P. 1
Video Games

Video Games

Views: 79|Likes:

More info:

Published by: Elviera Susannah Schreuder on Jul 16, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/09/2014

pdf

text

original

Video Games

A video game is a contest between a player and a computer designed program on a machine  equipped with a video screen and a joy stick or buttons that control the game's action. The machine  may be designed to play one game, as are those in video­game arcades. On game consoles or  home computers one can play any number of games, using different videotape game cartridges. The first video games were created on mainframe computers by engineers and computer  programmers in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The games traveled via a kind of programmers'  network from one computer research center to another. Games such as Star Trek and Space Wars  were played with essentially the same rules, whenever there was spare computer time­­usually in  the middle of the night. These first games were essentially verbal ­­that is, the graphics, if there  were any, were limited and the computer was programmed to respond primarily in words to each of  the choices made by the player. Many of these games were extremely complex, although none  approached the complexity of the programming involved, for instance, in computerizing a chess  game. In 1972, Nolan Bushnell produced the enormously popular Pong game, a machine in which two  players attempt to hit a computerized ball into the opposition's net­­all in black and white video  screen. Space Race, Gotcha, Tank, the voracious disembodied mouth, Pac­Man, and­­most popular  of all­­Space Invaders quickly followed. In Space Invaders, a moveable cursor fires at an even­ oncoming line of shapes representing spaceships. Bushnell marketed Atari, a game console that  plays through a TV set, beginning in 1979. Its formidable competitor, the Japanese Nintendo, had  captured 85% of the U.S. video game market by 1988. As they proliferated, video games gained color and complexity and adopted the basic theme that  most of them still exhibit: the violent annihilation of an enemy (a spaceship, an alien, a man­eating  crocodile) by means of one's skill at moving a lever or pushing a button (representing a gun, a  bomb, an arrow, an unidentified explosive). Many of the games played on home computers are more or less identical with those in video  arcades. Increasingly, however, computer games are becoming more sophisticated, more difficult,  and no longer dependent on elapsed time (as in arcade games, where a coin pays for a set number  of minutes); a few computer games go on for many hours. Graphics have improved to the point  where they almost resemble movies rather than rough, jagged video screens of past games. Some  of the newest arcade games generate their graphics through laser discs. Many include complicated  sounds; some even have music. Given an imaginative programmer, a sophisticated video game has  the potential for offering an almost limitless array of exotic worlds and fantastic situations. The  player is the game's protagonist, the persona who must work his or her way through a web of  possible actions, interactions with the game's reactions, and winning through a combination of  dexterity and strategy. There are those who feel that in order to play, one must accept the values implicit in these  interactive games, which­­like the often­condemned Dungeons and Dragons­­may involve extremely  violent or aberrant events and characters. Other types of games­­especially those which use  simulation (flying a plane, driving a car, escaping a maze)­­are simply highly imaginative tests of  intelligence and skill. Defenders of the games claim that they help prepare children for later  computer use and give them opportunity to learn how to reach and carry out decisions quickly. (See  also games.) Abigail Reifsnyder

Bibliography: Cohen, S., ZAP! The Rise and Fall of Atari (1984); Crawford, C., The Art of Computer Game Design (1984);  Greenfield, P., Mind and Media (1984); Loftus, G. R. and E. F., Mind at Play: The Psychology of Video Games (1983).

The video game­­introduced in the 1970s but achieving a high degree of technical sophistication  and impressive sales only in the 1990s­­is the prime contemporary example of interactivity between  TV program and viewer. Broadcasters and cable operators are establishing additional new systems  whereby viewers can interact with transmitted programs, send messages, and play games via  special telephone circuits, cellular networks, and satellite transmission.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->