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2009.Transforming Emotions With Chinese Medicine. an Ethnographic Account From Contemporary China by Yanhua Zhang

2009.Transforming Emotions With Chinese Medicine. an Ethnographic Account From Contemporary China by Yanhua Zhang

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Transforming Emotions
with Chinese Medicine

SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture

Roger T. Ames, editor

Transforming Emotions
with Chinese Medicine

An Ethnographic Account from Contemporary China

Yanhua Zhang

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PRESS

Published by

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK PRESS,

ALBANY

© 2007 State University of New York

All rights reserved

Printed in the United States of America

No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without
written permission. No part of this book may be stored in a retrieval system or
transmitted in any form or by any means including electronic, electrostatic, magnetic
tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior permission
in writing of the publisher.

For information, address
State University of New York Press
194 Washington Avenue, Suite 305, Albany, NY 12210-2384

Production by Christine Hamel
Marketing by Michael Campochiaro

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Zhang, Yanhua.

Transforming emotions with Chinese medicine : an ethnographic account from
contemporary China / Yanhua Zhang.
p. cm. -- (SUNY series in Chinese philosophy and culture)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN-13: 978-0-7914-6999-6 (hardcover : alk. paper)
ISBN-13: 978-0-7914-7000-8 (pbk. : alk. paper)
1.Medical anthropology--China.2.Medicine, Chinese.3.Traditional
medicine--China.4.Ethnopsychology--China.5.Emotions--Social aspects--
China.I.Title.II.Series.
GN296.5.C6Z53 2007
306.4´610951--dc22

2006012941

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

For my parents.

This page intentionally left blank.

vii

Contents

Tables

ix

Illustrations

xi

Acknowledgments

xiii

I.

Introduction

1

II.Chinese Medicine: Continuity and Modern
Transformations

17

III.The Chinese World of SHENTI (Body-Person)

31

IV.Contextualizing QINGZHI情志 (Emotions)

53

V.Understanding ZHONGYI Clinical Classification

75

VI.Manifestations of YU (Stagnations)

87

VII.Clinical Process of TIAO (Attuning)

105

VIII.Conclusion

139

Appendix: Transcription Conventions

145

Notes

147

Bibliography

169

Index

187

This page intentionally left blank.

ix

Tables

4.1Summary of the functions of the five visceral systems

68

4.2Wuxing and the five-zang systems

70

4.3Emotions and counteremotions

73

6.1Zheng (syndromes) and qingzhi disorders

91

6.2Distribution of qingzhi disorders according to zheng (Patterns)

92

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xi

Illustrations

4.1Te Sequence of Production and Restriction

70

Transcript Segments

7.1

115

7.2

119

7.3

121

7.4

123

7.5

127

7.6

129

7.7

135

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xiii

Acknowledgments

Tis book has benefited from the generous assistance and support of many indi-
viduals and institutions. Te study leading to this book began at the University
of Hawaii at Manoa when I was a graduate student. I have had wonderful teach-
ers: Roger Ames, Jack Bilmes, Fred Blake, Nina Etkin, Allen Howard, Tomas
Maretzki, Anthony Marsella, Gregory Maskarinec, and Geoffrey White. Tey
have directly and indirectly contributed to the formation of many ideas in this
book. I owe special thanks to Fred Blake, the chair of my dissertation commit-
tee, whose guidance and encouragement saw me through the arduous process of
dissertation writing, and to Roger Ames, who read the manuscript several times
and whose critical comments are largely responsible for the improvement of the
present book from the original dissertation. Several other people have read the
entire or parts of the manuscript at its different stages. John DeFrancis meticu-
lously went over my bilingual transcript of the clinical interaction and offered
detailed corrections and suggestions; Judith Farquhar read and commented on
an earlier version of the chapter on zhongyi clinical classifications; and Louis
Bregger at Clemson University proofread the entire manuscript at least twice.
My colleague, Joan Bridgwood, helped with the final proofreading of the book.
I am thankful for their assistance.
During the long process of the research and writing of this book, I learned
a lot from my fellow graduate students and colleagues through conversations
and discussions. I benefited from the insights, criticism, and camaraderie of
Weirong Cai, Nancy Cooper, Dphrosine Daniggelis, Bingzhong Gao, Melissa
Schrift, Chenshan Tian, Yanyin Zhang, Deborah Zvosec, and many others.
My field research benefited greatly from the help and support of many
friends and colleagues in Beijing, China. I want to thank my affiliated institu-
tion in Beijing, the School of Ethnology and Sociology at Central University
for Nationalities, for hospitality and institutional support. I want especially to
thank Yang Shengmin and Teng Xing for introducing me to their network of
social relations and helping arrange my fieldwork site. I thank all the students
and practitioners of Chinese medicine I met and interacted with in Beijing,

xiv

TRANSFORMING EMOTIONS

particularly Wang Xiuzhen and Cao Pei. Tey generously shared their knowl-
edge and experience of Chinese medicine with me and patiently answered my
questions. Director Zhou Shaohua of Xiyuan hospital provided me with the
best fieldwork environment I could ever hope for. He was not only the best
zhongyi teacher to me, but also my most knowledgeable resource in Chinese
medicine. I am also deeply grateful to the patients involved in my research for
their trust and generosity. My responsibility to protect their anonymity prevents
me from naming them individually, but my deepest gratitude goes to them.
My field research was funded by a grant (Grant No. 5668) from the
Wenner-Gren Foundation. I would also like to acknowledge the assistance and
support from the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawaii at
Manoa. Te opportunities to work in their various China-related projects and
access to their resources facilitated the completion of the original dissertation.
For this, I am particularly thankful to Cynthia Ning, the associate director of
the Center, and Daniel Tschudi. Course relief provided by the Department of
Languages of Clemson University helped speed up the writing of the final ver-
sion of this book.

My thanks also go to everyone at SUNY press whose hard work helped to
turn my manuscript into this book.
My parents supported my professional pursuit in every way they could.
Tey acted as surrogate parents to my daughter for many years while I was away
doing my graduate studies in the U.S.; and they housed me while I was doing
fieldwork in Beijing.

Cover Calligraphy by Michael M. Chen.

1

I.

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