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The Nature Conservancy's Mojave Desert Ecoregional Assessment 2010

The Nature Conservancy's Mojave Desert Ecoregional Assessment 2010

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Published by chris-clarke-5915
TNC quietly documents the nature of the lands Sierra Club, NRDC et al have been characterizing as "degraded": Many are ecosystemically intact and thriving, while some — such as the Ivanpah and Calico Solar proposal sites — are described as "Ecologically Core… largely undisturbed and un-fragmented, and support the conservation targets (species, ecological systems, springs and seeps) selected for this analysis. Their full protection is critical for long-term conservation of biodiversity in the Mojave Desert."
TNC quietly documents the nature of the lands Sierra Club, NRDC et al have been characterizing as "degraded": Many are ecosystemically intact and thriving, while some — such as the Ivanpah and Calico Solar proposal sites — are described as "Ecologically Core… largely undisturbed and un-fragmented, and support the conservation targets (species, ecological systems, springs and seeps) selected for this analysis. Their full protection is critical for long-term conservation of biodiversity in the Mojave Desert."

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Published by: chris-clarke-5915 on Oct 07, 2010
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05/26/2012

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Once protection through re-designation or acquisition of high-conservation-value lands has been
achieved, biodiversity conservation requires appropriate management to prevent and abate threats
and promote viability of native species and the health of native communities. “Effective
conservation” is a condition in which targets are viable, threats to their viability are abated, and
institutional and other enabling conditions are in place to ensure those conditions persist into the
future (Higgins et al. 2007).

Many areas of the Mojave Desert Ecoregion, including some that already enjoy the highest formal
protection for biodiversity, do not experience conservation management that is sufficient to abate
threats to long-term viability of targets. This is due in part to the multitude of threats in this
ecoregion and also limited and inconsistent funding. Moreover, the focus of agency management
is often directed to recover listed species. While this is likely to also benefit other plants and
animals that share the habitats of these species, broader efforts to improve management in other
habitats will be necessary to ensure that the full biodiversity of the ecoregion is effectively
protected.

The scarcity of conservation management funding calls on managers of desert resources—and the
researchers and other stakeholders that care about conservation of the Mojave Desert—to improve
collaboration across sectors and jurisdictions to identify ways in which monitoring and
management resources can be combined and/or coordinated, focused on the most essential
management imperatives, and directed to actions at scales necessary to be effective. Through
collaboration, important efficiencies and economies of scale may be achieved.

The Nature Conservancy

83

September 2010

Mojave Desert Ecoregional Assessment

Vision for Effective Conservation

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