School of Management 

        

Blekinge Institute of Technology 

The accuracy of customer reward  program as loyalty marketing tool 
  

Philip Law 

Supervisor: Anders Hederstierna 

Thesis for the Master’s degree in Business Administration  Fall/Spring 2008 

Abstract 

ABSTRACT 
    Relationship marketing is perceived as a leading trend in marketing and twenty‐first  century consumers have evolved into becoming ‘increasingly promotion‐literate’  (Harlow, 1997 cited in Egan 2001, pg 381).  The knock on effect of this is a decrease  in reliance on traditional and most frequently used methods for building customer  relationships.      For over a decade, supermarkets have transformed the shopping experience through  the creation of out of town locations which can accommodate the development of  considerable sized outlets, extensive product ranges expanding beyond food.   Offering a wide range of services one would not normally associate with a  supermarket such as telecommunications, finance and insurance, and with this the  additional incentive of customers collecting and redeeming points through customer  loyalty programs.  Categorically today Tesco is not only the UK’s largest grocer, but  also the world’s most successful internet supermarket (Humby and Hunt, 2004, pg  1).  The Tesco Clubcard is widely considered to be a pioneer and success story in  loyalty marketing, helping to propel Tesco to be the number one supermarket  retailer in the UK (Tapp, 2005, pg 176).     By carrying out a literature review on previously published materials and the use of a  quantitative survey, this study aims to uncover and identify the value of the Clubcard  scheme and how significant it is it in creating true customer loyalty to Tesco.     

The findings of the study revealed consumers place greater importance upon store  location, value for money and product range rather than loyalty card schemes, in‐ store magazines and vouchers.  The results revealed that although respondents  aspired to gain points and redeem the rewards offer by the Tesco Clubcard, they also  showed that today’s consumer is more in touch and has a greater knowledge of the  schemes and as such consumers tastes, perceptions, attitudes and demands have    1 

 

Abstract 

evolved.  Furthermore, it was revealed that consumers are effectively manipulating  suppliers to their own ends as the findings exposed that consumers are shopping  around for the best deals and they own and actively use more than one loyalty card.   The primary research revealed the failure to evolve the Tesco Clubcard scheme into  what today’s consumer demand has brought the Clubcard proposal to a unique  crossroad.    It is recommended that the Clubcard model evolves to adapt to the new tastes,  attitudes and demands of the new generation of consumers. An understanding of  the 21st century consumers will help ensure a loyal customer base.  Areas such as  lowering prices shall help sustain a competitive advantage within the supermarket  industry.  Further consideration should be given to giving customers an instant  rebate at the point and time of sale rather than rewarding them through the  collection of points.  The current image of the Clubcard feels dated and as such a  revision and re‐launch may give it a much needed boost and help motivate and  excite consumers.                                  2   

  Special thanks to my partner Jenny for all  her help and support during my course and the writing of this thesis ‐ I couldn’t have  done it without you!    I would like to thank my tutor Anders Hederstierna for his time.        Philip Law                        . attention and  guidance throughout the writing of this thesis.    Finally I would like to thank Tesco for allowing and helping with the research of this  dissertation.    First and foremost I would like to give great thanks to my family and friends who  have supported me through my studies.Acknowledgements    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS    I would like to give thanks to the following people for their help and support in the  completion of this study.

2   Introduction    The Tesco Story                                    13  13  17  20  21  23  26  29  31  34  36    2.2  1.6      The Rise of Tesco      The Background to the Study  The Scope of the Study   Purpose  Objectives  Summary                                                                                7  8  9  10  10  11  2.Table of Contents    TABLE OF CONTENTS    Abstract  Acknowledgements  Table of Contents  Table of Figures      1.0   CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW                        2.0   CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION  1.6   Characteristics of Customer Relationship Management (CRM)  The Clubcard Phenomenon    Defining Loyalty  Loyalty Marketing                                                  2.4   2.5   2.1   2.6.1   The Customer Loyalty Ladder   2.5  1.1   The Tesco Timeline    2.1  1.3  2.2.7   2.8   2.9   The Tesco Clubcard as a Loyalty Marketing Tool  The Relationship between Satisfaction and Loyalty   Does Loyalty Result to Profit?          .3  1.4  1.

0                                          CHAPTER THREE – METHODOLOGY  3.6.6   Coding   3.4.3.2   Justification of Questions                          3.3  Validity  3.4.2  Limitations  3.5  3.7  Summary  4.6.2.6.2.2  Introduction    Analysis                                    64  64  64  67    2  4.1   Strengths  3.6            Sample Selection Procedure and Sample Characteristics    Strengths. Limitations and Validity                                                                  3.1 4.4                    Questionnaire Design   3.0 CHAPTER FOUR – RESEARCH FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS  4.4.4   Questionnaire Layout     3.1  User Profile of Tesco Clubcard Respondents   4.1  3.4.11  Conclusion                  39  43  3.2   Analysis of Data  3.10   Do Customer Reward Programs Deliver Long Term?  2.1   Features of Qualitative and Quantitative Research    3.Table of Contents          2.2  3.3   Question Types and Wording   3.3  Introduction                                                    48  48  50  52  54  54  55  56  56  57  58  58  59  60  60  61  62  62  Research Objectives    Selection of Research Methods  3.4.2  Customer Perceptions on Tesco Clubcard      .3.4.5   Interviewer Versus Respondent Completion   3.1   The Eight‐step Questionnaire Construction Procedure  3.

2.3      Conclusion          5.3  Loyalty and Satisfaction            72  4.2.Table of Contents  4.3  5.0              CHAPTER FIVE ‐ CONCLUSION  5.4  Introduction                                            85  85  89  90  Conclusion of the Study  Recommendations    Limitations and further research  REFERENCES                                                                    93  BIBLIOGRAPHY    103  Appendix A ‐ Questionnaire Justification  Appendix B – Questionnaire      105  107  110  114  Appendix C ‐ SPSS Coded Questionnaire Results  Appendix D ‐ SPSS Frequency Tables for Questionnaire Results              3    .5  Has the Tesco Clubcard Created Loyalty?  4.2.6  Are consumers Manipulating Suppliers?  4.2.1  5.4  Tesco's Efficiency and use of the Information Gained from     Clubcard                                        73  75  76  79  82  4.2  5.7  Does Tesco Really Need the Clubcard?  4.2.

2.1 Features of Qualitative and Quantitative Research    3.4 Cross tabulation: I Trust Tesco Products and Their Image * I Feel            4  More Could be Done to Increase my Loyalty       69  4.0         CHAPTER FOUR – RESEARCH FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS  4.2.1 The Eight‐Step Questionnaire Construction Procedure      52  55      4.2.2.3 Cross tabulation: Please Indicate Which Age Group You Fall     Into * I Trust Tesco Products and Their Image      66  4.1.4.2.2.5 Cross tabulation: If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme.2.3 Cross tabulation: I Think Tesco is Very Innovative * I Feel More     Could be Done to Increase my Loyalty        69  4. Would       you Still Continue to shop there? * I Expect Rewards to be a   part of my Normal Shopping Experience        70    .2. Would   you Still Continue to Shop There?              68  4.2.2 Cross tabulation: Please Choose your Gender * Please     Indicate Which Age Group You Fall Into        65  4.3.0 CHAPTER THREE – METHODOLOGY  3.2 Cross tabulation: Please Indicate Which Age Group You Fall Into         * If Tesco Did Not Have the Clubcard Scheme.0   CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW        2.1  The Tesco Timeline    2.1.2.1 Frequency table: Please Indicate How Often You Use Your           Clubcard When You Purchase Goods or Services with Tesco    67  4.2.1 Frequency table: Gender of Respondents        65  4.1.1  Customer Loyalty Ladder                      17  29  3.2.2.6.Table of Figures  TABLE OF FIGURES      2.2.

2.Table of Figures  4.2 Frequency table: What more could Tesco do to make you more       Loyal?                  81                                5    .2.2.6.1 Frequency table: Apart from Clubcard.7.3.2. do you own and regularly                         use other store loyalty cards?  Please indicate how many    76  77  4.1 Cross tabulation: Does the Collection of Points Influence you to       buy more or to buy specific/alternative Promotional Products? *   Location Of Store Importance            75  4.4.4.6.2 Frequency table: I Usually Shop Around to get the Best Deals  4.2 Cross tabulation: Do you read Clubcard Magazine? * If "yes" or     "sometimes" Please Indicate what you think of the Magazine  74  4.3 Frequency table: I Expect Rewards to be a part of my Normal     Shopping Experience              78  4.2.2.2.2.2.2.6.6.5.1 Table: The Importance Respondents Placed upon Factors that     Influence Loyalty              79  4.1 Cross tabulation: Would you Describe Yourself as Being Loyal to       Tesco? * Would you Describe Yourself to be a Satisfied   Customer of Tesco?                72  74  4.7.2.4 Cross tabulation: Please Indicate which age group you fall into: *       Do you know how many Clubcard Points you gain for every £1    you spend in store?              79  4.6 Cross tabulation: Importance of Loyalty Card Schemes *                   Have you Redeemed any Rewards from the Clubcard   Scheme within the last 12 Months?          71  4.2.1 Frequency table: Do you read Clubcard Magazine?    4.

Chapter One ‐ Introduction                                                                                  Chapter One Introduction   6  .

 “The big success story of database driven management is Tesco. allowing the company to understand each  customer’s value to the company and how it may be able to increase that value or  prevent loss” (Tapp.  Individual‐level data has been systematically gathered  on most of Tesco’s 12 million customers. 2004.    Arguably one of the world’s most successful advocates of Customer Relationship  Management (CRM) (Humby and Hunt.Chapter One ‐ Introduction  1. Tesco was stuck as the UK’s  second‐ranking supermarket” (Humby and Hunt. pg 1) and as commented by Tapp  (2005. 2006. pg 1). pg 176). but also the world’s  most successful internet supermarket (Humby and Hunt.      7    . 2004. 2008).  It  seems to understand when to closely manage the analysis.    Tesco claims nearly £1 of every £7 spent on the high street (Hawkes. 2005. meeting analysts’ forecasts” (BBC Business News.  “Before Clubcard.1     The Rise Of Tesco    Categorically today Tesco is not only the UK’s largest grocer. It has revolutionised the way a multi‐ billion pound industry is run.  Tesco and  the Tesco Clubcard are seen as “the key player in the UK and one of the most  important schemes in commercial history ….  In April  2008 “Tesco has reported an 11.0    CHAPTER ONE – INTRODUCTION    1. pg 192).846bn. and when to let it go its  own way. when to go with a hunch based on experience and when to question  conventional wisdoms). 2008). the retailer has  managed to ascertain a sound reputation for innovation using imagination and  technology to constantly deliver customer value resulting in increased sales and  customer retention in the ferociously competitive food retailing industry.    Since the introduction of the Tesco Clubcard scheme in 1995. pg 1).8% rise in underlying annual profits for 2007 to  £2.

  CRM has become a major management growth tool of the last  decade (Gilles.  It represents an  inevitable – literally irresistible – movement.  With other  supermarkets offering similar schemes.2     The Background to the Study    The evolution of supermarket shopping has advanced at an expediential rate over  the last decade.      With this setting in mind I would like to initiate the concept of Customer Relationship  Management (CRM).9 billion in 2008 and is forecasted to reach $13.com.   (CRMToday. 2008). Righby and Reichheld 2002) and research has shown that the market  for the worldwide customer relationship management (CRM) software is projected  to surpass $8.3 billion by 2012.      1. pg 381). why exactly do customers constantly return  and not defect to rival stores?  What is the true value of the Clubcard scheme to  Tesco?  Given the current position that Tesco are in and offering so much to  customers it could be disputed if Tesco really need the Clubcard scheme.Chapter One ‐ Introduction  What this thesis will investigate is how significant and instrumental the Clubcard  scheme has been in building the success of Tesco’s rise to dominance.  This argument is further enforced that  twenty‐first century consumers have evolved into becoming ‘increasingly promotion‐ literate’ (Harlow 1997 cited in Egan 2001.   Barry stressed that the aim is to transform indifferent customers into  loyal ones and solidify the relationship. (1991) have commented that in order  for an organisation to sustain a relationship with its customers it needs to offer  benefits that are important to them and at the same time difficult for competitors to  replicate.  All businesses will be embracing CRM  sooner or later. with varying degrees of enthusiasm and success” (Peppers and  Rogers.    “Today. there is a CRM revolution underway among businesses. 2004. pg 6).  Berry and Parasuraman.  Having transformed the shopping experience and changed the way    8    .

 2004).    The trend and interest in using loyalty cards is undeniable.  Subsequently. some studies have suggested that the loyalty card  scheme are at a crossroad and do not work as shoppers attitudes have changed and  they prefer to pay less for their groceries than earn points on their purchases.  These  loyalty cards are key to an organisation’s marketing activity as it allows marketers to  interact directly to the people who will benefit the most with tailor made offers and  communication.  The motivation for this is that it shall provide a depth of  understanding. the methodology will explain the  conditions into how the primary research was conducted before an analysis of the  results attained.3     The Scope of the Study    The study of this dissertation will commence with focusing on secondary data. a wide range of services one would not normally  associate with a supermarket such as telecommunications.  The closing stages of this study will then be concluded and  recommendations will be made.        1.  therefore the findings of the literature review will direct the author into the  construction of a primary research tool in the shape of a questionnaire to address  areas where there maybe gaps. finance and insurance.  Approximately 85% of  households in the UK had at least one active loyalty card (Mintel. in the  form of a literature review.Chapter One ‐ Introduction  in which we shop through the creation of out of town locations which can  accommodate the development of considerable sized outlets.  However.   With this the additional incentive of customers collecting and redeeming points  through customer reward programs.        9    .  Primary research  is essential in order to complete the objectives that this thesis sets out to achieve. extensive product  ranges expanding beyond food. the concepts and theories that are to be investigated and to provide  an example on how others have embarked upon this subject area.

      1.4     Purpose    The intention of the thesis is to uncover if Tesco truly need their Clubcard scheme  any longer to keep customers loyal due to the sheer amount of effort they currently  use to keep customers loyal and given the position that they are in. Define loyalty and loyalty marketing. Chronicle Tesco’s rise to power and being the number one supermarket retailer  within the UK.Chapter One ‐ Introduction  1. Question how instrumental the Clubcard reward program is in building the  success of Tesco to where it is today and its role as a marketing tool. Discover the general attitude of Tesco customers towards the Clubcard reward  program.            10    .    6).    5).  The tool may  assist in the aid of repeat purchases but does the scheme demonstrate and create  true loyalty.    3). Recognise the factors that affect the significance of a customer reward program  and their roles within the supermarket sector.  Analyse and obtain the importance of the scheme to customers and  ascertain just how significant the scheme is in keeping them loyal.    4).5     Objectives    1). Establish the real value and significance of the Clubcard reward program to Tesco.    2).

6     Summary    From establishing the aim of this study the reader is conscious to the scope of the  investigation and what it sets out to accomplish.    The literature review follows in the next chapter.Chapter One ‐ Introduction  1.                                            11    .  The motivation of the subject and a  brief background to Tesco and its Clubcard scheme has provided a solid foundation  for advancing to examine secondary research.

Chapter Two – Literature Review                                                    Chapter Two Literature Review     .

  2).  3).1     Introduction    This chapter aims to provide a background to the study and seeks to carry out the  following objectives of the dissertation:                        The literature review will commence with the charting of Tesco’s background story.    4). Understand the concept of CRM.0     CHAPTER TWO – LITERATURE REVIEW    2. Realise the issues that may affect the value of a customer reward program        and recognise the importance within the supermarket industry. Chronicle the history and rise of Tesco.  It will  conclude with a summary of the main points mentioned.  5). examine if        the Tesco Clubcard is really needed.    .      13  1).      2. Define Loyalty and Loyalty Marketing.  followed with defining the fundamental terms with a focused discussion. Given Tesco’s current range of loyalty marketing strategies. Determine if the Tesco Clubcard has generated loyalty and what factors        customers are loyal to.  It is with allusion to these bodies of work that this section is based  upon.2     The Tesco Story    Recent work from Reference for Business (2007) and the European Foundation for  the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (2007) have chronicled the  history of Tesco.  6).Chapter Two – Literature Review     2.

Chapter Two – Literature Review   In 1919.    Helped by the acquisition of smaller grocery chains Tesco rapidly expanded over the  next two decades and in 1956 the first Tesco supermarket to carry fresh foods in  addition to more traditional dried goods was opened. the public were not ready for such a radical approach and it  failed to capture the interest of British shoppers.      By 1947.  This term not only referred to the actual size of the store but also the  immense selection of food and non‐food items available within it. selling whatever could be housed in the tiny stall. Stockwell and by adding the first two letters of his surname – TESCO was born. Cohen realised his dream and opened the first Tesco self‐service store in  Hertfordshire.000 square‐foot store the term “superstore”  was born.  In 1935 Cohen was invited by several key American  suppliers to the United States to witness and learn the American food retailing  system. Cohen wanted to take the American  self‐service supermarket vision and implement it in the UK.    Within 8 years. the end result was that the store  closed in 1948.    During the 1960’s.E.  Not deterred by this Cohen reopened the shop one year later to a  warmer reception from the great British public.      14    .  It was also  during this period that the company completed construction on a 90.000 square‐foot  warehouse. Tesco range of products diversified.  Thus began Cohen’s  career as a market trader after serving in the Royal Flying Corp.  Non‐food merchandise and  household items were now being sold and with it came a higher margin. Cohen expanded his operation and opened more than 100 small  stores in the London area. Cohen officially founded Tesco Stores Limited.  On returning to the UK from his visit.  With the opening of a 40. John Edward Cohen invested £30 into a small grocery stall in the East End of  London.  However.    By 1932.  The name was a based on a  private label tea that Cohen bought and sold from a merchant which used the initials  T.

    The food industry and consumers were evolving and Tesco were guilty of missing the  vital signs of change in the market and that consumers were demanding quality over  quantity. where the theory of the scheme was that retail organisations would  purchase these stamps and then give them away as a bonus to customers for every  purchase they made.  The outcome of this was customer loyalty as  shoppers congregated on stores offering stamps. consequently  causing an image problem among consumers. however the diminishing image of Tesco was still  apparent. the Tesco brand began to look slightly jaded and was  suffering an image quandary.    The American food retailing system that Cohen had introduced resulted in Tesco  operating approximately 900 supermarkets and superstores throughout the UK by  1976. sell it cheap’ did  not lend itself to generous profit margins and the firms management established  that this strategy had not aged well and in fact was deteriorating.      The sheer nature of the American supermarket vision of ‘pile it high.  The amount of stamps given reflected on how much  customers spent.  In addition.Chapter Two – Literature Review   In 1963. consumers were spending less money on food purchases and  Tesco profits were lower as customers’ tastes were changing and they had more  disposable income. the shoppers could then exchange this for  merchandise from a catalogue or shop. Tesco signed up to the Green Shield stamps scheme. increase sales and  gain more market share the Green Shield Stamp scheme was scrapped in 1973 and  prices were cut across the board.  In an attempt to win back shoppers.    During the 1970’s.  Once the customers had collected sufficient stamps and stuck  them into a Green Shield collector’s book.  This was another  American idea.    Initially the new strategy worked.  The majority of Tesco stores were poorly staffed with inadequate    15    .

 two new formats of store were  experimented.  It was also during this period that  Tesco expanded into new countries acquiring store chains in Poland.   Tesco made a considerable investment to not only improve its stores physically but  also to provide the higher quality merchandise that consumers desired.  To compliment the new high‐quality and service‐oriented image  of these new stores.      During the late 1970’s and early 1980’s the UK food sales market was in a slump.  In order to recuperate. Tesco also introduced its own label product lines which had  been developed through extensive Research and Development (R&D) programs. Tesco had become one of the top three food retailers  in the UK. which combined a petrol    16    .000 square feet.000 square feet but eventually expanded to as large as 65.500 food items.  By 1989 the company had spent £500  million on building 29 new stores.  The knock on effect of this was  a renewed price war between Tesco and J.Chapter Two – Literature Review   customer service and merchandise selection.  The average superstore covered  25.  The first was the Tesco Express format.  In  order to encourage more sales and customer loyalty Tesco began an application  which cut prices on approximately 1.   The upshot  was prevalent upgrading and enlargement of smaller cramped stores. an extensive  modernisation program was undertaken and 500 unprofitable stores were closed.    Throughout the rest of the 1980’s Tesco continued to expand into Ireland and in  1985 the 100th superstore was opened.    In order to improve efficiency the original distribution systems were computerised  and restructured. the Czech  Republic and Slovakia. encompassing 371 stores in Great Britain in addition to becoming the  largest independent gasoline retailer in the UK.    By the beginning of the 1990’s. Sainsbury.  Cosmetic and  practical changes such as widening aisles and enhanced lighting were used and the  main focus of Tesco was on the superstore concept.    To further reinforce the innovation at Tesco.

 Tesco stands as a genuine retail giant. sports equipment and  general household goods and furnishings. the Tesco Clubcard was introduced.Chapter Two – Literature Review   station and small convenience store into one. Taiwan. launched its e‐commerce business and turned to  developing its non‐food business.  Tesco branched out into financial services creating a Tesco Visa card.2.  The strength and diversification of Tesco’s own brand  products is indisputably impressive.    Today. toys. Malaysia and China.  The Tesco Extra format expanded the  non‐food departments.    Stores now carried extensive electronic products.  Expansion in the UK and abroad is continuing  and industry observers can find little to fault the company’s operations.  In September 2002 Tesco introduced its  own line of clothing. in 1997.1     The Tesco Timeline    Timeline on the growth of Tesco:    1919 ‐ Founder Jack Cohen begins selling surplus groceries from a store in the East  End of London. in‐store banks.  savings accounts. His first day's profit was 1 pound on sales of 4 pounds.  International operations were also developing as Tesco entered  Asia opening stores in Thailand.    By the millennium Tesco.  The aim was to turn the non‐food side of the  business to be as strong as the food side. South Korea.        2.    In February 1995. it has consistently out performed rivals  and increased market share.      17    .  Two years later. loans and insurance.

    1956 ‐ First Tesco self‐service supermarket opens in a converted cinema in Maldon. The name came from the  initials of TE Stockwell. but each store is larger. a partner in the firm of tea suppliers.    1991 ‐ Becomes Britain's biggest independent petrol retailer.    1961 ‐ Tesco Leicester enters Guinness Book of Records as the largest store in  Europe.    1982 ‐ Annual sales exceed 2 billion pounds.    1979 ‐ Annual sales reach 1 billion pounds. and CO from Cohen's  surname.    1939 ‐ Tesco has around 100 branches. the innovation set to transform the store’s fortunes.    1995 ‐ Becomes Britain’s market‐leading food retailer.    1960 ‐ Takes over chain of 212 stores in North of England and adds another 144  stores in 1964 and 1965.   Tesco enters Hungary.      18    .Chapter Two – Literature Review   1924 ‐ Cohen's first own‐brand product is called Tesco Tea. Tesco Clubcard customer  rewards scheme is launched.    1947 ‐ Tesco Stores (Holdings) Ltd floats on London Stock Exchange with share price  of 25 pence.    1987 ‐ Tesco has 377 stores – far fewer than before.    1963 ‐ Introduction of Green Shield Stamps scheme.  and track it’s customers.

      19    . Czech Republic.Chapter Two – Literature Review   1996 ‐ Tesco spreads to Poland.    1998 ‐ Enters Taiwan and Thailand    1999 ‐ Mobile phones go on sale in Tesco stores.S.    2003 ‐ Tesco enters Japan and Turkey. Launches own brand Fairtrade range.    November 8.    1997 ‐ Terry Leahy becomes chief executive.  Announces non‐food store trial. Slovakia and Northern Ireland. store near Los Angeles.    2004 ‐ Enters China. Company  launches 24‐hour trading as the first of many Tesco Extra Hypermarkets open.  Enters Czech Republic and Slovakia through Carrefour asset swap and exits Taiwan    2006 ‐ Tesco has a total of 1.879 UK stores and controls approximately one‐third of  the UK grocery market. 2007 ‐ Opens first U. Enters music download market.S. launches online bookstore and  online banking.    2002 ‐ Tesco has 730 stores in the UK.    2005 ‐ Makes 2 billion pounds of annual profits.    2001 ‐ Strategic relationship with U.com  model to United States.    2000 ‐ Tesco.com launched and goes live. Tesco broadband  launched. Enters Malaysia. Tesco moves to capture share of loan  and personal finance market as Tesco Personal Finance is launched. Enters South Korea. supermarket Safeway to take Tesco.

 pg 116‐117). cited in Wylie). CRM can be thought of as a set of business practices    20    Characteristics of Customer Relationship Management (CRM)  . 2004. not for them” (Gordon. largely misused. pg 6) back up this claim citing  that “there is a CRM revolution underway among businesses”. and in  some cases abused…often by the very people who strive to define it. the  end result is “value is thus created with customers.Chapter Two – Literature Review   Adopted from Sanderson (2007) and Simm (2007.”     In the modern marketplace customers continue to gain vigour.  “CRM is difficult to define. It’s somewhat misunderstood. Dowling and  Hammond.  Clearly CRM involves much more than marketing and  “in its most generalised form. pg 17). it is vital that an  understanding of them is undertaken to provide personalised value.  They want to be treated individually” (Newell  2003. pg  9).      What can be established is that the CRM process suffers when it is not adequately  understood or implemented. CRM  is designed to create and continuously improve the relationship between an  organisation and its customers in real‐time transactions.      2.  Despite the fact that CRM  is essentially rooted within information technology it is more than just a technology. as commented by Goodroe (2005. pg 92).3    “The past decade has seen many firms (re)adopt a customer focus – often through a  formal program of customer relationship management (CRM)” (Uncles. 1998.  “Customers  don’t want to be treated equally.  Despite becoming  one of the most intensive and important developments of the business climate there  is no specific definition for CRM.  Peppers and Rogers (2004.   It draws from traditional marketing principles and key to this process is the  recognition and definition of what customers deem as value and delivering it.     Through the use of an elaborate process arbitrated by information technology.

 to make them happier and the company  richer”.  Originally piloted in twelve stores. the  inspiration of the card was to gain an insight into shopping habits of customers and    21    . therefore any definition of CRM  would be fundamentally wrong if it didn’t start with the customer in mind.  It involves the understanding. focusing and management of ongoing  collaboration between suppliers and selected customers for mutual value creation  and sharing interdependence and organisational alignment” (Gordon. simply to put an enterprise into closer and closer touch with its customers.    Lord MacLaurin. the Tesco Clubcard was launched and it became the UK’s first  supermarket customer reward program.  The  following excerpt will be used to define CRM:    “Relationship Marketing is the ongoing process of identifying and creating new  values with individual customers and then sharing the benefits from this over a life  time. Humby and Hunt (2004. Chairman of Tesco    In February 1995.    For the case of the Tesco Clubcard. 1998.4     The Clubcard Phenomenon    “Customer loyalty is not about how customers demonstrate their loyalty to us.  in order to learn more about each one. 2005.  it is about how we demonstrate our loyalty to them”.Chapter Two – Literature Review   designed. with the overall goal of making each one  more valuable to the firm” (Peppers and Rogers.    In order for an organisation to truly engage the customer it is essential that  companies can exceed consumers expectations. pg 9). pg 16) have cited that  “the definition of CRM is best summarised as: to improve our performance at every  point of contact with our customers. pg 6).      2.

    Once the customer has accumulated 150 points the points are converted into  Clubcard vouchers at an exchange rate of 1p to one point. Tesco Personal Finance products and Tesco  Telecoms.  Additional points could also be connected at 10 Clubcard partner  companies (Papworth.  with over eight million Clubcard customers purchasing some 200 million in‐store    22    .  These deals are priced at four times the in‐store redemption value of the  vouchers.  Points would be accumulated for every £5 spent and  in turn the points would be converted every quarter into Clubcard vouchers which  the customer could redeem in any Tesco store. thus giving an effective  discount of 1%. on Tesco Petrol forecourts.  Less than 12 months after the launch. restaurant meals. holidays  and flights.  For example a year’s magazine subscription to Cosmopolitan magazine  which normally costs £34. they can be “swapped for AirMiles or Clubcard  Deals such as days out.     Within six months of the introduction of Clubcard.    To add further value to the vouchers.  In total it cost Tesco £300 million over the first three years and  approximately 4.    The costs associated with running a loyalty program are notoriously high. shoppers gained one point for every £1 spent on goods in‐ store. 2005). pg 5). Tesco’s share of the UK retail  grocery trade had increased from 15% to 18%. 2005).  The Green  Shield stamp scheme cost £12 million annually. costs £8.     Under the new scheme.   However this scheme was later  changed when it was realised that pensioners and students were not fully benefiting  due to the small frequent purchases they made (Louis. film hire. magazine subscriptions.55 in Clubcard vouchers” (Papworth.20. 2002.5% of Tesco profits to run the scheme.  The Clubcard scheme introduced  new point‐of‐sale (POS) technology as well a call centre to handle customer queries  and a vast supporting computer system to record and analyse the Clubcard  information.Chapter Two – Literature Review   give something back to them. online.

 2001).      2.    Seth and Randall (2001. there is an overwhelming amount of research focused on the definition  and term for the notion of loyalty. 2006).  One retailer. 2001).  Customer loyalty is acknowledged as a key  concept whose importance has been recognised by many academics and  practitioners.     Following the success. ASDA. but in retrospect they executed its introduction bravely  and brilliantly. getting the timing right”. some competitors launched rival schemes although these  were later scrapped.5     In order to investigate the value of the Tesco Clubcard scheme. of which over ten million card holders were active users.  It was assessed that in  2001 the Clubcard scheme had managed to attract approximately 20 million  members in the UK. did resist the trend of loyalty cards and  focused primarily on its competitiveness and reducing costs.  Upon further investigation and reading it can be seen that there is a    23    Defining Loyalty  .    With this in mind.      “Questions about how to define loyalty were addressed more than 20 years ago”  (Grisaffe. it is vital that an  understanding and definition of loyalty is established. pg 39) have commented that Tesco “did not invent the card  nor were they a first mover. the concept of loyalty may initially appear to be rather simplistic.Chapter Two – Literature Review   products per day. Tesco was now propelled to being the number one retailer in the  UK (Peppers and Martha.  It is usually characterised as activities carried  out by an organisation for the development of a long‐term relationship with its  customers.   However.  In the context of retail  marketing loyalty can be perceived as “a combination of customer behaviour and  attitude” (Fraoch Marketing.

 states that “loyalty is a behaviour”. pg 102).  However this is not significantly sufficient as the perception could  ascertain changes in behaviour and attitudes in the future.   Key to understanding this is the correlation between behaviour  and attitude.   Functional loyalty is often created by functional values such as quality. pg 491)  it is a “complex phenomenon”.  Humby and Hunt (2004. this is  “arguably the most controversial (view) but the best supported by data.      It has been suggested by scholars that loyalty is an emotional concept.    Neal (2000 cited in Grisaffe 2001). 2002). convenience or through different loyalty programs providing a tangible reason  to prefer certain suppliers.  To  further the ideology and recognition that thoughts and feelings are active. Fader and    24    . satisfaction and identity”. Jenkinson  (1995. thus  the creation of functional value only offers a short‐lived competitive advantage.  This advocates  that loyalty is an emotional concept created by trust.  functional loyalty can’t be very long lasting (Barnes.  The  controversy comes about because loyalty is this model is defined mainly with  reference to the pattern of past purchases with only secondary regard to underlying  consumer motivations or commitment to the brand” (Ehrenberg. this is easily replicated by competitors. pg 116) resists defining loyalty in behavioural terms and notes the concept of  loyalty as “the reflection of a customer’s subconscious emotional and psychological  need to find a constant source of value. East  (1997. distribution.      One of the most distinguished insights into loyalty was provided by Dick and Basu  (1994.  Conversely this view could be seen as being “functionally loyal” (Barnes  2002) whereby customers are only loyal to a company due to convenience. who cited loyalty as “the strength between relative attitude and  repeat patronage”. pg 539) comments “other variables such as social and  physical environment as well as the personal abilities have been found to pre‐empt  action”.  However. cited in Rowley.  price.Chapter Two – Literature Review   lot more to the notion and as commented by Parker and Worthington (2000. pg 17)  have commented that “loyalty is an emotional response based on empathy”. 1998.

  Essentially “from this  perspective. Kahn et al. pg 94). Many businesses continue to  define loyalty in behavioural terms”. they look  behaviourally loyal to B over time. 1970 as cited in Uncles. Until brand A enters the market at a lower price.  Then the customer switches to show repeat purchase of A. researchers  “have found that few consumers are ‘monogamous’ (100 percent loyal) or  ‘promiscuous’ (no loyalty to any brand). 2004. but because it is not worth the time and trouble to search for an  alternative” (Uncles. total spend. pg 94).. 1996. usually as  one of several” (Ehrenberg and Scriven. “If a buyer has a  cognitive rule. most people are ‘polygamous’ (i. 1994 (as cited in Uncles. 1988. frequency of visits. Dowling and Hammond. Loyalty is essentially an emotional concept.    Grisaffe (2001) argues that loyalty is not just about behaviour.. or the decision rule? True loyalty  is not just behavioural”.e. Dowling and  Hammond. cited in Uncles.  The consumer buys the same  brand again.      Uncles et al. the brands. share of    25    .  Barnes (2002) claims that “repeat buying does not make  loyalty …. and yet  many firms seem not to understand or appreciate this.    “Loyalty to the brand (measured by repeat purchase) is the result of repeated  satisfaction that in turn leads to weak commitment. and brand B is always lowest.  comments that after extensive studies of data and purchase pattern. like relationships.  Furthermore Barnes (2002) also cites that. ‘buy the lowest priced brand’.  “There is a great tendency in business to measure or define loyalty entirely in  behavioural terms ‐ number of visits. until market prices  change again. Massey et al. pg 94). 1999. 2004. Dowling and Hammond.  Shapiro and Varian (1998. pg 94). Dowling and  Hammond. To which are they loyal.  Rather.  loyal to a portfolio of brands in a product category)”. 2004..Chapter Two – Literature Review   Hardie. pg 128) believe that loyalty is  concerned with repeat purchase or buying largely and exclusively from a single  vendor. 2004. not because of any strongly‐held prior attitude or deeply‐held  commitment. loyalty is defined as an ongoing propensity to buy the brand.

 many companies today capture such  information automatically every time a customer interacts with the firm. an  incremental shift in buying behaviour”. the appropriate term  should be loyalty marketing as “loyalty is the business objective.  Why. do some businesses define loyalty primarily if  not exclusively in behavioural terms?  The answer is often as simple as that’s what  we are able to measure most easily.  To obtain a  list of our most ‘loyal’ customers.  In comparison retail loyalty implies on  “looking to achieve a little extra goodwill. 2005). without having to get into all that consumer psychology”.   It has been suggested that day‐to‐day life loyalty suggests “emotional commitment”  and “monogamy: one choice above all else”.  There is a tendency to confuse  loyalty with retention ‐ two concepts that are related. a slight margin of preference. such as relationship  marketing. one‐to‐one marketing.        2.    Loyalty marketing is often expressed in a manner of ways. loyalty is not. etc.Chapter Two – Literature Review   category spend.  A focus on retention  creates a high‐risk situation where a company may think its customers are a lot more  loyal than they really are. the characterisation deemed to be the most appropriate  when discussing the Tesco Clubcard has been cited by Humby and Hunt (2004. we simply request the information from the  customer database.  Retention is a behavioural concept. then.6     “Loyalty marketing can be defined as the management process of identifying ‘best  customers’ and utilising customer data and insight to create. number of years as a customer. customer‐centric marketing and frequency  marketing.  What we seek to  achieve here is loyalty”. Loyalty defined behaviourally is also a much easier concept to  understand. retain and grow  profitable relationships” (ICLP. but certainly not the same  thing.  However as commented by Duffy (1998. pg 9).    Of the various definitions.      26    Loyalty Marketing  .  In fact. pg 435).

 loyalty programs  enhance value proposition offerings to preserve active customer status” (Lacey and  Sneath. and/or increase the range of products bought from the  supplier. “several kinds of scheme are currently run in the retail  industry. loyalty marketing is an approach based on strategic  marketing and has been expressed as the “sine qua non of an effective business  strategy” (Heskett.  Repeat purchase is  rewarded and a channel of communication with customers is facilitated to  encourage further repeat purchase.  and model customer attrition and intervention strategies” (Lacey and Sneath. pg 431).  A second aim is more defensive – by building a closer bond between the  brand and current customers it is hoped to maintain the current customer base”. 2006. pg 92) claim that the “two aims of  customer loyalty programs stand out.  However. 2006. pg 355).    Gordon (1998.  Often based on cumulative brand purchases. pg 20).      27    . and customer magazines to customer  panels” (Wright and Sparks.  These databases can be used to determine  customer value.  “They allow marketers to capture detailed transactional and  preference customer databases.  Loyalty programs use  targeted communications and customise the delivery of branded goods and services  to build stronger bonds with the sponsoring brand/firm that would result without  such programs. pg 459). 1999. 2002.Chapter Two – Literature Review     Regardless of the idiom. define specific marketing strategies for finite customer segments.  pg 461).  One is to increase sales revenue by raising  purchase/usage levels. has criticised loyalty marketing as programs that “typically  result in another piece of plastic in your wallet to encourage more customer  patronage”. (2004. from card schemes.  The fundamental aim is to define profitable  behaviour and consequently manage this relationship by designing a range of  initiatives to maintain and influence profitable behaviour.    “Customer loyalty programs are coordinated. Dowling and Hammond.  Uncles. special services. membership based marketing activities  designed to enhance the building of continued marketing exchanges among pre‐ identified customers toward a sponsoring brand or firm.

  Operant conditioning deals  with learned and not reflexive behaviour and the procedure occurs as individuals  learn to perform behaviours that produce positive outcomes. pg 19).  Applied to retail  organisations. cited in Lacey  and Sneath 2006.    Rayner (1996. given their ability to identify frequent  buyers and segment the market.    They work by using a process of operant conditioning theory. it is more likely to occur  again upon similar occasions” (Skinner.  Humby and Hunt (2004. pg 17) have argued that it  should not be contended that card‐based customer reward programs are credible  alternatives to being offered excellent service. over time consumers associate with companies that reward them. It relies on two basic assumptions about human  experience and psychology: (1) a particular act results in an experience that is a  consequence of that act and (2) the perceived quality of an act’s consequence affects  future behaviour” (Heil. 1978. pg 8) identifies customer reward programs as a “mechanism for  identifying and rewarding loyal customers”. points and the incentives offered  all act to influence and strengthen consumers’ behaviour. the  knock on effect is they will choose to reiterate to buy products that fulfil their own  needs. pg 459). have commented that “loyalty programs are set apart  from other forms of promotions by their long‐term nature and deliberate emphasis  on preserving customer retention and intensifying purchase frequency”. innovative products and services or  the right price.  Sharp and Sharp (1997. 126) has    28    .  All of which can develop loyalty. 2006).Chapter Two – Literature Review     Of the above excerpts it can be empathised that the most frequent used customer  reward programs employed are loyalty cards. pg.  It can be remarked that  this behaviour is not generic amongst all consumers and that some customers are  not affected or influenced by the prospect of rewards. “Operant conditioning  refers to a systematic program of rewards and punishments to influence behaviour  or bring about desired behaviour ….  Tapp (2005.  Operant conditioning is based on the concept that “if  a given bit of behaviour has a consequence of a special sort.  “The important point is that these  initiatives and a card‐based loyalty scheme are not mutually exclusive”.  Implemented customer reward programs.

 pg 29‐30).6. pg 95) claim that “to increase sales by  enhancing beliefs about the brand and strengthen emotional commitment of  customers to their brand”.    Uncles.1     The Customer Loyalty Ladder      29    . “given the hue and cry about loyalty over the last decade.    2. let us be  clear ‐ the prevailing evidence is that absolute loyalty cannot be regarded as the  norm in most markets”. Dowling and Hammond. 1998 as  cited in Uncles. pg 95). White and Schneider. has constructed the “Customer Loyalty Ladder” which  illustrated that the goal of loyalty marketing is “keeping and improving the  relationship with the customer”. companies need to move “customers up a ‘loyalty ladder’  through image‐based or persuasive advertising and personal service (recovery)  programs are frequently used tactics” (Brown. Dowling and Hammond. 2000.    Payne (1994. 2004.Chapter Two – Literature Review   commented. (2004.

    The number and similarity of loyalty programs employed today has caused concern  and rather than creating or adding towards customer loyalty it can argued that they  are actually causing confusion and apathy and stimulating  “loyalty overload” (Tapp. claim that  “when widespread copying happens. The clear conclusion from these pieces of work is that exclusive brand  loyalty cannot be regarded as the norm in most markets”. any benefit gained is likely to be ephemeral”. “a lot of frequent‐purchase  behaviour (e.Chapter Two – Literature Review     From the above diagram each rung of the ladder shows the priority in which tasks  should be undertaken in order to accomplish loyalty.    Additionally. pg 172) construes that. 2005.g. pg 102).  Uncles. pg 126) asserts that.  pg 30).    Loyalty marketing is not undertaken by every organisation.  Furthermore Reichheld (cited in  Tapp. Dowling and Hammond (2004. but a duty and a must”. (2004. pg 26) has commented that some companies do not view loyalty  marketing as an “objective. in that  customers retain a basket of brands which they jump between in a ‘polygamous’  fashion …. Tapp (2005. 2002.            30    . Uncles. stable. Dowling and  Hammond.  Payne has observed that  companies need to focus on improving their relationship with each customer and  “progress them up the ladder” rather than converge on individual sale (Payne. profitable customers”.  Additionally. “ultimately the key to profitability was the high  retention of the firm’s existing.  2005). pg 95) conclude by claiming “loyalty programs are also designed  to strengthen commitment and create velvet handcuffs to bond the customer to the  brand”. supermarket goods) is based on ‘repertoire’ purchasing. Reichheld (cited in Finnie  and Randall. 1994.

    The amount of customer reward programs that has been introduced by retailers and  service providers has become more widespread in recent years. pg 195). And also  commonly found in markets where the core product is a commodity and companies  have great difficulty differentiating themselves” (Tapp. 2005. participating customers are offered an enhanced value  proposition.7     The Tesco Clubcard as a Loyalty Marketing Tool  “Loyalty schemes tend to be most useful in frequent purchase markets …. Tesco claims a 'first mover advantage' not in the sense of having  a scheme but in the sense of being the first where the scheme is a strong part of a  transformed marketing approach”. pg 13‐14) has commented that.  whereby consumers are willing to exchange their personal information in order to  obtain other resources. (2001)  suggests that there is over 150 such schemes currently in the UK with a result of  approximately 40 million cards in current circulation.  2005. 1980).  Stone (2004.  “In exchange for registration. In the case  of loyalty programs. pg 274). the customer receives  points that can be used in full or part payment for products or services” (Rowley. such as monetary savings or enhanced services …. The average consumer participates in three schemes.Chapter Two – Literature Review   2.    Mauri (2003.    “Historically information has been linked to exchange theory (Hirschman.    When a customer joins a customer reward program their details are entered into a  database in which further transactions of their purchases are recorded building a  profile of purchasing habits.  Byrom et al. pg 192)  comments that. and in return firms will be given access to personal information that can  be used to further refine strategies and tactics” (Lacey and Sneath. In  the grocery market. “the technology of loyalty cards allow  retailers to transform cold data on consumer behaviour into warm relationships and    31    . pg 461). 2006. “Around 80 per cent of UK households participate in at least one  customer loyalty scheme.

 telephone number and email. loyalty cards are also about  the collection of customer data. the time  they shop. “in a bonus program.      As the UK’s largest retailer and given the considerable customer base. It keeps track of exactly everything a  cardholder has ever bought. pg 458). “The Clubcard enables Tesco to keep a record of each holders name. have raised  the issue that “for customers who participate in loyalty programmes.  Simm (2007)  remarks. 2006.  shoppers use a Clubcard. age.  The Clubcard is viewed by Tesco as a way of saying thank you to its  customers by allowing them to earn points through “meeting everyday needs and  undertaking everyday activities” (Rowley. from which store.Chapter Two – Literature Review   eventually into a genuine loyalty founded on mutual understanding and trust.3 of this thesis. 2007). resulting in more than 11 million active  cards (Simm. the shop they visited and the entire contents of their trolley (Field 1997).    Langenderfer and Cook (2004. and the precise date and time of each  purchase.  As commented by Jenkinson (1995). not loyalty. It will know if you have a drink problem.  or threw a party at the weekend.  “Clubcard is designed to  give you something back for shopping with Tesco” (http://www. cited in Lacey and Sneath. there is  potential for increased concern about the misuse of personal information and loss of  control over how information is being collected and disseminated”.    A prologue with regards to the Tesco Clubcard has already been covered in section  2.com).  It is estimated that on eight of every ten trips to Tesco.  address. pg 198). Tesco can guess whether you had a lonely singles night in. 2005. the Tesco  Clubcard accumulates and records information on a sizable population of the UK on  an astounding basis. buy    32    .  With every swipe of a loyalty card at a point of sale.  A  warm relationship is also a learning relationship”.tesco. because loyalty is not  purchasable”. The company knows each holders dietary  preferences and the make‐up of their family.  From the data. the retailer is  recording the entire transaction in detail: from the name of the shopper. the bonus is the price for the  information that I get.  There are in the region of 25 million Clubcards in existence  which represents 14 million households.  I buy knowledge through it.

 Powergen joined Tesco’s Clubcard scheme as a key  facet to our approach to customer loyalty. 2006.  “An important  component of many loyalty programs is the cope for cross‐selling. 2005. in an attempt to  increase share‐of‐wallet. the  message is “Tesco is an everyday experience” (Rowley. “In 2003.  The information helps Tesco to typecast its customers by  analysing their ‘life stage’. The card will keep a record of any complaints  made or other communication with the store.  Tesco Clubcard demonstrates our focus  on customers”. whether student.  Being able to classify groups in this way has helped Tesco become the  UK’s dominant retailer”. 2004. 1997). rather than market share (Peppers and Rogers. pg 459)  have mentioned that “loyalty programs supported by multiple participants offer  increased customer value by accommodating a broader scope of business and  organisational value due to the sharing of program costs”. hooked on painkillers. ‘market’ or poor (or.   Loyalty‐program members are encouraged to buy products they would not normally  have bought from that provider. Dowling and Hammond.  mobile phone services in conjunction with core food and non‐food products. and any additional market research  you have taken part in.ON energy have joined to align themselves with the Clubcard  brand. addition multiple brands such as Avis  and Powergen/E. pg 199). pg 100). by spending and loyalty. or have an  undue fondness for tinned pineapple. whether you're a junk‐food addict. It assesses how  much they are worth to them.  The strength of the Tesco  Clubcard image was highlighted in the Powergen Corporate Responsibility Report  (2003) which notes. insurance. the loyalty program is seen as a brand  extension” (Uncles.Chapter Two – Literature Review   condoms. young family or retired.      With the vast range of product offerings from Tesco such as finance.    Due to the success of the Clubcard scheme. It works out if they are  ‘upmarket’. as Tesco euphemistically calls this category.  Swaminathan and Reddy (2000 as cited by Lacey and Sneath. ‘cost‐ conscious’.      33    .  In essence.

    It should also be mentioned that in addition to the Clubcard scheme.      2. but it’s not now”.  Approaches such as lower prices on  key products.Chapter Two – Literature Review   Capizzi and Ferguson (2005. “extending beyond the simple relationship between Tesco and their  customers” (Rowley 2005.   The Clubcard model although not unique  has firmly embedded itself as a customer reward program with multiple  relationships. “just as a shopper expects to be offered  trolleys at the entrance to a supermarket he/she will expect some sort of ‘reward’ to  be offered at the check‐out”. pg 198). principally in the UK where  “programmes look the same everywhere”. pg 72) describe the loyalty marketing industry as having  “the telltale characteristics of a mature market”.    Reichheld (1996.  As argued by Newell (2000. in‐store magazines or value added approaches in service or store  layout are all utilised. pg 491).  That may have been true at one  time.  Kotler (2000) defined satisfaction as “a person’s feelings of pleasure or  disappointment resulting from comparing a products perceived performance (or  outcome) in relation to his or her expectations”.  However.8     Much research has been carried out by scholars into the importance of customer  satisfaction. views that “customer satisfaction is the key to securing  customer loyalty”. this hypothesis has remained largely unsubstantiated and is far  from robust. Tesco also  employ other marketing tools to create loyalty. pg 381). pg 30) who claims that customers today  demand more that “simple satisfaction” for their loyalty and that “most companies  think a ‘satisfied customer’ will be a loyal customer.      The Relationship between Loyalty and Satisfaction    34    . with all this added value and as commented by  Parker and Worthington (2000.

 brand loyalty.Chapter Two – Literature Review   What can be established is that satisfaction can lead customers to “treat their  primary store as a safe bet in their attempt to reduce their perceived risk of  disappointment when shopping” (Reselius. but additionally observing that  “increasing satisfaction does not produce an equal increase in loyalty for all  customers”. loyalty and  retention. expands on this theory by accepting for a positive  association between loyalty and satisfaction.    It is vital that the distinction between satisfaction and loyalty is noted since the two  are clearly different. 2001). and positive word of mouth exposure (Hoyer and  MacInnis. by  linear progression.  satisfied customers can help form the base of any successful business and result to  repeat purchases.  However.  What this demonstrates is that the correlation between customer  satisfaction and customer loyalty is neither clear‐cut nor linear.  There is no evidence to  suggest that satisfaction alone is a significant factor in influencing loyalty.  Satisfaction does not continually produce in retention. to retention/loyalty and ultimately to profitability’ (Hallowell.  1996). with satisfied  customers still defecting.  remarking that “it is essential to get you in the race.  In addition gauging dissatisfied customers can be difficult since many  customers will not complain and also to differences in the industry sectors.    Zairi (2000) has commented on numerous studies that have been carried out to  examine the impact of customer satisfaction on repeat purchase. but it’s no longer enough to  make you a winner”.  Söderlund (1998).  ‘Customer satisfaction leads.  The end result is they all suggest a similar message in that: satisfied  customers are likely to share their positive experience with approximately five or six  people and dissatisfied customers are likely to tell another ten people of their  unhappiness.  Duffy (2001.        35    . pg 36) believes satisfaction is a starting point. 1971). similarly  dissatisfaction does not necessarily result in defection.  The importance of satisfaction should not be overlooked and  the consequences of not satisfying customers can have severe consequences to  businesses.

 level of service. “even if customers are satisfied with the service they will continue to defect if  they believe they can get better value.  In other words. “satisfaction influences repurchase  intentions whereas dissatisfaction has been seen as a primary reason for customer  defection or discontinuation of purchase”.9     “Firms employing loyalty programs should expect them to be profitable. pg 101)    Does Loyalty Result to Profit?    36    .  Satisfaction is a necessary but not a sufficient condition to loyalty. 2004.  “Breakaway customers may not have been dissatisfied with the service  provided from their primary store. “Grocery store. travel distance and reward programs. McIlroy and Barnett (2000)  argue.  It is the authors belief that  defecting customers may not have been dissatisfied with the service they received  from their primary store. it is purely that the store did not insulate them adequately  from switching.  This is especially significant to any business operating in  a highly competitive market with many choices and low customer switching costs. pg 16). but it is hard to have loyalty without  satisfaction”.    Miranda et al (2005.  It was discovered that loyalty was influenced by several factors such  as price. Dowling and Hammond. it is simply that it did not insulate them  sufficiently from switching”.  we can have satisfaction without loyalty.  On the cost  side of the profit equation.  This area has been  considered in chapter four of this thesis. pg 230) sustains that loyalty does not result from satisfaction  alone. and bank customers  can switch quickly if they are not completely satisfied”. as  commented by Best (2005. convenience or quality elsewhere ….  However.      2. restaurant.Chapter Two – Literature Review   The importance of customer satisfaction has been reinforced by La Barbera and  Mazursky (1983) who commented that. accurate estimates are difficult to obtain – even within  corporations” (Uncles.

 Butscher (2002. in part because they know the product and  require less information. cross‐purchasing of your other  products. The increased profit comes  from reduced marketing costs.  “When  you can increase customer loyalty a beneficial ‘flywheel’ kicks in. price premium due to appreciation of your added‐value services.  Such schemes can take years to establish and if  successful can reap dividends to an organisation.Chapter Two – Literature Review   The costs involved with executing and sustaining a customer reward program are  notoriously high. They even serve as part‐time employees. it can pay for itself many  times over”.   Finally. marketers are  seeking information on how to build customer loyalty.  Anton (1996) states. pg 147) has noted  that “if it is well planned and aimed at the right customers. reduced  operating cost because of familiarity with your service system and positive word‐of‐ mouth in terms of referring other customers to your company”. very few create real  loyalty and devotion”. Therefore loyal  customers not only require less information themselves.  Investment in technology means millions are being spent on  software.    The association between loyalty and profit and the economics of customer loyalty  has been recognised by numerous scholars and studies.    Bowen and Chen (2001) have stated “It is commonly known that there is a positive  relationship between customer loyalty and profitability. loyal customers cost less to serve.  Reichheld and  Sasser (1990) concluded that as a customer’s relationship with a company extends  then profits rise.      37    .  The sheer competitiveness of the food retailing industry ensures that  maintaining market share and increasing profit is an invariable and gruelling  campaign among major players. they also serve as an  information source for other customers”.  Clarke (1997. hardware and personnel.  Today. powered by:  increased purchases of the existing product. increased sales and reduced operational costs.  However. has noted that  “although there are thousands of programmes in existence. pg 3).

Chapter Two – Literature Review   To further the union between loyalty and profit. the substance and worth of word of mouth communication is  essential. pg 146) points out that making customers more loyal will  facilitate them to “remain as customers for longer.   With this perception the customers themselves are a marketing resource through  referrals.    In a “generation of increasingly promotion‐literate customers” (Harlow. pg 347) notes. “building customer loyalty has a direct impact on  profitability and past research has claimed that it can be five times more expensive  to obtain a new customer than to retain one”. stating “that consumers are smarter than marketers generally  perceive. most importantly generate extra business through referrals”.  “Profitability is determined by margins  that depend on a wide mix of factors. the internet has allowed an increase in suppliers of goods  and services to be utilised and all manner of price comparison websites and forums  to appear where members post deals for all variety of goods and services resulting in  sensitive price conscience consumers. family or  colleagues are perceived as a more reliable form of endorsement and assurance. buy more. cited in McIlory  and Barnett 2000. Haywood (1989. pg 381). pg 173). will pay premium  prices and.  However as mentioned.  “The Internet makes a buyers search more  efficient and encourages rational shopping versus a more emotional shopping in  brick and mortar store.  Egan (2001.    “Loyalty is a consequence of creating value for customers and profit is a  consequence of loyalty” (Tapp 2005.  Clarke (1997.  Today’s  consumers know the fundamental messages and aims of promotions designed to get  them to part with their cash. of which loyalty is one” (Dowling and Uncles  1997).    38    . consumers are becoming  increasingly more savvy.  The connection between loyalty and profit is apparent and may initially  appear to be rather simplistic. 1997 cited in  Egan 2001.  pg 381) argues that consumers are taking advantage of suppliers and jumping from  one to another to get the best deal they can. which appeals to our senses” (Trehan 2006).  Personal recommendations from friends.  Khan (1998) is  of the same opinion. and are actively manipulating suppliers for their own ends”.

      39    . 2000. (2001)  that there are over 150 such schemes currently in the UK.  In addition customer  preferences and circumstances change over time. base their decision to participate in loyalty  programs according to their perceptions of fairness” (Lacey and Sneath.  There are many factors at play such as how  one can “totally isolate the effect of one stimulus from all other factors that could  have influenced the target factor” (Butscher. one of  the most debated areas is just how successful are loyalty programmes in delivering  and do they actually create value to either businesses or consumers.  Uncles. 2002.   “Consumers are most likely to participate in programs they believe offer equitable  relationships and will. pg  14) state “there have been more loyalty programmes that have failed than  succeeded”.  2002) or reward programs (Kopalla et al.10   Do Customer Reward Programs Deliver Long Term?    “Loyalty programs are a marketing strategy based on offering an incentive with the  aim of securing customer loyalty to a retailer. 1999.    Given the popularity of loyalty programmes and as suggested by Byrom et al. promotion and other loyalty programmes. pg  462). Bell and Lall.  Despite the considerable growth in customer reward programs. so this type of program are also called frequent purchase  programs (Shoemaker and Lewis. 1999.. pg 387). 2001)” (Gómez.. pg 140). ultimately.  Achieving rewards is related with  purchasing frequency. Kim et al. Humby and Hunt (2004. as well as being exposed to a  whole host of advertisement.    Determining the success of a customer reward program is very subjective in that it  depends on the goals that were set and what echelon of achievement is a loyalty  programme considered to be a success. Dowling and Hammond (2004. Arranz  and Cillán 2006. 2006. pg 100) claim that “only a truly  exceptional program will change the purchasing behaviour of customers to increase  sales revenues significantly”.Chapter Two – Literature Review     2. Long and Schiffman.

Chapter Two – Literature Review  

As mentioned, Tesco is the number one supermarket retailer in the UK and Humby  and Hunt (2004, pg 3) have commented that “Tesco may well have got to this  enviable position without Clubcard – but it could not be done so as quickly or as  cheaply as it has done without the customer data and insight that Clubcard provides.   The information has guided almost all of the key decisions the management team  have made in recent times, reducing the risk of taking bold new initiatives”.      Many critics and scholars believe the customer reward program phenomenon to be  a bribe.  Parker and Worthington (2000, pg 496) have commented that the term  ‘loyalty card’ is a misnomer and that the customer’s loyalty is not for sale.  It cannot  be bought by organisations or deals.  To further this argument, Egan (2001, pg 382)  declared “loyalty is fleeting and cannot be bought”.  Reichheld (1996 cited in Tapp,  pg 170), raises the issue that “loyal customers ignore vouchers and coupons, and are  less price sensitive on individual items than new customers.  There is an interesting  irony here: many companies have ‘loyalty schemes’ which offer lower prices via  points systems in return for loyal custom; but companies whose customers only stay  with them because of the customer reward program don’t have genuinely loyal  customers”.    Reichheld (1996) found that ‘old’ customers pay higher prices than new ones because  fundamentally they are happy with the value they are getting from the company.  Reichheld  (2002, cited in Finnie and Randall), also argues that loyalty programmes can assist in  reducing business costs and increasing profit as “return customers tend to buy more from a  company over time”, “refer others to your company” and “pay a premium to continue to do  business with you rather than switch to a competitor who they are neither familiar nor  comfortable”.  Reichheld (1996) has constantly maintained that companies can’t buy loyalty.   They can only earn it through consistently creating superior value for their customers.    There has been much criticism of customer reward programs and that “most studies  claim lower prices, rather than loyalty schemes, will keep customers coming back for  more” (Matheson, 2003).  Additionally, loyalty programs have faced “mounting    40   

Chapter Two – Literature Review  

pressure concerning their use as a facilitator of specific customer information and  potential to discriminate against non‐member customers because of greater  marketing resource allocations shifted toward selective customers” (Lacey and  Sneath, 2006, pg 462).    When considering the success of loyalty programmes “some indices are easy to  measure, such as number of members, increase in expenditure on loyalty  programme products, and response to special offers.  Indices that are more difficult  to measure include a member’s repeat purchase behaviour or increase in brand  loyalty” (Butscher, 2002, pg 143).    “Perhaps the greatest benefit obtained from loyalty programs resides in the data  mining and knowledge base that firms can use to develop statistical models to  improve customer loyalty, support customer service, and develop new offerings to  help reduce defection and increase customer lifetime value” (Wansink, 2003, cited in  Lacey and Sneath, 2006, pg 461).  Equipped with this specific information,  organisations can design specific communications and product mix offerings.   “Loyalty programs represent an alternative to mass‐market promotion since firms  have the ability to more precisely target an increasingly fragmented customer base,  and communicate customised and relevant vale propositions and marketing  messages to individual customers” (Lacey and Sneath, 2006, pg 461).    What can be established is that loyalty programmes can provide retailers with a  mechanism and justification for individual customer data.  In such fiercely  competitive markets, as commented by Stone (1994, pg 37), “knowing who the best  customers are, what they buy, and how often provides a secret weapon”.  It is  estimated that as a result of the Clubcard scheme Tesco has approximately 100,000  different promotional messages which reflect the buying habits and preferences of  its customers.   

  41 

 

Chapter Two – Literature Review  

Pressey and Matthews (cited in Tapp, 2005, pg 171), argue that “despite the recent  use of loyalty cards and database marketing techniques by UK retailers, most  transactions are ‘discrete, short‐term, one‐off acts”.  Customer reward programs can  also direct businesses to overlook divisions of the business which may need  attention, as noted by Fill (2002, pg 672), “in 2000, the number of in‐store  promotions fell from 700 to just 200, reflecting the need to provide for those whom  are price sensitive”.    Although it is clear that customer reward programs can create value through  personalisation, they are increasingly attracting negative remarks.  O’Malley (1998,  pg 52) describes them as “little more than sophisticated sales promotion”.  Humby  and Hunt (2004, pg 13) profess that customer reward programs can destroy value  and encourage “a ‘Big Brother’ culture” implying that “the relationship isn’t trust, it  is bullying on behalf of corporate giants who won’t give discounts unless you give up  your right to privacy”.  This hints that “loyalty relationships are more appropriate to  business to business markets rather than consumer markets (Dowling and Uncles,  1997).  To further this perception, “The notion of customer loyalty is important to  marketing people but not, on the whole, to customers.  Customers don’t see why  they should accept a good offer from a new supplier just because they are satisfied  with their present one” (McCorkell, 1997 cited in Tapp, 2005, pg 172).    From the above critique and given the fact customer reward programs are “costly  compared to other promotions” (Dowling and Uncles, 1997).  One may question that  perhaps the marketing budget funds are better spent elsewhere.  This is palpable in  the market place today with many businesses projecting funds into lowering prices,  developing own brands and branching out into other markets and services.  Given  the sheer number of organisations participating and operating their own customer  reward programs and consumers owning more than one loyalty card, it is evident  that achieving loyalty is increasingly difficult.   

  42 

 

 1999. an  incremental shift in buying behaviour (Humby and Hunt. the rewards are largely intrinsic. and perhaps  even disenfranchised. Where true loyalty exists. loyalty programs can be used to convey prestige to customers and make  them feel special.  Moreover.  In actuality they are  “effectively locking them into the loyalty programme and preventing them from  moving to a competitor brand” (Fill. behavioural or attitudinal and defined as  “looking to achieve a little extra goodwill.  customers who participate in the program might become frustrated. (2003... pg 461) states.  “The basic premise behind such programs is to reward customers for giving the  company a greater share of their business. They create barriers to exit. 2006.11   It was suggested that there was a difference in every day loyalty and retail loyalty.  Despite the  criticism. Uncles et al. 1997 cited in Lacey and Sneath. 2006. He rarely gets to associate with other members. a slight margin of preference. 2000 cited in Lacey  and Sneath.Chapter Two – Literature Review   “Clearly.  Barnes (2002) also concurs that.  However. pg 459). but they don’t often lead to true loyalty”.  “However the effect on the firm’s non‐participating  customers can lead to dissatisfaction and alienation with the firm. “the ultimate marketing objective behind loyalty  programs is their use as a primary data‐gathering platform that can help improve the  efficiency and effectiveness of a firm’s marketing initiative”. Such programs often lock  customers in. loyalty programmes if executed properly and maintained can be hugely  beneficial to the retailer. One  shopper recently observed in an interview that the frequent‐shopper ‘club’ of which  he is a member feels nothing like any other club to which he has belonged. cited in Lacey and  Sneath 2006. due to their inability to benefit from those programs”  (Downling and Uncles. 2003.  “Loyalty    43    Conclusion  .  Tesco have always maintained that the Clubcard was a  simple “thank you” for customers who shop at their stores and as such offered the  promise of rewards to them. ‘free’  merchandise or trips.   Loyalty was recognised as being emotional. pg 9). pg 459). It never  meets.      2. pg 563). important and appreciated” (Morgan et al. The rewards are extrinsic ‐ points.

 pg 496) raise the issue of a new strain of customers known as  “points junkies” who are desperate to gain and save points in order to redeem them  for free products or services. which transpires through the theory of operant  conditioning. retain and grow profitable  relationships” (ICLP. 2005). the long‐term benefits of a customer reward program and if it creates  value was analysed. pf 52). 2002.  What was found  was the perception that loyalty could actually lead to customers manipulating  suppliers by jumping between organisations to get the best deal.  However the literature surrounding the subject implies  that loyalty schemes/ customer reward programs are manipulative and controlling  and are “little more than sophisticated sales promotion” (O’Malley (1998.  It is widely regarded that loyalty is  established through trust.      Additionally.  Loyalty marketing was also identified as a “business  strategy” (Heskett.  Loyalty programs are “designed to accommodate individual  consumers in the form of added products or enhanced customer service options not  generally presented to all of the firm’s customers” (Lacey and Sneath.Chapter Two – Literature Review   marketing can be defined as the management process of identifying ‘best customers’  and utilising customer data and insight to create. 1999. pg 355). 2006. pg 458).  While Parker and  Worthington (2000. pg 563).   These schemes can offer many benefits to the retailer and act as a mechanism and  justification for accumulating personal data of customers and increasing switching  costs “effectively locking them into the loyalty programme and preventing them for  moving to a competitor brand (Fill. pg 459).        44    .   Reichheld (2002.  Despite this “loyalty programs continue to be  used by organisations as marketing tools to support their customer relationship  management (CRM) strategies” (Lacey and Sneath. pg 27) argues that some loyalty programmes are “just gimmicks to  get the maximum value extracted from a customer base”. Additionally. pg 496)  commented on the knowledge of consumers by questioning “how ethical is a reward  scheme that relies on maintaining the ignorance of the very customers that it wants  to see exhibiting loyal behaviour”. Parker and Worthington (2000. 2006.

 1994) determined how marketing  tasks should be prioritised in order for an organisation to accomplish the target of  loyalty. 2004.  It was also  determined that organisations operating in market sectors where there is intense  competition and similar competitors necessitate the use of loyalty marketing.  By exploring the Tesco Clubcard model we gain a hypothetical insight into  how Tesco are providing an “everyday experience” (Rowley. specifically “lifestyle  themed rewards that appeal to a members’ dream”. “the oft‐cited success of Tesco’s loyalty scheme is difficult to determine  because it was introduced as part of a much broader program of new business  development and store acquisition” (East and Hogg.  it is vital that retailers are more innovative and creative with the rewards they offer.  The focus addressed issues that would  affect the value of a customer reward program and illustrates the need for an  organisation to steer satisfied customers into loyal customers.    However.      Due to the sheer number of customer reward programs being offered to customers. pg 102).      45    . pg 78) imply that some loyalty card members view the  rewards they gain as being opportunities of a lifetime which they have complete  control over having commented that the rewards given to customers must appeal on  a different level and that customer reward program participants are “embracing the  idea of redeeming points for an once‐in‐a‐lifetime experience”.Chapter Two – Literature Review   From the literature review it is apparent that satisfaction and loyalty is not the same  thing and they are not mutually exclusive. And also  commonly found in markets where the core product is a commodity and companies  have great difficulty differentiating themselves” (Tapp.   ”Loyalty schemes tend to be most useful in frequent purchase markets …. pg 199) to their  customers.   Capizzi and Ferguson (2005. 1997 cited in Uncles. 2005.  The theory is that customers  will aspire to collect and redeem more points and thus increase spending. pg 274). 2005. Dowling  and Hammond.    The use of the “Customer Loyalty Ladder” (Payne.

 the customer reward programs  itself and Tesco.  The  main issues is a user profile of the Clubcard and to realise the differentiation  between loyalty in relation to the Clubcard brand.Chapter Two – Literature Review   The completion of the literature review has addressed several objectives.  However  there are areas which have been identified and do require further investigation.                                                46    .  To which of these factors do loyalty schemes generate true loyalty?    These factors and the remaining objectives of the dissertation will be answered and  achieve through primary research in the next chapter.

Chapter Three – Research Methodology                                                      Chapter Three Research Methodology     .

  Referring to section 2.      3.  However. despite this positive  commendation there appears to be a lack of evidence that it has actually created  loyalty. primary research is  essential. pg 36) described satisfaction as being a starting  point in order to create true loyalty.  either through the theory that customers simply need to be satisfied in order to be  loyal or through Duffy’s loyalty calculation hypothesis. pg 17) argued that it should not be contended that  card‐based customer reward programs are credible alternatives to being offered  excellent service.7 in the literature review drawing  attention to the perception that a satisfied customer was not necessarily loyal.  disadvantages and limitations.  The crucial issue raised in the works of these  scholars is that it demonstrates the role of the Tesco Clubcard in building loyalty.0     CHAPTER THREE – RESEARCH METHODOLOGY   3.Chapter Three – Research Methodology   3. innovative products and services or the right price.1   In order to address all the objectives set out in this dissertation.    In conducting the literature review it was noted there was a wealth of acclaim and  admiration for the Tesco Clubcard scheme.  It will impart justification into the chosen method of research  and provide assessment to the chosen approach in terms of advantages.2    From the literature review.  Reichheld (1996) injects that “customer satisfaction is the key to securing customer  loyalty”. Duffy (2001.  All of which    48    Research Objectives  Introduction  .    The methodology will illustrate the chosen methods undertaken in order to conduct  the primary research.  Humby and Hunt (2004.  However. several issues were discovered which required further  investigation and research.

  Tesco.    The literature review also exposed that consumers are increasingly becoming more  aware..  pg 381) supports this view by concluding that consumers are taking advantage of  suppliers and jumping from one to another to get the best deal they can. and are actively manipulating suppliers for their own ends”. then one must determine what factors the customers are  loyal towards. 2005. range of  products and staff assistance. pg 230).  However.6 illustrated the view that Tesco sustained the Clubcard is a  straightforward “thank you” to their customers and it is “designed to give you  something back for shopping with Tesco” (www.  Therefore primary research is  required to be undertaken to determine and establish if the Clubcard has actually  created loyalty. “consumers are smarter than marketers  perceive.   However. it is essential to know if the Clubcard scheme “insulate(s) them  [consumers] sufficiently from switching” (Miranda et al.  Additionally  the literature review indicated that consumers have come to expect some form of    49    .  Tesco have been vigilant to these factors and the  needs of their customers by implementing all of the strategies mentioned. in  addition to the Clubcard customer reward program.  Much of the literature raised the claims that loyalty is  generated and influenced by other factors such as price.com).tesco.   The issue raised here is with regards to the building of affinity that Tesco has with its  customers through the use of specific magazine topics or quarterly mailings.  If it has. pg 39)  commenting that Tesco “did not invent the card nor were they a first mover”. coupons.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  can develop loyalty.    With the quantity and penetration of customer reward programs currently in  operation.  This would  suggest that loyalty card schemes are actually allowing consumers to manipulate  suppliers for their own needs.  Egan (2001. as commented by Khan (1998). from this an  area of interest is found concerning customers being less attentive to rewards and  instead being more interested in gaining appreciation and recognition from Tesco. the Clubcard model is not unique with Seth and Randall (2001. location. the customer reward program or to the Clubcard brand itself?    Section 2.

    2) Gauge the effectiveness of how the gathered information from the Tesco Clubcard  is utilised. pg 1‐2).    3) Recognise and identify the main users of the Tesco Clubcard Scheme.  pg 491). given the number of loyalty  initiatives currently employed by Tesco to facilitate customer satisfaction.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  reward as part of their routine shopping experience (Parker and Worthington. it was felt that several  other objectives were left unresolved.  As commented by Charoenruk (2007.  This research approach is an objective. analyse and  understand their opinions and mind‐set.3    The technique of research methods can be divided into quantitative and qualitative  approaches. It  derives from the scientific method used in the physical sciences (Cormack.    In addition to the issues raised from the literature review. 1991). formal systematic process using numerical    50    Selection of Research Methods  .    5) Establish if the Tesco Clubcard is actually needed. “quantitative research is  described by the terms ‘empiricism’ (Leach. 1990) and ‘positivism’ (Duffy.    4) Determine if the Tesco Clubcard has actually created loyalty and ascertain what  customers are loyal towards. 1985). 2000.    6) Consider the conjecture that consumers are manipulating suppliers for their own  needs by shopping around and participating in other customer reward programs.      3.  From this the research objectives are:    1) Investigate customer opinions and perception on the Tesco Clubcard.

 not  the researcher (Duffy. “qualitative research differs from  qualitative approaches as it develops theory inductively.  With reference to Proctor (2003. focus group discussions  and participant observation are common methods used for collecting qualitative  information. which attempt to elicit descriptive information about  the thoughts and feelings of respondents on a topic of interest to the research”. and examines cause and effect relationships (Burns  & Grove. quantitative research is “a  research methodology that seeks to quantify the data and typically applies some  form of statistical analysis”. 1987). comments that. pg 529). pg 150). qualitative research methods  “usually involve small samples. Benoliel (1985) expanded on this aspect and described  qualitative research as ‘modes of systematic enquiry concerned with understanding  human beings and the nature of their transactions with themselves and with their  understandings”.      51    . 1990).Chapter Three – Research Methodology  data findings.   According to Malthotra and Peterson (2006. pg 2). tests.    Charoenruk (2007. using a deductive process of knowledge attainment (Duffy. which are instead describe in the language  employed during the research process (Leach. There is no explicit intention  to count or quantify the findings. 1987).  Routinely the data is collected using a premeditated  template of questions in the form of a structured questionnaire survey incorporating  primarily closed questions with set responses. it describes.    Qualitative research is chiefly concerned with the collection of in‐depth information  via a process of asking questions to understand how people feel and why they feel as  they do (Market Research World 2006).”   It is primarily concerned with the collection of data using numbers and  measurements.  It seeks to establish relationships between two or more variables via  a process of statistical methods to obtain the connotation of the relationship. 1985).  “There are various vehicles used for  collecting quantitative information but the most common are on‐street or telephone  interviews” (Market Research World 2006).  In‐depth interviews. A qualitative approach is used  as a vehicle for studying the empirical world from the perspective of the subject.

    Researcher tends to become subjectively  immersed in the subject matter. count them. detailed description.      Researcher knows clearly in advance what   he/she is looking for. pictures or objects. time consuming. e.            Researcher uses tools.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  3.         Researcher may only know roughly in advance   what he/she is looking for.  questionnaires etc. able to   test hypotheses.      52    .    The design emerges as the study unfolds. and  construct statistical models in an attempt to  explain what is observed. but may miss contextual detail.3.g. uses participant observation.    Subjective ‐ individuals’ interpretation of events  is important .  and less able to be generalized.g.      Quantitative data is more efficient..      Researcher is the data gathering instrument.      Data is in the form of words..              All aspects of the study are carefully  designed before data is collected.    Qualitative          Quantitative    The aim is a complete.          Recommended during latter phases of  research projects.1 Features of Qualitative and Quantitative Research    Adapted from Neill (2007) ‐ Qualitative versus quantitative research: key points in a  classic debate.  in‐depth interviews etc.        Researcher tends to remain objectively  separated from the subject matter.      Objective – seeks precise measurement &  analysis of target concepts.e. such as questionnaires  or equipment to collect numerical data.  Data is in the form of numbers and statistics.                      The aim is to classify features.    Recommended during earlier phases of   research projects.      Qualitative data is more 'rich'. uses surveys.

 pg 150) comments that.  The qualitative  approach places emphasis on gaining in‐depth answers from a small number of  respondents. pg 179). whereas in contrast quantitative approaches accentuates gaining  statistical information from a large number of respondents. 2003.Chapter Three – Research Methodology    In order to achieve the objectives of the methodology.  “questionnaires can be designed to determine what people know. but collect the data in the  most accurate way possible”. the selected research method  to be used requires the outcome of a combination of statistical analysis in addition  to an indication with regards to consumers’ attitudes and perceptions. what they think or  how they act or plan to act ….    From the research methods mentioned above it has been determined that a  questionnaire survey will be the most effective and efficient medium in order to  achieve the objectives of the dissertation. the  questionnaire must not only collect the data required.    It is often mentioned amongst marketing research literature that qualitative and  quantitative approaches are bipolar measurements of data. Veal (1997.  An additional benefit of using open questions is that it allows for a  multitude of replies “where each respondent can give a personal response or  opinion in his or her own words” (Collis and Hussey. This supports the suggesting that qualitative  characteristic questions in a survey can be collected by using open ended questions  seeking opinions.  Luck and Rubin (1987) defined a  questionnaire as a “formalised schedule to obtain and record specific and relevant  information with tolerable accuracy and completeness”.  Additionally.  Bruce (2004. states  that “the role of the questionnaire is to elicit the information that is required to  enable the researcher to answer the objectives of the survey. The flexibility of the questionnaire results in very few  rules to follow in development of the instrument”. McNabb (2004. pg  34) has observed that “sometimes the information is qualitative in nature but is  presented in quantitative form”. pg 7).  To do this.      53    .  However.

2 Analysis of Data    Results and analysis of the data using a computer software package known as SPSS  (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) can be found in appendix C and appendix  D respectively. however.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  The decision to use a quantitative method over a qualitative approach was based on  the grounds that a large representative sample is needed. pg 81).  It is imperative that there is unbiased study and analysis of data. pg 7).  However.  Qualitative research is  principally based on in‐depth interviews and focus groups based on non‐ representative samples. it is felt that this understanding can be an achieved to an  extent on a larger scale and at considerably less expense.      3. it is apparent that in order to  extract the required information the interviewer required a great skill set. worse.      3.  Therefore this method is regarded to be inappropriate to  the study.4                54    “The questionnaire represents one part of the survey process. 2004. A poorly written questionnaire will not  provide the data that are required or.  One  such possible scenario with using a focus group could be that an individual could  influence other respondents or control the group to a specific direction.3. It is.    It is acknowledged that focus groups are a useful medium for understanding  emotions and attitudes.  a very vital part of the process. by using both qualitative and quantitative  techniques in the survey.   Furthermore.  Questionnaire Design  . “given the extensive training required to conduct a sophisticated  qualitative study” (McDaniel and Gates. will provide data that are  incorrect” (Bruce. 2006.

 pg 151) has constructed an Eight‐Step questionnaire construction  procedure      Malhotra (1999. Motivate respondents to answer all questions to the best of their ability.  The questionnaire must:            1). Successfully gather information that answers each study question. cited in McNabb.4. pg 151) claims that in the preparation of a  questionnaire “the researcher must follow a systematic procedure in order to be  sure that it fulfils three broad objectives.      3. Keep all potential error to a minimum.  3).Chapter Three – Research Methodology  As the questionnaire is the chief data collection tool. it is essential that the questions  are appropriate to what this study is intending to achieve.  2).”    55    .1 The Eight‐Step Questionnaire Construction Procedure    McNabb (2004. 2004.  Emphasis should be on  using the correct terminology and it should be appropriate enough to extract the  required information from the respondent base.

    The query of age group and sex of respondents are used to help meet the objective  of building a profile of the Tesco Clubcard user. 2006.  It was devised that the multiple choice closed questions allowed    56    . pg 8). 2004. pg 151). avoiding double‐barrelled questions and jargon to avoid any  unnecessary confusion. the above questionnaire construction table has been used as a  guideline rather than a checklist of steps as “questionnaire construction is as much  as art as it is a science” (McNabb.4. “a questionnaire  writer who is not familiar with the vocabulary of a market can very quickly come  unstuck”.  As age can be a sensitive issue it was  decided that the use of pre‐coded groups was the best method.2 Justification of Questions    The preliminary intentions for the survey have been recognised from the secondary  data.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  With this in mind.      3.  As commented by Bruce (2004. pg  272).  The validation of the questions used  can be found in appendix A. pg 30).  This has identified the issues and areas to be addressed by providing “a map  for the questionnaire” (Punch.  Additionally the consideration for avoiding bias in a question has been  noted and the problem if respondent’s inability to evoke has been abridged by  keeping the “reference time periods relatively short” (McDaniel and gates. 2003.    The questionnaire consists predominantly of both multiple choice and dichotomous  closed questions.3 Question Types and Wording    It is imperative that the questionnaire has been constructed using clear and concise  terminology.4.        3.

 pg 154).    The addition of an open question has been incorporated in the questionnaire. it is important. forbidding and boring….   The justification adopting a five‐point Likert scale is to  ensure that respondents have a sufficient choice of responses which best represents  their feeling and it will also increase the response rate and quality of responses. it is    57    .  The  initiative for this is to allow respondents to use their own words and expressions  without restricting choice.4  Questionnaire Layout    Cohen and Manion (1994. pg 258).  additionally this approach allows for attitudes to be measured and analysed  accurately.  Although analysis of this data will not be as straight  forward as the closed questions. 1999. certain questions within the  questionnaire will be graded using a Likert scale of one to five where ”respondents  are instructed to tick the response options that best reflect their positions on each  item” (Foddy. commented that “the appearance of the  questionnaire is vitally important. for  respondents to be introduced to the purposes of each section of a questionnaire.  The dichotomous questions were purposely limited to two  fixed alternatives as this is easier to manage but it also ensures a rapid answer from  respondents.  Furthermore it will enable an opportunity for the  interviewer to encourage respondents to develop and expand on their answers and  reveal more information. attractive and interesting rather  than complicated.  It must look easy. unclear. it was determined that they could support the data  obtained from the previous questions and reveal more information with regards to  their motivations and attitudes.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  respondents to indicate their opinions as well as allowing for more than one  response to be recorded.      3. perhaps.  If space permits. so  that they can become involved in it and maybe identify with it.4.  In order to gain a better understanding of respondents’ opinions and  to allow for a more precise measurement of attitudes.

 the opening question in the questionnaire will determine if the respondent  is qualified. if he/she owns a Tesco Clubcard.  This refers to “the way the  gathered data will be coded. easy‐to‐use statistical software tabulate almost all survey results. 2006.  It is vital  that care and attention must be taken so that no attempt is made to take lead or  influence the respondent into giving answers they normally would not give. i.6  Coding    “Coding means assigning a code.4.  The validation for this method of data collection is so  that the interviewer can ensure that the responses received are complete. and interpreted… Computers using  readily available.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  useful to tell the respondent the purposes and foci of the sections/of the  questionnaire”.    The questionnaire will commence establishing connection through the introductory  statement detailing the topic and the motive for carrying it out.        3. accurate  and facilitates any questions that respondents may field during the survey.   For this reason. usually a number.5  Interviewer versus Respondent Completion    The chosen method of data collection is that the questionnaires will act as an initial  script whereby the interviewer reads out the questions to the respondent and  records the answer they give.4. pg 407).e. tabulated. making data entry simple and less    58    .  Once initial contact  is made. most questionnaires are pre‐coded (classification numbers appear  beside each question and each possible response).  If the answer is negative then the  questionnaire will be terminated to avoid wasting time for either party. to each possible response to  each question” (Malhotra and Peterson.      3. analysed.  A positive  answer will be followed by a brief description of the respondent and multiple choice  questions which can be answered quickly and accurately.

 2003. pg 9).  Using this process will  eliminate any subjectivity and ensure a fair method of acquiring respondents.  This can be  classified as “convenience sampling” in which “the sampling selection process is  continued until your required sample size has been reached” (Saunders et al.          3.  The size of the sample  has had to be limited due to available time. pg 153).  Furthermore it has been determined that  potential respondents will be approached as they enter the supermarket.5    It has been determined that approximately 100 respondents shall be drawn from a  population of all visitors to Tesco in Newcastle Upon Tyne.  Regardless of the  response the process will start over again. 2004. money and resources.      Sample Selection Procedure and Sample Characteristics    59    . “every member of the target population has a  known nonzero probability of being included in the sample”.  As  commented by Fink (1995.    It is felt that probability sampling would be the most appropriate method.. whereby  every forth person that passes will be asked to participate.  pg 177).Chapter Three – Research Methodology  error‐prone… Responses to open‐ended questions are grouped into categories and  classes are then translated into numerical form for counting and additional statistical  analysis” (McNabb.    Potential respondents will be approached as they enter the supermarket and the  probability sampling that will be employed will be a rule of four persons. therefore  there is no set criteria for respondents other than that they are Tesco customers.  The  reason for this is because potential contributors are more likely to participate when  empty handed and less likely to be in a rush.

  Questionnaires can be custom‐designed to meet the  objectives of almost any type of research paper” (McNabb.30am ‐ 11.30am ‐ 11.1 Strengths    The method of using a questionnaire allows responses to be collected in a  standardised way. 2004. Limitations and Validity  Completed Questionnaires  14  24  19  22  12  9  TOTAL = 100  .30am        3.30am ‐ 11.        3.30am  19th April 2008 ‐ 9. resulting in the data being more objective.  The greatest of these is the considerable  flexibility of the questionnaire. it has its merits but additionally it also contains limitations and issues of  validity.6.30am ‐ 11.  The questionnaire was carried out on  the following dates and times:      Date & Time  15th April 2008 ‐ 9.  This results in a  reduced bias and allows respondents to talk freely. pg 150).30am  16th April 2008 ‐ 9.30am  18th April 2008 ‐ 9.Chapter Three – Research Methodology  The times and dates in which this research was carried out were unfortunately  constrained by the periods that Tesco allowed.30am  20th April 2008 ‐ 9.30am ‐ 11.30am  17th April 2008 ‐ 9.    “Questionnaires have many advantages.6   The proposed method of collecting data through questionnaires is akin to any form  of research.30am ‐ 11.    60    Strengths.

 if required. like many evaluation methods occur after the event. pg 27). data will  only be obtained from consumers who happen to visit the store on the specific days  the survey is conducted and within the allocated time frame.  Due to the restrictions.  Moreover this would facilitate the platform of a structured logical analysis  and.   Information can be gathered from a large portion of a group.      3. respondents may answer superficially.Chapter Three – Research Methodology    Furthermore the information gathered can be presented in numerical and graphical  form.  This is valid in all research models nonetheless this factor must be  taken into consideration when carrying out an analysis of the results. 1999).2  Limitations    “Questionnaires.  The use of the forth  person rule ensures that everyone calling into Tesco on the days and time the  questionnaire will take place has an equal probability of being chosen to carry out  the questionnaire.6. this can be re‐analysed by others.            61    .    The time limits imposed by Tesco for when the questionnaire can be conducted will  not be 100% representative of their customer base.    Additionally. however as the questionnaire is  designed to be completely relatively quickly hopefully this issue can be avoided. so participants  may forget important issues” (Milne. “there is always a gap between what people say and what they  actually do”.    Using a questionnaire results in a potentially large representative sample.  As commented by Clarke and Crichter  (1985.

  Using the questionnaire as a  research tool and combining quantitative and qualitative research methods will  answer the aims of the study. 1986.  For example.   If a questionnaire is shown to be unreliable  then there is no discussion of validity. validity could be compromised by an assortment of  scenarios and circumstances.      3.    62    Summary  .  This will further enhance the validity of the  questionnaire.  “Reliability is  a characteristic of the instrument itself. if respondents are in a rush to complete  the questionnaire this could affect their responses. “validity refers to whether the  questionnaire or survey measures what it intends to measure”.  EWB (2007) back this up by citing.7   The method in which the data will be collected has been defined and acknowledged  with validation in this chapter of the dissertation. pg 186) commented that validity  is “the extent to which (the questionnaires) accurately reflect what they are meant  to reflect”. pg 13).  The next chapter presents the research findings and  provides analysis of the results.  Veal (1987. the possibility of  respondents giving exaggerated responses or “fail to interpret the questions as  intended by its designer” (Belson. validity depends chiefly on reliability.6.Chapter Three – Research Methodology    3.    The proposal of approaching respondents and interviewing them before they enter  the store is made on the basis that the respondents latest experience with Tesco  may cause an irrational change in their opinion and thus resulting in inaccurate data  being recorded by the questionnaire. but validity comes from the way the  instrument is employed” (EWB 2007).  Additionally.3  Validity    In the context of questionnaires.    In an interview situation.

Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis                                                                Chapter Four Research Findings and Analysis   .

2    From the research methodology it was determined that there are several areas that  need to be established.    Individual frequency tables of the results can be found in appendix D      4.      4.  This has enabled the analysis to be divided into separate  sections in order to achieve each objective.1    The subsequent chapter will present the findings gained from the primary research  conducted via the questionnaire (appendix B) and interpret the results.        64  Analysis  Introduction  CHAPTER FOUR – RESEARCH FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS    .1  User Profile of Tesco Clubcard Respondents    The secondary research highlighted a distinct lack of information with regards to the characteristics of the fundamental users of loyalty cards.  This segment  of the study provides the fundamental information and data required in order to  meet the aims of the dissertation.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis    4.2.  The results  from the quantitative research have been correlated and investigated.  It has therefore been  determined that an ideal starting point is to identify and establish a user profile of  the selected sample.  The techniques employed in order to  present the findings of the analysis include frequency tables and cross tabulation.  Using the rule of every forth person helped ensure that the  sampling was random.0    4.

2.0 100.1 shows the results from the questionnaire illustrating that out of the  100 respondents.59 5 10 15 60 + 5 9 14 Total 29 71 100 Figure 4.0 100.1  Please choose your Gender: Cumulative Frequency Valid Male Female Total 29 71 100 Percent 29.0   Figure 4.29 9 12 21 30 .0 71.  The  data shows clearly the mass appeal of the Clubcard to be across all age    65    .1.2.39 5 23 28 40 .1.  Interestingly.0 Percent 29.49 3 9 12 50 .2 shows the age group of respondents compared to their gender.1. 29 are males and 71 are female.0 71.2.0 100.  Although the data obtained was  somewhat limited by the sample size and time scale.0 Valid Percent 29. the fact that 29 males owned a card  shows that men are also active consumers and the Tesco Clubcard has effectively  obtained the segment.      Figure 4.2.2  Please choose your Gender: * Please indicate which age group you fall into: Crosstabulation Count Please indicate which age group you fall into: Under 21 Please choose your Gender: Male Female Total 2 8 10 22 . it does exemplify that women  are more likely to be cardholders.1.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis      Figure 4.

     The results also show that the Tesco Clubcard appeals to every age group and that  Tesco is effectively managing its relationship with customers in each of their  different “life stage” (Simm.  What this shows is that Tesco has been successful  in establishing position in the market place.49 50 .    66    . it is also shown in the 22‐29 and  30‐39 age groups higher claims that they do not trust Tesco. 2007) to attain competitive advantage and thus adding  value to the Clubcard scheme.    Figure 4.29 30 .1.59 60 + Total 4 3 3 4 5 2 21 Agree 4 8 16 5 5 9 47 No Opinion 1 1 2 1 4 1 10 Disagree 0 7 4 2 1 2 16 Disagree 1 2 3 0 0 0 6 Total 10 21 28 12 15 14 100     Figure 4. 22% did not trust Tesco while 68% did trust Tesco (the other 10%  neither agreeing nor disagreeing).2.  Conversely.39 40 . there is no evidence to  suggest that the trust exemplified was formed by Clubcard single‐handedly.2.  In total out of the 100  respondents.3    Please indicate which age group you fall into: * I trust Tesco products and their image Crosstabulation Count I trust Tesco products and their image Strongly Strongly Agree Please indicate which age group you fall into: Under 21 22 .1.3 highlights the age of the respondents compared with their level of  trust for Tesco products and the Tesco image.  However.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  demographics and from the data we can establish that the typical male user of  Clubcard is aged 22‐29 and for females aged 30‐39.  The above data indicates that the age  groups most likely to be loyal to Tesco’s due to the notion they trust Tesco products  and its image are the 30‐39 age groups.

0 18.  It is essential that this margin is not overlooked  or ignored as this marker represents a large percentage and demonstrates that some  consumers do not buy into the scheme and are simply not motivated by the rewards  on offer.2.  However.0 18.0 81.0 1.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  4. 1978. pg 19).0 39.      Figure 4.0 100.  This  high value could be accounted for by suggesting that customers value the Clubcard  and have integrated it into their normal shopping behaviour and routine.2.0 100. furthermore it also illustrates that the Tesco Clubcard scheme is not enough  to keep specific customers loyal to Tesco. the results from the questionnaire show  that this concept is indeed not generic and that some consumers do not view one set    67    .2  Customer Perceptions on Tesco Clubcard    The specific focus of the questionnaire has resulted in limited results of Clubcard  users. creating unambiguous data that are significant to the study.0 1.  However.0 Percent 42.  despite this the results also show that there is a remaining 19% of customers who  seldom or never use their Clubcard.1 discloses that a total of 81% of the respondents surveyed used their  Tesco Clubcard always or frequently when completing a transaction with Tesco.6 and that “if a given bit of behaviour  has a consequence of a special sort.0 39.0 99.0 100. it is more likely to occur again upon similar  occasions” (Skinner.2.2.  With reference to operant conditioning as  mentioned in the literature review in section 2.1    Please indicate how often you use your Clubcard when you purchase goods or services with Tesco Cumulative Frequency Valid Always Frequently Little Never Total 42 39 18 1 100 Percent 42.0 Valid Percent 42.0   Figure 4.2.

would you still continue to shop there? Crosstabulation Count If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme.2  Please indicate which age group you fall into: * If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme.59 60 + Total 21 26 11 14 13 95 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 2 21 28 12 15 14 100 10 No 0 Don't Know 0 Total 10   Figure 4.2.  The results show that a resounding 95% of respondents  across all age demographics would still continue to shop there.2.    68    .Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  of behaviours to lead to positive outcomes.2.2.2 shows the age of respondents equated with the notion that if Tesco  did not have the Clubcard customer reward program in place.  It also raises the notion that loyalty is more behavioural than  attitudinal. adding value to the statement that  behaviour is not generic amongst all consumers and that some customers are not  affected or influenced by the prospect of rewards.39 40 .      Figure 4.  Appreciably what these results show is that Tesco is doing and  offering so much more than merely a loyalty card that facilitates repeat purchases to  their customers. would they still  continue to shop there.29 30 .  This raises the  notion that perhaps customers view the Clubcard as being of little or no significance  or application when they do their shopping at Tesco and in actual fact perceive it as  an additional bonus. would you still continue to shop there? Yes Please indicate which age Under 21 group you fall into: 22 .49 50 .

2.3  I think Tesco is very innovative * I feel more could be done to increase my loyalty Crosstabulation Count I feel more could be done to increase my loyalty Strongly Strongly Agree I think Tesco is very innovative Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Total 1 4 0 0 5 Agree 8 46 16 2 72 No Opinion 2 8 4 0 14 Disagree 0 4 2 1 7 Disagree 1 1 0 0 2 Total 12 63 22 3 100 What we can establish from figure 4.2.2.2. conversely 75% view Tesco as being an innovative company.    Figure 4.  What is evident  from these findings is that despite consumers feeling that more could be done to  increase their loyalty they nevertheless view Tesco as being an inventive company  and in a positive light.2.3 is that 77% of the respondents surveyed  either strongly agree or agree that more could be done by Tesco to increase their  loyalty.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  Figure 4.2.4  I trust Tesco products and their image * I feel more could be done to increase my loyalty Crosstabulation Count I feel more could be done to increase my loyalty Strongly Strongly Agree I trust Tesco products and Strongly Agree their image Agree No Opinion Disagree Strongly Disagree Total 1 3 1 0 0 5 Agree 16 34 5 13 4 72 No Opinion 2 7 2 2 1 14 Disagree 1 2 2 1 1 7 Disagree 1 1 0 0 0 2 Total 21 47 10 16 6 100   69    .

  What can be identified  from this is despite customers’ attitudes to more being done to keep them loyal they  would still continue to purchase products from services due to their confidence in  the products and brand offered by Tesco.2.            70    .3.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis    As stated previously and as shown in figure 4. despite this.  This  comparison again shows the loyalty that Tesco has generated and that the majority  of customers will shop there regardless of a customer reward program.  However.      Figure 4.2.2.  However. would you still continue to shop there? Don't Know Total 1 10 1 50 0 30 0 10 2 100 Yes No 8 1 Agree 48 1 No Opinion 29 1 Disagree 10 0 Total 95 3     Figure 4. despite this  95% would continue to shop at Tesco if they did not have the Clubcard scheme.2. would you still continue to shop there? * I expect rewards to be a part of my normal shopping experience Crosstabulation Count I expect rewards to be a part of my normal shopping experience Strongly Agree If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme.2. 77% of respondents felt more  could be done to increase their loyalty.2. 68% strongly agree or  agree on trusting Tesco products and their brand image.5 shows that 60% of the respondents strongly agree or agree that they  expect rewards as part of their normal shopping experience.  However  what is unclear are all the separate factors that have contributed to build this loyalty.5  If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme.

     71    .Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis    Figure 4. Additionally.2.2.2.6 shows that 61% of respondents have redeemed some kind of reward  with Tesco in the last 12 months.Not Important At All Total 4 7 5 13 12 9 5 6 61 No 5 1 2 3 9 3 11 5 39 Total 9 8 7 16 21 12 16 11 100   Figure 4. but instead view other  factors as being more important to them.  This shows that consumers are not principally interested in  customer reward programs or the rewards they can attain from despite a relatively  high number of respondents’ taking advantage of them.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .2.  What this finding illustrates is that  shoppers’ attitudes have changed and they view other factors as being more  important than earning points on their purchases. 8 = not important at all).  What these results reveal is that consumers are  attracted to the rewards and seek to realise the experiential and lifestyle themed  incentives that Tesco makes available to them.  When these results are analysed we can see  that 60% of respondents do not view loyalty card schemes as being primarily  important (ranked 4‐8). 40% of respondents  rank a customer reward programs importance between 1‐4 on a scale of 8 (1 = very  important.6  Loyalty Card Scheme * Have you redeemed any rewards from the Clubcard scheme within the last 12 months? Crosstabulation Count Have you redeemed any rewards from the Clubcard scheme within the last 12 months? Yes Loyalty Card Scheme 1 .

1 also indicated that 19% of the respondents are loyal and  satisfied with Tesco. 54% of the respondents surveyed  described themselves as being satisfied Tesco customers.  One justification for this could be defined by Barnes  (2002) as “functionally loyal” and mentioned in section 2.3  Loyalty and Satisfaction  The debate in the correlation between loyalty and satisfaction has been highlighted  in the literature. figure 4. when the  question is cross tabulated we can see that 31% are satisfied but would describe  themselves as not being loyal.  By using a cross tabulation table.  However.3.  Functionally loyal is  whereby customers are only loyal because they have an objective reason to be such  as convenience.2.3. 13% of respondents  expressed they were not satisfied Tesco customers but were loyal.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis    4.    Furthermore.  What we can deduce from this is that satisfied  customers are not necessarily loyal to a business.1). the individual variables can be  analysed (figure 4.3.5.    Figure 4. exhibiting that  they are locked into being loyal.  Accordingly.2.2. factors such as opening times and location is central to them.2.1  Would you describe yourself as being loyal to Tesco? * Would you describe yourself to be a satisfied customer of Tesco? Crosstabulation Count Would you describe yourself to be a satisfied customer of Tesco? Yes Would you describe yourself as being loyal to Tesco? Yes No Don't Know Total 19 31 4 54 No 13 15 1 29 Don't Know 4 12 1 17 Total 36 58 6 100   The results from the table show that overall.  It is advocated that this percentage of respondents achieved    72    .

1 below demonstrates the  frequency of the respondents who read the clubcard magazine. “increasing satisfaction does not produce an equal increase in loyalty for all  customers”.    73    .    What can be concluded is that the Clubcard scheme does add value and operating in  conjunction with other loyalty marketing tools that Tesco utilise.  2005.7) notion  that.    Some consumers simply need to be satisfied with a business in order to be loyal.1 indicates that most  consumers need more than satisfaction to be loyal. the results indicate that more additional factors are  required in order to “insulate them (customers) from switching” (Miranda et al.4 Tesco’s Efficiency and Use of the Information Gained from Clubcard    The Clubcard magazine has a run of nearly 9 million copies four times a year (Stone.4. pg 203) and is an integral part of the Clubcard scheme.    The results show that the association between loyalty and satisfaction is not  achievable through a single method alone and in actual fact is dependent on  consumers’ own variables. the 12% divergence from the results in figure 4.7.  2004. pg 230). allows customers to reach a state of loyalty via  different routes and methods.   However. such as competitive  pricing and customer service.3.  Thus confirming Söderlund’s (1998 – section 2.      4.    The Clubcard scheme can be viewed as a starting point to loyalty as mentioned by  Duffy (2001. pg 36).  However.  It was shown in the  previous section that 61% of respondents surveyed have redeemed some kind of  reward from Tesco in the last 12 months.  Figure 4.2.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  their loyalty condition through the linear progression theory as pointed out in  section 2..2.2.

0 Valid Percent 25. unhelpful and of no use 13 7 20 Total 25 26 51   74    .2.2.  These statistics are dependant  on how long the respondent has been a Clubcard member.0 100.  However.0 49. It covers everything you would expect and is of great use Do you read Clubard magazine Yes Sometimes Total 3 5 8 It is a good read with some informative articles and features 9 14 23 It is dull.4.0 100.0 26.0 Percent 25.0 100.0 26. Crosstabulation Count If “yes” please indicate what you think of the magazine.4.2  Do you read Clubcard magazine * If “yes” or “sometimes please indicate what you think of the magazine.        Figure 4. what can be  devised from this is that it does signify that consumers have a lack of interest in this  medium.0 49.0 74.1  Do you read Clubcard Magazine Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Sometimes Total 25 49 26 100 Percent 25.0   The results show that 49% of respondents claim to not read the Clubcard magazine  and that only 51% answered positively to reading it.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis    Figure 4.

Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  Furthermore.2 shows that out of the 51 respondents surveyed who did  read the Clubcard magazine.2.  unhelpful and of no use to them. this could suggest that Tesco is not  suitably employing the data it has gathered from Clubcard to efficiently and  effectively communicate with its end customers.2.Not 1 .4.      4. a staggering 20 of them found the magazine to be dull.    Figure 4. figure 4. a slight margin of preference.2.  Consequently. an incremental shift in buying  behaviour”. the data can be divided into true loyal and functionally  loyal.Very Important Does the collection Yes of points influence you to buy more or to buy specific/alternative promotional products Don't Know Total 21 29 19 13 9 5 3 1 100 2 6 3 1 2 2 2 0 18 No 0 19 2 1 22 3 3 13 4 1 11 5 1 6 6 0 3 7 0 1 Important At All 0 1 Total 6 76   75    .1    Does the collection of points influence you to buy more or to buy specific/alternative promotional products * Location Of Store Crosstabulation Count Location Of Store 8 . it could be suggested  that the marketing funds could be better utilised elsewhere.  To highlight a shift in buying behaviour it is practical to recognise and  acknowledge if the collection of points results in an increase of the respondents’  expenditure.  Therefore.5. pg 9) implied that retail loyalty is “looking to achieve a little   extra goodwill.5 Has the Tesco Clubcard Created Loyalty?    Humby and Hunt (2004.  By means of cross tabulating the data with how important respondents  rank the location of a store.

0 45.  This  suggests a minor fraction of substantiation against the functionally loyal concept. though only 6% of the respondents stated that their spending increased in  their pursuit of points.0 10.0 100. none of  them ranked the location of a store as being the most important factor to them.  However.0 83.2.5. while 17% professed they only own a Tesco  Clubcard.  The  importance of word of mouth exposure was pointed out in section 2. on closer inspection.1 shows that from the 100 respondents surveyed. this is a noteworthy figure in relation to profits.0 73.0 17.0 17.2.0 Valid Percent 28.2.  At a glance this statistic appears to show  that the Tesco Clubcard has failed in its activity to create loyalty and generate an  increase in sales.    Figure 4.      4.6  Are Consumers Manipulating Suppliers?    Figure 4.  Remarkably the  respondents who are increasing their expenditure because of the Clubcard.6.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  Figure 4. and with reference to preceding  literature.2.0 100. a total of 83%  indicated that they own and regularly use up to 3 other store loyalty cards in  addition to their Tesco Clubcard. do you own and regularly use other store loyalty cards? Please indicate how many: Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 other card 2 other cards 3 or more other cards I only own a Tesco Clubcard Total 28 45 10 17 100 Percent 28.7 and thus this  number can be seen as favourable in regards to profit margins.0 100.1 shows that 76% of the respondents surveyed claimed that the  collection of points did not influence them to increase their expenditure or to buy  specific alternative/promotional products.0 Percent 28.0 10.0   76    .0 45.1  Apart from Clubcard.6.

2.   Furthermore these results actually constraint the value of the Tesco Clubcard as a  loyalty marketing tool.0 32.0 100.  attitudes and perceptions.0 8. loyalty is now much harder to achieve.2.  Additionally.2  I usually shop around to get the best deals Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Strongly Disagree Total 28 32 10 22 8 100 Percent 28.  Figure 4.6.0 Percent 28.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  These results lead to the principle that competitors are finding it straightforward to  replicate and imitate similar offerings.0 100.  It can be  contended that when the Tesco Clubcard was first introduced in 1995 it could have  achieved loyalty through its uniqueness and innovation. it also points to the belief that the Tesco  Clubcard is little more than an expensive sales promotion technique.2 below puts this finding into practice as it illustrates that 60% of the  respondents surveyed either strongly agree or agree that they actually shop around  to get the best deals.0 32.  What this data confirms is that consumers are savvy.0 10.  One can question  if loyalty cards have reached saturation point and if the era of the Tesco Clubcard is  over?    Figure 4.9 and that they are manipulating suppliers for their own  gains.0 92.0 10.6.0     77    .0 70. reinforcing Khan’s (1998) notion “that consumers are smarter than marketers  generally perceive.0 8.0 60. and are actively manipulating suppliers for their own ends”.0 22. as  mentioned in section 2. and consumers are harvesting the benefits  from all these schemes.0 Valid Percent 28.0 22.0 100. today amongst  the twenty‐first century generation of consumers who have more diverse tastes.  However.

0 50.0 30.0 100. pg 496) also argued that such schemes were unethical and lead to the  materialisation of “points junkies”.0 90.0 60.2.      78    .2.2. pg 496).  Additionally Parker and Worthington  (2000.4 indicates that consumers are not as  ignorant as originally advocated.0 100.0 50.6.  Figure 4.0 Percent 10.0 30.6.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  With the sheer profusion on different but similar customer reward programs being  employed by organisations and offered to consumers.0 100.3  I expect rewards to be a part of my normal shopping experience Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Total 10 50 30 10 100 Percent 10.      Figure 4.3 reveal that 60% of respondents expect some kind  of reward as part of their normal everyday shopping experience. the data acquired through the  survey and shown in figure 4.0 Valid Percent 10.  However.  This exemplifies  the need for market leading suppliers to invest in loyalty marketing schemes in order  to compete for evolved consumers with exceptionally high buyer power. as well as pointing out that consumers recognise  how much they need to invest in to the scheme in order to receive a laudable  prize/reward.0 10.  A total of 52% of respondents correctly indicated that they knew that  for every pound they spent at Tesco they would receive one point in the Clubcard  scheme. 2000.0 10.0   The secondary research remarked that loyalty card schemes rely “on maintaining the  ignorance of the very customers that it wants to see exhibiting loyal behaviour”  (Parker and Worthington. the information gathered from the  survey opposes this hypothesis.6.

29 30 .49 50 .2.2.59 60 + Total 5 12 17 8 6 4 52 2 points for every £1 1 1 4 1 1 2 10 5 points for every £1 1 1 0 2 4 1 9 10 points for every £1 3 7 7 1 4 7 29 Total 10 21 28 12 15 14 100   4.6.1 below provides this information.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  Figure 4.2.7.7.39 40 .4  Please indicate which age group you fall into: * Do you know how many Clubcard points you gain for every £1 you spend in store? Crosstabulation Count Do you know how many Clubcard points you gain for every £1 you spend in store? 1 point for every £1 Please indicate which age group you fall into: Under 21 22 .2.7  Does Tesco Really Need the Clubcard  The data collected from the survey has provided an important insight into the  significance of what factors respondents place upon that influence loyalty.      Figure 4.  Figure  4.1        Value for money  Location of store  Quality of service and staff  Loyalty card scheme  Product range and presentation  Overall store layout and appearance  In‐store promotional magazine and flyers  Money off coupons/vouchers and special  promotions  1  Very  important  31%  21%  12%  9%  25%  1%  1%  0%  2        18%  29%  14%  8%  19%  9%  1%  2%  3        20%  19%  24%  7%  12%  12%  2%  4%  4        10%  13%  19%  16%  14%  13%  5%  8%  5        3%  9%  13%  21%  15%  18%  8%  6        6%  5%  8%  12%  4%  27%  14%  7  8     Not very     important  8%  4%  3%  1%  6%  4%  16%  11%  9%  2%  11%  9%  18%  51%  18%  14%  25%  29%    79    .

    The findings exemplify that location of store and value for money are the most  influential determinant factors in achieving loyalty.  The ranking system also shows  that loyalty card schemes are in the bottom half of important factors when choosing  a primary supermarket.  8) Money off coupons/vouchers and special promotions.2 show the results of the open‐ended question in the survey.  6) Overall store layout and appearance.2.    Figure 4.   3) Product range and presentation. if we  examine the other end of the grading scale we can see that a staggering 51% of the  respondents ranked in‐store promotional magazine and flyers as 8 (not very  important).  5) Loyalty card scheme.7.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis      Taking into account what respondents valued as 1 and 2 (very important/important)  and totalling them up revealed the highest ranked order to be:    1) Location of store.  7) In‐store promotional magazine and flyers.  4) Quality of service and staff.  The aim of  which was to give respondents the opportunity to freely write their own comments  and remarks into how Tesco could make them more loyal.  This is an interesting discovery as these are both products of the Tesco  Clubcard.  The responses were  grouped as follows:        80    .  These findings are substantiation that Tesco may be better off investing  money into other areas rather than in its Clubcard scheme.  2) Value for money.  Although the results show that money off  coupons/vouchers and special promotions as being the least important.

0 3.0 22.0 14. improved  provisions for older people.0 100.0 48.0 10.0 16.0 58.0 3.0 1.0 77.0 3.0 12. the findings also show that Tesco should consider investing extra  money into providing adequate transport facilities for customers.0 Valid Percent 10.0 100.0 99.0 Percent 10.   This evidence points towards consumers trying to un‐complicate and simplify their  everyday lives and that the Clubcard is in theory complicating things for them.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  Figure 4.0 3.  The feeling is that the Tesco Clubcard should evolve by    81    .0 1. increased product selection and improvements to the  online shopping service.2.0 3.7.0 3.0 4 12 3 3 3 16 1 100 4.0 14.0 2.0 46.0 2.0 12.0 80.  discounts from their final shopping bill.    Additionally.0 10.0 32.2  What more could Tesco do to make you more loyal? Cumulative Frequency Valid Improve facilities for elderly people Have discounts at the till rather than rewards Help those without transport Improve store layout Faster checkouts/self service checkouts More Clubcard points per pound Increase product range Increase store promotions More store entrances and exits Increase Clubcard rewards Improved on-line shopping Improve Clubcard administration Total 10 Percent 10.0 74.0 83.0 62.0 100.0 22 14 2 10 22. rather than gaining rewards in the long term. on the spot.0 4.0 16.0   The results show that the majority of responses signal towards direct.

    The results from the questionnaire show that loyalty does exist amongst Tesco  Clubcard holders and Tesco and thus the Tesco Clubcard can be viewed as a valuable  asset in terms of a loyalty marketing tool.   Furthermore the results have shown that other areas need to be considered to  prevent consumers from switching to a rival. location  and store facilities.  There has been no indication or  evidence to support the theory that the Clubcard alone has created loyalty. in‐store vouchers and  magazines which were all ranked poorly by respondents.  Not only will this assimilate the pricing element of loyalty.  The results  assessed the value of the Tesco Clubcard as a loyalty marketing tool by classifying  the findings into several fundamental areas. rather than loyalty card schemes.    The analysis suggests that the Clubcard scheme is a costly sales technique and that  perhaps the resources used to finance the scheme might be better apportioned  elsewhere to factors which can keep customers loyal and lead to repeat purchases  such as lowering prices throughout the entire product range.  The high usage of the card by respondents  indicate that they have accepted the scheme and are willing to incorporate it into  their normal shopping experience at Tesco.3    Through the analysis of the primary research.  but it could also help maintain the success of the Tesco Clubcard.    Despite the accomplishment of the Clubcard.  Particular attention should be paid to  the details that consumers place importance on. the results demonstrate that it is not  the only aspect that causes consumer loyalty.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  taking into account direct discounting from the final bill at the point of sale as a  result of points collection.  Respondents regarded    82    Conclusion  . several key findings have been  established and the objectives of the study have been achieved.      4. such as value for money.

 attitudes and perceptions and the  results show that the buying power they possess is higher than ever and as such they  are effectively manipulating suppliers to meet their own needs and wants.  Additionally 60% of  respondents also strongly agree/agreed that they usually shop around to get the  best deals.Chapter Four – Research Findings and Analysis  the product of the Clubcard (vouchers and in‐store magazine) to be at the lower end  of the scale in terms of importance when choosing a primary supermarket. it could be contended that the Tesco Clubcard in its current form is a dated  remnant of the past and needs to evolve and transform in order to advance its value  as a loyalty marketing tool. 49% of respondents claimed they did not read the magazine and out of  the respondents that did admit to reading the magazine nearly half maintained that  the magazine was not adequate as it did not appeal to them and they regarded it as  dull and unhelpful.  With this  in mind.  The results have brought to light the new twenty‐first century generation  of consumers who have more diverse tastes.    A total of 85% of respondents claimed they owned and regularly used at least 1  other store loyalty card in addition to the Tesco Clubcard.                                83    .   Moreover.

Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations                                                                  84    Chapter Five Conclusion and Recommendations .

 but the study has  revealed no evidence to support the notion that the Tesco Clubcard alone has  achieved loyalty.1   CHAPTER FIVE ‐ CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS  Introduction  The purpose of this study was to discover if Tesco really needs the Clubcard scheme  despite all the efforts it employs to keep customers loyal.      85    Conclusion of the study  .  The primary research carried out has produced key results and  addressed the objectives of the thesis.0    5.Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations  5.    This concluding chapter shall illustrate the main findings of the study collectively.  This wealth of information has enabled Tesco to sustain its  position as the market leading UK supermarket retailer.2   The literature review has pointed to the notion that loyalty card proposals such as  the Tesco Clubcard scheme are an invaluable marketing tool offering a multitude of  advantages to both the organisation and the consumers. highlighting areas that need  further investigation and directing further research. finally.  concentrating upon the objectives before making applicable recommendations.    It was discovered that loyalty did exist amongst some card holders. it also  examined the value of the Tesco Clubcard scheme in the context as a loyalty  marketing tool.      5. preferences  and spending habits. by examining the  scheme in the context of meeting the objectives of this thesis.  ascertaining the limitations to the study and.  Additionally. outlined in chapter one.  The Clubcard has provided  Tesco with an opulent collection of data on individual customer tastes. it can be noted that  the significance and value of the Clubcard in achieving customer loyalty appears  dissimilar.  However.

  At the time of launch the scheme  was innovative and appealing to consumers. the thesis has acknowledged and identified the  importance of store location and competitive pricing as being the most effective  factors in achieving customer loyalty. however the results of the primary  research reflect that respondents who claimed they were satisfied with Tesco were  not necessarily loyal and thus more is required in order to lock them into being truly  loyal to Tesco. The knock on effect would be to  allow funds to be better allocated and spent on areas which improve the other  techniques currently in place.  Therefore it can be  argued that the Clubcard scheme can be seen as an expensive encumbrance and is  detracting away from the core business of Tesco. however the  results from the primary research dispute and contradict this.    Harlow (1997 cited in Egan 2001.  The primary research  showed that consumers are aware of the value of points and they do own and use    86    . the study has shown that consumers have evolved since the original  conception of the Clubcard scheme. pg 381) remarked on the evolution of twenty‐first  century consumers as becoming ‘increasingly promotion‐literate’ and this has  reduced the significance of the loyalty card within the supermarket industry.  What has transpired from the study is the discovery that the  Tesco Clubcard was a starting point for loyalty. attitudes and buyer  power they possess has immensely altered the value of the Clubcard and how they  see the Clubcard.  Today’s consumer is more interested in finding  the best deal they can.    Tesco currently utilises a number of  techniques to ensure that customers are happy and content.    Additionally.Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations    The study has identified that a series of modus operandi exists in order to achieve a  loyal customer base and that loyalty marketing consists of several factors and not  just loyalty cards. claimed that consumers are ignorant.  Furthermore the huge number of customer reward programs and  similar designs has resulted in consumers no longer being concerned with the loyalty  marketing gimmicks and rewards.  Parker  and Worthington (2000.  Additionally. and the new perceptions. pg 496).

 it can be deduced that today’s consumers are actively and effectively  manipulating suppliers to meet their own needs.    Consumers today are loyal to functional aspects of their shopping experience rather  than rewards. product range.6 has been proven to not be generic with some consumers  showing positive actions and behaviour without the need for rewards.Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations  more than one loyalty card.  The knock on effect of the boom of  loyalty cards has now led consumers into expecting some kind of reward in their  normal shopping experience.  Ultimately these factors all  contribute to a more convenient shopping experience but it has been suggested that  the Clubcard only complicates matters.   This is a clear indication that consumers today are more attracted to an instant  saving/price reduction rather than the long‐term collection of points in order to  attain a similar reduction.  The findings also showed that respondents perceived the card as an  additional bonus to their shopping and the theory of operant conditioning. transport and  online shopping all viewed as being important aspects. the results also showed  some respondents using the card little or never per transaction which points towards  the speculation that rewards are simply not enough to keep certain customers loyal  to Tesco.  This factor is  further reinforced by the discovery that the majority of respondents’ surveyed  claimed they would continue to shop at Tesco even without the Clubcard scheme.    The general customer perception of the Tesco Clubcard revealed respondents high  usage of the card and that they trust the Tesco brand and image in addition to  having ardent aspirations to redeem rewards.  As consumers utilise technology around them. as  highlighted in section 2. the results indicated that  many respondents claimed that money off discounts of their final bill at the point of  sale rather than future rewards were preferred and would make them more loyal. with factors such as faster checkouts.  From this finding it can be suggested that changing the  format of the Clubcard to be more in line with what consumers demand may make it  a more viable and valuable loyalty marketing tool.  Furthermore.      87    . such as  the internet.  Conversely.

    Parker and Worthington (2000.   What the findings have shown is that the epoch of the loyalty card is becoming  passé.    The findings from the primary research have revealed several factors which limit the  value of the Tesco Clubcard.  Readership amongst respondents were moderately low and  several respondents did not rate the magazine and/or its content.  These are:      88    .  The sheer number of similar  customer reward programs has reduced the overall value of schemes.  In its current form it is not enough to sustain competitive advantage.  The  failure to evolve the Clubcard scheme into what today’s consumer demand has  brought the Clubcard proposal to a unique crossroad.  This finding  suggests that the Clubcard scheme is directing Tesco to disregard particular sections  of the market which offer more interest to consumers such as price reductions or  improved facilities.  The results showed that Tesco’s communication with its customers  via the medium of magazine and vouchers was not effective and not realised to full  capacity by recipients. discovering over half  the respondents claiming they were satisfied customers of Tesco. pg 16).Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations  One of the categorical features of employing a customer reward program is to  reduce high wastage by specifically targeting consumers with information that will  appeal to them. pg 496) commented that loyalty “cannot be bought”  and the findings in the primary research back this theory up.  Further  confirmation of this was established with the greater part of respondents  maintaining they would continue to shop at Tesco and trusted the Tesco brand. 1997.  This evidence points to the Clubcard  scheme becoming a “zero sum game” (Mazur.  With outlay into other more effective loyalty marketing  mechanisms it can be reasoned that in terms of achieving a loyal customer base they  may produce better results.  Coupled with  consumers that have evolved and are more intelligent has resulted in high buyer  power within the supermarket industry.

  Building upon this conclusion.  The study has ascertained that the value of the Tesco Clubcard is contentious as it  has made loyalty harder to achieve and thus failed to meet the base requirements of  the model.  Additionally.  External environment: the evolution of tastes.  Its value as a loyalty marketing tool is weakening due to numerous  factors.      5.Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations  •      •      •          Competitors: the quantity of similar schemes has de‐valued customer reward  programs. awareness and  demands of today’s promotional literate consumer has resulted in savvy  shoppers who are hunting around for the best deals and commanding more.    Examine and reduce the current amount of money invested into the Clubcard  customer reward program as the concept becomes more dated and investing    Recommendations  . attitudes.  Perception: the study revealed respondents’ perceptions towards the  Clubcard and the additional Clubcard products such as in‐store magazine and  vouchers was perceived as being weak in terms of productivity and  effectiveness. the following recommendations can be  suggested:    •      •      89  Investigate key areas which are of importance to consumers and allocate the  funds necessary in order to ensure that these new customer demands are  met to help ascertain a loyal customer base.3    Unquestionably the Tesco Clubcard customer reward program has brought success  to Tesco. caused confusion and resentment amongst consumers and their  simplicity of limitations has brought loyalty card schemes to a crossroad. yet despite this accomplishment the study has found that it is now in a  state of decline. the research can conclude that the Clubcard in its current  format may well have reached its zenith and if it continues to stay dormant then the  future value of the scheme is uncertain.

    Extra studies could be performed at different Tesco stores to determine if the value  and perception of Clubcard is the same or if it differs from region to region. it is felt that if qualitative interviews were  established and carried out the results could help verify and support the findings  from the questionnaire.    Time and money are supplementary factors which have limited the study to a  degree. with  reference to the 100 respondents.  The main area of concern is the sample size of  the questionnaire.  attitudes and demands of the new generation of consumers. generalisations have regrettably had to be made  to the sample group.  Tesco would only allow questionnaires to be carried out during a small  number of mornings and over a few hours.  Limitations and Further Research  This study is not without limitations.  The result of this is limited results of  consumers who happened to visit the store on the specific times and dates the  survey was being carried out.  Additionally.  It is felt that it is not a 100% representation of the whole  population and the times and dates in which this research was carried out were  unfortunately constrained by the periods that Tesco allowed.  Areas such as lowering prices shall help  sustain a competitive advantage within the industry.Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations      •                  5.  The  current image of the Clubcard feels dated and as such a revision and re‐ launch may give it a much needed boost and help motivate and excite  consumers.4    money in more significant areas.  Furthermore.  Consideration  should be noted to giving customers an instant rebate at the point and time  of sale  rather than rewarding them through the collection of points.  Evolve and transform the Clubcard model to adapt to the new tastes.  Further  investigation could be carried out to reveal what effects an increased rate of loyalty    90    .

 however it may have been  advantageous to extend the investigation to reflect on consumers who do not own a  Clubcard yet continue to shop at Tesco despite this.  Performing such an analysis  would illustrate and identify what generates consumer loyalty and thus determine  the most valuable loyalty marketing tool within the supermarket industry.                                                          91    .Chapter Five – Conclusion and Recommendations  points per pound spent would have and if it would make the scheme a more viable  and valuable proposition.    The research focused solely on Clubcard holders.

References                                                                                                References and Bibliography   92  .

co. pg. Kogan Page. Structure and Write Survey  Material for Effective Market Research. BBC News.   Retrieved May 7. J. (2002). Marketing Services‐Competing Through  Quality. Customer Clubs and Loyalty Programmes. Gower Publishing Company. (1991).uk/1/hi/business/7347769. Upper Saddle River.L. (2005). (International Edition). S. 213‐217. (2002). I.      93    . J. (2001).bbc. ‘Tesco sees profit rise to £2. S.    BRUCE. Pearson Prentice Hall. New York Free Press. (1986). Questionnaire Design: How to Plan.stm     BELSON.htm    BBC NEWS BUSINESS. (online).and CHEN. from:  http://www. A.8bn’. ‘The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty  and Customer Satisfaction’. Customer Relationship Management: Making Hard Decisions  with Soft Numbers. Validity in Survey Research.  from: http://news. CRM  Guru. Market Based Management: Strategies for Growing Customer Value  and Profitability. (2008). L. Gower Publishing. and PARASURAMAN. A. (1996). J. 2008. (13 (5). ‘From the Customer’s Perspective: Defining Loyalty’.    BARNES.babyshopmagazine.    BOWEN.com/spring04/customloyalty. (online).    BERRY.  Retrieved May 6.    BUTSCHER.References  REFERENCES      Anton. (2004). International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality  Management. 2008.    BEST. R. Prentice‐Hall.

 and HUSSEY. R. pg. (1985). L. Palgrave Macmillan. L. Routledge.  CRMToday.  from:  http://www. D. (2001). 7 (3).  International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management. pg. 146‐149. Research Methods in Education.  Retrieved April 25.   Retrieved May 8. 333‐341.th/amsar/PDF/Documents49/quantitative_and_qualitative_met hodologies. J. ‘Loyalty trends for the twenty‐first century’. ‘Looking after business: linking existing customers to profitability’. R. ‘The Devil makes Work: Leisure in Capitalist  Britain’.  from:  http://www. (online).ac.utcc.. University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce. 2008.. Worldwide CRM Software Market to Grow 14 Percent in 2008.References  BYROM. 29 (7). pg. and CRICHTER. (1997).    DUFFY.crm2day. (2007). ‘Communication Research Methodologies: Qualitative and  Quantitative Methodology’.    CAPIZZI.com/news/crm/124764. pg.. (2003).pdf (accessed 08/05/08). J.    COHAN.      94    . 22 (2). (1998). Business Research: A Practical Guide to  Undergraduate and Postgraduate Students. (2005).    COLLIS.  Journal of Consumer Marketing. 72‐82. (2008).    CLARKE J. 435‐445. 2008.    CHAROENRUK. ‘Customer loyalty strategies’. M and FERGUSON.    CLARKE.  Managing Service Quality.  (online).    CRMToday. University of Illinois Press. 15  (5). (1994).php (accessed 25/04/08). Journal of Consumer Marketing. and MANION. R. ‘The role of loyalty card data within local marketing initiatives’. D.

References 

DICK, A AND BASU, K. (1994), ‘Customer loyalty, towards an integrated conceptual  framework’, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 22 (2), pg. 99‐113.    DOWLING, G AND UNCLES, M. (1997), ‘Do customer loyalty programmes really  work?’ Sloan Management Review, summer Edition, 38 4), pg. 71‐83.    EGAN, J. (2001), ‘Throwing the baby out with the bathwater?’ Marketing Intelligence  & Planning, 19 (6), pg. 375‐384.

EUROPEAN FOUNDATION FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF LIVING AND WORKING  CONDITIONS, (2007), EMCC Case Studies – European Commerce Sector: Tesco PLC,  (online), European Monitoring Centre on Change.  Retrieved April 21, 2008,  from:  www.eurofound.europa.eu/pubdocs/2007/1063/en/1/ef071063en.pdf     EWB, (2007), ‘Questionnaire Validity’, (online), Evensen Web Design.  Retrieved May  8, 2008, from: http://www.evensenwebs.com/validity.html    FIELD, C. (1997), ‘Data Goes to Market – Utilising Information Obtained from Loyalty  Cards’, Computer Weekly, 16 January, pg. 44‐46.    FILL, C. (2002), Marketing Communications, 3 Edition, Pearson Education Limited.    FINK, A. (1995), How to Sample in Surveys, SAGE Publications Ltd London.    FINNIE, W. and RANDALL, R. (2002), ‘Loyalty as a philosophy and strategy: an  interview with Frederick F. Reichheld’, Strategy & Leadership, 30 (2), pg. 25‐31. 
rd 

FODDY, W. (1999), Constructing Questions for Interviews and Questionnaires,  Cambridge University Press  

  95 

 

References 

FRAOCH MARKETING, (2006), Consumer Loyalty in the 21st century – Can we Pin  Down Butterflies, (online).  Retrieved April 26, 2008, from:  http://www.fraochmarketing.com/wp‐ content/uploads/2006/02/consumerLoyalty.pdf    GILLIES, C., RIGBY, D., REICHHELD, F. (2002), ‘The story behind successful CRM’,  European Business Journal, (online).  Retrieved May 6, 2008, from:  http://www.loyaltyrules.com/loyaltyrules/library_articles_details.asp?id=10738&me nu_url=library_articles.asp (accessed 06/05/08).    GORDON, I. (1998), Relationship Marketing, John Wiley & Sons Canada. 

GÓMEZ, B., ARRANZ, A., and CILLÁN, J. (2006), ‘The role of loyalty programmes in  behavioural and affective loyalty’, Journal of Consumer Marketing, pg. 387‐396.    GRISAFFE, D. (2001), ‘Revived debates about loyalty’, Creating Loyalty Library  (online).  Retrieved May 10, 2008, from:  http://www.creatingloyalty.com/story.cfm?article_id=117 

HALLOWELL, R. (1996), ‘The Relationships of Customer, Customer Loyalty, and  Profitability: an Empirical Study’, International Journal of Service Industry  Management, 7 (4), pg. 27‐42. 

HAWKES, S. ‘Tesco to Monitor Millions of Consumers Around the World’, The Times,  April 12th 2008.    HEIL, K. (2006), Operant Conditioning, (online).   Reference for Business.  Retrieved  April 27, 2008, from: http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Ob‐ Or/Operant‐Conditioning.html   

  96 

 

References 

HESKETT, J. (2002), ‘Beyond customer loyalty’, Managing Service Quality, 12 (6), pg.  355‐357.      HUMBY, C. and HUNT, T. (2004), Scoring Points: How Tesco is Winning Customer  Loyalty, Kogan Page Limited London.    HOYER, W. and MACINNIS, D. (2001), Consumer Behaviour, 2nd Edition, Houghton  Mifflin Company, Boston.    ICLP, (2006), Loyalty Marketing – Definition, (online).  International Customer Loyalty  Programmes.  Retrieved April 28, 2008, from: http://www.iclp.com.cn/?q=loyalty‐ marketing     JENKINSON, A. (1995), ‘Retailing and shopping on the internet’, International Journal  of Retail & Distribution Management, 24 (3), pg. 26‐37.    KHAN, Y. (1998), ‘Winning Cards’, Marketing Business May, CIM Cookham.    KOTLER, P. (2000), Marketing Management, 10th Edition, Prentice‐Hall New Jersey.    LABARBERA, P.and MAZURSKY, D. (1983), ‘A Longitudinal Assessment of Consumer  Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction: the Dynamic Aspect of Cognitive Process’, Journal of  Marketing Research, 20, November, pg. 393‐404.    LACEY, R. and SNEATH, J. (2006), ‘Customer loyalty programs: are they fair to  consumers’, Journal of Consumer Marketing, 23 (7), pg. 458‐464.    LOUIS, P. ‘Tesco: Every Little Helps’, Department of Research, Instituto de Empresa,  April 2002, pg. 4‐5.    LUCK, D. AND RUBIN, R. (1987) Marketing Research, 7 Edition, Prentice Hall London.    97   
th 

 (1999). C.uk/1/hi/business/3099718.    MCILROY.    MCDANIEL. Sharpe. 2 edition. S.  Retrieved May 8. 16. L. N. D.hw. Managing Service Quality.  Retrieved May 8. R.  Wiley. (1997).E. pg.stm     MAURI.net/index. 10 (6). (2006). from:  http://www.  Retrieved April 30. A.    MAZUR. Learning  Technology Dissemination Initiative. 2008.icbl. 347‐355. C.marketresearchworld. pg. Research Methods for Political Science: Quantitative and  Qualitative Methods. Basic Marketing Research.php?option=com_content&task=view& id=11&Itemid=64     MATHESON. (2004). from:  http://www. Brands. Building Customer Relationships: Do Discount  Cards Work?. 2008. AND GATES.ac. from: http://news. (2000). (2006). Has Nectar played its cards right. J. (2003). C.uk/ltdi/cookbook/info_questionnaires/index.    MILNE. ‘Card Loyalty: A new Emerging Issue in Grocery Retailing’. 5 edition. (online).bbc. 13‐25.html  th  nd    98    . and BARNETT. Market  Research Portal.    MCNABB. BBC News. Vol 10. (online). (2003). 2008.References    MALHOTRA. AND PETERSON.co. ‘What is quantitative research’. Marketing Research Essentials. M. Marketing Business. pg. Journal  of Retailing and Consumer Services. ‘Questionnaires: Advantages and Disadvantages’.  Prentice Hall London. (online). (2006).    MARKET RESEARCH WORLD. M.

 23 (2). KÓNYA. 28 (11). What Price Loyalty?.co.supermarkets     PARKER.com/sinatra/reports/search_results/show&&type=RCItem&pa ge=0&noaccess_page=0/display/id=4346/display/id=142006&section/display/id=434 6     MIRANDA. Why CRM Doesn’t Work: How To Win by Letting Customers  Manage the Relationship. ‘When lemonade is better than whisky:  investigating the equitableness of a supermarket’s reward scheme’. Research Methods For Studying Psycho‐Social Change Programs.   Retrieved May 8. J. 2008.guardian.. pg. 490‐497. 29‐31. Bloomberg Press.  Retrieved May  7. Managing  Service Quality. 2008. 4 (6). from:  http://reports. (2007). 47‐55. (2000). (online).    O’MALLEY.mintel.    NEILL. F. and HAVRILA. 220‐ 232. pg. (2005).html     NEWELL.com/research/QualitativeVersusQuantitativeResearch. from:  http://wilderdom. 16 (1). ‘Customer Loyalty and Discounting in Retailing’. ‘Relationship Marketing – Making the Customer Count’. from:  http://www.  The Guardian.. (2005). (online). Marketing Intelligence & Planning. 2008. (online).    99    .  Retrieved  April 21.    PAYNE. (1998). International  Journal of Retail & Distribution Management. S. pg.    PAPWORTH.References  MINTEL (2004). C and WORTHINGTON.uk/money/2005/apr/16/consumerissues. (2003). A. I. ‘Can loyalty schemes really build loyalty?’ Marketing  Intelligence & Planning. pg. ‘Shoppers’ satisfaction levels are  not the only key to store loyalty”. ‘Qualitative versus quantitative research: key points in a classic  debate’. L. (1994).. L. J. M.

 105‐11. from:  http://www.com/history2/11/Tesco‐Plc. S. from: http://www. W. D. T. (1971). and SASSER. ‘Consumer Rankings of Risk Reduction Methods’.  Retrieved April 20. (1990). (1996).  Business Description.  Retrieved May 4.     PEPPERS.crmguru. and ROGERS. (2007). (2003).aspx    PROCTOR.    RESELIUS. K.html (Accessed:  20/04/08)    REICHHELD.    POWERGEN CORPORATE RESPONSIBILTY REPORT (2003). 2008. D. ‘Zero defects: quality comes to service’.  Reference for Business. Survey Research: The Basics. www. Tesco Plc – Company History. F. Customer Loyalty Schemes: Effective Implementation and  Management. Why Tesco clicks (and Bricks) with UK  Customers. Information. M. John Wiley & Sons. Essentials of Marketing Research.    RAYNER. (2003). (1996). Journal of  Marketing. SAGE Publications Ltd London.    REICHHELD.    PUNCH. Harvard Business School Press.    100    rd  .eon‐uk. pg. Pearson Education  Limited UK.com 12th March 2001. Background Information on Tesco Plc. 35 (1) pg 56‐61.  2008. Managing Customer Relationships: A Strategic  Framework. M. (2004). Financial Times Retail & Consumer Publishing London. Boston. 3 Edition. History.  Harvard Business Review.References    PEPPERS. F.referenceforbusiness. and ROGERS. (online). The Loyalty Effect. (online).com/about/1202. (2001). T. September/October.    REFERENCE FOR BUSINESS.

 2008. ‘Building Brand Webs: Customer Relationship Management  Throught the Tesco Clubcard Loyalty Scheme’. (online). B. the internet and the weather: the changing nature of  marketing information systems?’ Management Decision. 37 (6).F. pg. 514 – 518. New  Jersey.. Successful Direct Marketing Methods. 2nd edition. (2007).    SETH. B. M. (2003).reuters. (2005). The Grocers. (1999).    STONE. A.com/article/businessNews/idUKL2110323620071127    SAUNDERS. (2004). Tescopoly: How One Shop Came Out on Top and Why It Matters. A. Prentice Hall Inc.      101      . New Statesman.. P. (1994). TIMELINE – Tesco’s Rise to World’s Third Largest Retailer.  (online). 33 (3). Reflections on Behaviourism and Society. Research Methods for Business  Students. (2001). A.    SANDERSON. J. from: http://www. R. Financial Times Prentice Hill. 2008. LEWIS. Prentice Hall. J. 194‐206.newstatesman. London. Reuters UK. (1978). and THORNHILL. International Journal of Retail &  Distribution Magazine.  Retrieved April 25.  from:  http://uk. Kogan Page Limited  London. A. M. (2007). Kogan Page Limited.com/200706250018     SIMMS. 3rd Edition. and RANDALL. pg.    SIMMS. Consumer Insight. ‘Loyalty.References    ROWLEY.    ROWLEY. (2007) ‘Getting To Know You’.  Constable.  Retrieved April  29.    STONE. G.    SKINNER.

 ‘Price Sensitivity ‐ It takes more than a teaspoon to stir public  opinion’.com/trends‐detail‐sid‐23909. M. K. (1999). ‘Managing Customer Dissatisfaction Through Effective Complaint  Management Systems’. from: http://www. The TQM Magazine. pg. Hospitality Trends. 2008. and HAMMOND.htrends.. CRM Case Study #14: A Report of CRM Best Practices in the Retail  Industry. 3rd Edition.vg/pages/CRM/case_study_14_Tesco. ‘Loyalty Saturation in Retailing: Exploring the end  of Retail Loyalty Cards?’  International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management. pg. H. (2004). A. D.    WRIGHT. 331‐335. 429‐439. 92‐106. DOWNLING. (2005). 2008. C AND SPARKS.  Retrieved May 7. ‘Customer loyalty and  customer loyalty programs’. A. from:  http://www. 12 (5). 9 (2). (2006). (online). ‘Customer satisfaction and its consequences on customer  behaviour revisited: The impact of different levels of satisfaction on word‐of‐mouth. (1998).  Retrieved  April 26. M.  27 (10). pg. Principles of Direct and Database Marketing.References  SÖDERLUND..  feedback to the supplier and loyalty’.loyalty. G. (2000).    TREHAN. L.  Seklemian/Newell International Marketing Consultants. R. (online).    VEAL. International Journal of Service Industry  Management.htm     ZAIRI.    WYLIE. pg. Pearson  Education. Research Methods for Leisure and Tourism.    102    . (2005).html    UNCLES. Pearson Education  Limited. 169‐188    TAPP. (1997). Research and Practice in Management.

Bibliography 

BIBLIOGRAPHY   
  AMBLER, T. (1997), How much of brand equity is explained by trust?  Management  Decisions, 35 (4), pg. 283‐292.    HUMBY, C. and HUNT, T. (2004), Scoring Points: How Tesco is Winning Customer  Loyalty, Kogan Page Limited London.    PEPPERS, D. and ROGERS, M. (2004), Managing Customer Relationships: A Strategic  Framework, John Wiley & Sons.    ROWLEY, J. (1999), ‘Loyalty, the internet and the weather: the changing nature of  marketing information systems?’ Management Decision, 37 (6), pg. 514 – 518.    ROWLEY, J. (2005), ‘Building Brand Webs: Customer Relationship Management  Throught the Tesco Clubcard Loyalty Scheme’, International Journal of Retail &  Distribution Magazine, 33 (3), pg. 194‐206. 

 
SIMMS, A. (2007), Tescopoly: How One Shop Came Out on Top and Why It Matters,  Constable, London. 

 
STONE, M. (2004), Consumer Insight, Kogan Page Limited. 

 
TAPP, A. (2005), Principles of Direct and Database Marketing, 3rd Edition, Pearson  Education. 

 
UNCLES, M., DOWNLING, G., and HAMMOND, K. (2004), ‘Customer loyalty and  customer loyalty programs’, Research and Practice in Management, pg. 92‐106. 

       
 

 

Appendices 

                                                                             

Appendices

 

 

Appendices 

APPENDIX A – QUESTIONNAIRE JUSTIFICATION 
   
QUESTION  1a). Do you own a Tesco  Clubcard?     1b). If "yes", please indicate how  often you use your Clubcard  when  you purchase goods or services  with Tesco.        2). Please choose your Gender     3). Please indicate which age  group you fall into.        4). On a scale of 1‐8 (1 = excellent  and 8 = poor), how do you rank  the importance of each  of the following factors when  deciding which supermarket  you use     5). Apart from Clubcard do you   own and regulary use other   store loyalty cards?  Please indicate how many     6a). Do you read the Clubcard  Magazine?              6b). If "yes" or “sometimes”    Please indicate what you think of   The magazine.     7). Do you know how many  Clubcard points you gain for   every £1 you spend in store?     8). Does the collection of points   influence you to buy more or to  buy specific/alternative  promotional products which   offer bonus points?  VALIDATION  Initial question, leads directly into the subject and instantly establishes  rapport with the respondent.     Although customers may own a Clubcard, the inclusion of this question  determines how actively they use their card.  If a respondent owns a  card but never uses it, this will indicate to the author a greater insight  with regards to impending questions concerning their attitudes towards  the Clubcard scheme.     Used to build a user profile of the Clubcard scheme.     Helps in building the user profile and responses have been intentionally  broadly grouped.  It is vital there is no overlap in the age ranges   stipulated. The intention of this question is to establish what factors lead  customers to repeat purchase and determine the connection between   customer and store.  This question also highlights the range of loyalty  marketing strategies currently used within the retail industry.         The use of this question will determine how many respondents  own more than one loyalty card and divulge if consumers are “actively  manipulating suppliers for their own ends” (Khan 1998).        Tesco use the information gathered from Clubcard users to determine  the articles it publishes in its Clubcard magazine.  This question will   establish how effective this practice is and if customers are responding  by reading the magazine and indicate how prevalent this modus   operandi is.     The motive of splitting this question is to void any confusion to   respondents and also understanding how they value Tesco’ efforts  to communicate with them.     The inclusion of this question will discover is consumers are as  as ‘ignorant’ as Parker and Worthington (2000) asserted.        Parker and Worthington (2000) claimed that consumers are  becoming ‘points junkies’ who are desperate to gain and save  points.  Additionally it will also address if customers aspire to  collect and redeem more points and thus increase spending.    

  105 

 

 Please tick the appropriate  box which accurately reflects your  level of agreement or  disagreement.        Purposely an open ended question to determine any other feelings  that respondents had and to gain a better understanding of them.        This will establish directly if the customer feel loyal towards Tesco.     This question will establish if consumers are ‘locked in’ to Tesco as  the paradigm created by the literature review suggests that it is not  just loyalty cards that create loyalty. Have you redeemed any   rewards from the Clubcard  scheme  within the last 12 months?     10). What could Tesco do more to  make you more loyal?           This question is designed to test Capizzi and Ferguson (2005) claim  that customers actively seek lifestyle themed rewards. If Tesco did not have the  Clubcard scheme. Would you describe yourself  to be a satisfied customer of   Tesco?     12).        Used in conjunction with the above question this will address the   concerns in the literature review with regards to the relationship  between loyalty and satisfaction.    Hopefully it will also present new ideas or concepts surrounding  customer loyalty.     14).     The inclusion of this was to gather and understand customers  attitudes and opinions with regards to Tesco and loyalty. Would you describe yourself  as being loyal to Tesco?     11).                                                  106    . would you still  continue to shop there?     13).Appendices     9).

 . . . . . . . . . . . . .  All results will be kept confidential. do you own and regularly use any other store loyalty cards?  Please indicate how many:       3    1 other card       1    3 or more other cards    2 other cards       2    I only own a Tesco Clubcard     4    . . . . . . . . .      It covers everything you would expect and is of great use       1        It is a good read with some informative articles and features       2      It is dull. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  If “yes”. . . unhelpful and of no use             3  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      3). . . . . . . . . . . .    ‐ Please turnover questionnaire to continue ‐     107    . . . . . . . . . .          4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Please choose your Gender:    Male     1  Female     2  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      1a). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Please indicate which age group you fall into:    Under 21   1      40 – 49     4    22 – 29     2      50 – 59     5    30 – 39     3      60 +     6  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . please indicate how often you use your Clubcard when you purchase goods or service with Tesco:     Always        1          Frequently        2               Little                   3           Never         4  . .  Do you read the Clubcard Magazine?  If “No” please move onto Question 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    6a). . . . . . . . . . . . .    Yes     1  No     2  Sometimes   3    6b). . . .  Apart from Clubcard.      Do you own a Tesco Clubcard?    Yes     1  No     2  1b). . . . . . .Appendices  APPENDIX B ‐ QUESTIONNAIRE      TESCO CLUBCARD USER SURVEY    As part of my MBA thesis I am doing some research on the Tesco Clubcard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  I would appreciate it if you  could take a few moments of your time to carry out this survey. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   If “yes” or “sometimes” please indicate what you think of the magazine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  On a scale of 1 to 8 (1 = very important and 8 = not important at all) How do you rank the importance of each  of the following factors when deciding which supermarket you use:                      Rank 1 ‐ 8    ‐ Value for money              ________ 1    ‐ Location of store              ________ 2    ‐ Quality of service and staff helpfulness          ________ 3     ‐ Loyalty card schemes              ________ 4        ‐ Product range and presentation            ________ 5           ________ 6     ‐ Overall store layout and appearance    ‐ In‐store promotional magazine and flyers          ________ 7     ‐ Money off coupons/vouchers and special promotions      ________ 8  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    5). . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Would you describe yourself to be a satisfied customer of Tesco?      Yes     1  No     2  Don’t know   3  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    13). . . . .   Have you redeemed any rewards from the Clubcard scheme within the last 12 months?      Yes     1  No     2  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Does the collection of points influence you to buy more or to buy specific/alternative promotional products  which offer bonus points?      Yes     1  No     2  Don’t know   3  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Would you describe yourself as being loyal to Tesco?      Yes     1  No     2  Don’t know   3  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Please tick the appropriate box which accurately reflects your level of agreement or disagreement:  Strongly Agree    I trust Tesco products and   their image  Agree No Opinion Disagree  Strongly Disagree 1 2 3 4 5   I think Tesco is very  innovative      I usually shop around to get  the best deals      I expect rewards to be   a part of my normal   shopping experience       I feel more could   be done to increase   my loyalty      1 2 3 4 5  1 2 3 4 5  1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5   108    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  If Tesco did not have the Clubcard scheme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    12). . . . . . . . . . . .Appendices    7). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    10). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . would you still continue to shop there?   1  No     2  Don’t know   3      Yes    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    11). . . . . . . . . . . . . .   Do you know how many Clubcard points you gain for every £1 you spend in store?    1 point for every £1   1    5 points for every  £1     3      2 points for every £1   2    10 points for every £1     4  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    8). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  What could Tesco do more to make you more loyal?    _______________________________________________________________________________________________    _______________________________________________________________________________________________    _______________________________________________________________________________________________    _______________________________________________________________________________________________      ‐ Many thanks for your time and attention ‐                                                                         109    .Appendices      14).

Appendices  APPENDIX C – SPSS CODED QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS  Q1a  Q1b  Q2  Q3  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q5  Q6a  Q6b  Q7  Q8  Q9  Q10  Q11  Q12  1  2  1  2  3  2  8  1  5  4  6  7  1  1  3  4  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  1  4  1  2  3  8  4  5  7  6  1  2  1  3  2  2  3  1  1  2  2  3  2  1  6  7  3  4  8  5  1  2    1  2  2  2  2  1  1  3  2  4  1  4  3  2  5  6  8  7  1  3  3  2  2  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  3  2  3  4  1  5  7  8  6  1  2    4  1  2  1  2  1  1  2  2  3  3  7  2  1  5  8  4  6  1  1  2  1  2  2  2  2  1  1  2  2  4  4  2  1  3  6  7  8  5  4  2    3  2  1  1  1  3  1  3  2  2  6  3  5  1  4  7  8  2  2  2    1  1  1  2  1  1  1  3  2  4  3  1  5  6  4  7  8  2  2  1  1  1  2  1  1  2  1  1  3  1  2  4  3  2  7  1  5  8  6  2  1  3  4  2  1  2  3  1  1  2  2  3  3  2  4  8  1  6  7  5  2  3  3  1  3  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  2  3  2  1  6  7  8  5  4  2  3  2  4  2  1  1  2  1  1  3  2  4  3  2  1  5  7  8  6  4  2  1  3  1  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  3  3  2  1  5  8  7  6  4  2  1  3  2  2  2  2  2  1  1  3  2  2  3  2  1  5  7  8  6  4  2  3  2  1  3  2  2  2  1  1  2  1  3  3  1  4  8  2  5  6  7  2  1  3  1  3  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  3  7  1  2  5  3  6  4  8  1  3  3  4  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  4  5  3  1  2  6  7  8  1  2    1  2  2  2  1  1  1  3  1  5  4  1  3  5  2  6  8  7  3  2    1  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  1  2  3  2  7  4  1  5  6  8  4  2    1  3  1  2  2  1  1  3  2  4  6  3  2  1  4  5  7  8  4  1  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  6  6  5  4  1  2  3  8  7  4  1  2  4  3  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  1  6  2  4  3  1  5  8  7  4  2    1  2  1  2  3  1  1  1  2  6  1  6  4  8  2  3  5  7  4  2    3  2  1  2  1  1  1  3  2  3  1  4  3  7  2  6  5  8  1  2    2  2  2  3  3  1  1  1  2  6  1  3  4  2  5  6  7  8  1  2    2  3  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  1  1  2  5  8  3  7  4  6  1  2    4  2  1  2  3  1  1  1  1  3  1  4  6  5  2  3  8  7  1  2    1  2  2  2  3  1  1  2  1  1  2  6  3  1  4  5  8  7  1  3  2  2  2  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  1  3  2  1  5  4  8  7  6  2  3  3  4  2  1  2  3  1  1  1  2  3  8  3  4  2  1  6  5  7  2  3  1  1  1  1  2  1  1  1  3  2  5  5  4  1  7  3  2  8  6  4  2    3  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  3  3  7  2  8  1  6  4  5  4  2    1  3  1  1  2  1  1  1  2  5  2  3  4  7  1  6  8  5  3  1  3  3  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  1  4  5  8  2  3  6  7  4  3  2  1  3  2  2  2  1  1  4  2  5  5  4  3  2  1  6  8  7  1  3  3  1  2  1  1  3  1  1  2  2  3  2  3  1  8  4  5  7  6  1  2    1  3  2  1  3  1  1  1  2  2  1  2  3  4  5  6  8  7  2  3  2  1  2  1  2  2  1  1  1  2  6  8  1  3  5  7  6  2  4  2  1  3  1  2  2  2  1  1  1  3  2  3  6  2  3  7  1  4  5  8  2  3  2  4  1  2  3  2  1  1  1  2  4  7  5  1  3  4  2  8  6  3  2    1  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  6  1  3  2  5  6  8  4  7  3  3  2  4  2  1  3  1  1  1  2  2  3  8  4  3  5  7  2  1  6  3  1  2  2  2  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  1  4  3  5  8  6  7  4  3  3  1  3  1  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  1  5  3  4  2  6  8  7  4  2    1  2  1  1  2  1  1  1  2  5  2  4  1  7  6  5  3  8  1  3  1  4  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  6  1  2  3  4  7  5  8  6  1  2    1  2  1  2  3  1  1  1  2  6  7  1  4  6  3  2  8  5  1  1  2  1  2  2  2  1  1  1  2  1  2  1  2  4  6  3  5  8  7  1  2    4  3  2  2  3  1      110    .

Appendices    Q13  Q13  Q13  Q13  Q13  4  2  1  3  2  1  2  1  3  3  2  4  1  3  2  2  2  2  3  2  2  2  2  3  3  4  2  2  3  2  4  2  3  1  2  4  2  2  3  2  4  2  2  2  2  4  2  2  3  2  2  2  4  2  2  4  2  5  2  2  2  1  4  2  1  4  2  4  2  3  4  3  1  1  2  5  3  5  2  3  4  2  4  3  2  2  2  3  1  3  1  3  4  4  2  3  4  1  2  4  1  2  2  4  3  2  3  1  3  3  1  2  2  1  1  1  3  1  2  2  2  1  4  3  2  3  2  2  1  1  1  2  5  3  2  2  1  4  2  2  2  2  4  3  1  1  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  3  4  4  4  3  2  4  2  4  2  4  2  3  2  1  3  5  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  2  2  2  2  1  2  2  1  2  1  1  2  2  1  5  2  3  2  2  1  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  1  1  4  2  2  3  2  3  3  2  2  2  3  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  1  2  2  3  4  2  1  2  3  2  2  2  2  2  2  4  2  4  2  2      111    .

Appendices    Q1a  Q1b  Q2  Q3  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q4  Q5  Q6a  Q6b  Q7  Q8  Q9  Q10  Q11  Q12  1  2  2  5  4  5  3  2  6  1  8  7  1  1  2  4  1  1  2  2  3  1  1  1  3  4  3  1  2  5  6  7  8  2  2    1  2  1  2  2  1  1  1  1  6  4  1  3  8  5  2  6  7  2  3  2  4  2  1  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  3  1  4  8  7  2  5  6  2  2    1  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  5  8  3  4  2  1  5  7  6  2  1  3  1  2  1  2  3  1  1  2  2  5  2  3  6  5  1  7  8  4  2  3  3  3  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  1  6  3  5  7  6  1  2  8  5  2  1  1  4  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  5  2  1  3  7  5  4  8  6  2  2    2  2  1  2  2  1  1  3  2  3  2  8  3  7  1  4  6  5  2  2    1  2  2  1  1  2  1  3  2  4  3  2  5  4  1  7  8  6  2  2    1  2  1  2  1  1  1  3  2  5  1  3  7  6  2  4  8  5  2  3  2  1  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  2  6  4  5  1  3  7  8  4  3  2  1  3  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  6  2  1  3  5  4  6  8  7  4  1  2  4  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  1  1  7  2  6  3  4  8  5  2  2    4  3  1  2  2  1  1  1  2  2  4  2  8  6  1  3  7  6  2  3  1  4  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  3  1  5  3  4  2  6  8  7  2  1  3  4  3  1  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  3  1  4  6  2  8  5  7  2  2    1  2  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  3  7  5  3  4  1  2  8  6  2  1  2  1  2  1  3  1  1  1  1  2  4  7  2  4  6  1  3  8  5  2  1  3  4  2  1  1  2  1  1  3  2  1  2  1  6  5  3  4  7  8  2  2    1  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  5  6  1  2  3  4  5  7  8  2  1  3  4  2  1  1  1  1  1  2  2  3  1  4  2  5  3  6  8  7  1  2    4  2  1  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  4  2  8  5  1  6  3  7  1  2    1  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  1  6  7  3  4  5  1  2  8  6  1  2    4  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  3  1  2  7  5  4  3  8  6  4  3  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  4  6  5  1  3  7  8  4  2    1  2  2  2  1  1  1  2  1  2  7  1  2  6  3  4  8  5  2  3  1  1  2  1  1  2  1  1  1  2  3  5  6  7  1  2  3  8  4  2  2    1  2  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  2  1  4  2  7  5  3  8  6  2  2    1  2  2  2  1  1  1  2  1  4  2  1  5  7  3  4  8  6  3  2    1  2  2  2  2  1  1  2  2  3  1  4  8  7  2  5  6  3  4  2    4  2  1  2  1  1  1  1  2  1  1  2  5  4  7  8  6  3  4  2    3  2  2  1  3  1  1  2  1  2  4  2  5  3  1  6  8  7  1  2    3  2  2  2  3  1  1  2  2  3  3  2  5  4  1  6  8  7  2  2    2  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  2  3  2  6  5  1  4  8  7  1  1  2  4  2  1  2  3  1  1  1  1  4  1  4  3  8  2  7  5  6  2  2    3  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  2  1  2  3  4  7  5  8  6  1  2    2  2  1  1  1  1  1  3  1  5  1  5  6  7  2  4  8  3  2  2    4  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  1  5  2  6  5  7  1  5  8  3  2  2    3  3  2  1  2  1  1  2  2  6  3  1  6  7  2  4  8  5  2  1  3  4  2  1  2  3  2  1  3  2  1  2  1  7  6  5  3  8  4  2  3  1  1  2  1  1  3  1  1  2  2  5  2  1  5  3  4  6  8  7  2  2    1  2  1  1  1  1  1  1  1  3  1  3  2  4  8  6  7  5  2  1  3  1  2  2  2  1  2  1  1  1  3  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  3  2    4  3  1  1  2  1  1  3  2  4  1  2  4  7  3  5  8  6  3  1  1  1  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  1  5  1  3  5  4  2  7  6  8  3  2    1  2  1  3  1  1  1  2  2  6  7  3  1  4  2  5  8  6  3  3  2  1  2  2  2  1  1  1  1  2  3  1  3  2  5  4  6  7  8  2  3  2  1  3  1  1  2  1  1  2  2  2  3  1  2  4  5  7  6  8  1  2    4  2  1  3  1  1  1  2  2  6  1  3  5  2  4  6  8  7  2  2    2  2  1  2  1  1  1  2  2  1  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  1  3  2  1  2  1  2  1  1    112    .

Appendices  Q13  Q13  Q13  Q13  Q13  4  2  4  2  2  2  2  1  2  2  2  3  4  4  2  2  2  1  2  4  2  1  4  2  2  1  3  2  4  2  1  2  4  2  5  2  2  5  3  4  3  2  1  2  2  5  3  3  1  4  1  2  4  2  2  2  1  5  2  2  2  1  1  1  5  4  2  4  2  2  5  3  5  4  2  2  3  4  2  2  2  2  2  3  2  2  2  1  4  2  2  3  3  4  2  2  3  4  4  2  1  2  1  2  2  3  2  1  4  2  2  3  4  2  2  1  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  1  2  1  2  4  4  2  3  3  2  2  4  1  2  4  2  2  1  2  1  3  2  5  1  2  2  2  2  3  2  2  2  1  2  1  3  2  2  3  2  2  2  2  2  1  3  2  2  2  1  2  2  5  3  2  2  2  1  2  2  3  2  2  1  2  2  2  3  1  1  3  3  3  2  2  2  2  2  2  2  3  2  2  2  1  3  2  2  2  1  3  3  2  2  2  2  1  3  2  3  2  2  3  3  3  3  3  2  2  1  2  2  4  2  2  3  3  2  3  5  3  2  4  3  3  2  2  2  2  1  2  2  2  3  3  2  2    113    .

0 100.0 Frequency of how often respondents used their Clubcard when purchasing goods  or services with Tesco  Cumulative Frequency Valid Always Frequently Little Never Total 42 39 18 1 100 Percent 42.0 Valid Percent 29.0 81.0 Percent 100.0 39.0 18.0 71.0 1.0           114    .Appendices    APPENDIX D – SPSS FREQUENCY TABLES FOR QUESTIONNARE RESULTS        Respondents who own a Tesco Clubcard  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes 100 Percent 100.0 100.0 Valid Percent 42.0 18.0 100.0 Percent 42.0 99.0 71.0 Gender of respondents surveyed  Cumulative Frequency Valid Male Female Total 29 71 100 Percent 29.0 1.0 Valid Percent 100.0 100.0 Percent 29.0 39.0 100.0 100.

0 18.0           115    .0 18.0 Valid Percent 31.0 Percent 31.0 12.49 50 .0 Valid Percent 10.0 20.0 14.Appendices        Age group of respondents surveyed  Cumulative Frequency Valid Under 21 22 .0 4.0 88.59 60 + Total 10 21 28 12 15 14 100 Percent 10.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 15. how important is value for money  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0 14.0 21.0 86.0 3.0 12.0 6.0 49.0 100.0 79.0 28.0 100.0 100.0 96.0         When deciding on which supermarket use.0 8.0 21.0 69.0 Percent 10.0 8.29 30 .0 31.0 10.0 6.0 59.0 100.0 71.0 100.39 40 .0 82.0 3.0 15.Not Important At All Total 31 18 20 10 3 6 8 4 100 Percent 31.0 10.0 4.0 28.0 100.0 20.

0 19.0 50.0 8.0 4.0 1.0     116    .Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 100.0 82.0 69.0 13.0 5.0 26.0 5.Not Important At All Total 21 29 19 13 9 5 3 1 100 Percent 21.0 4.0 Valid Percent 21.0 50.0 19.0 6.0 13.0 100.0 19.0 29.0 99.0 69.0 14.0 96.0 9.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 91.0 100.0 82.0 29.0 Valid Percent 12.0 Percent 21.0 24. how important is quality of service and  staff helpfulness  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0 When deciding on which supermarket use.0 14.0 8.0 100.0 96.0 100.Appendices        When deciding on which supermarket use.0 13.0 24.0 19.0 100.0 Percent 12.0 13.0 3.0 6.0 9.Not Important At All Total 12 14 24 19 13 8 6 4 100 Percent 12. how important is location of store  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0 90.0 1.0 3.

0 12.0 16.0 15.0 98.Not Important At All Total 9 8 7 16 21 12 16 11 100 Percent 9.0 11. how important is product range and  presentation  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0     When deciding on which supermarket use.0 15.0 100.0 100.0 14.0 16.0 Percent 9.0 24.0 Valid Percent 9.0 12.0 19.0 8.0 12.0 100.0 9.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 44.0 61.0 4.0 21.0 100.0 73.0 2. how important is loyalty card schemes  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0       117    .0 16.0 40.0 2.0 56.0 7.0 9.0 21.Not Important At All Total 25 19 12 14 15 4 9 2 100 Percent 25.0 100.0 4.0 Percent 25.0 11.0 Valid Percent 25.0 19.0 85.0 7.0 14.Appendices      When deciding on which supermarket use.0 8.0 16.0 89.0 70.0 12.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 100.0 17.0 89.

0 22.0 27.0 8.0 18.0 17.0 1.0 80.0 13.0 100.0 14.0 2.0 2.0 9.Appendices      When deciding on which supermarket use.0 100.0     118    .0 49.0 5. how important is in‐store promotional  magazine and flyers  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0 51.0 11.0 53.0 12.0 51.0 11.0 91.Not Important At All Total 1 1 2 5 8 14 18 51 100 Percent 1.Not Important At All Total 1 9 12 13 18 27 11 9 100 Percent 1.0 5.0 31.0 9.0 9.0 100.0 100.0 1.0 4.0 10.0 8.0 Valid Percent 1.0 18.0 9.0 12.0 2.0     When deciding on which supermarket use.0 100.0 27. how important is overall store layout  and appearance  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 .0 9.0 18.0 35.0 100.0 14.0 13.0 Percent 1.0 Valid Percent 1.Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .Very Important 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 Percent 1.0 18.

0 14.0 100.0 6.0 53.0 100. how important is money off  coupons/vouchers and special promotions  Cumulative Frequency Valid 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 .0 Percent 28.0 8.0 4.0 83.0 25.0 29.0 17.0 100.0 14.0 10.0 Valid Percent 2.0 4.0 18.0 17.0 82.0 10.0 14.0 25.0 18.0 100.0           119    .Not Important At All Total 2 4 8 14 25 29 18 100 Percent 2.0 100.0 28.Appendices          When deciding on which supermarket use.0 8.0 29.0 100.0 73.0 45.0     Frequency of respondents who own and use another loyalty card including the  Tesco Clubcard  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 other card 2 other cards 3 or more other cards I only own a Tesco Clubcard Total 28 45 10 17 100 Percent 28.0 Percent 2.0 Valid Percent 28.0 45.

8 100.7 15.7 It is a good read with some informative articles and features It is dull.0 26.0 20.0 74.0 26.0 15.0 Percent 25.2 100.0 Valid Percent 25.0 45.0 49.0 60.0 100.0 Respondents’ perception on the Clubcard magazine  Frequency Valid It covers everything you would expect and is of great use 8 Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent 8.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 49.Appendices            Frequency of respondents who read the Clubcard magazine  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Sometimes Total 25 49 26 100 Percent 25. unhelpful and of no use Total Missing Total System 23 20 51 49 100 23.1 39.0 51.0       120    .0 49.

0 100.0         121    .0 76.0 100.0 18.0     Frequency of respondents who increase expenditure or purchased  specific/alternative products in the pursuit of collection points  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Don't Know Total 6 76 18 100 Percent 6.0 29.0 Valid Percent 6.0 9.0   Frequency of respondents who have redeemed any rewards from the Clubcard  scheme within the last 12 months  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Total 61 39 100 Percent 61.0 Valid Percent 61.0 100.0 9.0 10.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Percent 6.Appendices      The amount of points per every £1 spent respondents thought they were receiving  Cumulative Frequency Valid 1 point for every £1 2 points for every £1 5 points for every £1 10 points for every £1 Total 52 10 9 29 100 Percent 52.0 Percent 61.0 Valid Percent 52.0 71.0 39.0 100.0 100.0 62.0 76.0 18.0 10.0 100.0 Percent 52.0 39.0 82.0 29.

0 17.0 3.0       Frequency of respondents who would continue to shop at Tesco if they did not  have the Clubcard scheme in place  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Don't Know Total 95 3 2 100 Percent 95.0 100.0 29.0 Percent 54.0 Valid Percent 36.0 58.0 98.0 3.0 17.0 6.0   Frequency of respondents who would describe themselves as being a satisfied  Tesco customer  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Don't Know Total 54 29 17 100 Percent 54.0 83.0 100.0 100.0 58.0 100.0 Valid Percent 54.0 100.0 100.0 6.0 Percent 95.0 100.0 29.0 100.0 2.0 2.0 94.0 Valid Percent 95.0       122    .0 Percent 36.Appendices  Frequency of respondents who would describe themselves as being loyal  Cumulative Frequency Valid Yes No Don't Know Total 36 58 6 100 Percent 36.0 100.

0 32.0 100.0 Valid Percent 28.0 10.0 63.0 6.0 100.0 47.0 16.0 68.0 Percent 12.0 63.0 100.0 94.0 22.0 100.0 10.0 Valid Percent 12.0 97.0 16.0 100.0 10.0   123    .0 75.0 22.Appendices  Frequency of respondents who trust Tesco products and their image  Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Strongly Disagree Total 21 47 10 16 6 100 Percent 21.0 78.0     Frequency of respondents who usually shop around to get the best deals  Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Strongly Disagree Total 28 32 10 22 8 100 Percent 28.0 Percent 28.0 47.0 6.0 3.0 22.0 32.0 22.0 100.0 60.0 Valid Percent 21.0 8.0 8.0 3.0 92.0 10.0 100.0 Percent 21.0 100.0   Frequency of respondents who think that Tesco is very innovative  Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Total 12 63 22 3 100 Percent 12.0 70.0 100.

0 100.0 91.0 100.0 90.0 2.0 Frequency of respondents who feel more could be done to increase their loyalty  Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Strongly Disagree Total 5 72 14 7 2 100 Percent 5.0     124    .0 2.0 72.0 100.0 Percent 5.0 7.0 Valid Percent 10.0 77.0 98.0 50.Appendices        Frequency of respondents who expect rewards to be a part of their normal  shopping experience  Cumulative Frequency Valid Strongly Agree Agree No Opinion Disagree Total 10 50 30 10 100 Percent 10.0 10.0 14.0 100.0 14.0 60.0 30.0 72.0 30.0 100.0 Valid Percent 5.0 50.0 100.0 7.0 Percent 10.0 10.

Appendices  What more could Tesco do to make you more loyal  Cumulative Frequency Valid Improve facilities for elderly people Have discounts at the till rather than rewards Help those without transport Improve store layout Faster checkouts/self service checkouts More Clubcard points per pound Increase product range Increase store promotions More store entrances and exits Increase Clubcard rewards Improved on-line shopping Improve Clubcard administration Total 10 Percent 10.0 100.0 14.0 14.0 32.0 12.0 100.0 22 14 2 10 22.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 Percent 10.0 Valid Percent 10.0 10.0 2.0 80.0 22.0 48.0 58.0 16.0 74.0 1.0 10.0 83.0 4 12 3 3 3 16 1 100 4.0 3.0 3.0                                 125    .0 4.0 46.0 99.0 100.0 1.0 16.0 77.0 62.0 12.0 2.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful