morgan & Kauffman Series (2008) Fourth Edition. analyze the performance of systems and quantify the performance measurements. 2. They will be aware of the way in which language features raise challenges for compiler builders. Computer Organization & Design : The Hardware/Software Interface By Patterson & Hennessy. Making Complex Decisions. Adversarial Search. Knowledge Representation. Probabilistic Reasoning over Time. Operands. By Stuart Jonathan Russell. Instruction-Level Parallelism and Dynamic handling of Exceptions. Peter Norvig. Memory Hierarchy Design. Course Name: Computer Course Structure: Lectures: Architecture 3. Planning and Acting in the Real World. 6th edition: Pearson Education. principles of Instruction Set Design. Informed Search and Exploration. Performance Issues and improvements. working knowledge of various subsystems and the general principles that affect their performance. Morgan & Kauffman Series (2006) Fourth Edition.Course Outline: Artificial Intelligence: Introduction. Uncertain knowledge and reasoning: Uncertainty. Course Name: Compiler Construction Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Theory of Automata and Formal Languages Objectives: At the end of the course students should understand the overall structure of a compiler. Resources: 1. addressing modes and encoding. perceiving. 2003. Reference Material: 1. Reinforcement Learning. Multiprocessors and Thread Level Parallelism. Main Memory Performance Issues. Making Simple Decisions. fundamentals of all technologies. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach by Hennessy & Patterson. Case Studies. Prentice Hall. John F. Course Outlines: Fundamentals of Computer Design including performance measurements & quantitative principles. pipelining of Processors: Issues and Hurdles. Knowledge in Learning. and advanced architectural features that boost the performance of computers. Cache Design. Storage Systems. Knowledge and reasoning: Logical Agents. Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving: International Edition By George F. 2008. 44 . and acting: Communication. Labs: 0 Credit Hours: 3 Prerequisites: Digital Logic and Design Objectives: Get a deeper understanding of how computers work. Intelligent Agents. Luger. Probabilistic Language Processing. Canny. Constraint Satisfaction Problems. Introduction to LISP/PROLOG and Expert Systems (ES) and Applications. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. Perception and Robotics. Statistical Learning Methods. 2. Problemsolving: Solving Problems by Searching. First-Order Logic. Communicating. exception handling features. 2nd Edition. Probabilistic Reasoning. Learning: Learning from Observations.

By Andrew W. Ravi Sethi. 4. Academic Press. 2007. detection and recovery from errors. 1971. John Wiley. William F. Multiple Integrals. 3. Ceriel J. Co. Lexical and syntax analysis. By Dick Grune. Modern Compiler Design. 2004. Jacobs. Henri E. Bal.Addison-Wesley Pub. 2003. 1994. Ullman. Reference Material: 1. Henri E. Contributor Maia Ginsburg. Thomson Learning EMEA. Green‘s and Stoke‘s Theorem. John Wiley & Sons. Line and Surface Integrals. Trench. Swokowski. 6th edition. Compilers: Principles. Jeffrey D. and Tools By Alfred V. 5th edition. Even & odd functions. Techniques. Cengage Learning publishers. Computer Science – Supporting Courses (9 credit hours) Course Name: Multivariable Calculus Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Calculus and Analytical Geometry Objectives: The goals are to develop the skills to have ground knowledge of multivariate calculus and appreciation for their further computer science courses. 2000. 4. Albert Herr. Koen G. Course Outline: Functions of Several Variables and Partial Differentiation. Bal. James Stewart. 2nd edition. Separable Equations.1987 Original from the University of Michigan 2. Ltd. Ceriel J. Fourier Series: periodic functions. Reference Material: 1. Parsing techniques. Langendoen. 1995. and developing differential equations for real-world problems. Half Range expansions. Ullman . Jacobs. Modern Compiler Design by Dick Grune. Langendoen. Multivariable Calculus. Contrast between compilers and interpreters. ZTransform. Organization of compilers. 3. Equations Reducible to 45 . Object code generation and optimization. Koen G. H. Aho. Cambridge University Press. Maia Ginsburg. Modern Compiler Implementation in C. Multivariable Calculus. Course Name: Differential Equations Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Calculus and Analytical Geometry Objectives: Develop fundamental skills of solving ordinary differential equations.. Functions of any period P-2L. Contributor Jeffrey D.Course Outline: Compiler techniques and methodology. Howard Anton. 2. Bernard Kolman. Appel. 6th edition. Calculus and Analytical Geometry. Laplace Transform. Course Outline: Ordinary Differential Equations of the First Order: Geometrical Considerations. Fourier Transform. Olinick and Pence. H. John Wiley. Elementary Multivariable Calculus. Isoclines.

John Wiley & Sons Inc.A. Numerical Differentiation and Numerical Integration. C. Ordinary Linear Differential Equations. Backward Differences and Central Differences. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing : J. Integrating Factors. 2. Double Root of the Characteristic Equation. Reference Material: 1. Michael Greenberg. Initial Value Problems for Ordinary Differential Equations. 7th edition. Forward Differences. Penney. Advanced Engineering Mathematics. Homogeneous Linear Equations of Arbitrary Order. wave. Course Outline: The concepts of efficiency. Series Solutions of Differential Equations. 1996. Mathematical Preliminaries.using Matlab for all methods. Homogeneous Linear Equations of Arbitrary Order with Constant Coefficients. 1993. Prentice Hall. A First Course in Differential Equations. 4. Zill. Brooks/Cole Publishing. Linear FirstOrder Differential Equations. Prindle. Course Name: Numerical Computing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Calculus and Analytical Geometry Objectives: On completion of this unit. 1996. Heinbockel Numerical Analysis: I. The course must serve the purpose of scientific software development for science and engineering problems.H. David E. Partial Differential Equations: Method of Separation of variables. Cullen. 1993. Direct Methods for Solving Linear Systems. Khubaza Numerical Analysis and Programming : Shan S Kuo Numerical Analysis by Berden Fairs 46 . Solution of non-linear equations. Zill. Differential Operators. 3. General Solution. Homogeneous Linear Equations of the Second Order. Systems of Differential Equations. 3. Theory of Differences. Variation of Parameters. Dennis G. Difference Operators. Interpolation and Polynomial Approximation.Separable Form. Heat & Laplace equations and their solutions by Fourier series method. H . Prentice Hall publishers. Minimising computational errors. 4. Brooks/Cole Publishing. reliability and accuracy of a method.Edwards. 5. Complex Roots. Homogeneous Second-Order Equations with Constant Coefficients. Weber and Schmidt. 2. 1996. Cauchy Equation. students will be able to demonstrate programming proficiency using structured programming techniques to implement numerical methods for solutions using computer-based programming techniques . Reference Material: 1. Differential Equations with Boundary-Value Problems. Difference Tables. Real Roots. Solution of Equations in one variable. Elementary Differential Equations With Applications. Modelling of Electrical Circuits. Exact Differential Equations. Numerical Methods in Scientific Computing Germund Dahlquist and Åke Björck . 5. Non-homogeneous Linear Equations. Erwin Kreyzig. Michael R. Iterative Techniques in Matrix Algebra.

Thresholds Based on Several Variables. Global Processing via the Hough Transform. Differential Line Algorithm. F. Local Processing. Thresholding. Region Splitting and Merging 47 . Foley. A. Local Thresholding. and segmentation. 3. Peter Burger and Duncan. Gillies. Principles and Practice. Basic Adaptive Thresholding. The Role of Illumination. 2. Addison-Wesley ISBN: 0-201-12110-7. Applications of graphics. Edge Detection. (2003) Course Name: Digital Image Processing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3 Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Objective: The aim of this module is to understand the main terms & concepts of Information Systems & their applications in everyday business. rendering. D. Fundamental algorithms. methods. Two and three dimensional imaging geometry (Perspective projection and Orthogonal projection) and transformations. Point Detection. Rotation. computers and telecom and to manage IT systems in modern organisational structure. Image Segmentation. Interactive graphics programming — graph plotting. Addison-Wesley. panning and zooming. F. Order-Statistics Filters. 1. Course Outline: Graphics hardware. Estimation by Experimentation. Estimation by Image Observation. Curve and surface design. J. Periodic Noise Reduction by Frequency Domain Filtering. Inverse Filtering. F.Hill. Computer Graphics. S. Bandpass Filters. Bandreject Filters. Hughes. Mean Filters. K. Interactive Computer Graphics: Functional. Region Growing. Basic Global Thresholding. The main objectives of this module are to make business students aware of the increasing importance of IT. Edge Linking and Boundary Detection. Feiner and J. Region-Based Segmentation.6. Region filling and clipping. Maxwell MacMillan ISBN: 0-02-354860-6. Raster algorithms and software — Scan-Converting lines.S. Visual Programming Objectives: Study of various algorithms in computer graphics and their implementation in any programming language. Numerical Analysis by Gerald Computer Science – Elective Courses (21 credit hours) Course Name: Computer Graphics Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Credit Hours: 3 Prerequisites: Object Oriented Programming . Computer Graphics. colour and animation. Minimum Mean Square Error (Wiener) Filtering. Estimation by Modeling. Reference Material: 1. characters and circles. Adaptive Filters. shading. Estimating the Degradation Function. windows and clipping. Restoration in the Presence of Noise Only–Spatial Filtering. Detection of Discontinuities. Programming raster display systems. van Dam. Line Detection. Translation. Notch Filters. Another important objective of this module is to learn about various information systems used in industries and select the appropriate information system for the required application. Scaling. Procedural and Device-level 2.

1. Stockman. 2003. parameterisation of conic sections. quadtree structures for segmentation. Perceptual grouping: failure of the Hough transform. Students will also be able to illustrate some successful applications of vision systems and will be able to identify the vision systems limitations. 2. intermediate and high level vision. Commulative property. Session 2 of Matlab. with circle. grouping edge points into straight lines by means of the Hough transform. Fourier series representation. Distributive property. Fourier series representation of periodic signals. By Linda G. Transformation Of independent variable. Overview of mammalian vision: experimental results of Hubel and Weisel. Unit impulse and unit step and their relationship. Analog and digital/discrete signal. Convolution. applications of vision systems and their limitations. Signals and systems. Causality. improved Hough transform with perceptual features. Sobel and Laplacian operators. Step response of an LTI system. Segmentation: region splitting and merging. By David Forsyth. mean and variance pyramids. Discrete time signal Processing Course Name: Computer Vision Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Pre-Req: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: By the end of this course Students will be able to explain the concepts behind computer based recognition and the extraction of features from raster images. Text Books/Reference Books: 2. Oppenheim. Associative property. analogy to edge point detection and Hough transform. Course Outlines: Concepts behind computer-based recognition and extraction of features from raster images. Signal types. Computer Vision. grouping line segments into curves.Energy of a signal. Prentice Hall. Applications of DSP.Course Name: Digital Prerequisites: Signal Processing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3 Labs: 0 Objective: Introduction to signal. Session 1 of Matlab. computing the first and second derivatives of images using the isotropic. Relaxation labelling of images: detection of image features. Examples of Fourier series representation. Relation of complex no. Properties of an LTI system. Difference b/w continuous time and discrete time signal. Impulse response of an LTI system. Depth measurement in images. Invertability. Prentice Hall. Shapiro. Examples of an LTI system. Reference Material: 1. Overview of early. 3. Computer Vision: A Modern Approach. Fourier series representation of periodic signal. George C. Jean Ponce. Properties of an LTI system. Mathematical representation of periodic signal. Examples of Fourier series representation. limitations of the Hough transform. 48 . Grouping of contours and straight lines into higher order features such as vertices and facets. 2001. Stability. Oppen Heim. Euler‘s relation. perceptual criteria. LTI system with and without memory.

4. Olivier Faugeras. use different testing techniques used in software engineering to test software systems. Software Engineering. Sixth Edition. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be to understand the importance of software engineering to computer science and the most important general approaches to structuring the software production process. Course Outlines: Introduction to Software Engineering. Course Name: Software Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3hrs Objective: The students will study techniques for software verification. Addison-Wesley. Roger Pressman. 2001 (7th edition). UML Distilled Course Name: Data Course Structure: 3 Pre-requisite: Communication Credit Hours: 3 Objectives: To provide knowledge of Data Communication and different 49 . 2006. manage the important issues for planning a project. Software Process Framework Process Models Agile Software Process Software Engineering Practices System Engineering Requirement Engineering Analysis Modelling Design Engineering Architectural Design Component Design User Interface Design Testing Strategies Testing Tactics Product and Process Metrics Project Management Project Estimation Project Scheduling Risk Management Quality Management Change Management Text Books/Reference Books: 1. analyze the requirements for a software system and produce a software design from requirements (Data Flow Diagram (DFD)). McGraw-Hill. Handbook of Mathematical Models in Computer Vision. 2. Software Engineering: A Practioner's Approach. By Nikos Paragios. 2005. Yunmei Chen. Ian Sommerville. 3. Birkhäuser. assess software productivity using metrics. They would also study reliability and performance issues in software design and development. validation and testing.

Load balancing. Identification schemes. Pthreads. Examples: parallel search. distributed shared data (DSD). Enterprise: Process templates. Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment. FSK. Data Communication and Networking. ASK. W. Data and Network. Cryptography and Network Security. More on Block Ciphers. Elliptic curves. Upper Saddle River. Conventional encryption techniques. Parallel Algorithms. Forouzan. Concurrency and synchronization. S-MIME. Course Name: Distributed Computing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outlines: Why use parallel and distributed systems? Why not use them? Speedup and Amdahl's Law. PSK. Digital signatures. Transmission Media. clusters (latest variation). PGP. Introduction to Signals. Firewalls. Parallel Programming: Techniques and Applications Using Networked Workstations and Parallel Computers. Other Parallel Programming Systems. Granularity. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. PAM. etc. PVM. Layers. RSA and Discrete Logarithms. Stevens. Business Data Communication. parallel sorting. Course Name: Data and Network Security Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outlines: Introduction. distributed shared memory (DSM). Viruses. B. Locks and semaphores. QAM. Cryptology and simple cryptosystems. processes and message passing. Hardware architectures: multiprocessors (shared memory). Miscellaneous topics. Research Topics Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Stream and block ciphers. Common parallelization strategies. Prentice Hall PTR. W. Data Communication Protocols. William Stalling. Key management schemes. Modulation. Public key Encryption. Addison Wesley. 2. VPNs. NJ. 3rd Edition. Software architectures: threads and shared memory. Allen. Possible research and project topics. SET. Data and work partitioning. Aurora: Scoped behaviour and abstract data types. networks of workstations (distributed memory). Distributed-Memory Programming: Message Passing. Types of errors. Confidentiality & Message authentication: Hash functions.mechanisms of communication Course Outlines: Introduction. Wilkinson and M. 1993. SSL and IPsec. MPI. 1999. PCM. Data Communication Techniques and technologies. OSI Model. Kerberos and directory authentication. 1/e. E-mail security. Multiplexing. Prentice Hall. Reference Material: 1. Digital Transmission. Stallings. Shared-Memory Programming: Threads. 50 . Number theory and algorithm complexity. Distributed shared memory. Behrouz A. DES. Current technologies being used for data communication. Dial-up security. 2. Emerging Internet security standards. 2003. The Advanced Encryption Standard.

Stallings.2. coaxial cables (types and specifications). ―Wireless Communications and Networks‖. Addison Wesley. ―WCDMA for UMTS Radio Access for Third Generation Mobile Communications‖. T. 1997. error control techniques. Course Name: Telecommunication Course Structure: Lectures:3 Labs: 0/3 Prerequisites: None Systems Credit Hours: ¾ Objectives: To provide a first level exposure to the broad domain of telecommunication Systems Course Outline: Introduction to media. V. Course Name: Wireless Networks Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outlines: This course covers fundamental techniques in design and operation of first. J. R. 2001. bandwidth and noise. Chapman and Hall/CRC. Kaufman. P. medium access techniques. EDGE. Castro. Applied Cryptography. 5. 3. IS-136. optical fibres (types and losses). Theodore S Rappaport. Toskala. 7. 2002. David Tse. Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM). Fundamentals of Wireless Communications. Perlman. etc). Prentice Hall PTR. A.S.K. 2001. Schiller. cdma2000. Computer Security: Art and Science – Addison-Wesley. Second Edition. 7. Wiley. GPRS. Holma and A. John Wiley and Sons. FDMA. 2000. and S. ―IS-95 CDMA and cdma 2000‖. Upper Saddle River. Richard A. TDMA and CDMA. Switching: circuit and packet switching. 6. CRC Press. radio resource and network management. Oorshcot. W. Prentice Hall. Garg. power control. FL. Text Books/Reference Books: 1.Air Interface Techniques for Future Mobile Systems‖. As an example for the third generation air interfaces. 51 . M. satellite communication and infrared links. Twisted pair (UTP. 4. CRC Press. STP). ―Mobile Communications‖. Menezes. FL. handoff. Introduction to mobile and cellular communications. John Wiley & Sons. Wireless Communications. NJ. Network Security: Private Communication in a Public World – Prentice Hall PTR. second. An Introduction to Cryptography. 2002. Rappaport. Microwave links. 2002. Handbook of Applied Cryptography. Vanstone. WCDMA is discussed in detail since it is expected to have a large impact on future wireless networks. 1996. Bishop. NY. TDM. 3. Prentice Hall. Stinson. 6. Boca Raton. 2000. 5. 8. common air protocols (AMPS. Mollin. B. Boca Raton.P. This course is intended for graduate students who have some background on computer networks. WCDMA. ―Wireless Communications: Principles & Practice‖. H. radio propagation models. 4. Cryptography: Theory and Practice. and third generation wireless networks: cellular systems. M. 2001. Introduction to optical sources and detectors. Speciner. ―The UMTS Network and Radio Access Technology . Schneier. J. Block diagram and current trends. 1995. GSM. 2. IS-95. 2003.

New Executable format. Beck. 2. Virtual Machine (VM)Basics. System Virtual Machine. Fundamentals of Telecommunication Networks. Database Systems by Thomas Connolly. Course Name: System Programming Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Operating Systems Objectives: Demonstrate mastery of the internal operation of Unix system software including assemblers. The UNIX Programming Environment. macro-processors. Pike Prentice-Hall. Reference Material: 1. loaders. Introduction to Telecommunications Network Engineering. Window System Programming for Intel386 Architecture: 16 bit Vs 32 bit. Dynamic shared objects. Enhancing Unix Kernel. Overview of relational DBMS and Normalization. ISBN: 0471515825. G. 3. 2. Distributed Transaction Management. Telecommunication Systems. Fonteolliet. COFF obj format 16 bit. Operating System. ISBN: 1580535003. Course Outline: Introduction. Distributed Database Recovery. Module Management. Course Outline: System Programming overview: Application Vs. Leland L. Linear Executable format. (Unix) other 32-bit O. 1990. System Software. Reference Material: 1. T. Windows Architecture. Wiley US. Replication/Fragmentation. Ring O Computer. Unix Device Architecture (Character & Block Devices). interprocess communication. 2. Unix Binaryble format (ELF). T. Unix Kernel Programming (Ring O). interpreters. Distributed database design and Data Distribution Strategies. Distributed Data Security. Addison-Wesley Longmsan. Artech House 1991.Reference Material: 1. System Programming. P. Device Driver Development. B. System Software. OS Calls. Device Drivers. 1984. 32 bit Flat memory model. Distributed Concurrency Control. 52 . ISBN: 0-201-50945-8. 2nd edition. Programming. Course Name: Distributed Database System Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 (3. Kernighan & R. Distributed Query Processing.0) Prerequisites: Database Systems Objectives: To clearly describe the difference of Centralized database and Distributed database and enable the students to design/model a distributed database. Principals of Distributed Database Systems by Ozsu Tamer. Virtual Device Driver (V + D). Portable Executable Format.S Programming for I 386. Distributed DBMS architecture. Aattalainen. Saadawi. Artech House 2003.

the focus shall be on items particularly important for technology ventures. Comparison Of DM & ER Models.Course Name: Datawarehouse Course Structure: Prerequisite: Database Systems Credit Hours: 3 Objective: To provide the Introduction of Datawarehouse and its purpose. Designing a Data warehouse. 53 . Semester: 8 Principles of Accounting Course Outlines: This course provides the student with an understanding of the entrepreneurship process. End user tools. It exposes them to the concepts. Data Warehouse Architecture. cases studies and projects designed to convey the unique environment of the entrepreneurs and new ventures. Extraction. guide them through the launch their own business. to plan out whether their idea is marketable to investors. The course gives students the tools necessary to think creatively. OLAP. Cleansing and Loading process and techniques. The Art of the Start: The Time-Tested. Dimensional Modeling. Course Name: Entrepreneurship Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Credit Hours: 3 Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management. Course Outline: Introduction to Data Warehouse and Data Marts. As CS students. And enable the students to understand different features / issues in datawarehousing and its designing. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. ISBN: 1591840562. Battle-Hardened Guide for Anyone Starting Anything by Guy Kawasaki. practices and tools of the entrepreneurial world. or to support an employer in launching and growing an entrepreneurial venture. This will be accomplished through a combination of readings. Comparison of OLTP Systems & Data Warehousing.

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Curriculum for MS (Computer Science)
The recommendations of the last meeting held in August 2008 were also considered and very minor changes in the structure have been made in the light of committee‘s recommendations. The complete detail regarding proposed MS (Computer Sciences) Programme is available herein the following pages    Minimum credit hours shall be 30 for MS (Computer Science) programme. The programme shall comprise 4 semesters spread over 2 years with two semesters a year. The additional major areas have been appended in the list of specialization each having on average 4 courses from ―Computer Science Curriculum 2008: Interim Revision of CS2001 report‖ by Interim Review Task Force of ACM and IEEE Computer Society.

55

The following is the modified distribution of total credit hours:
Category or Area Core Electives Thesis Total Credit Hours Credit Hours 12 12 9 33

Objectives
A challenging graduate programme may be structured on the basis of the classical objective, which is the preparation for study of doctoral level, and this remains an important aspect of such programmes, but it is believed that all programmes should prepare the student for study beyond the master‘s level. Many people already in the field desire additional training in Computer Science. These individuals may have undergraduate degrees in Computer Science and desire to advance; or they may have considerable experience in Computer Science, but little formal education in the field. While this latter group should be declining in number as more undergraduate Computer Science majors enter the job market, the demand does exist and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. In addition, there will be a continuing need for individuals with a bachelor‘s degree in Computer Science to update their training. Among the objectives for students in master‘s programmes is entry into the Computer Science field at a relatively high level of responsibility and expertise. Computer Science is such a new and rapidly expanding field that individuals entering with a master‘s degree in this field will almost immediately move to positions with great responsibility. This, in turn, implies the requirement for an advanced level of prior training in both technical and related areas (e.g. communication skills). In all these cases, the master‘s degree provides both motivations for the student and a standard for reward by the employer.

Programme Structure
The graduate programme should embody sufficient flexibility to fulfil the requirements of either an ―academic‖ degree (Breadth-Based) obtained in preparation for further graduate study or a terminal ―professional‖ degree (DepthBased). The discipline of Computer Science has matured enough that the distinction between academic and professional programmes is beginning to appear. However, the concept of an utterly terminal programme is not widely accepted in the field. All Computer Science academic programmes should provide the possibility of additional study in the field. The proposed programme is intended to establish an integrated breadth and depth based curriculum model to assure that the common aspects of various potential masters‘ programmes in Computer Science are captured. 56

Eligibility  BS (CS) 4 Years Degree Programme (min 130 credit hours). 16 year Science and Engineering graduates are eligible but they have to cover deficiency. Generally graduate programmes are structured with a common core of fundamental material and wide range of options for the rest of the course work.The proposed curriculum structure may be implemented within four-semester time. 57 . or  Computer Science Conversion Course 2 Years Degree Programme referred to as ―MCS‖ or ―MSc (CS)‖.   BCS-3 years Degree Programme-Student will be required to complete the deficiency of difference of total earned credit hours and 130 credit hours. A project/thesis work may be unified with student‘s chosen depth oriented specialties.

Hrs Code Specialization Areas Artificial Intelligence Design of Intelligent Systems Machine Learning Neural Networks Mathematical Reasoning Decision Support Systems Computer Vision Automated Reasoning Knowledge based systems Planning systems Natural Language Processing Agents Robotics Symbolic Computation Genetic Algorithms Crt. Software Quality Assurance Requirements Engineering Software Architecture Agent Oriented Software Engineering Software Project Management Software Design Software Engineering and Formal Specifications Empirical Software Engineering Software Process Improvement Component-Based Computing Programming 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 58 .Hrs CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Software Engineering Advanced Software Development Topics in Software Engineering Object Oriented Software Engineering.SCHEME OF STUDIES MS (CS) Courses Requirements: Core courses # 1 2 3 4 Code CS CS CS CS Course Title Advanced Theory of Computation Advanced Algorithm Analysis Advanced Operating Systems Credit hours 3 3 3 3 Semester 1 1 1 1 Advanced Computer Architecture (12/30) Electives (Specialized Areas)-Not limited to the list given below (4 Courses of 12 credit hours) Code Specialization Areas Crt.

CS Environment Safety-Critical Systems Information Management 3 CS Semantic Web 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Advanced DBMS Multimedia Information Systems Database Design Transaction Processing Distributed and Object Databases Data Mining Spatial and Temporal Databases Semantic Databases Data Warehousing Object Oriented Databases Digital Libraries Web-Based DBMS Topics in DBMS Data Grids Text Mining System Engineering 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Computer Architecture and Organization Embedded Systems Parallel and Distributed Systems Design Verification Integrated Circuit System on a chip VLSI Development Device Development Graphics and Visual Computing Advanced Computer Graphics Multimedia & Hypermedia System Virtual Reality Visualization Geographical Information Systems Computer Animation Genetic Algorithms Human Computer Interaction 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Digital Signal Processing Switching and Fault Diagnosis FPGAs and Verilog Control Systems and Robotics Real Time Systems Parallel & Distributed Systems Control Systems and Robotics Real Time Operating Systems Embedded System 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 59 CS CS CS CS CS CS Computer Science Education Educational Technology Multimedia and Hypermedia Sys Computer Aided Instructions Web Based Education Systems Measurement of Learning Topics in Comp Science Education 3 3 3 3 3 3 .

CS CS ASIC Design VHDL 3 3 CS Human Computer Interaction Intelligent User Interfaces Information Retrieval Techniques Rich Internet Applications Graphical User Interfaces ComputerSupported Cooperative Work (CSCW) Multimedia Systems Development Interactive-Systems Development 3 3 3 3 Net-Centric computing CS CS Advanced Computer Networks Network Security Topics in Computer Networking Broadband and Satellite Communication Mobile and Pervasive computing Wireless and Mobile Computing Networks Intelligent and active networks Network Performance Evaluation Cluster Computing 3 3 CS CS CS CS 3 CS 3 CS CS CS CS 3 3 3 3 CS CS 3 3 Social and Professional Issues (SP) CS CS CS CS CS CS Social Context computing Computing and Ethics Computing Economics Computer Law Intellectual Property Privacy and Civil Liberties 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS 3 3 Distributed Computing 3 Data Compression Network Management Enterprise Networking Programming for the World-Wide Web 3 3 3 3 Operating Systems Programming Language Design and Translators CS CS Compiler Construction Programming Language Design 3 CS CS CS Concurrent and Distributed Systems Dependent Computing Fault.Tolerance 3 3 3 60 .

Time Systems 3 CS CS CS Discrete Structures Combinatorics Probability and Statistics Coding and Information Theory 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS Computational Science Computational Science Numerical Analysis Operations Research Simulation and Modelling Scientific Computing Computational Biology Web Engineering Semantic Web Web Services 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Grid and Cloud Computing Autonomous Computing Data Grids Semantic Grid Computational Grid Utility Computing Autonomous Computing Data Grids CS 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS CS CS 3 3 61 .CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS Programming Language Semantics Programming Paradigms Functional Programming Logic Programming Scripting Languages Algorithm and complexity (AL) Advanced Algorithmic Analysis Automata and Language Theory Cryptography Geometric Algorithms Parallel Algorithms 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 CS Real.

Model Programme: Semester-wise Plan MS (CS) Semester 1 (12 credit hrs) Subjects 1 2 3 4 CS CS CS CS Advanced Theory of Computation Advance Algorithm Analysis Advanced Operating Systems Advanced Computer Architecture Credit Hrs 3 3 3 3 Total: 12 Semester 2 (9 credit hrs) Subjects 1 2 3 CS CS CS Elective I Elective II Elective III Credit Hrs 3 3 3 Total: 9 Semester 3 (4 credit hrs) Subjects 1 2 CS CS Thesis (partial registration) Elective IV Credit Hrs 3 3 Total: 6 Semester 4 (5 credit hrs) Subjects 1 CS Thesis (partial registration) Credit Hrs 6 Total: 6 Total (all semesters) = 33 62 .

3. First Edition. time hierarchy. Introduction to Algorithms. By Vijay V. Introduction to Automata Theory. Algorithmic animation is used to reinforce theoretical results. 1997.. Topics include asymptotic analysis of upper and average complexity bounds using big-O. 4. An Introduction to Formal Languages and Automata. Cormen. 3.Course Description and Profiles: Core Courses: Course Name: Advanced Theory of Computation Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Automata theory. and theta notation. Languages. Course Name: Advance Algorithm Analysis Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Pre-Req: Data Structures and Algorithms Course Outline: Advanced algorithm analysis including the introduction of formal techniques and the underlying mathematical theory. MIT Press and McGraw-Hill Book Co. little-o. backtracking. pattern matching. and select and apply algorithms appropriate to a particular situation. branch-and-bound. Michael Sipser. Rivest. By Thomas H. Formal models and Computability. Additional topics include standard complexity classes. students should be able to explain the mathematical concepts used in describing the complexity of an algorithm. Addison-Wesley. using recurrence relations to analyze recursive algorithms. 1994. Christos Papadimitriou. determinism. et al. Charles E. time and space tradeoffs in algorithms. Upon completion of the course. By Mikhail J. in Handbook of Computer Science. selected advanced topics. nondeterminism. computational complexity. and Computation. 2004. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. 1996. 2. CRC Press. PWS Publishing Company. 5. the halting problem. non-computable functions. Peter Linz. (or the second edition). Fundamental algorithmic strategies (brute-force. Cormen.H. 1979. 2nd edition. ISBN: 0-66917342-8. Addison-Wesley. and the implications of non-computability. space hierarchy. T. Introduction to Algorithms. 63 . Introduction to the Theory of Computation. 1990. divide-and-conquer. Atallah. Ronald L. Vazirani. 6. Heuristic and Approximation Algorithms. Atallah Contributor Mikhail J. greedy. and numerical approximations) are covered. and Bala Ravikumar. Tao Jiang. CRC Press. NP completeness. 2. Randomized Algorithms. Computational Complexity. computability theory and reducibility. 1998. Search Techniques. Turing machines. Approximation Algorithms. formal languages. John Hopcroft and Jeffrey Ullman. NP-completeness. Clifford Stein. 2001. Ming Li. Published by MIT Press. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Algorithms and Theory of Computation Handbook.. Springer. Also included are standard graph and tree algorithms. Leiserson.

Zhiwei Xu. Kai Hwang. Sinha 3.System Models Architectural models . memory management techniques.Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Reference Books 1.Concurrency Control in Distributed Systems . Process scheduling and resource management. McGraw Hill Publishers. Various coarse-grained and fine-grained architectures with reference to SIMD and MIMD designs should also be covered.Issues of Security in Distributed Systems (Partial coverage) . Course Outlines: This course is aimed at the hardware aspects of parallel computer architectures including the design and protocols evaluation for memory coherence. 2.Problems of coordination and agreement in Distributed Systems . 1998. file systems. Architecture. ―Scalable Parallel Computing Technology. Distributed Systems Concepts and Design 4th edition by George Coulouris. Terence Fountain. Peter Kacsuk.Distributed File System .Course Name: Advance Operating System Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3 Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Objective: To apprise the students with characteristics of modern operating systems and architectural models. Addison-Wesley Publishers. ―Advanced Computer Architecture: A Design Space Approach‖. Distributed Operating Systems: Concepts and Design by Pradeep k. 1997. Dezso Sima. 64 .Replication – Advantages and requirements Fault-tolerant services . Jean Dollimore and Ttim Kindberg 2.Introduction Characterization of Modern Operating Systems. reconfigurable computing and power aware designs. Advanced topics in this course will cover multiprocessors on a chip. inter-connection networks and system scalability. Programming‖. . as a foundation for advanced work in computer architecture. Course Contents Course Outline: .Interprocess Communication . Advanced Concepts in Operating Systems by Singhal and Shiviratri Course Name: Advance Computer Architecture Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3 Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Computer Architecture Objective: To develop a thorough understanding of high-performance computer architecture. Text book: 1.

Oppenheim and Ronald W. Stevens.Electives Courses Course Name: Digital Signal Processing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: One. Concurrency and synchronization. Load balancing. Addison Wesley. Statistical signal processing: Stochastic signals: correlation functions and power density spectra. W. networks of workstations (distributed memory). 1/e. Possible research and project topics. Aurora: Scoped behaviour and abstract data types. Linear filtering of signal: Time domain: Difference equations and convolution. Sampling theorem. Pthreads. Locks and semaphores. Software architectures: threads and shared memory. Hardware architectures: multiprocessors (shared memory). Examples: parallel search. 1999. Discrete-time Fourier transform. Distributed-Memory Programming: Message Passing. MPI. clusters (latest variation). Common parallelization strategies. Parallel Programming: Techniques and Applications Using Networked Workstations and Parallel Computers. Optimal filtering: Wiener filters. parallel sorting. B. Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment. Parallel Algorithms. 2nd edition Alan V. PVM. 65 . Impulse invariance. Allen. distributed shared memory (DSM). Prentice Hall. Distributed shared memory.and N-dimensional signals and systems. Shared-Memory Programming: Threads. etc. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Discrete-Time Signal Processing. Wilkinson and M. discrete Fourier transform. Enterprise: Process templates. 1993. Adaptive filters: LMS and array processing. Course Name: Parallel and Distributed Computing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outlines: Why use parallel and distributed systems? Why not use them? Speedup and Amdahl's Law. Other Parallel Programming Systems. bilinear transform. Research Topics. Prentice-Hall. Schafer. FIR filter design. z-transforms: stability and minimum phase signals/systems. fast Fourier transform. Granularity. distributed shared data (DSD). Text Books/Reference Books: 1. processes and message passing. Data and work partitioning. 2D filter design. 2.

C. immersive and omnipresent applications. 2nd ed. Next Generation IP – Ipng.C. Routing. web-based management 66 . Controllability and observability. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Transducers. Introduction to state space methods. Management: Quality of Service (QoS). and construct sample applications on representative platforms. smart sensors. Mobile IP. Algorithms. and others. state transformations. 1994. Platforms range from handheld and mobile computers to media and real-time server systems. 1990. Voice over IP (VoIP). K. 2nd Edition. Avoidance. Dorf. pole placement. State space models. such as autonomous robotics. Wireless: Radio basics. Control Engineering. Modern Control Systems. Network Security. current trends. Introduction to robotics. 3. Course Name: Advanced Networking Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Review of basic concepts: The OSI Model. PID controllers. Prentice Hall. packet and circuit switching. Satellite Systems. Classical design using frequency domain methods. Design using state feedback. Text Books/Reference Books: It is an advanced course and the instructor may make his notes from various resources at the web. Platforms may also include specialized systems used in application-specific contexts. Bissell. actuators and robot control. 2. use of observers. network vs. Course Name: Real Time Operating Systems Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: The principles of real-time and embedded systems inherent in many hardware platforms and applications being developed for engineering and science as well as for ubiquitous systems. LQR design. Internet Addressing.Course Name: Control Systems and Robotics Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Review of classical control analysis methods. Publisher: Chapman & Hall.Ogata. IP Multicast. The TCP/IP protocol stack: IP. 7th (1995). RSVP. WAP. ISDN. R. understand real-time operating systems and the resource management and quality of service issues that arise. DNS. solution of the state equations. Congestion in the Internet. Modern Control Engineering. Congestion Control: Control vs. VPNs. Relay auto tuning. Nyquist stability criterion. TCP and UDP. distributed systems management Protocols. ARP. Addison-Wesley. network topology. Issues with wireless over TCP. 8th (1998) or 9th (2001) Edition. interactive and multimedia. Real-time and quality of service system principles.C. ICMP. including robotics and manufacturing. phase lead and lag controllers.

5. Oorshcot. Bishop. E-mail security. Mollin. John Wiley and Sons. Handbook of Applied Cryptography. Coulouris. QoS mechanisms and architectures. Viruses. W. FL. CRC Press. Cryptography and Network Security. PGP. Upper Saddle River. Cryptology and simple cryptosystems. Addison Wesley. SSL and IPsec. Upper Saddle River. Digital signatures. Prentice-Hall — Sixth Edition (for those who want to review basics of networking). Richard A. 7. Miscellaneous topics. RSA and Discrete Logarithms. Dollimore. An Introduction to Cryptography. Course Name: Network Security Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Introduction. Fundamentals of Internet Protocol (IP) networking. Detailed operation of Internet routing protocols such as Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). Boca Raton. 3. The course also includes a research project in computer networking involving literature survey. "Data and Computer Communications". 2. Boca Raton. SET. Ross. Computer Security: Art and Science – Addison-Wesley. Network Security: Private Communication in a Public World – Prentice Hall PTR.Text Books/Reference Books: 1. M. More on Block Ciphers. ―Computer Networking – A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet‖. A. 1995. 2003. Key management schemes. 2003. Applied Cryptography. Kindberg. Typical topics can be listed below: Overview of packet switching networks and devices. Confidentiality & Message authentication: Hash functions. Conventional encryption techniques. B. Course Name: Topics in Computer Networking Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: This course offers an advanced introduction and research perspectives in the areas of switch/router architectures. DES. 6. NY. Perlman. Vanstone. FL. NJ. VPNs. optical networking. Stinson. CRC Press. Kaufman. Router architecture and performance. The Advanced Encryption Standard. scheduling for best-effort and guaranteed services. 2001. Schneier. Route lookup algorithms. network interface design. 1996. Identification schemes. M. Firewalls. James F. S-MIME. Menezes. Elliptic curves. Chapman and Hall/CRC. P. William Stallings. ―Distributed Systems – Concepts and Design‖. 1997. Addison Wesley. and finally. Prentice Hall PTR. Kurose and Keith W. web protocols and applications. R. and S. an original and novel research contribution. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Stallings. and network economics. 2002. Public key Encryption. Dial-up security. Integrated and 67 . NJ. Cryptography: Theory and Practice. Speciner. 2. Stream and block ciphers. Kerberos and directory authentication. Number theory and algorithm complexity. 4. 3. critical analysis. Emerging Internet security standards.

Prentice Hall PTR. and constraint-based routing algorithms. EDGE. J. 4. 4. second. 2002. radio propagation models. 3. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. 2003. manage. (2000) Course Technology. and video communications. Computer Networks. Resource signalling and resource reservation protocols. 2. GSM. Switching and Routing. ―IS-95 CDMA and cdma 2000‖. handoff. Prentice Hall. WCDMA. 2000. Principles of Web Design. 1998. ISBN: 0135259657. 2. cdma2000. (2002) Course Technology. install. March 1996. Morgan Kaufman. Peterson and Davie. 2002. ―Wireless Communications: Principles & Practice‖. IS-136. T. Addison Wesley. Addison Wesley. etc). TE-based routing and signalling protocols. Andrew S. This course is intended for graduate students who have some background on computer networks. voice. Quality of service mechanisms for multimedia and real-time communications. Fundamentals of per-flow and aggregate scheduling algorithms. Multi-protocol label switching and its generalization. WCDMA is discussed in detail since it is expected to have a large impact on future wireless networks. error control techniques. Worst-case analysis for multimedia networking.S. 3rd Edition. Puzmanov. ISBN: 0-619-03528-5. McGraw-Hill. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. and design and implement a Web Site on the Web Server created. ISBN: 0-619-01526-8. Traffic Engineering (TE) concepts and mechanisms including label assignment. Garg. Course Name: Network Administration Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Through completion of this course. label distribution. Tanenbaum. 3rd Edition. Course Name: Wireless Networks Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: This course covers fundamental techniques in design and operation of first. students will be able to plan. As an example for the third generation air interfaces. Application-level and network-level signalling protocols for data. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. 68 . and configure a Web Server. IS-95. Garica and Widjaja. ―Mobile Communications‖.K. High-Speed Networks: TCP/IP and ATM Design Principles. Stallings.differentiated network service models. William Stallings. Computer Networking a Systems Approach. W. Communication Networks: Fundamentals Concepts and Key Architectures. Schiller. and third generation wireless networks: cellular systems. and optimize a Web Server. common air protocols (AMPS. medium access techniques. V. 3. Prentice Hall. Rappaport. Information Technology Project Management. Second Edition. GPRS. 2000. 2. 2001. 2002. monitor. Prentice Hall. Prentice Hall. radio resource and network management. power control. ―Wireless Communications and Networks‖. 5.

1994. Advanced Programming Language Design. Muchnick. Raphael Finkel. Techniques. J. Dataflow. H. G. Addison-Wesley. The Study of Programming Languages -.Bertrand Meyer 3. Functional Programming and Lambda calculus. Computer Networks and Systems: Queuing Theory and Performance Evaluation. Ravi Sethi. Wiley. 2001. Advanced Compiler Design & Implementation. The class focus is processor-specific compilation techniques. Topics include control-flow and data-flow analysis. Castro. Object-oriented Programming. 2nd edition. and Jeffrey D. instruction scheduling. Addison-Wesley. classical optimization.P. 6. ―The UMTS Network and Radio Access Technology . Compilers: Principles. Springer-Verlag. 2. Logic Programming. Steven S. Control Structures. predicated and speculative execution. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Advanced topics include memory hierarchy management. and register allocation. Robertazzi. Course Name: Network Performance Evaluation Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: This is an advanced course in networks and protocols. Types. simulation and experimental methods should be used to evaluate and design networks and protocols.Air Interface Techniques for Future Mobile Systems‖. 1997. optimization for instruction-level parallelism. 2001.Ryan Stansifer 4. ―WCDMA for UMTS Radio Access for Third Generation Mobile Communications‖. 69 . Aho. thus familiarity with both computer architecture and compilers is recommended. Introduction to the Theory of Programming Languages -.Fischer and Grodzinsky 5. Course Name: Theory of Programming Languages Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Introduction and History. Syntax and Semantics.Sebesta Course Name: Advanced Compiler Design I Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: An in-depth study of compiler backend design for highperformance architectures. T. and Tools. 1988. John Wiley & Sons. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. Concurrent and Distributed Programming. Investigate network management tools and techniques. Analytical. modulo scheduling. Concepts of Programming Languages -. Toskala. ISBN: 0805311912 2. Holma and A. The Anatomy of Programming Languages -.5. Morgan Kaufmann. Ullman. Alfred V.

1997. senstitive to our needs. Weiyi Meng. 3. similarity based search (spatial. by Clement T. Alfred V. Wolfgang Wahlster (Editor). 1998. Readings in Intelligent User Interfaces. and Micheal Kifer. 1998. Arthur Bernstein. Robert Morgan. and genuinely useful has motivated research across the world to advance the state of the art and practice in user interfaces that exhibit intelligence.S. The text covers the topic well. Advanced Compiler Design & Implementation. ISBN: 1558604340. Theoretical study should depend on the level of the first course Design I and the student needs. and Tools. Course Name: Multimedia Database Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: Introduction. Butterworth-Heinemann. Text/Document Databases. Logical Frameworks. 1998. Robert Morgan. Databases and Transaction Processing. 3. An Application-Oriented Approach. Subrahmanian. Compilers: Principles.3. Ullman.736 pages (April 1998) Morgan Kaufman Publishers. Text Books: 1. Overview of Relational and Object-Relational Data Representations. 2. by V. Building an Optimizing Compiler. Techniques. agile. Addison-Wesley. Course Name: Advanced Compiler Design II Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: The course should consist of one or two major projects. 1988. Mark T. San Fransisco. 1998. Lewis. Building an Optimizing Compiler. Multidimensional Data Structures. ISBN: 1558604448. Principles of Multimedia Database Systems. Paperback . Steven S. XML Databases. Morgan Kaufmann Publishing Company. Aho. ISBN: 1558604669. The promise of interfaces that are knowledgeable. Principles of Database Query Processing for Advanced Applications (Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems). Morgan Kaufmann. Philip M. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. and Jeffrey D. 2. audio). Addison Wesley 70 . Course Name: Intelligent User Interfaces Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: The increasing complexity of software and the proliferation of information makes intelligent user interfaces increasingly important. Maybury (Editor). CA. Muchnick. Butterworth-Heinemann. Temporal Data Models. Text Books: 1. image. Yu. Ravi Sethi.

Overview of early. Text Books/Reference Books: No particular text book can be specified as the contents and teaching approach depend on the instructor and the latest trends in the area. 3. Perceptual grouping: failure of the Hough transform. Olivier Faugeras. Jean Ponce. Handbook of Mathematical Models in Computer Vision. However. Prentice Hall. Yunmei Chen. ISBN: 0201708728. 2006. Prentice Hall. grouping edge points into straight lines by means of the Hough transform. Students will also be able to illustrate some successful applications of vision systems and will be able to identify the vision systems limitations. 2. 71 . By Nikos Paragios. Mainly. programming languages and the software design and engineering to develop projects of medium to large magnitude.Publishers. George C. improved Hough transform with perceptual features. grouping line segments into curves. mean and variance pyramids. Depth measurement in images. Stockman. Course Name: Rich Internet Applications Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Course Outline: This course covers the concept and technology evolution regarding the internet applications and the use of interface tools. 2003. quadtree structures for segmentation. Segmentation: region splitting and merging. By David Forsyth. computing the first and second derivatives of images using the isotropic. Birkhäuser. parameterisation of conic sections. By Linda G. analogy to edge point detection and Hough transform. limitations of the Hough transform. 2002. Course Name: Computer Vision Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Labs: 0 Pre-Req: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: By the end of this course Students will be able to explain the concepts behind computer based recognition and the extraction of features from raster images. Computer Vision: A Modern Approach. 2001. Sobel and Laplacian operators. Shapiro. Overview of mammalian vision: experimental results of Hubel and Weisel. applications of vision systems and their limitations. Text Books/Reference Books: 1. macromedia‘s FLASH. intermediate and high level vision. Course Outline: Concepts behind computer-based recognition and extraction of features from raster images. Computer Vision. the course can focus on any one of the technologies of modern day. perceptual criteria. the course will use the concepts of data structures. for example. however. object oriented programming. Grouping of contours and straight lines into higher order features such as vertices and facets. Macromedia‘s presence on the web can be utilized to maximum. Relaxation labelling of images: detection of image features.

S. International Islamic University. Convener Member Member 4 Dr. 2008 to develop the vision for Software Engineering education and curriculum for software engineering programmes. Member Professor and Dean. Zubair A. Islamabad Member Member 7 Dr. Forman Christian College University. Imdad Ali Ismaili. Nazir A. Meritorious Professor. Muhammad Abdul Qadir. Faculty Block-2. 72 . 6 Associate Professor. Allama Iqbal Open University. Naveed Ikram. 2 Dr. Rawalpindi. Jerald Allan Kabell. 2009 to finalize the curricula recommendations. Professor & Chairman. Lahore. Participants represented most of the universities and software industry of the country. Dr. Jinnah Avenue. Professor and Director Institute of Information and Communication Technologies University of Sindh. H-10 Campus. The Committee met again on 7-9 April. Department of Computer Science. Islamabad The Mall.T.. University of Karachi. Chairman and Director. Sangi Professor. Department of Computer Science. Mohammad Ali Jinnah University. Islamabad Campus. Faculty of Engineering & Applied Sciences. Jamshoo.Shaikh Member PEC Nominee FAST National University of Computer & Emerging Sciences National Highway 5 Dr.National Curriculum Revision Committee Software Engineering The National Curriculum Revision Committee for Software Engineering (NCRC-SE) met on 24-26 November. Department of Computer Science & I. M. Islamabad 3 Dr. Aqil Burney. Department of Computer Science. Following experts participated in the meetings: 1 Dr.

Saeed Mahfooz. SZABIST. Principal Engineer. Sukkur Member 9 Dr. Mehran University of Engineering & Technology. University of Peshawar. (NOT PRESENT) Department of Computer Science.8 Dr. Assistant Professor. Peshawar 13 Mr. University of Karachi. Department of CS and SE Engineering. Department of Computer Science. 11 Dr. COMSATS Institute of Information Technology. Sukkur 14 Dr. Nadeem Mahmood. Karachi 12 Dr.O. Muhammad Akram Sheikh Member Associate Professor. Department of Computer & Information Science. Department of Information Technology. Associate Professor. Islamabad Member Member Member Member Member Member 16 Dr. Karachi. Tahseen Ahmed Jilani. Qamar Uddin Khand. Najmi Ghani Haider Professor and HOD Department of Computing Science. Member Assistant Professor. Jamshoro 10 Dr. Department of Computer Science. Member 73 . Shahid Nazir Bhatti. Ghulam Mujtaba Sheikh Lecturer IBA Sukkur Airport Road. Arshad Iqbal. Islamabad 17 Mr. Sukkur IBA Airport Road. PIEAS Nilore. Lahore. P. Shafay Shamail Associate Professor and Head Department of Computer Science School of Science and Engineering Lahore University of Management Science (LUMS). Department of Computer Science. Assistant Professor. 15 Mr.

“Software Engineering Programmes are not Computer Science Programmes”. It also includes the design and development of techniques. pp. robust. A software engineering programme should develop professionals who have a mastery of software development principles. 2 David Parnas. Ghazi Road. Sector E-8. 1999. Zahoor Jan. Department of I. 74 . 1999. Lahore Cantt.. (NOT PRESENT) Project Manager NetSol Technologies Ltd. It requires facility in problem analysis. Nov/Dec. Therefore. solution design. according to Parnas2. IEEE Software.T. The Discipline of Software Engineering Software Engineering is a bridge connecting the basic concepts and principles of Computer Science with the variety of users who can benefit from technologies based upon those principles.University of Karachi. Generally. with the principles of good engineering practice and with the underlying concepts and principles of computer science. Software Engineering and Computer Science differ in much the same way as do Electrical Engineering and Physics1. IEEE Software. Bahria University. University of Peshawar. the goal of Computer Science. (NOT PRESENT) Lecturer. is to 1 David Parnas. efficient. 19-30. as well as attention to the critical nature of the various products of the process. and process. Karachi 18 Syed Asim Ali Shah. and maximally useful and usable. while science is more theoretical. Software engineering therefore requires familiarity with the basic needs and processes in the various application domains. Peshawar. engineering should be concerned with applying what we already know to create products. maintainable. “Software Engineering Programmes are not Computer Science Programmes”. pp. cost effective and sustainable manner. program development and documentation. 19-30. Assistant Professor. Islamabad 19 Abdul Mujeeb Kabadia. processes and higher level tools by which these applications can be developed in a timely. It also requires a basic understanding of the ways in which humans interact with technological systems. It includes the design and development of software systems which are effective. At both levels it requires a systematic approach which deals with quantifiable measures of quality and effectiveness. / Computer Science. Shangrila Road. 54792 20 Dr. Nov/Dec. practice. NetSol Avenue. theory.

theory. SE on the other hand aims to use the science and technology already available to create products and tools for use. measurement. quantifiable design.. deploy." [CMU/SEI-90-TR-003] "The application of a systematic. and problem with solution. analysis and verification providing a strong foundation in engineering principles and practices as applied to software development. concept with application. deployment. quantifiable development. practices. There are many definitions in literature. A software engineering programme should develop professionals who have a mastery of principles.‖ approach to is application approach to reliable and Vision Software engineering is the discipline of creating high-quality software systems in a systematic. develop. deployment and maintenance of software systems. and processes necessary to produce quality software systems. The curriculum committee formalized the Vision Statement for SE education in Pakistan as follows: The SE education in Pakistan will focus on imparting the knowledge and training which should enable students to harmonize theory with practice. operation. and their adaptability to team environments. Software Engineering derives its essence from computer science as other engineering disciplines do from natural or life sciences. disciplined. development. 2. and methods to the design. It involves the application of engineering concepts. and maintain software systems. The application of systematic. disciplined. and processes to design. practices.  "Software engineering is that form of engineering that applies the principles of computer science and mathematics to achieving cost-effective solutions to software problems.   IEEE defines software engineering [IEEE-93] as ―1. controlled and efficient manner. Definition Software Engineering is a discipline concerned with the development of software systems by applying engineering principles with the goal of developing costeffective quality systems.learn and to extend the science. The programme will inculcate among 75 . quantifiable approach to the development. and maintenance of economical software systems. and maintenance of software" [IEEE 1990]. with an emphasis on issues of process. It will prepare them to apply ably engineering principles.‖ Software Engineering could also be defined as: ―The application of systematic. design. operation. development. It will help students to enhance their ability in oral and written communication. techniques. The programme will lead to development of student’s professional and interpersonal skills. The study of approaches as in 1. disciplined. and maintenance of software. Such as:  "The establishment and use of sound engineering principles (methods) in order to obtain economically software that is reliable and works on real machines" [Bauer 1972]. that of engineering to software.

Knowledge Areas of SE Curriculum Development ABET Engineering Criteria 2000 notes: The curriculum must provide both breadth and depth across the range of engineering and computer science topics implied by the title and objective of the programme. 3. The graduates thus produced will be adequately equipped to exploit the opportunities and answer the challenges offered by the modern world. SE curricula thus developed would reflect the aim to satisfy professional demands of the industry and academia both in terms of immediate needs and the capacity for longer term development. verify. Practical component should use medium to large scale projects to develop in students a systematic approach to problem solving and program development. 5. The programme will also strive to develop a capacity for innovation and a passion for life long learning. the ability to appropriately apply discrete mathematics. 2004August 23. Software engineering concepts should be taken up as early as the start of 2 nd year. It should gradually introduce and strengthen the core professional competencies and desired skill-sets. Good SE practices must be nurtured all through the education programme. design.students a strong sense of civic. 2004 Edition. A capstone design project should provide the opportunity to bring together all the knowledge 3 4 Guide to Software Engineering Body of Knowledge. and maintain software systems. The programme must demonstrate that graduates have: the ability to analyze. The graduates. SE curriculum specified here has been developed systematically by identifying the major knowledge areas of SE education. in the spirit of engineering criteria above. Software Engineering – Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Degree Programs in Software Engineering. The following major areas of relevant pedagogy have been identified to be appropriate for design of the software engineering curriculum: 1. It is noted that efforts carried out by ACM and IEEE-CS to develop international software curricula are very relevant and provide excellent guidelines on the issue. professional and ethical responsibility. Software Engineering Education Knowledge (SEEK)4. Humanities. The practice of software engineering is often in the context of non-software application domains. The main technical SE content should be covered during the third and forth years.. and relevant topics in computer and management sciences to complex software systems. probability and statistics. Outcome of these efforts is documented in Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK)3. It will help them learn and demonstrate the application of software engineering practices. and Computing Curriculum 20085. validate. 2. therefore. Social Sciences) The committee is of the view that good curriculum should focus on building a solid foundation in the early stages of learning. implement. Computing Foundation (CS/SE/CE) Software Engineering (SE Major) Software Engineering Application Domain Supporting Areas (Mathematics and Natural Sciences) General Education (Management. 4. should be provided an opportunity for reasonably broad exposure to at least one application area in the senior years. 2004 5 Computing Curriculum 2008—Draft 76 . apply.

The notation used for this purpose is X(YZ). Software Engineering Degree Programs Nomenclature The committee emphasized that the nomenclature followed for Software Engineering programs should correspond to international trends and standards. universities may define their own admission criteria. 77 . It was agreed that 3 weekly lab hours shall be treated as one credit hour for a course. X represents credit hours. The following nomenclature was thus agreed upon for various degrees: Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering — BS Software Engg — BS (SE) Master of Science in Software Engineering — MS Software Engg— MS (SE) Duration of Programs The committee defined a credit hour as 15 lecturing hours in a course offered in a particular semester.gained in a wide variety of courses to solve realistic problems in a team-based environment. universities may define their own admission criteria. however. Admission Criteria The eligibility criteria for BS Software Engineering admission was agreed to be intermediate with mathematics or equivalent qualifications. y represents hours of practical in class per week and z represents hours of lab work per week over a 15 week semester. The BS Software Engineering Degree would be a 4-year programme spread over 8 semesters and MS Software Engineering programme would be a 2-year programme spread over 4 semesters. The eligibility criterion for admission to MS Software Engineering was unanimously agreed to be 4-year BS Software Engineering or equivalent qualifications. In normal circumstances a semester comprises 15 teaching weeks followed by the final examination. however.

Curriculum for BS Software Engineering — BS (SE) Curriculum Objective The objective of the curriculum is to prepare students for professional careers and graduate studies with a balance between computing theory and practical application of software engineering concepts. humanities and social sciences. processes. be able to verify and validate the software systems. be able to understand and apply software project management skills: measurement. understand and be able to apply the principles of software engineering practice and process. implement. 78 . and the trends of the industry. estimation. Various components have been included in the curriculum to ensure that the graduates will:              understand and be able to apply mathematics. tools and technologies in the modern software development environments. deployment and tracking of resources. understand professional responsibility and application of ethical principles.computer. costing. and the cultural. and practices. be able to model. mathematics and science. have strong communication and interpersonal skills. historical. These areas will be taken care of 6 While setting the objectives the committee benefited substantially from different universities’ online documentation for similar programmes available on http://sites.6 The curriculum is designed to ensure breadth across allied disciplines and supporting subjects. deploy and maintain software systems. and social issues that influence and effect or relate to the development of high quality software systems. methodologies.html . gradual and definite way. During the first two years of the programme the students will be given an underpinning in computer science. subject to realistic constraints. computer science and related disciplines. and depth in most areas of the software engineering body of knowledge. They will have grounding in communication. Graduates of such programs will be able to function as proficient software developers and effective team members. Curriculum Model The curriculum is designed to achieve systematically the objectives set out above for the programme. with special emphasis on software engineering — concepts. document and track system requirements. Graduates will be able to understand and assess their own software engineering capabilities and performance. physical science. planning. It has been structured to suit the needs of the students. analyze. have knowledge of economics. The students will be exposed to the discipline in a systematic. both functional and non-functional. be able to work in one or more application domains.org/ccse/SEprogrammes. be able to design. Students will also be trained in the skills and techniques which are rooted in the basic sciences like mathematics and physics. the demands of the market. They will have knowledge of and experience with software product engineering and engineering management and an understanding of professional issues and practices. have an awareness of current industry standards and practices. understand and apply the principles of the team process. be capable of independent learning.

whereas the Table SE1 gives the credit hour distribution of the core and elective courses. SE Design Project General Courses Elective (18) General Courses Core (15) Support Courses Elective (9) Support Courses Core (12) SE & Domain Elective Courses (15+6) Software Engineering Core Courses (18) Computing Foundation Core Courses in CS/SE/CE (37) Figure-SE1 Structure of the proposed curriculum (credit hours within parenthesis) 79 .in the supporting courses which have been allocated reasonably sufficient space. During the senior years the students will be given exposure to the more specialised aspects of the discipline. The final year design project will mark the crystallisation and culmination of the students‘ four-year learning process. Figure SE1 illustrates the structure of the proposed curriculum. In order to inculcate among them a scientific attitude they will go through a substantial lab work. They will also be given training in at least one application domain which will help institutions to prepare human resource well suited to the needs of different segments of the job market. A host of slots for elective courses have also been proposed to give to the students an opportunity to move towards their areas of interest. which will prepare them for the industry and for further research oriented studies. Students‘ personal traits and personality polishing will be cared for by the general education courses including communication and writing skills.

80 .8 Labs preferred in these courses. However. implementation details are left upon the concerned Institutes.Major Areas Computing Foundation Software Engineering Software Engineering (Application Domain) Supporting Studies (Math/Science ) General Education Total Core/ Required 43 18 Electives Credit Hours 21 82 (63%) -- 06 12 15 82 (68%) 9 12 48 (32%) 21 (17%) 27 (21%) 130 Table SE1: The Credit Hour Distribution of the Core and Elective Courses Computing-Core Courses – 43 Credit Hours # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1: Co de PreReq 1 3 3 4 4 2 6 Course Title Credit hours 4 (3-3) 4 (3-3) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 4 (3-3) 4 (3-3) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 6 Introduction to Computing Programming Fundamentals Object Oriented Programming Discrete Structures Data Structure and Algorithms Digital Logic and Design 1 Operating Systems Introduction to Database Systems Introduction to Software Engineering 1 Computer Communications and Networks 1 8 Human Computer Interaction 3 (3-0) 7 Senior Design Project 6 (0-18) 7.

8 16. CS 30 Introduction to Soft Computing 3 (2-3) 4. CS 8 Data Warehousing and Data Mining 3 (3. CE 6 Microprocessor Interfacing 3 (3-0) 7 29. 15. CS 7 Business Process Automation 3 (3-0) 7. 5 22.3 27. MG Information System Audit 3 (3-0) 7 15.4 Automata Theory and Formal 3 (3-0) 5.7 18.8 17. CS 4 Data Security and Encryption 3 (3-0) 6 26. CS 7. CS 3. 16. CS 30 Artificial Neural Networks 3 (3-0) 8 33. 3 Principles of Programming Languages 3 (3-0) 7 31. CS 3 Discrete Structures – II 3 (3-0) 2. SE 7 Distributed Computing 3 (3-0) 7-8 21.10 Real-time systems 3 (3-0) 6-7 23. 6 Languages 28. SE 15 Software Metrics 3 (3.0) 3-4 14. 13. CS 8 Advance Database Management 3 (2-3) 8 Systems 34.8 13. Code SE SE SE SE SE SE Prereq 4 7 13 13 7 7 Course Title Software Construction Software Requirements Engineering Software Design and Architecture Software Quality Engineering Software Project Management Formal Methods in Software Engineering (18/133) Credit Hours 3 (2-3) 3 (2-3) 3 (2-3) 3 (2-3) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Semester 4 5 6 6 7 5 Elective Computing & Software Engineering Courses (15/133) (The list below is by no means exhaustive. CS Computer Graphics 3 (2-3) 6 32. 14.0) 7. CS Design Patterns 3 (3-0) 7.0) 6.4 Formal Methods 3 (3-0) 6-7 19. Institutions may add new course) # Code PreCourse Title Credit Semester req hours 12. CS 4 Analysis of Algorithms 3 (3-0) 6 30. CS Web-Engineering 3(3-0) 5-8 81 . CS 3 Artificial Intelligence 3 (3-0) 6 25.Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering: BS (SE) Computing Core Requirements part) 37 Credit Hours (Refer to Computing Required Software Engineering Courses # 12. SE 7 Software Testing 3 (2-3) 6. SE 7 Software Engineering Economics 3 (3. 7 24. 17. CS 2. CS Bio-Informatics 3 (3-0) 5-8 35. SE 7 PSP and TSP 3 (3-0) 7-8 20. SE 3.

Depth in security 3 IS Enterprise Business issues related to security. SCM Systems. textile and garments. Institutions may add new domains. medicine. Depth in databases 6 5-8 Systems and Depth in business administration Data Processing 5 IS Financial and Accounting. 6 5-8 and distributed systems. Hardware verification 9 BI Bio-medical Biology and related sciences 6 5-8 Systems Related safety critical systems knowledge 10 SS Scientific Depth in related sciences.Domain Specific Elective Courses (6/133) In-depth treatment of one of the following SE Application Domains should be offered in the form of set of two to three courses of 3 credits each in the selected domain. etc. The list below is by no means exhaustive. insurance. CRM 6 5-8 Systems Systems Engineering 2 NS Net-Centric Knowledge and skills in Web-based 6 5-8 Systems Technologies Depth in networking. Common domains may include banking. oil exploration. 6 5-8 Security Security weaknesses and risk analysis. Depth in security. Each domain treatment should be organized as domain introduction. Proof of 6 5-8 Systems correctness. Depth in 6 5-8 Systems statistics Visualization and graphics 11 TE Telecommunic Depth in signals. etc. Finance 6 5-8 E-commerce Depth in security Systems 6 CE Fault Tolerant Knowledge and skills in heterogeneous. defence. etc. 6 5-8 ation Systems Telephony and telecommunication protocols 82 . agriculture. Depth in networks 4 IS Information Data warehousing. Knowledge of control systems 8 CE Embedded & Hardware for embedded systems 6 5-8 Real time Languages and tools for development Systems Depth in timing issues. Architecture Cryptography. information theory. etc. computing concept of the domains and the domain specific computing examples with general sprit of implementation using SE principles. Survivable Intrusion detection Systems Failure analysis and recovery 7 CE Safety Critical Depth in formal methods. Domains Topics /Component Cr 1 IS Enterprise ERP Systems.. steganography. cryptanalysis.

Wireless technology Related embedded and real-time systems knowledge Related telecom systems knowledge Machine learning. MT -Operation Research 3(3-0) 5-6 16. EE 4 Digital Electronics 4 (3-3) 3-4 12. game. and entertainment Systems System for Small & mobile Platforms 17 AI Agent based Systems Mechanical engineering concepts Related safety critical systems knowledge Related embedded and real-time systems knowledge Control systems Industrial engineering and other relevant areas Related embedded and real-time systems knowledge Visualization. and graphics Depth in human computer interface design Depth in networks Depth in human computer interfaces for small and mobile platforms. CS -Natural Language Processing 3 (3-0) 6-7 83 . MT 1 Advanced Calculus 3 (3-0) 2 6.3) 3-4 13. Sc Bio-Chemistry 3 (3-0) 4 10. MT -Computational Linear Algebra 3(3-0) 5-6 14. Sc -Software Engineering Economics 3(3. Sc Biology/ genetics 3 (3-0) 4 11. haptics.12 AS Avionic & Vehicular Systems 14 IE Industrial Process Systems 15 ES 16 WN Multimedia. MT 3 Numerical and Symbolic Computing 3 (3-0) 5-6 7. Institutions may add new course) 5. Fuzzy logic Knowledge engineering 6 5-8 6 5-8 6 5-8 6 5-8 6 5-8 Computing Requirements-Supporting Sciences 12 Credit hours (refer to Computing part) Elective Supporting Courses (9/133) (The list below is by no means exhaustive. Sc Physics-II (Mechanics) 3(3-0) 2 9. MT -Simulation and Modeling 3(3-0) 4-5 17. MT 3 Stochastic Processes 3 (3-0) 6-7 8. MT -Mathematical tools for Software 3(3-0) 6-7 Engineering 15.

etc.Computing Requirements-General Education 15 Credit Hours (Refer to Computing part) Elective General Education Courses (12/133) (The list below is by no means exhaustive. French. Institutions may add new course) 60 SS English Literature 3 (3-0) 5 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 SS SS SS SS HU MG MG MG MG MG Economics Sociology Psychology International Relations Foreign Language (Arabic.) Information System Audit Principles of Management Human Resource Management Marketing Accounting and Finance 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 7 2-6 6 7 7-8 7 4 5 6-7 5-7 84 . German.

15 Semester 5 Cr. Hrs. Hrs. Semester 6 Software Requirement Engineering Probability and Statistics Computer Communication and Networks SE Elective I Supporting Elective III GE/University Elective III 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs. Semester 2 Cr. Semester 3 Semester 4 Introduction to Software Engineering Data Structures and Algorithms Digital Logic & Design Linear Algebra Pakistan Studies and Islamic Studies 3 3 3 3 3 Operating Systems Software Construction Supporting Elective II GE/University Elective II Introduction to Database Systems English-III (Technical and Report Writing) 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs. Introduction to Computing Programming Fundamentals Calculus and Analytical Geometry Physics English-I (Functional English) 3 4 3 3 3 16 Cr. Semester 7 Semester 8 Senior Capstone Project I Software Project Management Professional Practice SE Application Domain Elective –II GE/University Elective IV 3 3 3 3 3 18 Senior Capstone Project II SE Elective III SE Elective IV SE Elective V 3 3 3 3 12 85 . Human Computer Interaction Software Quality Engineering Software Design & Architecture Formal Methods in Software Engineering SE Elective II SE Application Domain Elective –I 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs.Sample Scheme of Study for BS (SE) 4-year Programme (8 Semesters) (130 Credit Hours) Semester-wise 4-Year Plan Semester 1 Cr. Hrs. Discrete Structures-I Object Oriented Programming Supporting Elective I GE/University Elective I English-II (Communication Skills) 3 3 3 3 3 15 Cr.

Modelling system behaviour with extended finite state machines o SDL o Representing concurrency. 4. published by Microsoft Press. and analyzing concurrent designs Lab Work: .Use of software engineering tools to create designs . Relation of scanners and compilers o Parsing concepts. Object-Oriented Software Construction. Sep 2005 3. Ferenczi. Published by. reliability. and generate code from the specifications using appropriate tools o Design simple concurrent software o Analyze software to improve its efficiency. LL Parsing o Overview of principles of programming languages. Backus Naur Form. context free grammars. Software Engineering by Ian Sommerville. 2006 86 . students will have the ability to: o Apply a wide variety of software construction techniques and tools. principles of scanners o Using tools to generate scanners.Software Engineering Course Name: Software Construction Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2/ Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: Upon completion of this course. Addison & Wesley. more regular expressions and transition networks.COURSE CONTENTS BS (SE) . Criteria for selecting programming languages and platforms o Tools for automating software design and construction. syntax and semantics. regular expressions and their relationship to state diagrams o Lexical Analysis.Use of parser generators to generate languages Reference Material: 1. and maintainability Course Outline: o Basics of formal languages. Prentice Hall in 1997 2. including state-based and table-driven approaches to low-level design of software o Design simple languages and protocols suitable for a variety of applications o Generate code for simple languages and protocols using suitable tools o Create simple formal specifications of low-level software modules. Parsing. 8th edition. 2004. applications of scanners. and Andras Pataricza . Second Edition. check the validity of these specifications. Formal Methods in Computing by M. tokens. by Bertrand Meyer. grammars. parse trees. Code Complete 2nd edition: A practical handbook of software construction.

Goal modeling heuristics. 2003. Fundamental concepts and activities of requirements engineering. Identifying objects from goals. Loucopoulos and Karakostas. Modeling quality goals. Information elicitation techniques. the role of quality goals in the requirements selection process. John Wiley Sons. Outline of business requirements. Modeling scenarios Fundamentals of goal-oriented requirements engineering. the product vision and scope for applications. 2004. Use case elicitation using automated tools e. Object modeling heuristics. Requirements management. Requirements verification and validation Management of inconsistency and conflict. Deriving operational requirements from goals. Hull. Springer 2.g. Course Outline: Definition of requirements engineering and role in system development. Modeling use cases and state machines. Wiegers. Karl E. Course Name: Software Design and Architecture Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Software Requirement Engineering 87 . 2nd Edition. Requirements Specification. Modeling behavioral goals. Kotonya and Sommerville. Jackson. to understand modeling and analysis of Non-Functional Requirements. Lab Work      The requirements are for the development of case applications. to understand and use Formal Techniques. UML. Object modeling notations. Microsoft Press 3. Requirements Engineering: Processes and Techniques. System Requirements Engineering. Requirements traceability and impact analysis. to understand and use Requirements Elicitation and Specification.Course Name: Software Requirement Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Engineering Objectives: To understand Issues in Requirements Engineering. to understand and apply Requirements Engineering Process. Techniques for requirements evaluation. requirements engineering risks. and Dick. Software Requirements. 1995 4. selection and prioritization. Object modeling for requirements engineering. 1998. Requirements Engineering. Mobile Scenarios and PDA‘s etc Development of Software Requirement Specification (SRS) Requirement Engineering Group Discussion activity and resource allocation etc Reference Material: 1. McGraw-Hill .

Objectives: An in-depth look at software design. Software Architecture as a Career. Software Architecture as a Design Plan. Uses for the Code Architecture View. frameworks. Continue Developing Strategies. Analyze Factors. and reverse engineering. Module Architecture View: Design Activities for the Module Architecture View. Survey of current middleware architectures. The Architect Coordinates. Evaluation and evolution of designs. Traceability. students will have the ability to: o Apply a wide variety of design patterns. Upon completion of this course. Component based design. frameworks. Final Design Task: Resource Budgeting. Design of distributed systems using middleware. Uses for the Module Architecture View. and Configuration. Continuation of the study of design patterns. Central Design Tasks. Final Design Tasks. Conceptual Architecture View: Design Activities for the Conceptual Architecture View. and architectures in designing a wide variety of software o Design and implement software using several different middleware technologies o Use sound quality metrics as objectives for designs. The Architect Implements. and then measure and assess designs to ensure the objectives have been met o Modify designs using sound change control approaches o Use reverse engineering techniques to recapture the design of software Course Outline: Introduction: Putting Software Architecture in Context. Basics of software evolution. Continue Developing Strategies. Software Architecture as an Abstraction. Traceability. Execution Architecture View: Design Activities for the Execution Architecture View. Connectors. Central Design Tasks: Components. reliability. and Configuration. Software Architecture Terminology. 88 . Final Design Task: Resource Allocation. Code Architecture View: Design Activities for the Code Architecture View. Analyze Organizational Factors. Traceability. The Architect Advocates. The Architect Makes Decisions. Communication Paths. Loose coupling between Views. Global Analysis: Overview of Global Analysis Activities. Four Views of Software Architecture. reusability. safety. Using the four Views. Final Design Task: Interface Design. etc. Analyze Product Factors. Begin Developing Strategies. Central Design Tasks: Modularization and Layering. and architectures. Uses for the Execution Architecture View. Develop Strategies. Analyze Technological Factors. Measuring internal qualities and complexity of software. Uses for the Conceptual Architecture View. Measurement theory and appropriate use of metrics in design. Designing for qualities such as performance. Role of Architect: The Architect as a Key Technical Consultant. Central Design Tasks: Runtime Entities. security. Traceability. Engineering concerns addressed by different views. reengineering. The Architect Coaches.

Xiang Fu and Kai Qian 2. Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Plans. Security assessment.Lab Work      Planning and Practice of existing software design methodologies. Specification based test construction techniques. Software verification. Avoidance of errors and other quality problems.Methodology and Styles Stipes Publishing L. White Box Testing.g. Principles of software validation. SQA-Organizational Level Initiatives. Reliability Validation. Dilip Soni. Safety Assurance. Software Testing. Software Architecture Design . Applied Software Architecture. Christine Hofmeister. Quality Assurance in Software Projects (Phases). Recursion Testing etc 89 . Quality Assurance and Standards. UML (for code generation). Checklist. Planning Verification and Validation. its phases and thus implementation of different process models Efficient use of different modeling and design tools e. Course Name: Software Quality Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 /Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Software Requirement Engineering Objectives: The objective of this course is to make students have ability to understand and practice: How to assure and verify Quality. and the need for a culture of quality.g. Product assurance. Product and process assurance. Writing of Software Design Specifications Resources: 1. the existing design & architecture practices using up to date tools and technologies Applications of Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Quality Control v/s Quality Assurance. Quality Management. Robert Nord. incorporation of feedback loop to support quality promotion. 1999. The Quality Challenge. Outline of requirements. Walkthroughs and Inspections. Verification and Validation.L. Black Box Testing. open source code development etc. Structure. Audits. Statistical approaches to quality control. Product Quality and Process Quality. Testing. Critical System Validation. Standards for process quality and standards for product quality. Planning for Software Quality Assurance. Roles and Responsibilities (Reviews. Results). Numbers. White-box and grey-box testing. Copyright © 2006 Lixin Tao. Principles and Practices. Inspections and reviews. Inspections. How to make Reviews and Inspections most effective Lab Work: o Planning and Development of test cases o Planning and implementation of different Testing Techniques e.C. Data flow oriented test construction techniques. Problem analysis and reporting. Others comprehensive software testing techniques for SDLC. etc). Quality process standards. verification and validation techniques using variety of tools. Quality Planning and Quality Control. SQA Planning (Observations. Clean-room approach to quality assurance. Process assurance vs. Inspections and reviews. Pearson. Course Outline: Introduction to software quality assurance. Control flow oriented test construction techniques.

1998. Quality Assurance. Closing. Resources 1. McGraw Hill Higher Education 2. Software Project Management. 2005. Addison & Wesley. Resource leveling. Perfect Software: And other illusions about testing by Gerald M. published Dorest House. Project Monitoring and Control: Status reporting. Scheduling: Project network diagram fundamentals. ISBN 0-471-67420-6 BS (SE) . by Nina S. Risk management and Change control Project Recovery. IEEE Computer Society Press and Wiley Interscience. Project plans. Post Project Reviews. Assigning Resources. Cutover/Migration.Software Engineering Courses (Electives) Course Name: Software Metrics Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Lab:0 Prerequisites: Software Quality Engineering (SQE) Objectives: Upon completion of this course. Managing conflict and motivating. 4. Edward. Statement of Work (SOW). 2nd Edition. Critical chain scheduling. 2004. Software Testing in the Real World: Improving the Process by Kit. Communications Techniques. Estimation of effort and cost (Expert Judgment.o Collection and Generation of test data o Practicing Testing methodologies using automated testing tool & technologies o Analysis of Test results & Extreme testing Resources: 1. and Quantifiable Improvement by Jeff Tian. published by Alpha Science. Weinberg. FP and Use Case point methods). matching lifecycles to projects. Godbole. PERT. Project charter. Classic Mistakes. Bob Hughes and Mike Cotterell . Using MS-Project. Team models. Project metrics. Documentation. EVM. students will have the ability to: 90 . Dwayne Phillips. 2004 2. The Software Project Manager's Handbook . published by John Wiley & sons. Work Breakdown Structures (WBS). PMI Process Groups.Principles that work at work. 2005 3. maximizing the return from each stage of the software development life cycle. Software project Phases. Planning Phase: Development lifecycle models. Course Outline: Software Crisis and Software Engineering. Gantt charts. 2008 Course Name: Software Project Management Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 /Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Engineering Objectives: To develop ability to plan and manage software development projects successfully. CPM. Overview of Project Management. Software Quality Assurance: Principles and Practice (Hardcover). Software Quality Engineering: Testing.

Decisions based on testing.o Take account of the Metrics Program. object point. Basic software quality metrics. Basic metrics for OO systems. and analyzing concurrent designs Software structural measurement. Software Size: Reuse.Applying ISO external metrics attributes to existing SDLC phases 91 . Formal experiments: Planning. CK metrics. Software quality models: Boehm's model. Types of metrics. Test concepts. measuring external product attributes: quality. Metrics for OO software quality SQA. Metrics for productivity measurement. software test metrics.Estimate the attributes and sub-attributes of the SDLC depending upon the assigned data/project . use-case point). Software Lifecycle Management (SLIM).. object-oriented metrics) o Measurement management Account of well known International metrics in software and system engineering Course Outline: o o o o o o o What are software metrics. Software Size. Cyclomatic complexity. Basic Measurement Theory Measurement quality. McCall's model. Measurement validation Software measure classification Goal-based paradigms: Goal-Question-Metrics (GQM). Software Size: Length (code. Cost models: advantages and drawbacks Software quality. Especially account of ISO/ IEC 9126 External Metrics suite etc. OO analysis and design metrics. Measurements and Models. Software Size: Complexity Representing concurrency. Allocating test times . Data flow and data structure attributes. measuring software reliability. Formal experiments: Principles and Formal experiments: Selection Internal Metrics. Goal-Question-IndicatorMetrics (GQIM) and Applications of GQM and GQIM Design Metrics. Quality management models. Remaining defects measurement o o o o o o Lab Work: . Test coverage measurement. Measurements Scales Software engineering investigation. measuring cost and effort. Software Size: Functionality (function point. design).Use of software engineering tools to estimate attributes of existing well known metrics . Measuring customer satisfaction Object-Oriented measurement concepts. o Measurement theory (overview of software metrics. Investigation techniques. specification. ISO 9126 model. Control-flow structure. basics of measurement theory. Estimating number of test case. Constraint model. Software testability measurement. Investigation principles. feature point. goal-based framework for software measurement. Architectural measurement Software cost model. definitions and techniques. Measurement process. empirical investigation in software engineering) o Identify the internal and external metrics attributes o Enhancing the software development process with respect to metrics o Software product and process measurements (measuring internal product attributes: size and structure. COCOMO and COCOMO II.

Making the Software Business Case: Improvement by the Numbers . Software Engineer's Reference Book. by Stephen H. Identify best practices and lessons learned with Webbased developments. Fenton and S. Resources: 1. Software Metrics: A Rigorous and Practical Approach. Kan. Addison Wesley. PWS Publishing. CostEffectiveness Models. 1998 3. 1981. C. Course Name: Software Prerequisites: Engineering Economics Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: /Labs: Objectives: Determine how new software development technologies affect the economics and risks of software development. Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering. Performance Models. Course Name: Information Prerequisites: None System Audit Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3 / Labs: 0 Objectives: To provide basic concept of information system audit and control. Software Engineering Economics. McGraw-Hill. Applied Software Measurement: Assuring Productivity and Quality. Boehm. Boehm et al. 3. software trends: cost. Auerbach Publications. Addison-Wesley Professional (2002) 2. Sensitivity Analysis. Springer-Verlag. The Raylaigh Distribution. Butterworth Heinemann. introduction to COCOMO. Year of Publication 6.). Optimal Performance. To review and evaluate or conduct IS audits of an organization 92 . (2004). social impact. Jones. phase distribution. Pfleeger. Ravindranath Pandian. 2001. Identify acquisition and lifecycle risks Course Outline: Programming aspects. policies and procedures as defined by ISACA. Janice Singer (Eds.). interpolation. Understand and characterize how the paradigm shift affects or replaces our current methods of software cost. and Application. economic aspects. 5.Reference Material: Additional Recommended Text and Reference Books: 1. 2nd ed.E. (2nd ed. development effort and schedule. 2007. Software Cost Estimation with COCOMO II . 2000. Software Metrics: A Guide to Planning. Prentice Hall..). Prentice Hall. by J. The GOALS Approach to Software Engineering. the plurality of SE Means. schedule and risk estimation. Year of Publication 4. basic software maintenance effort estimation. by N. ISO/IEC 9126 External Metrics Reports I & II 7. human relations aspects. C. Analysis. The Software Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). definitions and assumptions. Reifer. Guide to Advance Empirical Software Engineering by Forrest Shull. 2. Software Maintenance. McDermid (Edt. Don.L.

report. Auditing IT infrastructure. by Jack J. evidence and follow-up. ‗ Performance and Capacity Planning with Bpel by Matthies Masour. Acquisition. views and latest methodologies of business process modeling o utilize software tools for business process designing o understand key concepts in the design and utilization of best business practices embedded in large business applications (ERP) o have an appreciation of issues pertaining to organizational design and organizational change management in the context of business process management Course Outline: o o o o o Business Process Definitions Business Process Analysis and Modelling Business Process Lifecycle Policies. 2004 2.org. user interactions and bottlenecks o understand the concepts. published by john Wiley & Sons. by Information System Audit and Control Foundation. 2003 2. 3rd Ed. Procedures. Trading Partners and Suppliers in Business Processes o Business Process Simulation o Business Process Re-Engineering (objectives and techniques) o Basic concepts of Six Sigma (in terms of business process improvement) Reference Material: 1. 2004. Champlain. VDM-Verlag 2007. Backup and procedures Resources: 1. complexity. 93 . IP pro count policies and process. Audit computer networks and communication. 3. Polices. Maintenance. Business process re engineering: IS audit proposal. Business Process Automation ARIS in Practice by August Wilhelm Scheer. Springer-Verlag. Auditing software development.isaca.Course Outline: IS Audit charter. Customers. Andy Scherzinger. Auditing Management and Organization. by Information System Audit and Control Association. CISA Review Manual. Business Process Automation. complaint to standard. students will have the ability to: o Apply their knowledge of business processes in the development of applications for various industry verticals o Analyze business processes in terms of rules. Enterprise service agreement. Procedures and Rules (in terms of business processes) Role of People. www. Control Objective for Information Technology (COBIT). Course Name: Business Process Automation Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3/Labs:0 Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Engineering Objectives: Upon completion of this course. Auditing Information Systems.

2/e by James Trott (Kindle Edition . Design Patterns Explained: A New Perspective on Object-Oriented Design. equivalence classes. Orientation around other types of patterns. and analysis. After the course you will have a deep understanding regarding the thoughts behind design patterns. boundary testing. Developing test plans. published by Prentice hall. Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development. integration testing. o Design and implement comprehensive test plans o Apply a wide variety of testing techniques in an effective and efficient manner o Compute test coverage and yield according to a variety of criteria o Use statistical techniques to evaluate the defect density and the likelihood of faults.Course Name: Design Prerequisites: Patterns Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 /Labs: 0 Objective: This course provides good knowledge about design patterns and how they are practically implemented in order to enhance existing systems and their design solutions.Feb 24. Classification of patterns. test driven development. 2009) Course Name: Software Testing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Software Construction Objectives: Testing techniques and principles: Defects vs. profiling. some patterns and idioms (language specific techniques) meant for real-time systems will be provided. Managing the testing process. Test instrumentation and tools. State based testing. Deep understanding of the thoughts behind design patterns. Furthermore. students will have the ability to: o Analyze requirements to determine appropriate testing strategies. Third Edition 2. Problem reporting. Black-box Vs. by Craig Larman. You will also have a knowledge database consisting of usable design patterns and related concepts. Resources: 1. The course may include following contents: General design patterns. 94 . and acceptance testing. Structural testing. Specific patterns for technical real-time systems. Coverage criteria. failures. Testing strategies: Unit testing. Types of defects. web site testing. configuration testing. Course Outline: The course focuses on studying a large number of general design patterns and their practical application. tracking. beta. 2004 3. which will make you well-prepared for implementation in your daily work. Learning objectives: Upon completion of this course. Alpha. compatibility testing.

The Z Language. Lab Work Additional teaching considerations: This course is intended to be 95% testing. Generics. Gabbar. System Development using VDM by Jones. Cambridge University Press. Testing categories. Metrics and complexity. Course Outline: Introduction and overview: Testing and inspection concepts. Black box and white box testing Unit testing. Schema references. Transformational development. Specification analysis and proof. 2nd edition. Bindings and schema types. Schema expressions. The course should build skill and experience in the student. Edward. Regression testing. Objects and types: Sets and set types. with deep coverage of a wide variety of testing techniques. Z – Specification Language by Spiveny (Year of Publication) 3. SpringerVerlag 2006. Schema texts. user acceptance testing. and verify their properties. preferably with production code. Introduction to Software Testing by Paul Ammann and Jeff Offutt Published February 2008. Course Name: Distributed Computing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Development 95 . SAMS publishing. Tuples and Cartesian product types. State based testing. Use of software testing tools. Resources: 1. (1995) Course Name: Formal Prerequisites: None Methods Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Objectives: In this course students learn how to represent computing systems with both state-based and process algebra models. C. Sequential Systems. Software Testing in the Real World: Improving the Process by Kit. Inception process: Objective of formal inspection Organizing Test cases: Decision Tables. (Year of Publication) 2. Generic constructions. Relations and functions. They use theorem proving and model checking tools. Syntactic conventions. UK. Outline: Resources: 1. They connect specifications to programmes through refinement and decomposition. Predicates. Integration testing. System testing.o Conduct reviews and inspections. Programme verification. B. reason about specifications. They specify computing systems formally. Modern Formal Methods and Applications by Hossam A. Properties and schemas. 2005 3. Software Testing by Ron Patton. 2. Course Introduction to formal specification. . Syntax testing. Cambridge.

learning in artificial neural networks. neural dynamics. introduction to biological and artificial neural network. introduction to fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic systems. Introduction: Introduction to soft computing. Knowledge Acquistion b. Resource monitoring. Resource clustering. Distributed Systems: Concepts and Design (International Computer Science Series) by Jean Dollimore. such as. Exact and Simulation-based Propagation Algorithms 96 . RMI. 4. Multithreading. applications of fuzzy systems. MPI. Distributed Systems: Principles and Paradigms by Tanen Baum. CORBA. . additive and shunting neural networks. Neural Networks Classification Tree Naïve Bayes Applications of Predictive Models Probabilistic Reasoning using Bayesian Networks a. The main focus is on the theory and application of probabilistic graphical models (commonly known as Bayesian networks in the Artificial Intelligence community) and related topics. 2nd Edition 2. knowledge elicitation issues. Tim Kindberg.NET and will highlight the interfacing of middle layer with the upper layers and system layer Course Outline: Introduction to distributed systems. Batch processing models. and George Coulouris (Hardcover . Alternative models of uncertain reasoning (including belief function theory and fuzzy logic) and biologically inspired computational models (neural networks and evolutionary algorithms) are also presented. 3. (Week 5-8) Fuzzy systems and applications: fuzzy sets. Storage elements. Distributed data. Middle layer architecture. Load balancing. 5. Resources: 1. (Week 24) Artificial neural networks and applications: artificial neural network models. simulation schemes for belief updating. Belief Updating c. parameter and structure learning of Bayesian networks. fuzzy inference systems. RMI. 2.Objectives: This course is intended to provide a sound background for net centric software development. The course will concentrate an overview of major technologies like CORBA. short term and long-term memory. Thread synchronization. fuzzy reasoning. neural network applications in control systems. Biological neural networks: generalization of single neuron. Net. (Week 9-11) Course Outline: 1. Resource brokerage. and integration of time and uncertainty.14 Jun 2005) Course Name: Introduction to Soft Computing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/ Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Artificial Intelligence Objectives: The course provides an in-depth overview of the theoretical and the practical aspects of the soft computing paradigm. belief updating in singly and multiply connected networks. fuzzy control. Distributed processing system.

Margaret H. Data Reduction Techniques. Course Name: Artificial Intelligence Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Data Structures Objectives: This course focuses on the set of computational tools and techniques. Models. Text Books/ References Books 1. Principles of Data Mining. Decision Trees and Decision Rules. solving 97 . 2003. Mehmed Kantatardzic. 2. 2. Knowledge Representation: Natural language. Course Outline: Introduction to Common Lisp. productions. OPS-5. by Karray & De Silva. 2006. Springer-Verlag. Data Preparation Techniques: outlier and missing data analysis. 1999. Dunham and S. Other Soft Computing Approaches in Data Mining. 2007. John Wiley and Sons. Data Mining. The MIT Press. means-ends analysis. 2004. Larose. Paulraj Ponniah. 3. 2006. Bayesian Artificial Intelligence. Principles of Data Mining. Cluster Analysis. 2005. Statistical Methods in Data Mining. pattern matching. IBM Corporation. Soft Computing & Intelligent Systems Design. 4. Course Name: Data Warehousing and Data Mining Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Lab: 0 Credit Hours: 3 Course Outline: Concepts of Data mining and Data Warehousing. Max Bramer. Parameter and Structure Learning 6. Pearson Education. Genetic Algorithm. objects. ELIZA. Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Set Theory. Symbolic Mathematics: student. 2003. Eunsaeng Kim Ann Valencic. Chuck Ballard Dirk Herreman Don Schau Rhonda Bell. simple search. Ben Coppin. scripts. Data Mining Methods and Models. agglomerative and Naïve Bayesian methods. 3. hierarchal. International Technical Support Organization. learning methods in Data mining. Kevin Korb and Ann Nicholson. 7. best first search. Methods. 5. semantic networks. A* search. AddisonWesley. Search: Depth first search. Dempster-Shafter Theory of Belief Functions 8. Data Warehousing Fundamentals. rule based translators. John Wiley and Sons. breadth first search. Data Modeling Techniques for Data Warehousing. min-max search. David Hand. 2001. John Wiley and Sons. rules. hill climbing. Heikki MAnnila and Padhraic Smyth. evolutionary algorithms. which mimic the human decision-making process and capability. and Algorithms. Sridhar. rules. frames. Fuzzy Logic Resources: 1. AI classical systems: General Problem Solver. predicate logic. Influence Nets 7. Association Rules.d. Artificial Intelligence Illuminated. Artificial Neural Networks. Daniel T. 2005. Introductory and Advanced Topics. 6. Data Mning: Concepts.

Macsyma. 2nd ed. Russell and Norvig. Course Outline: The course consists of three parts: mathematical background. solving algebraic equations. RIPEMD-160. Sample case studies of shells and Knowledge Based Systems. Kerberos). RC-5). modular arithmetic and discrete logarithms. Artificial Course Name: Data Prerequisites: Security and Encryption Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: This is an introductory course on the methods. HMAC). electronic mail security (S/MIME. digital signatures. The third part (network security) deals with practical applications that have been implemented and are in use to provide network security. providing integrity. confidentiality. Intelligence by Luger. and network security. Pearson Education. PRESS.509. we show how these techniques can be integrated to solve particular data and communication security problems. The first part (mathematical background) introduces the principle of number theory and some results from probability theory. including Primes. algorithms. translating English equations. SHA-1. RC-4. William Stallings. and authenticity of the documents and the communicating parties. After studying the theoretical aspects of cryptographic algorithms and protocols. Prolog. Logic Programming: Resolution. 4th edition. A brief appreciation of state of the art computational techniques like neural networks. meta-rules. SET). ATLAS. Diffie-Hellman). Prolog programming. techniques. Reference Material: 1. horn-clause logic. fuzzy sets. hash functions (MD5. 2. SSL. re-write rules. TLS. Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice. genetic algorithm. simplification rules. unification. including conventional and symmetric encryption (DES. 4th edition Pearson Education. and tools of data security and cryptography. and thus. The second part (cryptography) covers cryptographic algorithms and design principles. Blowfish. Rijndael. PGP). 2005 Course Name: Discrete Prerequisites: None Structures–II Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 98 . cryptography. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Aproach. Resources: 1.algebra problems. Prentice Hall. random numbers. web security and protocols for secure electronic commerce (IPSec. and certificates. IDEA. public key or asymmetric encryption (RSA. key management. This course material is of use to computer and communication engineers who are interested in embedding security into an information system. including authentication protocols (X.

Universal Turing Machine. Chomsky‘s hierarchy of grammars Turing Machines Theory: Turing machines. applications o Computational complexity: Order analysis. trees. Transducers (automata with output). recurrence relations. independence o Methods of Proof. elementary solution techniques o Graphs and trees: Fundamental definitions. 2. Mathematical Induction and Recursion. Discrete Mathematical Structures by Rosen 2006. Trees and Graphs. modus ponens and modus tollens. Regular expressions/Regular languages. loop invariants. Course Outline: Finite State Models: Language definitions preliminaries. diagonalization proof to show uncountability of the reals. Post machine. Discrete Mathematics by Richard Johnsonbaugh 1996. TM encoding. Some of the abstract machines shall also study as ―Transducers‖. Simplifying CFLs. Optimization and matching. Pumping lemma and non regular language Grammars and PDA: Context free grammars. Course Name: Theory of Automata and Formal Languages Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Discrete Structures Objectives: The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical foundations of computer science through study of mathematical & abstract models of computers and the theory of formal languages. limitations of predicate logic o Recurrence relations: Basic formulae. Pigeon whole principle. Derivations. computational complexity. Context sensitive Grammars. elementary computability. Push-down Automata. 99 . kleene‘s theorem. Decidability. NFAs. Course Outline: o Review of previous course o Predicate logic: Universal and existential quantification. Finite automata (Fas). Variations on TM. simple algorithms. traversal strategies.Objectives: Continues the discussion of discrete mathematics introduced in CS105. and discrete probability. proof techniques. Defining Computers by TMs. spanning trees. definition of the P and NP classes. standard complexity classes o Elementary computability: Countability and uncountability. conditional probability. graphs. derivation trees and ambiguity. Topics in the second course include predicate logic. Transition graphs (TGs). simple demonstration of the halting problem o Discrete probability: Finite probability spaces. Theory of formal languages and use of various abstract machines as ‗recognizers‘ and parsing will be studied for identifying/validating the synthetic characteristics of programming languages. matrices. Pumping lemma and non-context free languages. Normal form grammars and parsing. Resources: 1. applications o Matrices: Basic properties.

Sudkamp. Cormen. shading. Jr. Two and three dimensional imaging geometry and transformations. by Thomas A. complexity. Graph algorithms. windows and clipping.Resources: 1. Polynomial and matrix calculations. Sc. Automata Theory by Martin 2. Approximation algorithms. Prentice Hall. 1996 3.Scan-Converting lines. Languages and Computation. An Into to the Theory of Comp. by Denial Cohen. Computer Graphics Using Open GL. colour. Ronald L. Search trees. rendering. Divide-and-conquer approach.. Introduction to Computer Theory. panning and zooming. characters and circles. Region filling and clipping. Shortest paths. Emphasis on the structure. Dynamic programming.. Second Edition. 2005 100 . Fundamental algorithms. Course Name: Analysis of Algorithms Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Discrete Structures. Recursion and recurrence relations. Introduction to Automata Theory. Greedy approach. NP complete problems. 2/E. Sorting. Fundamentals of Computer Graphics: 2nd Edition by Peter Shirley A. Course Outline: Introduction. and segmentation. Disjoint Sets. Asymptotic notations. Charles E. Inc. Hashing. Heaps. John Wiley & Sons. Programming raster display systems. String matching. Thomas H. Resources: 1. 2001 Course Name: Computer Graphics Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Object Oriented Programming Objectives: Study of various algorithms in computer graphics and their implementation in any programming language. Languages and Machines. and efficiency of algorithms. 4. Rivest and Clifford Stein.K. by J Hopcraft. Interactive graphics programming . and animation..graph plotting. Hill. MIT press. Raster algorithms and software . Introduction to Algorithms. Several measures of complexity are introduced. Leiserson. Peters. D. Course Outline: Graphics hardware. Applications of graphics. Network flow. Resources: 1. Ullman. Curve and surface design. Data Structures Objectives: Detailed study of the basic notions of the design of algorithms and the underlying data structures. 2006. 2001 2. Francis S.

Artificial neural networks: an introduction. Counterpropagation Networks (CPN) . by G. Temporal Differences method (TD). KellerTechnology & Engineering-2005 3. Priddy. Genome-scale sequencing projects have led to an explosion of genetic 101 . Fuzzy logic and its connection to NNs Resources: 1. Simon Haykin. by Kevin L. Recurrent Networks (Time series . Artificial Neural Network overview. Prentice Hall. Paul E. Conjugate Gradient method . Bi-Directional Associative Memory (BAM) Optimization Problems Neural Network Approaches. The objective of this course is on the understanding of various neural network and fuzzy systems models and the applications of these models to solve engineering problems. Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) . Backpropagation . Multi-Layer Perceptrons (MLPs) . Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method . Polynomial Networks . Evolutionary Programming . Radial-Basis Networks . Perceptrons . 2005 Course Name: Bioinformatics Course Structure: Lectures: 3/ Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Credit Hours: 3 Objectives: This course introduces the scientist to Bioinformatics. Neural networks: methodology and applications. which uses computer databases to store. CascadeCorrelation Networks . SECOND EDITION. Course Outline: Introduction Contexts for and Motivation Neural Networks: Artificial Intelligence | Biological | Physics. Hopfield Networks . Principal Component Analysis networks (PCA) Associative Models Linear Associative Memory (LAM) . BSB) . Dreyfus-computers-. Adalines Supervised Learning: Multi-Layer Networks. Backpropagation through time . Upper Saddle River. Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ). Brain-State-in-a-Box . Unsupervised Learning Simple Competitive Networks: Winner-take-all | Hamming network . Madalines . Finite Impulse Response (FIR) MLP ). retrieve and assist in understanding biological information. Kohonen Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) . Boltzmann Machines and Simulated Annealing . 1999 2. Supervised Learning: Single-Layer Networks . NJ. Neural Networks: A Comprehensive Foundation.Course Name: Artificial Neural Networks Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures:3/ Labs: Prerequisites: Artificial Intelligence Objectives: This course presents an overview of the theory and applications of artificial neural network and fuzzy systems to engineering applications with emphasis on signal processing and control.

3. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources. which direct the production of proteins that in turn regulate all life processes. Lesk (2002). John Howard Parish. control theory. Course Outline: This interdisciplinary course provides a hands-on approach to students in the topics of bioinformatics. Oxford University Press.―Introduction to Bioinformatics‖.―Bioinformatics: the machine learning approach‖. network theory. 4. John Wiley & Sons. David R. Westhead. Resources: 1. Where applicable. Published by BIOS. and biotechnology applications. PSI-BLAST. Jean-Michel. These gene sequences are the codes. Jean-Michel Claverie. MIT Press. robotics and other domains will be expounded upon. Incorporated. Twyman (2002). machine learning. microarray expression analysis. BLAST. 102 . Students will be introduced to the basic concepts behind Bioinformatics. The student will be shown how these sequences can lead to a much fuller understanding of many biological processes allowing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to determine for example new drug targets or to predict if particular drugs are applicable to all patients. Bayesian methods. scalefree networks. Søren Brunak (2001). Claverie. Contents are designed for should include for those with a computational and/or engineering background. BLOCKS. actual implementations. ClustalW. ―Bioinformatics‖. Arthur M. Lectures and labs should cover sequence analysis. 2007 2. Pfam. Pierre Baldi. Richard M. engineering issues from signal processing. Prosite and the PDB. The use of NCBI's Entrez.sequences available for automated analysis. it will include current real-world examples. and engineering design issues. ― Bioinformatics for Dummies‖. PRINTS. Cedric Notredame.

1996 2. H. Calculus. Nievergelt. orthogonalization and least squares methods.Implementation and testing of algorithms for typical linear algebra problems. D. including an analysis of errors. formal methods for program verification Course Outline: Sample labs and assignments: . G. special linear systems. Golub. Wavelets Made Easy.. subspaces. Lanczos methods. Knuth and O.. R.. Matrix Computations (3/e). Knuth. Resources: 1. and D. Sewell. and C. Graham. Computational Methods of Linear Algebra (2/e). E.. Van Loan. Error analysis and estimation for all techniques studied. numerical matrix algebra. various matrix operations. 1999. 103 . discrete Fourier and cosine transforms and simple applications. and linear system sensitivity. D. iterative methods for linear systems. Resources: 1. functions of matrices. Y. L. measuring vectors. Course Outline: Background matrix algebra. Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science (2/e).Elective Supporting Courses Course Name: Computational Linear Algebra Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 1 Prerequisites: Linear Algebra. the unsymmetrical eigenvalues problem. 2005 3. various discrete and continuous optimization techniques. Calculus Objectives: Students will gain familiarity with and facility in the use of standard techniques for the numerical solution of a variety of problems in linear algebra. calculation of eigenvalues and determination of eigenvectors.. In all cases. students will be introduced to possible sources of error and techniques for estimating the magnitude. E. tools for the analysis of efficiency. Discrete Mathematics Objectives: Students will gain familiarity with and facility in the use of a variety of mathematical concepts and tools with significant applications in software engineering. Patashnik. Sample labs and assignments: . including mathematical models of machines and computations. Students will be introduced to various discrete transforms and apply some specific transforms to the solution of simple problems.Building a significant project using one or more well known middleware architectures. including solutions of linear systems. Mathematics for the Analysis of Algorithms. matrices. Introduction of discrete transforms. G. Gaussian elimination. 1994 2. Course Name: Mathematical Tools for Software Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Linear Algebra. evaluation of determinants and permanents. Greene. the symmetric eignevalues problem. 1990.

Course Name: Operations

Research
Credit Hours: 3

Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 1

Prerequisites: Linear Algebra, Calculus, Discrete Mathematics, Probability and Statistics

Objectives: Students will become familiar with techniques of modeling real
world problems. They will gain facility in working with a number of the most common models and modeling patterns. They will understand and be able to apply the notions of sensitivity analysis. They will be able to select appropriate deterministic or stochastic models in a wide variety of common situations.

Course Outline: Introduction to mathematical modeling.

Linear program models, simplex method for solving LP models, sensitivity analysis, other solution techniques for LP models, specialized LP models (transport, assignment, etc.). Network based models, shortest path, min weight spanning tree, max flow, PERT/CPM. Decision models, dynamic programming, games theory. Probabilistic models, expected return models, Markov chains, stochastic processes, queueing models, stochastic inventory models. Sample labs and assignments: - Given a scenario, select and develop an appropriate model, solve it for the given parameters, and analyze the sensitivity of he solution to changes in the problem parameters.

Resources:
1. Hamdi A. Taha, Operations Research: An Introduction (8/e), 2006 2. Hillier, F. S., and G. J. Leibermann, Introduction to Operations Research (8/e), 2005 Course Name: Simulation

and Modeling
Credit Hours: 3

Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3

Prerequisites: Probability and Statistics, Calculus

Objectives: This course emphasizes the development of modeling and
simulation concepts and analysis skills necessary to design, program, implement, and use computers to solve complex systems/products analysis problems regarding software engineering discipline. The key emphasis is on problem formulation, model building, data analysis, solution techniques, and evaluation of alternative designs/processes in complex systems/products. Overview of modeling techniques and methods used in decision analysis, including Monte Carlo simulation and systems dynamics modeling are presented. 1. To apply modern software packages to conduct analysis of real world data. 2. To understand the technical underpinning of modern computer simulation software. 3. The ability to apply the appropriate analytical technique to a wide variety of real world problems and data sets. 4. To summarize and present the analysis results in a clear and coherent manner. Course Outline: Introduction to Simulation and Modeling, Discrete-Event Simulation, Simulation of a Single-Server Queueing System, Alternative Approaches to Modeling and Simulations; Review of Basic Probability and 104

Statistics; Estimation of Means, Variances, and Correlations, Confidence Intervals and Hypothesis Tests for the Mean, The Laws of Large Numbers; Random number generators; Simulation of discrete, continuous probability distributions and empirical distributions; tests on simulated distributions, rejection method, simulation of multivariate distributions, correlations, and stochastic processes, simulation of models of arrival processes, Poisson Processes, Nonstationary Poisson Processes, Batch Arrivals, tests on generators, Markov- Chain Monte-Carlo simulations; Variance-Reduction Techniques.

Resources:
1. A.M. Law and W.D. Kelton, ―Simulation Modeling and Analysis‖, McGraw Hill, 2000. 2. J. Banks, J.S. Carson and B.L. Nelson, ―Discrete-event System Simulation‖, Prentice Hall International, 1994. 3. Mitrani, ―Probabilistic Modeling‖, Cambridge University Press, 1998. 4. Sheldon M. Ross, ―Simulation and Modeling‖, 2002. 5. Brian Ripley, ―Stochastic Simulations‖. Course Name: Ethics

and Professional Practices for Computing Professionals
Credit Hours: 3

Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None

Objectives: A Computing graduate as professional has some responsibilities
with respect to the society. This course develops student understanding about historical, social, economic, ethical, and professional issues related to the discipline of Computing. It identifies key sources for information and opinion about professionalism and ethics. Students analyze, evaluate, and assess ethical and professional computing case studies.

Course Outline: Introduction, Computing Ethics, Philosophy of Ethics, Ethics
and the Internet. Intellectual Copy Right, Accountability and Auditing, Social Application of Ethics.

Resources:
1. Deborah G. Johnson, ―Computer Ethics‖, Pearson Education (2001) 3rd edition. 2. Professional Issues in Software Engineering, M.F. Bott et. al.

105

Curriculum for MS Software Engineering — MS (SE)
Eligibility
1. BS (SE/CS) 4 years degree programme, OR 2. Computer Science conversion course two years degree programme referred to as MCS or M.Sc. (Computer Science), OR 3. BCS 3-year programme degree applicants may be provisionally admitted in the MS (SE) programme. Candidates will be required to take additional courses to complete credit hour requirement of min. 130 before being formally enrolled in the MS (SE) programme. Under eligibility criteria 1-3 the university/department may recommend additional deficiency courses, from the BS (SE) curriculum, considering the deficiency of the candidates. OR 4. 16-years education science/engineering degrees. Under eligibility criterion 4 candidates will be required to complete the deficiency coursework prior to the MS (SE) coursework to ensure the prerequisite competency in SE. The deficiency coursework will be determined on the basis of the core SE courses of the BS (SE) degree.

Duration
  4 semesters 30-36 credit hours from graduate Software Engineering courses including thesis

Degree Requirements
In order to obtain MS (SE) degree a student must pass a minimum of: i) ii) Four (4) courses (12 credit hours) from the core courses AND Four (4) courses of 12 credit hours graduate elective courses of which two graduate courses may be taken from other areas. AND Satisfactorily complete a Research Project Thesis of 9 credit hours.

iii)

106

Core Courses Following three courses are the core S. Graduate Level SE courses (Institution may add courses to the list of Electives.) Elective Courses 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Software Engineering Management Software Risk Management Software Measurement and Metrics Global Software Engineering Software Configuration Management Knowledge Based software Engineering Software Dependability Software Costing and Estimation Business Process Reengineering 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Formal Methods in Software Engineering Software Engineering Ontologies Semantic based Software Development Semantic web enabled software engineering Model Driven Software Development Machine Learning Applications in Software Engineering Software Process Engineering Software Case tools and Applications Web Engineering 107 . 3 3 3 Semester 1-2 1-2 1-2 Elective Courses  Candidate has to select a minimum of Two (2) courses from the following list of SE electives. Hrs. Code Course Title 1 2 3 SE SE SE Requirement Engineering Software System Architecture Software System Quality Cr. Other electives may be taken from allied areas to support the research work. No.

No. Hrs. Code Course Title 1 2 3 Total SE SE SE Elective–IIV Elective–V Thesis–I Cr.No. Hrs. 3 3 3 9 Credit Hrs. Code Course Title 1 2 3 Total SE SE SE Requirement Engineering Software System Architecture Elective–I Cr. Semester 3 S. 108 . Hrs.No. 3 3 3 9 Credit Hrs. Code Course Title 1 2 3 Total SE SE SE Software System Quality Elective II Elective–III Cr. 3 3 3 9 Credit Hrs. Semester 4 S.No.Sample Scheme of Study for MS (SE) 2–year Programme (4 Semesters) (30 Credit Hours) Semester 1 S. Code Course Title 1 Total SE Thesis–II 6 Cr. 6 33 Credit Hrs. Semester 2 S. Hrs.

Fundamental concepts and activities of requirements engineering. Course Name: Software Prerequisites: None System Architecture Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Objectives: To develop an understanding of the relationships between system qualities and software architectures. Identifying objects from goals. Karl E. John Wiley Sons. Advanced concepts such as refinement. Requirements Engineering: Processes and Techniques. Principles of sound documentation. Software Requirements. Modeling quality goals. Requirements Engineering. to understand and use Formal Techniques. ARID). styles. Hull. Evaluating a software architecture (ATAM. Requirements traceability and impact analysis. The QAW. 4. performance. Loucopoulos and Karakostas. the role of quality goals in the requirements selection process. Understanding and achieving quality attributes. to understand and apply Requirements Engineering Process. Object modeling notations. to understand and use Requirements Elicitation and Specification. the architecture business cycle. Object modeling heuristics. context 109 . interoperability. Architecture Driven Design. Techniques for requirements evaluation. and views. 2003. 2004. security. Requirements Specification. Course Outline: Definition of requirements engineering and role in system development. requirements engineering risks. Object modeling for requirements engineering. software architecture documentation. Modeling use cases and state machines. Requirements verification and validation Management of inconsistency and conflict. Evaluating software architecture. Springer 2. View types. such as availability. 2nd Edition. System Requirements Engineering. Modeling scenarios Fundamentals of goal-oriented requirements engineering. Course Outline: Definition and overview of software architecture. Goal modeling heuristics. McGrawHill.MS (SE) – Core Courses Course Name: Requirement Prerequisites: None Engineering Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Objectives: To understand Issues in Requirements Engineering. and Dick. Requirements management. Microsoft Press. Jackson. selection and prioritization. Modeling behavioral goals. Wiegers. Documenting software architecture. Attribute-driven design. a method for eliciting critical quality attributes. and modifiability. CBAM. Resources: 1. architectural reuse. software architectural styles and their relationship to system qualities. to understand modeling and analysis of Non-Functional Requirements. software architecture evaluation. Kotonya and Sommerville. Deriving operational requirements from goals. 3. Architecture reuse Life-cycle view of architecture design and analysis methods. Information elicitation techniques. attribute-driven design.

variability. Course Outline: What Is Software Quality: Quality Assurance. Lattanze. Product and process assurance. Fault Tolerance and Failure Containment. QUANTIFIABLE QUALITY IMPROVEMENT: Feedback Loop and Activities for Quantifiable Quality Improvement. Architecting Software Intensive Systems: A Practitioners Guide. Data Dependency. Quality Models and Measurements. Coverage and Usage Testing Based on Checklists and Partitions. Documenting the behavior of software elements and software systems. Taylor. Inspections and reviews. Testing. Addison-Wesley Professional. Quality process standards. Bass. and Kazman. 2009 2. Clements. Risk Identification for Quantifiable Quality Improvement. 2001. and Klein. Avoidance of errors and other quality problems. Formal Verification. Clements. and Dashofy. Process assurance vs. problem reporting and resolutions. Specialization. Resources: 1. verification and validation activities. Problem analysis and reporting. verification and validation techniques. 2003.diagrams. Control Flow. Software Architecture in Practice (2nd Edition). Kazman. and Techniques. Theory. Defect Classification and Analysis. and software quality improvement through systematic test planning. and Practice. Auerbach Publications 3. Test Activities. Sample labs and assignments o Use of automated testing tools 110 . Software Architecture: Foundations. and Automation. Choosing relevant views. Testing Techniques: Adaptation. and Interaction Testing. Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods and Case Studies. Issues. Course Name: Software Prerequisites: None System Quality Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Objectives: The objective of this course is to study in detail the issues involved in software quality engineering. and how to document interfaces. research and trends in Quality: how to assure it and verify it. Addison-Wesley Professional 4. Medvidovic. Management. Establishing software quality goals and improvement measurement. Building a documentation package. Product assurance. 2008. QUALITY ASSURANCE BEYOND TESTING: Defect Prevention and Process Improvement. and the need for a culture of quality. Statistical approaches to quality control. Coverage and Usage Testing Based on Finite-State Machines and Markov Chains. Quality Engineering SOFTWARE TESTING: Testing: Concepts. The course focuses on current practice. and Integration. Economics of testing. software interfaces. and test documentation. Software Reliability Engineering. Software Inspection. Comparing Quality Assurance Techniques and Activities. Input Domain Partitioning and Boundary Testing. Anthony J. design and executions.

The results for the continuous assessment (30%) will be submitted by the course supervisor.‖ Wiley-IEEE Computer Society Pre 2. Multimedia. Boris Beizer. Abilities: 1. software quality documentation.o Testing of a wide variety of software o Application of a wide variety of testing techniques o Inspecting of software in teams. Client Representatives and Internal Supervisor. professional and legal issues‖. Final Project workshop results will be prepared by the supervisor based on the final evaluation (70%) by a panel of IT experts. and that they will undertake their research activities in an ethical and professional manner. designing. Each student/team is expected to select an area of greatest interest and implement a related general interest software application. Client server. Course Name: Research Prerequisites: Study Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Objectives: Introduction: The aim of the course is ―to provide the students with an ability to undertake postgraduate level research and an appreciation of relevant ethical. and testing and project management. Internet/network computing. comparison and analysis of results Resources: 1. 2. professional and legal issues provide a research domain but the overall purpose is to ensure that the students gain research skills that will support them in the rest of their courses. Elective Courses Course Name: Software Prerequisites: Engineering Laboratory Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Objectives: Course Outline: This course is designed to help the student develop the capability in specifying. All students/groups /projects will be examined by the panel. Current research publications and literature and URLS where such courses are being offered. and implementing real-life software applications following software development methodologies. Can carry out research investigations using information repositories. database systems. objects oriented modeling. The evaluation will be done in a similar manner as outlined for software project. 3. Software Testing Techniques (second edition). Essentially the ethical. Software application areas covered include. in their future careers. and Quantifiable Improvement. Can effectively report the results of research activities 3. Jeff Tian (2005). Software Quality Engineering: Testing. Can develop and deliver presentations to disseminate research findings 111 . Quality Assurance.

Conference papers are not allowed for review. CASE in software development process. specialized design tools. Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches  Introduction to the Concepts of Research-2: Process.Course Outline: Introduction to the course:  International Ethical. As part of course. M. methods. C. Critical analysis  Thinking about methods  Reading for research  Data Collection and Information Gathering  Information Gathering: Literature Surveys  Data Analysis  Proposals for Research Projects and Research Papers  Information Gathering: Surveys and Questionnaires  Presentation of Information: Writing Academic Papers-1 Content and Referencing The students have to perform meta analyses of 25-30 research papers selected in current research topics in International Journals. Originality. Forming Hypotheses. Students have to read all such papers and prepare the analysis related to model. Tight Course Name: Software Prerequisites: Objectives: Case Tools & Applications Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Course Outline: The students will be appraised of. OO Design. Case tools & techniques. findings and come up with what has been done related to selected area of research and research gaps if any are explicitly identified with future work. Professional and Legal Issues in Computing  Introduction to the Concepts of Research-1: Definitions. Managing CASE methodologies. How to Research. by Loraine Blaxter. Resources: 1. Specific CASE tools. The course starts from the introduction to Ontologies and latest 112 . students will be assigned a real life problem for development through CASE tools Resources: Selected software case tool documentation Course Name: Software Prerequisites: None Engineering Ontologies Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 Objectives: The objective of this course is to study in detail the Ontologies available for software development and highlights their strengths and weaknesses in achieving the goals for which the Ontologies have been developed. 2nd Ed. Emerging CASE methodologies. Topic and papers will be selected with approval from the instructor. Hughes. Traditional CASE methodologies.

Comparative Study of Semantics Coverage in Ontologies as per SWEBOK 7. 5. Methods. Use of Ontologies and its significance in development of software systems will be covered with the help of some real life examples. Measurements. 2006) Language: English ISBN-10: 3540345175 ISBN-13: 978-3540345176 113 . and Languages 2. Development of Ontologies for SWEBOK (Software Engineering Body of Knowledge): Issues and Techniques 4. Francisco Ruiz (Editor). Maintenance. Ontology Engineering: Principles. Tools. There will be a lot of case studies in this course as assignments. 1 edition (October 19.languages used to describe / document Ontologies. Then a detailed study and comparison of different Ontologies available for each phase in the software engineering development life cycle will be done. Extensive Use of Online Available Latest Resources 2. Mario Piattini (Editor) Publisher: Springer. Course Outline: 1. Some Ontologies for Software Development: Ontologies for Requirements. Online Available Ontologies (search by using Swoogle) 3. Resources: 1. Alignment of Different Available Ontologies. Design. Using Ontologies in Software Engineering 3. Use of Ontologies in Domain Oriented Software Development Environments 6. Ontologies for Software Engineering and Software Technology by Coral Calero (Editor).

Dr Naveed Ikram Associate Professor Department of Computer Science International Islamic University Islamabad 4. Professor Dr. Nazir A. Islamabad. 2009 at Higher Education Commission (HEC). Dr. Muhammad Ali Member Assistant Professor Department of Information Technology & Computer Science Institute of Management Sciences Peshawar 7. The following experts participated in the meeting: 1.National Curriculum Revision Committee (NCRC): Information Technology (IT)-2009 A three-day final meeting of National Curriculum Revision Committee was held from April 21-23. Professor Dr Muhammad Sher Chairman Department of Computer Science International Islamic University Islamabad 5. Dr Muhammad Yousaf Associate Professor Department of Computer Science & Engineering Bahria University Islamabad Convener Secretary Member Member Member 6. Professor Dr Imdad Ali Ismaili Director Institute of Information Technology University of Sindh Jamshoro 3. Professor Dr Farhana Shah Director Institute of Information Technology Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad 2. The lengthy discussions held throughout the period finally led us to design the curricula for BS. The purpose of this meeting was to finalize the draft curricula for undergraduate as well as graduate students of Information Technology. Sangi Chairman Department of Computer Science Allama Iqbal Open University Member 114 . MS/MPhil degree programs.

Dr.Islamabad 8. Professor Dr Aqil Burney Member Chairman Department of Computer Science and Information Technology University of Karachi Karachi. Muhammad Nadeem Khokhar Member Assistant Professor and Coordinator Computer Science Department Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science & Technology Islamabad 9. Professor Dr Madad Ali Shah Professor Information Technology IBA Sukkur Airport Road Sukkur Member 12. 15. Professor Dr Iftikhar Hussain Shah Member Professor Department of Computer Science & Information Technology Forman Christian College Lahore 11. Dr Shafay Shamail Associate Professor Department of Computer Science LUMS Lahore Member 115 . Dr Sharifullah Khan Member Associate Professor School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences (SEECS) National University of Sciences and Technology Rawalpindi 14. Mr. Sohail Asghar Member Assistant Professor and Head of R&D Department of Computer Science Shaheed Zulfikar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science & Technology Islamabad 10. Forman Christian College Lahore 13. Professor Dr Jerald Allan Kabell Member Chairperson Department of Computer Science & Information Technology.

Abdul Hussain Shah Bukhari Member Dean Faculty of Information and Communication Technology Balochistan University of Information Technology. and Management Sciences. NCEAC FAST National University of Computer & Emerging Sciences Karachi 17. Quetta 116 .16. Professor Dr. Professor Dr Zubair A Shaikh Member Representative. Professor Dr. Engineering. Professor Dr Abdul Qadir Dean Faculty of Engineering and Sciences Muhammad Ali Jinnah University (MAJU) Islamabad 18. Syed Mansoor Sarwar Principal PU College of Information Technology (PUCIT) Punjab University Lahore Member Member 19.

security and social issues. The members of the National Curricula Revision Committee (NCRC) (the Committee) unanimously nominated and elected Dr Farhana Shah as Convener and Dr Naveed Ikram as Secretary of the Committee. IT graduates who can: a) identify needs and possibilities of the organization which may be met by appropriate use of IT resources. The work was presented before the committee for deliberation. Riaz ul Haq. deploy. The aim of the undergraduate program of IT is to provide students with skills and knowledge that enable them to take on appropriate professional positions in IT and grow into leading roles. Member (Acad) presided over the meeting. in coordination with organizational management. He welcomed the participants and highlighted the need for reviewing the existing curriculum. legal. manage and support the required IT resources. and their responsibilities as IT professionals. Dr. plan. and help in improving the qualify for higher education programs. ethical. communicate with a range of audiences and participate effectively as part of teams.First Meeting of National Curricula Revision Committee in the Field of Information Technology The meeting started with recitation of the holy Quran. select. integrate.g. analyze the local and global impact of computing and understand professional. The participants liked to begin the revision of the existing curriculum in light of: a) Changes already recommended by Computer Science Committee especially bringing in of the common section of Computing Part for undergraduates Revised modifications recommended by the international community (e. ACM/IEEE) on previous curricula suggested in IT The feedback and innovative ideas of members of the committee based on their experiences and diverse backgrounds b) c) Revision of Goals for the Program of BS in Information Technology The participants of the committee preferred to discuss the product of the program by having a vision and setting the goals first. 117 b) c) d) e) . Following are the recommendations by the committee as a result of combined consensus. The Convener declared the floor open for discussion after brief introductory remarks and explaining rules of the game. software and communication technologies. including hardware. The goals are to produce. A sub committee was assigned the task of researching the effective goals for the next four years at least.

The NCRC for Information Technology (IT) did not agree with the recommendation(s) coming from the NCRC for Computer Science (CS) that the course ―Discrete Structures‖ should be moved from the Computing . A course of ―Basic Electronics‖ be introduced in place of ―Physics (Electromagnetism)‖ in ―Computing .Core Courses‖ to ―CS Required Supporting Courses‖.General Education‖.Supporting Sciences‖ part. it was recommended by the NCRC for IT that this course should remain within ―Computing–Core Courses‖.‖ The titles of the courses ―Digital Logic and Computer Architecture‖ and ―Database Systems‖ in Computing – Core Courses be changed to ―Digital Logic Design‖ and Introduction to Database Systems‖ respectively. The course ―Human Computer Interaction‖ be added to the ―Computing–Core Courses. b) c) d) e) f) g) 118 .Core Courses‖ to ―Computing . Ethical. The Islamic and Pakistan Studies course should be divided in to two courses of 2 credit hours each. However. Legal and Professional issues. The course of ―Professional Practices‖ in ―Computing – General Education‖ should cover Social.Review of Recommendations Made by NCRC for Computer Science (2008) Regarding “Computing” Section The NCRC for Information Technology agreed to disagree upon the Computing Part with the following observations and recommendations: a) ―Introduction to Computing‖ be renamed to ―Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)‖ and be moved from ―Computing .

and Management respectively. Structure of BS in Information Technology # Category 1 Computing Courses Core Courses Supporting Areas General Education 2 Information Technology Courses IT Core Courses IT Electives Courses IT Supporting Courses 3 University Electives Credit Hours 68 37 13 18 48 18 21 9 18 119 . System Integration and Architecture The course of ―Principles of Management‖ should be replaced by ―Technology Management‖ in the Required Supporting area defined for the curriculum. The three subsets of courses revolved around Technology. Web Technologies and e-Systems j. Strategy. revise three subsets of courses and work thoroughly on their contents. Data Warehousing h. Information Security c. Knowledge-Based Systems g. Communication Systems Design b. Network Security f. Fundamentals of Information Technology b. Data Mining i. Web Services e. The Elective courses with respect to Information Technology and General areas were suggested along with Fields of Concentration as follows: a. Three sub-committees were constituted to pay special attention to details. Multimedia Systems and Design d. Systems and Network Administration e. universities may offer other courses. Mobile and Pervasive Computing d.Revision of BS Program in Information Technology The task was divided into subtasks. A consensus was built on recommendations as given below: a) Six courses worth 18 credit hours should be considered Core area for the curriculum of BS in Information Technology as follows: a. The lay out of courses together with the contents and up to date books were brought to the main committee for further discussion. Network Systems k. Web Site design and Usability f. Knowledge Management b) c) However the list is suggestive not exhaustive. Web Systems and Technologies c.

8 Computing — Supporting Sciences (12 Credits Hours) # 12 13 14 15 Required Supporting Courses Code Prereq Course Title MT MT MT EE Calculus and Analytical Geometry Probability and Statistics Linear Algebra Basic Electronics (13/134) Credit hours 3 (3-0) 4 (4-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 1 2 4 3 Computing — General Education (18 Credits Hours) # 1 2 3 4 Required General Education Courses Code Prereq Course Title Credit hours EG English-I (Functional English) 3 (3-0) EG EG PK English-II (Technical and Report Writing) English-III (Communication Skills) Islamic and Pakistan Studies 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 1 2 3 1 120 .Total Credit Hours 134 Computing — Core Courses (37 Credits Hours) # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Required Computing Courses Code Prereq Course Title CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS CS 1 2 3 4 4 4 6 Programming Fundamentals Object Oriented Paradigm Discrete Structures Data Structure and Algorithms Digital Logic Design Operating Systems Introduction to Database Systems Introduction to Software Development Computer Communications and Networks Human Computer Interaction IT Capstone (37/134) Credit hours 4 (3-1) 3 (2-1) 3 (3-0) 3 (2-1) 3 (2-1) 3 (2-1) 3 (2-1) 3 (3-0) 3 (2-1) 3 (3-0) 6 (0-18) Proposed Semester 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 6 - 7.

IT Electives Code Prereq Course Title Communication Systems Design Information Security Communication Technologies Mobile and Pervasive Computing Web Services Web Site Design and Usability Knowledge-Based Systems # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Credit hours 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester 121 .5 6 IT SS - Introduction to Information and Communication Technology Professional Practices (18/134) 3(2-1) 3 (3-0) 1 8 IT — Core Courses (18 Credits Hours) # 1 2 3 4 5 6 Required IT Core Courses Code Prereq Course Title Fundamentals of Information Technology Web Systems and Technologies Multimedia Systems and Design Systems and Network Administration Network Security System Integration and Architecture (18/134) Credit hours 3 (3-0) 3(2-1) 3(2-1) 3(3-0) 3(3-0) 3(3-0) Proposed Semester IT — Supporting Sciences (9 Credits Hours) Required Supporting Courses Code Prereq Course Title Technology Management Organizational Behaviour Information Systems (9/134) # Credit hours 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Proposed Semester IT — IT Electives (21 Credits Hours) Following is a suggestive list of the elective courses. Universities may offer other courses.

2+1 3+1 3+0 2+1 3+0 16 Semester 3 Digital Logic Design Data Structures and Algorithms Linear Algebra English-III (Technical and Report Writing) Cr. 3+0 2+1 3+0 3+0 3+0 2+0 17 Cr. 2+1 2+1 3+0 3+0 Islamic Studies/Ethics University Elective II 2+0 3+0 17 Cr. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 3+0 2+1 3+0 3+0 3+0 2+1 18 122 Semester 5 Web Systems and Technologies University Elective IV Introduction to Software Development IT Elective I Multimedia Systems and Design Information Systems Semester 6 University Elective V Systems and Network Administration IT Elective II University Elective VI IT Elective –III Human Computer Interaction . 2+1 3+0 3+0 3+0 2+1 3 18 2+1 3+0 18 Cr. 2+1 2+1 3+0 3+0 Probability and Statistics Computer Communication and Networks University Elective III Semester 4 Operating Systems Introduction to Database Systems Organizational Behaviour Semester 2 Discrete Structures Object Oriented Programming Fundamentals of IT University Elective I English-II (Communication Skills) Pakistan Studies Cr.8 9 10 Database Management Data Warehousing Information Retrieval 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) 3 (3-0) Scheme of Study for BS (IT) 4-Year Program (8 Semesters) (130 Credit Hours) Semester-wise 4-Year Plan Semester 1 Introduction to ICT Programming Fundamentals Calculus and Analytical Geometry Basic Electronics English-I (Functional English) Cr. Hrs. Hrs.

* 3 3 3 3 3 18 Semester 8 IT Capstone Part II IT Elective VI Professional Practices IT Elective VII Cr. Hrs. Hrs.Semester 7 IT Capstone Part I (continued) Technology Management IT Elective IV Network Security System Integration and Architecture IT Elective V Cr. 6 3 3 3 12 123 .

after incorporating the approved changes the structure of MS in IT with its complete design and details emerged as follows: Structure of MS in Information Technology Category or Area Core Elective Thesis/Project/Course work Total Credit Hours Credit Hours 12 12 6 30 Core Area S No 1 2 3 4 Course Title Advanced Database Management Systems Telecom Management Information Security and Assurance Information Technology Infrastructure Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 Elective Area The committee argued at length the elective courses and recommended the following courses as suggestive list. and Practice IT Disaster Management Distributed Databases Data Mining Advanced Topics in Databases Information Technology Architecture Credit Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Thesis/Project/Course work The committee. A minimum of 6 credit hours for thesis/project work/course work are recommended. Universities may add more courses on similar lines. S No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Course Title Economics of Technology IT Planning and Evaluation IT Services Management IT Project Management E-Biz IT Audit and Assessment IT Policy. 124 . project work. after long discussion. Laws.MS Program in Information Technology The curriculum for the Master‘s program was thrashed out with diverse perspectives. Everybody agreed upon defining tracks consistently and suggesting courses accordingly. or course work. Finally. recommended that university should be given option for selecting thesis.

Enhanced ERD Relational data model: mapping ERD to relational model. data storage and retrieval techniques and database design techniques. The course primarily focuses on relational data model and DBMS Course Outline: Basic database concepts. Structured Query language (SQL). Korth S. IT. 3.). Addison Wesley Pub. R. 125 . Email management systems. Implementation and Management‖. WWW. Elmasri and S.. J.COURSE CONTENTS For BS in IT Course Name: Introduction to Database Systems Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2/Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: The course aims to introduce basic database concepts. including computing environments. software engineering and communication technology along with social and ethical issues.Begg . Computing: General Education Course Name: Introduction to Information and Communication Technologies Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2 / Labs: 3 Prerequisites: None (first semester course) Objectives: This course focuses on a breadth-first coverage of the use of computing and communication technologies to solve real life problems. general application software like word processing. Date.Connolly and C. SE etc. a Practical Approach to Design. DBMS. Relational Algebra. Functional dependencies and Normalization: 1st -3rd Normal Form and BCNF. Anti-Virus and Spam Protection. visual presentation applications. ―Database System Concepts‖. concurrency control recovery techniques and query optimization concepts. Logical database Modelling and design: Entity Relationship diagram (ERD). Navathe. The course attempts to provide every student a set of productivity tools that they will be able to use for the rest of their lives. 2. Introduction to the basic computing hardware (main building blocks). Database Systems. different data models. C. Sudarshan. T. Virus. An introduction of the program of study in computing for which this course is being taught (CS. Co. Fundamentals of Database Systems. operating systems. Benjamin/Cummings. Pearson education. ―Database Systems. data networks. Fundamental knowledge about Transaction processing. Reference Material: 1. tabular data manipulation. Henry F. Abraham Silberschatz. 4.

retrieve. design. information technology as the use of computer based technology to organize. 6th Edition. legal and ethical issues related with each topic.Course Outline: Number Systems. 2. web mail applications. History computer system. BS IT Core Courses Course Name: Fundamentals Course Structure: Lectures: 3 of Information Technology Credit Hours: 3 Prerequisites: Introduction to Computing (recommended) Objectives: To introduce students to the scope of the field of Information Technology. Sherer. 4. information transfer at the human/machine interface. Differences in human and machine processing of information. Prentice Hall. DBMS. and to explore some of the computer based technologies used for these purposes. WWW. Computer Science: An overview of Computer Science. AI.. modalities for information presentation. 126 . Reference Material: 1. data modeling. ISBN 0-07-059374-4. storage. its organization. Information System Today by Leonard Jessup. Basandra. along with social. 3. Von Neumann Architecture. Computer networks and internet. Definitions of information. advantages and disadvantages of various presentation media. 9/e by Larry Long and Nancy Long. and implementation. Operating system. 2002/ISBN: 0130929891. Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning. store. Overview of Software Engineering and Information Communication Technology. Introduction to Computers by Peter Norton. 2000. such as word processors. Boolean logic. Computers: Information Technology in Perspective. Use of office productivity tools. Challenging issues for today‘s information and communication technologies. Viruses and AntiViruses. Binary numbers. Graphical programming. retrieval and presentation. Professional and Legal Issues. Joseph Valacich. Information organization via databases. 5. Programming paradigms and languages. An Invitation to Computer Science. transmit and present information. Computers Today by Suresh K. Compiler. Suggested Text Book: 1. and information management systems. McGraw-Hill SiE. Ethical. presentation applications. Course Outline: Introduction to the academic discipline of IT as well as the general meaning of IT as per objectives given in the start of this program. Social. issues in organizational need assessment and management of large scale information systems. Basic network ideas and models. Algorithm definition. spreadsheets. basic machine organization. to give them a basic understanding of information. transmission. Computer graphics. and overview of the complete program of studies in computing and its structure. sender/receiver/channel model for information transfer. etc. Schneider and Gersting.

Cyganski. to explore some of the technologies used for display. principles of web site design. and Web3. Introduction to Information Technology (Hardcover). 2 edition (July 12.). John A. data access and processing. xHTML. Prentice Hall. Web Based Applications including search engines and content management. Ray. content management. and Opportunities (3rd Edition) (Hardcover). Publisher: Wiley. Web2. 2003). etc. Rex Kelly Rainer (Author). Course Outline: In-depth study of World Wide Web architectures. 2003). development. Information Technology: Principles and Applications. John A. Information Technology: Principles. etc. Hardcover: 592 pages. Information Technology: Principles. XML.by Efraim Turban (Author). Ajoy Kumar and Tinku Acharya. WML.). Richard E. Vaz. Prentice-Hall India. Practices. 2001 2. search engine architectures. by James A. Web Services. Senn (Author). Senn (Author). 2004 3. protocols. practical exercise in web site development. Web Technologies and Tools (such as scripting tools) for web application development and deployment (web servers. ISBN-10: 0471073806 Course Name: Web Course Structure: Prerequisites: Systems and Technologies Lectures: 3 Credit Hours: 3 Fundamentals of Information Technology (required) Objectives: This course will extend the WWW Technologies and Web Based Applications architecture. deployment and management concepts studied in the course of Fundamentals of Information Technology. ISBN-10: 0131436260 Reference Material: 1. ISBN-10: 0131436260 4. HTML. cHTML. and semantic web. web services. protocols and standards (HTTP. Prentice Hall. Cyganski. David. web2. and to give the students practice in integrating these to produce a functional webbased system. 2001 2. David. management of large scale web based information systems. web applications architecture. Semantic Web. The instructor is expected to cover an in-depth treatment of the web technology and applications related topics including web standards. Potter (Author). Vaz. Pearson Education (LPE). Orr and Richard F. Information Technology Inside and Outside.Suggested Text Book: 1. CGI. application servers. 3 edition (December 1. Orr and Richard F. Information Technology Inside and Outside. Pearson Education (LPE). and Opportunities (3rd Edition) (Hardcover). 127 . 2002). 3 edition (December 1. by James A. Practices.

testing. Gosselin. design. graphics. Web Applications: Concepts and Real World Design. Lab: 3 Fundamentals of Information Technology (required) Objectives: To introduce students to the complete process of multimedia system specification. multimedia standards. 2003 3. software. Cengage Learning. 2008). Web Application Architecture: Principles. multimedia software development tools. Web Technologies: A Computer Science Perspective. Publisher: Wiley. design. Paperback: 752 pages. Dan. Nuckles.. 2 edition (October 31. various equipment. images. J. Addison-Wesley 6. video and audio capture. Mike and Joline Morrison. 2008). Jackson. Introduction to multimedia systems.Oct 31.. and prototyping. Cengage Learning. Zak. 2003 2. Web Wizard series for various technologies. animation. Programming the World Wide Web (4th Edition) (Paperback). Pearson (LPE). Database Driven Websites..Jul 5. 2008 7. Cengage Learning. C. 4th edition (August 17. Bob Leasure and James Leasure. step-by-step procedure in developing multimedia systems: (specification. and Werner Retschitzegger (Paperback . T. al. Siegfried Reich. and to give the students practice in the production using a variety of media and tools. annotation. The Web Warrior Guide to Web Programming. 2006) Course Name: Multimedia Course Structure: Prerequisites: Systems and Design Credit Hours: 3 Lectures: 2. ISBN-10: 0321489691 Reference Material: 1. ISBN-10: 047051860X 8. Morrison. Leasure. 2002 5. Sebesta (Author). Student projects .developing multimedia systems in the laboratory. Paperback: 420 pages. Craig. et. to present design principles and techniques to maximize the effectiveness of such products. multimedia applications. Birgit Prýýll. 128 . including the tools and techniques for integrating multimedia content (text.. al. testing. The Web Warrior Guide to Web Database Technologies. Publisher: Addison Wesley. et. Course Outline: Introduction to multimedia systems. Diane. 2003 4. storage and playback techniques. 2/e. Protocols and Practices by Leon Shklar and Richard Rosen (Paperback . hardware. sound.Suggested Text Books: 1. The Web Warrior Guide to Web Design Technologies. Web Engineering: The Discipline of Systematic Development of Web Applications by Gerti Kappel. Cengage Learning. multimedia applications and development tools. 2007). by Robert W. Wiley 2006 2. motion video and virtual reality) into a product. and prototyping).

2006) 2. Li. file systems and directory permission structures. device configuration and management. Homogenous and Heterogeneous networks. disk maintenance. Shuman. S. the use of advanced scripting to ease system administration tasks. Villalobos. ISBN: 0470-85890-7 3. Cengage Learning. security. James. Installation and administration of heterogeneous networks using Windows and Linux platforms. booting and halting the system. Issues involved in the setup of Heterogeneous networks. Lake. Prentice Hall 2004. Operating Systems Objectives: This course will give an overview of systems and network administration based on both Windows and Linux environments. Multimedia: Making it Work. user account administration. (2nd ed. Course Outline: Brief introduction to the Networks. Configuration issues. Enhanced Edition. 129 . Cengage Learning. M. M. Z. The course is primarily dealing with the Linux and Windows operating systems and especially with Linux-based servers and Window-based clients. 2007 Reference Material: 1. DNS and similar. Seventh Edition by Tay Vaughan (Paperback Dec 20. Exploring Multimedia for Designers. J. Wiley 2004. Ray. Multimedia Concepts. System installation. In labs focus is on how to install. Fundamentals of Linux user interface.Suggested Text Books: 1. Digital Multimedia: The Business of Technology. Drew: Fundamentals of Multimedia. File systems. client administration. print and disk quotas. N. Chapman: Digital Multimedia. 2002 3. Course Name: System and Network Administration Credit Hours: 3 Semester: 5 Course Structure: Lectures: 2/Labs: 1 Suggested Prerequisites: Computer Communication and Networks. configuration management. The objective are common system administration tasks and practices and how to implement and maintain standard services like email. file sharing.). remote access. template implementation and cross directory implementation. setup and maintain Linux server machine and to perform various system administration and security related tasks on those machines. Cengage Learning. but some information about the most fundamental differences between various Linux systems will be provided. ISBN: 0-13-127256-X 2. Susan and Karen Bean. the use of schedulers. remote administration. Chapman. 2007.

integrate and deploy these resources in the form of a system. Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice. Windows Administration Latest Edition. Linux Administration Guide Latest Edition Course Name: Network Security Credit Hours: 3 Semester: 7 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Computer Communication and Network Course Outline: Principles and Practices of network security. Suggested Text Books: 1. Paperback: 496 pages. acquisition. 2. Introduction to Software Development (Recommended) Objectives: This course will prepare the students to understand the system level requirements of an organization and acquire the required information and communication resources. standard security protocols. electronic transaction security and digital signatures. Reference Material: 1.. system security. 4/E. Prentice Hall. Government Policy documents on security issues. web security. organizational context and architecture. Hogan. integration. ISBN-10: 0471400106 130 . security threats and methods to avoid them. authentication applications. data mapping and exchange. the 2nd Edition by Thomas A. Cummins (Author). Microsoft Press 3. 1st edition (February 1. by Fred A. testing and quality assurance. scripting techniques. Publisher: Wiley. sourcing. Enterprise Integration: An Architecture for Enterprise Application and Systems Integration (Paperback). Limoncelli. 2005. Practice of System and Network Administration. intersystem‘s communication. 2002). project management. cyber crime. intruders and viruses. software security and an overview of programming languages. William Stallings. policy and regulations. Course Outline: System level requirements gathering and analysis. electronic mail security. 2. firewalls. introduction to cryptographic algorithms. integrative coding.Suggested Textbooks: Reference Material: 1. Course Name: System Integration and Architecture Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Information Technology (Required). IP security. 2005.

Technology strategy. job design. change issues. goals and objectives. Robert Williams and Marks Walla. Course Name: Organizational Prerequisites: None Behaviour Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: (a) (a) To introduce organizational behaviour and its impact on work within organization. Reference Material: 1. motivation. power and politics in organizations. assessment and selection of technology. IT as change enabling technology. focusing on technology management issues. training planning. personality. Decision making. Basic management functions (Planning. team behaviour and organization. Reference Material: 1. software. performance and rewards. (b) Impact of IT on individual behaviour.BS IT Supporting Courses Course Name: Technology Prerequisites: None Management Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: (a) (b) to introduce basic management functions. learning and reinforcement. human resources. organizational design. common hurdles. Small case study. ―Principles of Management‖ 3. leadership. etc. an organizational behaviour. negative forces and conflict management. Common challenges in change management. Implementation processes. Organizational Behaviour: an Introductory Text. individual behaviour. ―Management‖ 2. Course Outline: Introduction to Behavioural Science. equipment and systems acquisition processes. case study to appraise students real problems Course Outline: Introduction and issues in technology management. perceptions and attitudes. Business Change and Technology challenges and issues. organizational structure. team dynamics and paradigms. ―The Ultimate Window 2000 System Administration‘s Guide. Organizational Behaviour by Fred Luthans 131 . stress and work. Technology transfer issues related to hardware. DM and its implications. work processes and control issues. Control. communications. Huczinsky and Buchanan 2.. organizing etc. impact of IT on behaviour. Robins Stephan. communication effectiveness. Griffwn.).

CASE Tools. Managing Conflicts in Information Systems projects. Critical Success Factors. Enterprise Information Systems. and success and management aspects will be placed in order to discuss the management of the technical processes involved. Measuring Project Complexity. Characterization of Transmission Media and Devices. Team Composition. Source and Channel Coding 132 . Case Studies. Business Strategies and Types. Information Systems success and Failure. Actual Case Studies will be central to the delivery of the unit. Recent. Reference Material: 1. Alignment of both Strategies. 2007 BS IT Elective Courses Course Name: Communication Prerequisites: None Systems Design Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: The objective of this course is to learn theory of communication system design. Digital Transmission of Analog Signals. Elements of Information Theory. design. 13th Edition. Advanced Design Issues. McGrawHill. Lifecycle of IS Projects. Transmission over Dispersive Channels. IS Strategies. Analog Modulation Systems. developments in all aspects of Information Systems development will also be covered and discussed. Rapid Application Development (RAD). Detailed IS Design Issues. Course Outline: Preliminaries on Deterministic and Random Signals. O Brien and Marakas. Prototype Approaches. Structure of IS Projects. Digital Modulation Systems. Major Taxonomies of Information Systems. Cohesion and Structured Charts. Managing Information Systems Projects. This course will facilitate students to understand the advanced concepts of information systems.Course Name: Information Prerequisites: None Systems Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: Major emphasis than is usual for Information Systems analysis. Information Systems Project Evaluation. IS Feasibility Study and Types. Soft System Methods (SSM). Course Outline: Introduction and Classification of Information Systems. Design Issues in IS. Coupling. Role of CIO. well-accepted. Types of IS Strategies. System Analysis of IS Projects.

Awareness and Management Commitment to Security. Emergency Rules Attacks. Encryption. Areas of particular focus include secure network design. Network Hardware Security. Processing and Storage) (Spiral-bound). Application Security Rules. integrity. Course Name: Communication Technologies Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: None 133 . Anatomy of Attack. Network Monitoring Rules. Nevio Benvenuto. implementation and transition issues. Security kernels. It covers concepts and applications of system and data security. Communication System Design Using DSP Algorithms: With Laboratory Experiments for the TMS320C6713 DSK (Information Technology: Transmission. Information Security Best Practices by George L. Intrusion detection and response. Communication Systems: Fundamentals and Design Methods. Physical Security Rules. Configuration Management Rules. Operating System Security Rules. privacy and social issues. An introduction to confidentiality. Database security. implementation and transition issues. Maintenance and Troubleshooting Security Rules. Host-based and network-based security issues. Access controls. Areas of particular focus include secure network design. Operational security issues. Data Encryption Rules. Secure programming. Policy formation and enforcement. by Steven A. Security Policy. Nicola Laurenti 2. PC Operating Security Rules. Reference Material: 1. Course Outline: Information Security Attacks & Vulnerabilities. Risk assessment. Risks and vulnerabilities. Information flow. and the levels of training and expertise needed in organizations to reach and maintain a state of acceptable security. Information Auditing. 2006. Rules for Selecting Security Hardware & Software. classification and trust modelling. and techniques for responding to security breaches. Physical security issues. the responsibilities and basic tools for information security. Legal. and techniques for responding to security breaches. Tretter Course Name: Information Security Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Computer Communication and Network Objective: This course provides a broad overview of the threats to the security of information systems. authentication technologies and models. availability. Controls and protection models. Information Security Network Architecture Design Rules. Personnel security. Software Validation and Verification Rules. Tomaso Erseghe. Roberto Corvaja.Suggested Textbook: 1. Identification and authentication in local and distributed systems. Internet Security Rules. Stefanek.

Role-based Access Control. Assessment for Learning in Science. Database Security and Authorization: Discretionary Access Control. Fragmentation and Replication. Advance Topics in Communication Technology. Communication Systems. Communicating Science & Technology. Reference Text: 1. 134 . Science & Communication Technology for all Learners. Distributed Catalogue Management. New Directions for Science & Technology Education. (2008) Readings for Science & Communication Technology.Objective: Goals for the course include developing teaching strategies consistent with the constructivist philosophy of education that help new learners understand: how science & communication technology relate to society and the environment. Designing and managing Triggers. Tuning Queries and Views. Integral to the course is our objective to help student-teachers develop their commitment to students and student learning. Maintaining Safe Learning Environments for Science & Communication Technology. Recovery Techniques: Database backup and recovery from catastrophic failures. Index Selection. Database System Architectures: Centralized and Client-Server Architectures. (b) to monitor the processing of database system. Society and the Environment (STSE). and the application of professional knowledge to professional practice and leadership in learning communities. Database Workloads. Database Tuning: File Structures and organizations. basic concepts from the major fields of science & communication technology. how to use the processes of scientific inquiry and communication technological design. Interrelating Science. Learning through Science & Technology. Stored Procedures. and Halpern J. Encryption and Public Key Infrastructures. Views in SQL. Mandatory Access Control. Course Outline: Introduction to Science & Technology. C. Physical Design and Tuning Decisions. furthering professional knowledge through ongoing professional learning. Parallel and Distributed Database Systems. Cross Curricular Connections. Course Outline: Advanced Structurejd Query Language (SQL): Complex Integrity Constraints (Assertions). Communication Technology. Course Name: Database Management Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2/Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Introduction to Database Systems Objectives: (a) to manage large database systems. Hashing and Indexing. Tuning Schema: De-normalization and Decompositions. Communication Technology. Simon Haykin 4th Edition. Rees. 2.

Giarratano. ―Database Management Systems‖. 3rd Edition (January 1999). Thomson/PWS Publishing Company. Korth S. Gonzalez and D. a Practical Approach to Design. (b) to learn how to analyze. Course Outline: Introduction to knowledge-based systems. Introduction to Expert Systems (3rd Edition) by Peter Jackson. 3rd Edition. or latest edition. Dankel. AddisonWesley Longman Publishing Company. Sudarshan. T. 2nd Edition (Preprint). Reference Material: 1. Feasibility analysis. The Engineering of Knowledge-Based Systems by A. Objectives: (a) to understand important problems. Benjamin/Cummings Publishing. R. Course Name: Knowledge-Based Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 1 Systems Credit Hours: 4 Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Artificial Intelligence or Students should be familiar with programming and be able to work with elementary logic in propositional and predicate calculus environments. Henry F. Knowledge acquisition and system implementation. Architecture of a knowledge-based system. Expert Systems: Principles and Programming by Joseph C. Benjamin/Cummings. challenges. Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke. Prentice Hall. 4th Edition. 2004. PWS Publishing Co. design. Prentice Hall. 2. Abraham Silberschatz. Bayesian inference and other models of reasoning and decision making under uncertainty. Verification and validation. Elmasri and S.Reference Material: Latest editions of 1. (c) to know importance of an explanation of many systems‘ suggestions in a format accessible to humans. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (Latest Edition) by Stuart Russel. Requirements specification and design. Software lifecycle in knowledge-based systems. Luger.Connolly and C. ―Database System Concepts‖.. 2. 4.Begg . 135 . Riley. Artificial Intelligence: Structures and Strategies for Complex Problem Solving by George F. Logic and automatic reasoning (forward and backward reasoning). Third Edition. ―Database Systems. 3. Navathe. 2. Knowledge representation and reasoning models. Gary D. Fundamentals of Database Systems. 3rd Edition 2000. Suggested Text Books: 1. Rule-based expert systems. 3. McGraw Hill. Peter Norvig. Implementation and Management‖. concepts and techniques from the field of Knowledge-Based Systems. Pearson education. Thrid Edition. and build systems with ability to deal with knowledge in various forms.

by P. 3rd Edition. Indexing techniques used in data warehousing. Data Marts. Data Warehouse Design Methodology: Entity Relationship Modeling and Dimensional Modeling.. Differentiate Data Marts and Data Warehouse. by D. Addison-Wesley. John Wiley & Sons Inc. A Guide to Expert Systems. Addison-Wesley. Paulraj Ponniah.. Lucas and L. Reference Material: 1. Hardware and software systems consideration for data warehousing. 5. 1992 or latest edition. Building the Data Warehouse (Second Edition). Waterman. 3. van der Gaog. The Data Warehouse Toolkit (Second Edition). NY. Data Warehousing Fundamentals. Principles of Expert Systems. focusing on technology management issues. Winston. Inmon. Artificial Intelligence. John Wiley & Sons Inc. Course Outline: Introduction of the business context for data warehousing and decision support systems. NY.4. John Wiley & Sons Inc. Data warehouse maintenance.H. Course Name: Information Retrieval Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Data Structures and Algorithms Objectives: (a) to introduce basic management functions. by P. Data warehouse Architecture. Differences between TPS and DSS environments.H. 6. Ralph Kimball and Margy Ross.. (b) to monitor the processing of database system. NY. (b) case study to appraise students real problems 136 . 1991 or latest ed. Evaluation of Data Warehouse. OLAP in data warehousing and different types of OLAP such as MOLAP ROLAP and HOLAP. Course Name: Data Warehousing Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 2/Labs: 3 Prerequisites: Introduction to Database Systems Objectives: (a) to manage large database systems. AddisonWesley. W.A. 1986 or latest edition. 2.

text-similarity metrics. 2005. Distributed Database Design. Manning.Course Outline: Basic and advanced techniques for text-based information systems: efficient text indexing. Spatial and Geographic Databases. XML Data Models. Applying Information Technology: Enterprise Systems. Mobile Databases. S. Business Intelligence. ranked retrieval. Addison-Wesley COURSE CONTENTS FOR MS IT Course Name: Advanced Database Management Systems Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Introduction to Database Systems Course Outline: Object-Oriented Databases. cosine similarity. Current Research and Development Trends of Database Analysis. Prabhakar Raghavan and Hinrich Schütze (2008): Introduction to Information Retrieval. classification. Temporal. text mining . Experimental Evaluation of IR: Performance metrics: recall. and F-measure. Course Name: Telecom Prerequisites: None Management Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: The course provides the understanding of the operation and management of a telecommunication business. Christopher D. link-based algorithms. and Web metadata. Course Contents: Introduction Information Technology: Computer Hardwar. Design. Cambridge University Press. Evaluations on benchmark text collections. Supporting Computer Users. Prentice Hall. Urban. Methodologies for Purchased Software Packages. Distributed Multimedia Database Systems. Telecommunications and Networking. E-Business Systems. XML Documents and DTD. Reference Material: 1. W. Managerial Support Systems. The 137 . 2. Modeling and Applications. Object-Relational Databases. Data Warehouse and OLAP Systems. D. inverse document frequency). Dietrich and S. XML Query Languages. IT Project Management. Web search including crawling. precision. Basic IR Models: Boolean and vector-space retrieval models. text/Web clustering. Berthier Ribeiro-Neto. The Data Resource. TF-IDF (term frequency. An Advanced Course in Database Systems: Beyond Relational Databases. and Ricardo Baeza-Yates (1999): Modern Information Retrieval. Methodologies for Custom Software Development. Acquiring Information Systems: Basic Systems Concepts and Tools. Computer Software. Recommended Text: 1.

Legal. Identification of Basic Services of Security e. Define the System Boundaries. managing and implementing strategies based on these regulatory requirements will be discussed. Daniel W. Biometrics. Integrity authentication. William C Perkins 2. CISRA and other. Daniel W. DeHayes.g. Course Technology. Jeffrey A. and H. DeHayes (Author). eds. Perform Vulnerability and Thereat Analyses.acsac. GLBA. M. D. Ethical. Confidentiality. Standards and Auditing. Podell. Hoffer (Author). Understanding and evaluation the impact of legal and ethical issues on information security practice. Security Policies. The protection of information assets underpins the commercial viability and profitability of all enterprises and the effectiveness of public sector organizations. S. J. Intrusion detection. M. Wainright E. privacy and security laws and regulations and assurance such as HIPAA. Managing Information Technology: What Managers Need to Know by Carol V Brown. nonrepudiation and digital signatures. Ethical. Reference Material: 1. Wainright E. Information Assurance Requirement in Modern Information Systems. online at http://www. Leading the Information Systems Function. and Professional Issues in Information Security Recommended Text: 1.org/secshelf/book001/book001. Security Mechanisms such as Hashing. Managing Information Technology (6th Edition). ISBN: 0619063181 2. Jeffrey A. FISMA. Hoffer. Jajodia. Martin (Author). and Social Issues. Information Security: An Integrated Collection of Essays. IEEE Computer Society Press. Course Outline: Information Assurance. Information security should not be left to chance but should be managed to ensure it provides efficient and effective safeguards for your organization‘s information assets. Techniques for planning. by Carol V Brown (Author). Legal. Security Protocols for End-to-End Secure Communication on all Types of Networks. Historical Approaches to Information Security and Information Assurance. Extensive Case Studies in each topic discussed in the course.html 138 .Information Management System: Planning Information Systems Resources. Information Security. Patriot Act. Introduction to Conventional and Un-Conventional Cryptosystems. Mattord (2003). Implement Threat Control Measures. Abrams. Very Effectiveness of Thereat Control Measures. (1995). Conduct Accident/Incident Investigations. Smartcards etc. Martin. Principles of Information Security. Sarbanes-Oxley. William C Perkins Course Name: Information Security and Assurance Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Network Security Objective: This course explores the issues of ethical challenges and legal issues that fact security practitioners. Whitman & H.

long term change and release management concepts and practices. Bruce Schneier (2002). documents. Vision. knowledge management (KM). Service design objectives. Aileen CaterSteel 2009. enterprise information infrastructure. scalability. application management. IT investment and valuation. Micki Krause 2. ISBN: 0-471-25311-1 Reference Text: 1. control & measurement.Herrmann Course Name: Information Prerequisites: None Technology Infrastructure Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Course Outline: IT strategy and management. 2002 139 . cost. and architectures for the design of IT service solutions/processes. strategic planning for IT.Edition: 6. implementation of service strategies. 3. implementation. Practical Guide to Security Engineering and Information Assurance by Debra S. Counterpane Internet Security. Computer Security Assurance using the common criteria by Merkow & Breithaupt 4. Andrew S. change management. Selecting the model. risk analysis. control & measurement. and risks and critical success factors. Best Practice for ICT Infrastructure Management. and Architecture.Thomas. Office of Government Commerce. illustrated. State of IT governance Reference Material: 1. Secrets & Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World. Global Information Infrastructure: The Birth. IGI 2. business and information technology strategy linkage. 1996. Published by The Stationery Office. Information Security Management Handbook By Harold F. Targowski. Information Technology Governance and Service Management. Information Assurance and Computer Security By Johnson P. IT infrastructure for virtual organizations. cultural and organizational change management. Mohamed Essaaidi 3. and control & measurement.3. Tipton. Development and maintenance of information technology policies. and tools & methods.

): Principles of Distributed Database Systems (2nd Edition). (b) to apply DM techniques to a variety of research and application projects. Distributed Query Processing. Commercially-Available DM Tools: Excel. M. Distributed Database Design: Issues. and will study query processing techniques as well as transaction management and concurrency control concepts used in such systems Course Outline: Introduction to Distributed Data Processing. Ozsu. Neural Networks. Morgan Kaufmann. M. Reference Material: 1. R. 140 . Elmasri and S. Decision Trees. Valduriez (eds. Query Optimization. Oracle. Bernstein and E.MS IT Elective Courses Course Name: Distributed Databases Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Introduction to Database Systems Objectives: Students will learn the usage of different design strategies for distributed databases. 1999 2. Newcomer. IBM. Wiley. Whitecross.T. 1997 3. SAS. Classifiers. Navathe. Fragmentation and Allocation. Teradata. P. High-Dimensional Data. Query Decomposition and Data Localization. SPSS. Prentice Hall. The CRISP-DM process. Fundamentals of Database Systems. 1997 4. Benjamin/Cummings. Data Replication. Multidatabase Systems. Buretta. Course Outline: Introduction to Data Mining (DM). Distributed Transaction Management and Concurrency Control. Association Rules & Sequences. Clustering Algorithms. Principles of Transaction Processing. Distributed DBMS Architecture. Distributed DBMS Reliability and Replication Techniques. Integrity Constraints. P. tools and applications of data mining. Course Name: Data Prerequisites: Mining Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Objectives: (a) to introduce the techniques.

This course is a combination of various advanced topics. Wiley and Sons Inc. Recommended topics include. David Hand. Richard Roiger & Michael Geatz. Soft Computing and Bioinformatics‖. Pub. Addison-Wesley. ―Principles of Data Mining‖. Examples include semantic heterogeneity. 4. to answer specific questions. • Mapping between XML and relational databases. but are not limited to. there has been an explosion of information in a variety of environments that pose significantly different data management challenges than traditional database domains. World Wide Web. ideas. • Streaming data. 3. ―Data Mining: A Tutorial –Based Primer‖. Pub. Sushmita Mitra and Tinku Acharya. sensor networks. The main activity of the lectures will be discussions based around a set of papers. • Semi-structured data (i..e. The aim of this course is to explore the latest techniques. Course Name: Information Technology Architecture Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3 / Labs: 0 Prerequisites: System Integration and Architecture 141 . Prentice Hall of India. P2P networks etc. each student is required to lead the discussion on one or two of these technical papers. In addition. the following: • Data integration. 5. Course Name: Advanced Topics in Databases Credit Hours: 3 Course Structure: Lectures: 3/Labs: 0 Prerequisites: Advanced Database Management Objectives: In recent years. XML. and to prepare new questions prior to class discussions. • Ontology engineering. ―Data Mining: Multimedia. Course Outline: This course is intended to be highly interactive. 2. • Pervasive and mobile distributed database management Reference Material: 1. • Data caching and replication. Heikki Mannila and Padhraic Smyth.Reference Material: 1. and what are involved in designing and evaluating the cutting-edge database technologies. Usama M. ―Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining‖. scientific domains. The MIT Press. Fayyad et al. XML) storage. Research Papers form HEC Digital Library. trends. All students are required to read technical papers. 6. • Semantic heterogeneity.

Building Enterprise Information Architectures: Reengineering Information Systems. Enterprise Integration: An Architecture for Enterprise Application and Systems Integration (Paperback). Hill 5. Processing.org/itac/ 142 . Information Management Processes. Spewak. Standards. Steven C. 1st edition (February 1. and related products that interconnect different systems and ensure their interoperability. by Fred A. composed of principles. Transfer. networks. Boar 4. Security Framework. Security Architecture: Security Services. Benard H. Policies.Objectives: Objective of this course is to understand the Information Technology Architecture as a framework and a set of strategies for the utilization and management of information technology. Course Outline: Business Architecture: Business Strategy. IT Management and Governance: Planning. Assessment Reference Material: 1. Melissa A. Decision Making.ewita. The Open Group: http://www. Enterprise Architecture Planning. 2002). Enterprise-wide IT Architecture: http://www. Students will be able to select and implement the computing platforms. Infrastructure Architecture: Hardware. ISBN-10: 0471400106 2. Information Architecture: Information Needs. Publisher: Wiley. and Communication Network for Information Storage. Management. Software. Cummins (Author). Cook 3. Follow up.opengroup. policies. Paperback: 496 pages. Application Architecture: Guidelines for Design and Development of Business Applications. Business Support Functions and Processes. and Tools for Application Development.com/ 6. and standards that guide the engineering of an organization‘s IT systems and infrastructure in a way that ensures alignment with business needs. software. Constructing Blueprints for Enterprise IT Architectures. Steven H.

ISBN 0194313506 143 . Third edition. Course Contents Basics of Grammar Parts of speech and use of articles Sentence structure. Martinet. Practical English Grammar by A.V. clause and sentence structure Transitive and intransitive verbs Punctuation and spelling Comprehension Answers to questions on a given text Discussion General topics and every-day conversation (topics for discussion to be at the discretion of the teacher keeping in view the level of students) Listening To be improved by showing documentaries/films carefully selected by subject teachers Translation skills Urdu to English Paragraph writing Topics to be chosen at the discretion of the teacher Presentation skills Introduction Note: Extensive reading is required for vocabulary building Recommended books: 1. Thomson and A. Practical English Grammar by A.J. Third edition. Exercises 2. Martinet. active and passive voice Practice in unified sentence Analysis of phrase.A COMPULSORY COURSES COMPULSORY COURSES IN ENGLISH FOR BS (4 YEAR) IN BASIC & SOCIAL SCIENCES English I (Functional English) Objectives: Enhance language skills and develop critical thinking. 1997. 1997.J. Exercises 1.Annexure . Thomson and A. a) Functional English Grammar 1. ISBN 0194313492 2. Oxford University Press. Oxford University Press.V.

Oxford Supplementary Skills. 2. Writing. Martinet. Intermediate by Marie-Chrisitine Boutin. Practical English Grammar by A. Oxford Supplementary Skills. summary and précis writing and comprehension Academic skills Letter/memo writing. Fourth Impression 1992. Third edition. Suzanne Brinand and Francoise Grellet. Reading. Suzanne Brinand and Francoise Grellet. unified and coherent paragraph Essay writing Introduction CV and job application Translation skills Urdu to English Study skills Skimming and scanning. Fourth Impression 1993. use of library and internet Presentation skills Personality development (emphasis on content. Fourth Impression 1993. intensive and extensive. and speed reading. Oxford Supplementary Skills. ISBN 0 19 435406 5 (particularly good 144 b) . Brain Tomlinson and Rod Ellis. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Thomson and A. ISBN 0 19 431350 6.V. Third Impression 1992. Course Contents Paragraph writing Practice in writing a good. Writing. Upper Intermediate. Writing 1. Intermediate by Marie-Christine Boutin. Exercises 2. ISBN 0 19 435405 7 Pages 20-27 and 35-41. ISBN 019 435405 7 Pages 45-53 (note taking). style and pronunciation) Note: documentaries to be shown for discussion and review Recommended books: a) Communication Skills Grammar 1. Oxford University Press 1986. minutes of meetings. ISBN 0 19 453402 2.b) Writing 1. Reading/Comprehension 1. Writing. Speaking c) d) English II (Communication Skills) Annexure-B Objectives: Enable the students to meet their real life communication needs.J. Upper-Intermediate by Rob Nolasco.

(A reader which will give students exposure to the best of twentieth century literature. 145 . St. Third Impression 1991. General Editiors: Janice Neulib. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mc=Graw-Hill Higher Education. Oxford Supplementary Skills. 2. 2004. Patterns of College Writing (4th edition) by Laurie G. Stephen Ruffus and Maurice Scharton. narrative. descriptive and argumentative writing). argumentative and report writing). Reading. A Custom Publication. Third Impression 1992. Mandell. Presentation Skills Reading The Mercury Reader. introduction to presentations. descriptive. Compiled by norther Illinois University. Study Skills by Riachard Yorky. language. argumentative Academic writing How to write a proposal for research paper/term paper How to write a research paper/term paper (emphasis on style. Advanced by Ron White. without taxing the taste of engineering students). Oxford Supplementary Skills. form. Reading and Study Skills by John Langan 3. Advanced. ISBN 0 19 435407 3 (particularly suitable for discursive. 2. consistency) Technical Report writing Progress report writing Note: Extensive reading is required for vocabulary building Recommended books: Technical Writing and Presentation Skills a) Essay Writing and Academic Writing 1. Brian Tomlinson and Rod Ellis. Writing. 3. Kathleen Shine Cain. ISBN 0 19 453403 0. b) c) College Writing Skills by John Langan. content. clarity. discursive.for writing memos. c) Reading 1. Martin‘s Press. English III (Technical Writing and Presentation Skills) Annexure-C Objectives: Enhance language skills and develop critical thinking Course Contents Presentation skills Essay writing Descriptive.

Annexure - D
Pakistan Studies (Compulsory)
Introduction/Objectives
  Develop vision of historical perspective, government, politics, contemporary Pakistan, ideological background of Pakistan. Study the process of governance, national development, issues arising in the modern age and posing challenges to Pakistan.

Course Outline
1. Historical Perspective a. Ideological rationale with special reference to Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, Allama Muhammad Iqbal and Quaid-i-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah. b. Factors leading to Muslim separatism c. People and Land i. Indus Civilization ii. Muslim advent iii. Location and geo-physical features.
2.

Government and Politics in Pakistan Political and constitutional phases: a. 1947-58 b. 1958-71 c. 1971-77 d. 1977-88 e. 1988-99 f. 1999 onward

3.

Contemporary Pakistan a. Economic institutions and issues b. Society and social structure c. Ethnicity d. Foreign policy of Pakistan and challenges e. Futuristic outlook of Pakistan

Books Recommended
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Burki, Shahid Javed. State & Society in Pakistan, The Macmillan Press Ltd 1980. Akbar, S. Zaidi. Issue in Pakistan’s Economy. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2000. S.M. Burke and Lawrence Ziring. Pakistan‘s Foreign policy: An Historical analysis. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 1993. Mehmood, Safdar. Pakistan Political Roots & Development. Lahore, 1994. Wilcox, Wayne.The Emergence of Banglades., Washington: American Enterprise, Institute of Public Policy Research, 1972. Mehmood, Safdar. Pakistan Kayyun Toota, Lahore: Idara-e-Saqafat-e-Islamia, Club Road, nd. Amin, Tahir. Ethno - National Movement in Pakistan, Islamabad: Institute of Policy Studies, Islamabad. 146

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Ziring, Lawrence. Enigma of Political Development. Kent England: WmDawson & sons Ltd, 1980. Zahid, Ansar. History & Culture of Sindh. Karachi: Royal Book Company, 1980. Afzal, M. Rafique. Political Parties in Pakistan, Vol. I, II & III. Islamabad: National Institute of Historical and cultural Research, 1998. Sayeed, Khalid Bin. The Political System of Pakistan. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1967. Aziz, K.K. Party, Politics in Pakistan, Islamabad: National Commission on Historical and Cultural Research, 1976. Muhammad Waseem, Pakistan Under Martial Law, Lahore: Vanguard, 1987. Haq, Noor ul. Making of Pakistan: The Military Perspective. Islamabad: National Commission on Historical and Cultural Research, 1993.

147

Annexure - E ISLAMIC STUDIES (Compulsory)
Objectives:
This course is aimed at: 1 To provide Basic information about Islamic Studies 2 To enhance understanding of the students regarding Islamic Civilization 3 To improve Students skill to perform prayers and other worships 4 To enhance the skill of the students for understanding of issues related to faith and religious life. 2 (2-0)

Course Outlines
Introduction to Quranic Studies 1) Basic Concepts of Quran 2) History of Quran 3) Uloom-ul -Quran Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran 1) Verses of Surah Al-Baqra Related to Faith(Verse No-284-286) 2) Verses of Surah Al-Hujrat Related to Adab Al-Nabi (Verse No-1-18) 3) Verses of Surah Al-Mumanoon Related to Characteristics of faithful (Verse No-1-11) 4) Verses of Surah al-Furqan Related to Social Ethics (Verse No.63-77) 5) Verses of Surah Al-Inam Related to Ihkam(Verse No-152-154) Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran 1) Verses of Surah Al-Ihzab Related to Adab al-Nabi (Verse No.6,21,40,56,57,58.) 2) Verses of Surah Al-Hashar (18,19,20) Related to thinking, Day of Judgment 3) Verses of Surah Al-Saf Related to Tafakar,Tadabar (Verse No-1,14) Seerat of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) I 1) Life of Muhammad Bin Abdullah ( Before Prophet Hood) 2) Life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Makkah 3) Important Lessons Derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Makkah Seerat of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) II 1) Life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Madina 2) Important Events of Life Holy Prophet in Madina 3) Important Lessons Derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Madina Introduction To Sunnah 1) Basic Concepts of Hadith 2) History of Hadith 3) Kinds of Hadith 4) Uloom –ul-Hadith 5) Sunnah & Hadith 6) Legal Position of Sunnah 148

Ahmad Hasan. ―An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Law‖ leaf Publication Islamabad.‖ Hussain Hamid Hassan. ‗Introduction to Islam Mulana Muhammad Yousaf Islahi. Pakistan. Islamabad (1993) 149 . International Islamic University. ―Muslim Conduct of State‖ Hameed ullah Muhammad. IRI. in Islam Islamic History 1) Period of Khlaft-E-Rashida 2) Period of Ummayyads 3) Period of Abbasids Social System of Islam 1) Basic Concepts of Social System of Islam 2) Elements of Family 3) Ethical Values of Islam Reference Books: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) Hameed ullah Muhammad. ―Emergence of Islam‖ . Islamabad Hameed ullah Muhammad.Selected Study from Text of Hadith Introduction To Islamic Law & Jurisprudence 1) Basic Concepts of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence 2) History & Importance of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence 3) Sources of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence 4) Nature of Differences in Islamic Law 5) Islam and Sectarianism Islamic Culture & Civilization 1) Basic Concepts of Islamic Culture & Civilization 2) Historical Development of Islamic Culture & Civilization 3) Characteristics of Islamic Culture & Civilization 4) Islamic Culture & Civilization and Contemporary Issues Islam & Science 1) Basic Concepts of Islam & Science 2) Contributions of Muslims in the Development of Science 3) Quranic & Science Islamic Economic System 1) Basic Concepts of Islamic Economic System 2) Means of Distribution of wealth in Islamic Economics 3) Islamic Concept of Riba 4) Islamic Ways of Trade & Commerce Political System of Islam 1) Basic Concepts of Islamic Political System 2) Islamic Concept of Sovereignty 3) Basic Institutions of Govt. ―Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence‖ Islamic Research Institute.

S. Bhatia.7) 8) 9) Mir Waliullah. ―Studies in Islamic Law. Religion and Society‖ Deep & Deep Publications New Delhi (1989) Dr. ―Introduction to Al Sharia Al Islamia‖ Allama Iqbal Open University. ―Muslim Jrisprudence and the Quranic Law of Crimes‖ Islamic Book Service (1982) H. Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq. Islamabad (2001) 150 .

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