Basic Training

Starting the School Year Right
Lessons by: Brian Thomas Strategies by: TCI

The beginning of the school year is critical.

You are getting to know your students. They are getting to know you. The students are also learning either directly or indirectly your procedures and expectations for class. Take control of the first days of school by getting the students immersed in the procedures and protocol of hands-on learning. This multi-lesson unit is meant to get the students engaged and trained to have a successful experience using TCI lessons. By no means is this the only way to begin a year or teach these procedures, but I am happy to offer this as a framework. Please use, manipulate, and make your own. The four lessons making up this unit are: 1. Lesson A: Getting Started and Getting to Know Each Other 2. Lesson B: The Interactive Student Notebook 3. Lesson C: Your Learning Styles and Working with Others 4. Lesson D: Automating Classroom Procedures to Save Time

Starting the School Year

LESSON

Getting Started and Getting to Know Each Other
Why should you care about how you learn?
Overview
Students are immersed into the learning procedures, theories, and classroom behaviors that will be used for the coming school year. Preview Students meet/greet each other in an autograph activity Activity In a Visual Discovery, students will analyze a series of images related to the class including expectations and a preview of activities to come. Processing Students will create a notebook cover which shares some details about themselves.

A

Materials
•“Get an Autograph” sheet (1 per student) •Visuals A1-A7 •Master A1: Role Cards •Student access to desktop publishing software OR •Plain paper, glue sticks, and colored pencils.

Objectives
In the course of this lesson and participating classroom activity, students will • analyze the importance of knowing each other in a collaborative atmosphere • describe the expectations for behavior in class. • explain how following directions and having respect for one another will make for a better class experience.

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Procedures

Preview
Suggested time: 10 minutes 1. Greet Students at the Door. Make sure to introduce yourself to each student as they enter class. Begin now learning their names and creating an inviting atmosphere in your class. 2. Have students complete “Get An Autograph.” Distribute “Get An Autograph” sheet to each student as they enter into class. 3. Explain the importance of knowing each other. Tell students that they will be working with each other throughout the year in various grouping configurations. It will be important to know each other well to build trust and mutual respect.

“Get An Autograph” Handout

Visual Discovery
Suggested time: 20 minutes

1. Explain the visual discovery to class. Invite the students to analyze Visual A1 of students engaged in class. Challenge the students to answer the following questions: • What do you see in this image? • What are the students doing? • What is the role of the teacher? • How would you describe the level of attention from the students? • What classroom expectations do you think are present to allow this activity to take place?
2. Introduce the classroom expectations to students. Have students review your classroom expectations or rules. Tell the students that the next series of images in class will depict an activity they will do this year. Each image will contain a clue to one of the three classroom expectations that will be highlighted. Their job is to figure out which classroom expectation is highlighted.
Visual A1

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Procedures

3. Project image of Visual A2: Students Working in Pairs. Encourage the students to carefully analyze Visual A2. • Challenge students to discuss with a neighbor what students are doing. • Have students stand up and point (from their seats) to an example of respect being shown in the image. • Encourage students to discuss in small groups what might happen next (between the pair with a yellow dot) if one of the pair were disrespectful. What would the next picture look like? • Project Visual A3 and stress to students how important it is that they be respectful of one another and you as their teacher. Generous respect will allow for trust to build in class and a greater diversity of activities in class.

Visual A2

Image Suggestion
Swap out the images used in the Slide Share document for images of actual activities you will do in class. Try to include an image that would also include you.

4. Project image of Visual A4: Students Teasing at Table. • Have students take out a scrap piece of paper and draw, using stick figures, a rough sketch of this picture. • Tell the students to add a speech or thought bubble to each student in the picture with what they think the student would be saying or thinking. • Encourage a few students to share their image; pointing out examples where the yellow dotted student is saying something related to a put-down or teasing. • Project Visual A5 and stress to the students how important it is that everyone be respectful and to be very careful not to tease in a way that is hurtful. • Ask the students for some examples of playful and okay teasing vs. hurtful comments. What is the difference?

Visual A4

Going Digital Suggestion
Use polleverywhere.com and have the students text in what they think is being thought or said by one of the pictured students. Choose a few examples to be explained.

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Procedures

5. Project image of Visual A6: Students Engaged in Group Activity. • Conduct an Act-it-Out with the students by having some volunteers “step into” the image and assume the role of an individual pictured. • Pass out role cards to participating students. Have students review their role card carefully and if necessary, use it as their script when selected to “come to life” by the teacher. • Explain to the rest of the class that the actors in front will become a talking statue when touched by you. The characters will come to life and share a thought, suggestion, or reaction to something that just happened. • Make sure that the student actors understand that they are to follow the directions on Act-it-Out Role Cards when they are tapped by you. One by one, tap each student with a role card. Start with the student who has Role Card A, and progress in order from there. Move quickly through the students so the scene unfolds naturally as it would in class. • After the act-it-out, ask the class to identify where the group activity started to go wrong. What was the point of disruption? What would be the consequences? How would it be different if the person dotted in yellow reacted differently? Project Visual A7 and review.

Visual A6

Master A1: Role Cards

6. Summarize the Rules for Class. Have the students get into a large circle. Have each student use a word to describe something they think of when they think about the classroom expectations based on today.

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Procedures

Processing
Suggested time: 10 minutes to start in class; homework 1. Pass out materials for notebook coversheet. Explain that in the next lesson, students will learn about the Interactive Student Notebook (or ISN). They will learn the procedures as well as do the initial set-up. 2. Show students a sample cover sheet. Using a previous student or your own, show the students a sample notebook including a custom cover.

3. Challenge the students to create a cover for their own notebook. Using the materials you’ve brought or alternately using tech resources, have the students create a custom cover for their notebook that includes the following information: • Their name prominently sized • Bell or Period • School Appropriate images that would highlight 2-3 interests or hobbies.

Sample Notebook Covers

Going Digital Suggestion
Have students use digital publishing tools to create their notebook cover. PowerPoint, Photoshop, or others are excellent resources.

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Get the Autograph of Someone Who...
For each of the 35 categories below, find someone in the class who fits the description. Before you get his or her autograph, you must shake the person’s hand and introduce yourself (“Hello, my name is . . . ”) and ask one question about the item the person is signing. For example, for the first category about leaving the state, you might ask, “Where did you go?” You are allowed only two signatures from the same person. You will have to circulate throughout the classroom. 1. Has left the state over the summer_______________________________________________________ 2. Has the same shoe size as you __________________________________________________________ 3. Likes to watch football _______________________________________________________________ 4. Likes to draw _______________________________________________________________________ 5. Plays a musical instrument ______________________ ______________________________________ 6. Has been to a play ___________________________________________________________________ 7. Has had braces ______________________________________________________________________ 8. Is wearing jeans _____________________________________________________________________ 9. Is in another class with you ____________________________________________________________ 10. Is new to this school _________________________________________________________________ 11. Is from a different ethnic group than you _________________________________________________ 12. Has traveled to another country ________________________________________________________ 13. Has the same color eyes as you ________________________________________________________ 14. Likes to read in bed _________________________________________________________________ 15. Was born outside the United States _____________________________________________________ 16. Likes to dance ______________________________________________________________________ 17. Has a hair style different from yours ____________________________________________________ 18. Is much taller than you _______________________________________________________________ 19. You have never spoken to before _______________________________________________________ 20. Loves history _______________________________________________________________________ 21. Dislikes history _____________________________________________________________________ 22. Has been surfing or ice skating _________________________________________________________ 23. Likes the outdoors ___________________________________________________________________ 24. Has more than two brothers and sisters ___________________________________________________ 25. Is an only child _____________________________________________________________________ 26. Likes to sing ________________________________________________________________________ 27. Speaks another language ______________________________________________________________ 28. Likes the same TV show as you_________________________________________________________ 29. Likes to swim _______________________________________________________________________ 30. Was born in the same month as you _____________________________________________________ 31. Has ridden a bike over 25 miles in one day _ ______________________________________________ 32. Knows how to sew ___________________________________________________________________ 33. Chews gum ________________________________________________________________________ 34. Likes broccoli _______________________________________________________________________ 35. Plays on a sports team ________________________________________________________________

140

Bring Learning Alive!

Visual A1

Visual A2: Students Working in Pairs

Visual A3

Everyone, including the teacher, will be treated with respect.

Visual A4: Students Teasing at Table

Visual A5

Put-downs or purposely hurtful comments or actions will not be tolerated.

Visual A6: Students Engaged in Group Activity

Visual A7

No one will be allowed to disrupt the learning process of others.

Master A1

Role Card A – Yellow Dotted Student You are watching another group present to the rest of the class. One of the students is your best friend. When tapped by the teacher, say the following: “I told my friend _____ , in the middle of their presentation, that she looked crazy.” Role Card C – Another Group Member Presenting During the middle of your group’s presentation, a classmate interrupted. When tapped by the teacher share the following: “Just wait until their group goes, I’ll do the same thing to them. See how they like that!”

Role Card B – Friend of Yellow Dotted Student During the middle of your group’s presentation, your friend interrupted. When tapped by the teacher laugh hysterically and exaggerated until you are tapped again and stop abruptly.

Role Card D – Another Group Member Presenting During the middle of your group’s presentation, a classmate interrupted. When tapped by the teacher share the following: “This is embarrassing, I’m not doing this anymore! I’d rather read a long chapter and do a worksheet.”

Starting the School Year Right

LESSON

The Interactive Student Notebook
How will the ISN make you a better student?
Overview
In a social studies skill builder, students analyze placards depicting portions of the interactive student notebook (ISN) and begin working on putting theirs together. Preview Students complete a “buddy clock” activity to be used in paired activities for this lesson and future lessons. Activity In a Social Studies Skill Builder, pairs study six important components to the interactive student notebook. Where appropriate, students will begin setting up their own notebook. Processing Students will create a simple editorial cartoon on the topic of the lesson essential question .

B

Materials
•Copies of the Student Handout B1: Buddy Clock (1 per student) •Copies of Student Handout B2: ISN Matrix (1 per student) •Copies of Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines & Expectations •12 or more folders with copies of Placards B1-B6 inside. •Colored Pencils •Glue Sticks •Scissors OR •Materials consistent with how you want students to put together their notebook.

Objectives
In the course of this lesson and participating classroom activity, students will • analyze the importance of working in pairs as a way to learn content. • describe the expectations for setting up a successful interactive student notebook in your class. • explain how maintaining a good notebook will allow them to deepen their understanding of content.

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Procedures

Preview
Suggested time: 10 minutes 1. Greet Students at the Door. Distribute a copy of Student Handout B1: Buddy Clock to each student as they enter the room. 2. Explain the reason for the Buddy Clock Activity. Tell the students that from time to time, they will be doing activities in class that require pairs to work together. Completing this Buddy Clock activity will allow the students to move quickly into pairs and allow them the opportunity to work with different people throughout the year. 3. Go over the rules for the Buddy Clock activity. Instruct the students to read the directions quietly while you read them aloud. • Using a projected Buddy Clock, digital, doc-cam, or transparency, walk the students through each of the three scenarios at the bottom of their handout. 4. Give students 5 minutes to get as many signatures as possible. Consider ringing a bell or announcing to the class any time a student completes their clock and brings it to you. 5. At the end of time, have all the students who still have an opening for an hour to come to the middle of the room. Pair these students quickly by finding out what hours people have open, and if students have not signed previously, signing them up. For those that remain, use your professional judgement to allow pairs to work a second hour together or to have a group of three in some circumstances. (note: if you have absent students, either fill one in for them yourself or have another student fill one in for them.)
Student Handout B1 Buddy Clock

Alternate to Clock Suggestion
Instead of a clock, consider a map with selected locations for students to sign. Instead of calling them clock buddies, they would be travel companions.

6. Model how the Buddy Clock is used. Ask students to review their clock. Have them point, from their seats, to their 7 o’clock buddy. Ask them to move together and work together for the lesson. Explain Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

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Procedures

that for future lessons where students are to be paired, you will use the buddy clock to pair them up quickly. Over time, they will have the opportunity to work with everyone in the class.

Social Studies Skill Builder
Suggested Time: 30 minutes 1. Explain the purpose of the activity. Tell the students in the next activity, they will learn about the interactive student notebook (or ISN) and how it will be used in class and at home. 2. Create 12+ Manila Folders with copies of Placards B1-B6. Pass out a folder to each pair of students to use as they complete each step in the process. 3. Pass out Student Handout B2: Matrix for ISN. Have the students look at each feature on their matrix. Pairs are to complete each column in their matrix, including the last column which must be initialed by their teacher. 4. Have pairs begin work on the first feature. Have pairs begin with the first feature, ISN Setup, and complete all three columns of their matrix. Remind students that before moving onto a next feature in sequence, they must check in with you and be signed off. Pairs will repeat this process until they have completed all six features on their matrix. Once pairs complete the fifth feature, give each student in a pair a copy of Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines & Expectations. 5. Debrief all six features quickly. Explain to the students that it will be necessary to bring their notebook to class every day unless they are told differently.
Placards B1-B6

Student Handout B2: Matrix for ISN

Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines & Expectations

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Procedures

Processing
Suggested Time: 10 minutes; complete for homework 1. Challenge students to create an editorial cartoon. Have students turn to page 4 of their interactive student notebook. Tell them that you would like to challenge them to create an editorial cartoon. 2. The subject of the cartoon should be on the ISN. Tell the students to use the interactive student notebook as the subject of their cartoon. The cartoon should include things that would explain features the features and benefits of the notebook. 3. Challenge students to use appropriate materials. Students can draw their cartoon and color it, or use other means to create their cartoon.

“Going Digital” Suggestion
Have students use a web tool that allows them to create their cartoon and share it. One possibility is www.toondoo.com .

“What if” Suggestion
What if you don’t want your students to create their own notebook using a spiral? What if you have a consumable notebook instead? What if you’d like your students to include other features not listed as part of this activity? Teaching is a private practice. This way to set up the notebook may differ from what you like. Adjust your matrix and materials as needed. It is also suggested to review the Social Studies Alive (for elementary) or Bring Learning Alive (for secondary) methods books as a whole section in both is devoted to various configurations of the interactive student notebook.

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Student Handout B1: Buddy Clock

Directions: When your teacher asks you to, circulate the room and get a different student to PRINT their first, last name by each hour on the clock. Here are a five rules to complete this task.

Print Your  Name Here

1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

Print your name in the middle of your clock on the line provided. You may only get another students name on your clock ONCE. When asking someone to sign a particular hour on your clock, you BOTH have to blanks by that hour. If you are having trouble finding someone that has an opening for a particular hour on the clock, ask aloud, “Does anyone have an opening for __ o’clock?” Take your completed clock to your teacher when all twelve hours are filled.

Want to be my 2 o’clock appointment?

I’ve already got someone there, can we do that?

Can you also sign my 6 o’clock appointment?

Are we allowed to sign more than once?

I’m open at 10 o’clock, are you?

Let me look. No one has signed my 10.

NO

NO

YES!

Student Handout B2: ISN Matrix

Notebook Feature

Two words to describe feature

Why is this feature important?

To Do List for You
Create a Table of Contents (TOC) inside the front cover like the example. Number the TOC page 1 Create a bag with a glue stick, pack of colored pencils, and a pair of scissors from the supply area. Cut out the Buddy Clock Glue it onto page 2 Add the title to your TOC

Notebook Setup Materials Used Previews Reading Notes Process Pages

Fold this matrix in half Glue it onto page 3 Add the title to your TOC.

On page 4 of the ISN, create a large rectangle on the top half of the page. Add the title, “Cartoon About ISN” at the top and TOC. Glue the “Notebook Expectations and Guidelines” to the inside-back cover of the ISN.

Notebook Assessments

Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines & Expectations

INTERACTIVE STUDENT NOTEBOOK GUIDELINES What is the purpose of the notebook? The purpose of the interactive notebook is to enable the student to be a creative, independent thinker and writer. Interactive notebooks will be used for class notes as well as other activities where students will be asked to express their own ideas and process the information presented by this class. What materials will the student need? *Spiral Notebook: Spiral bound, College bound preferable 70 sheets to 100 11 x 8 ½ in. Three holed punched *Highlighters *Blue or Black Pens, Pencil, Colored Pencils or Crayons *Glue-sticks

How should the notebook be organized? Students will get detailed instructions in class the first week of school, but what follows is the basic premise. The notebook will be organized into a left side and a right side. What goes on the Right Side of the Interactive Student Notebook? The right side of the ISN is for class and reading notes. As students take notes, they will structure them so that key ideas are clear and supported by examples from class instruction, discussions, or reading assignments. What goes on the Left Side of the Interactive Student Notebook? The left side of the ISN will be used for a variety of different activities, including homework. This side should be the place where all of the creative and artistic inklings come busting out! Left side activities will ask the student to demonstrate understanding of new ideas. The kinds of new activities for the left side are listed as follows: “PREVIEW”: is an activity where the student will be asked to preview new material that will tie into the content of the lesson. This activity relies on students’ prior knowledge and is meant to be something that EVERY student can answer. “PROCESS”: an activity in which the student will be asked to present new ideas they learned from the lesson in a way that is meaningful. For example, a student my show their understanding of new ideas by writing a poem or a story, drawing pictures, making diagrams, drawing political cartoons, or writing a eulogy. How will it be possible to earn an “A” on the Interactive Student Notebook? A student who expects to receive an A- or higher grade on their notebook will be one who has taken the time to consistently include thorough, neat, accurate, and colorful work. How will the Interactive Student Notebook be graded? Notebooks will be checked quarterly for neatness, accuracy, and completeness. All class notes and notebook assignments should be included, even for days in which the student is absent. Students are personally responsible to check the MASTER ISN I keep or MYSELF for work. Students can expect to have their notebooks checked twice first quarter and once a quarter thereafter. Where will the ISN be kept? For the most part, the ISN will never leave the classroom. Only on days where there is an extended Process activity for homework. A box to hold ISN’s for each period of American History will be left in the classroom. What happens when the 70 page notebook runs out of paper? Students will use one notebook per quarter. This eliminates the cumulative damage from day to day use over time.

Placard B1: Notebook Setup

Setting up the Interactive Notebook is extremely important. It’s also important to be consistent. Notice that the Table of Contents allows the student to find their place quickly. What other features in the set up of these notebooks allow students to find and know what is on the pages?

Placard B2: Notebook Materials

The materials used to maintain the Interactive Student Notebook are critical. Look at the following pages. What did the student use to create a good looking notebook? Some of the pages look like handouts. What tools will be needed to get handouts inside the notebook?

Placard B3: Notebook Previews

The first part of every lesson will begin with a preview. This part of the lesson is usually 5 to 10 minutes. Sometimes students recall previous information. Sometimes students share a thought on a possible scenario. When you hear the word “preview,” what role do you think this plays in the lesson? Why would it be an important part of the notebook?

Placard B4: Reading Notes

When the class moves into learning new content from an activity, textbook, lecture, or other source of information, students take their notes around graphic organizers. Note how both words and images are used to help the student to remember the key information. Remember that this portion of the notebook is testable.

Placard B5: Notebook Processing

The class will engage in processing assignments at the end of each lesson. This is the students opportunity to show what they know. Look at these examples of process assignments, what are some characteristics? Would a student just be able to memorize facts and complete these assignments? Why will these assignments make you a better tester?

Placard B6: Notebook Assessment

From time to time, notebooks will be collected and assessed. The expectations and guidelines for keeping your notebook will help you to be ready for these assessments. While every page in your notebook may not be reviewed, all are fair game.

Starting the School Year Right

LESSON

Your Learning Styles and Working with Others
How could your learning style(s) impact your work and others?
Overview
In a Problem-Solving Groupwork activity, students create a 60-second commercial touting the importance of working together. Preview Students take a multiple-intelligence assessment to learn their dominant learning styles. Activity Students are placed into heterogeneous groups based on learning styles. Groups are challenged to create a 60-second commercial which would tout the advantages to cooperative learning. Processing Students add a virtual sticky note to a web tool stating their preferred learning style and a personal example of their strength.

C

Materials
• Multiple Intelligence Test(1 per student) • Student Handout C1 (1 copy per group) • Flip Video Cameras or video recording equipment and editing software. OR • Materials for groups to create a live commercial.

Objectives
In the course of this lesson and participating classroom activity, students will • describe how their learning style can positively affect their ability to understand content. • explain the expectations and responsibilities while working within a group. • create a commercial using audio-visual equipment.

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Procedures

Preview
Suggested time: 10-15 minutes 1. Greet Students at the Door. Make sure to introduce yourself to each student as they enter class. Begin now learning their names and creating an inviting atmosphere in your class. 2. Distribute copies of the Multiple Intelligence Assessment. Explain to students that once they are in their seat, they are to take five minutes to complete the 35 question survey. Encourage the students to move quickly and not spend a lot of time wavering between answers. 3. Score the Multiple Intelligence together. Project the MI Assessment and Key in side by side fashion. Using your interactive whiteboard tools, show the students how to quickly score their assessment. 4. Have students record their top two learning styles. Once students have scored their assessment, encourage students to review their key. Have students come to the front of the room.

Multiple Intelligence Assessment

Problem-Solving Groupwork
Suggested time: 60-90 minutes 1. Divide the class into heterogeneous groups of four. Using the results from the multiple intelligence assessment, divide the class into groups of four. Try to divide the class so that there is a strong visual learner, strong interpersonal, and strong linguistic learner in each group. 2. Move students into their groups. Move students into their groups and challenge them to complete a quick team-builder activity. Have them finish this sentence within their group, “My favorite commercial is ____ because ___.”

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Procedures

3. Introduce the Project. Explain to the students that they will now work together within their group to create a commercial that touts the importance of working together. • Play the following YouTube link as an example for what you are looking for: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDzZTX_t5uo • Pass out Student Handout C1: Directions for Completing Teamwork Commercial. Make sure that each person within the group has a copy. • Walk the students through each step in the commercial development process stopping at the end of each step to reinforce that groups must have your initials at the completion of a step before moving to the next step. • Have the groups complete the first step: role assignments and begin work. 4. Facilitate the work on the commercials. • Encourage the groups to work on their project independent of your help unless absolutely necessary. • Make sure to stay engaged while the students are working. Having the students checking in with you at the end of each step will help, but there may be stretches where students are immersed in their work. This is the time to wander around the room and visit groups. • Project or post the completion time. If possible keep a timer visible to students at all times. This will help the groups stay on task and keep the time for this activity from spilling over unnecessarily.

Student Handout C1

YouTube Blocked?
•At home, go to  www.youtube.com and  locate the video that  you want.  •Copy the URL of that  particular video.  •Go to  www.keepvid.com. In  the blank, paste the URL  of the YouTube video  that you want.  •Click the Download  button at the end of the  URL bar.  •A choice of formats will  appear. Right‐click on  the one you want and  select Save As. Give the  video a name that you'll  recognize and save it to  your Desktop.  •Once the video is  downloaded, copy it to a  flash drive to take to  school the next day. 

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Procedures

5. Play each group’s commercial. • Have the students provide the link or upload the video so that it can be projected to the entire class. • Create a fun way for students to consume the commercials and reflect on the importance of the topic. One suggestion would be to turn the class into an awards committee. Tell the students they will need to pass out several awards: best commercial, best actor/actress, best special effects, etc. When groups vote, they are allowed to vote for any group or individual provided it is NOT themselves or their group. • Play each video and allow groups to jot down notes they think are important surrounding the commercial. • After the videos have been aired, challenge the students to reflect personally on the topic through the process activity.

Processing
Suggested time: 5 minutes to start in class; homework 1. Project a class Wallwisher for the students. Using www.wallwisher.com, post the essential question for the lesson. 2. Encourage the students to respond at home. Tell the students that you’d like each of them to respond with a quick answer. Bonus points can be awarded for students that include videos or links to support their answer.

New to You?
If websites like wallwisher or others are new to you, visit TCI’s blog to download a Starters Guide to Free Web 2.0 sites. You can find the guide here: http://blog.teachtci.com/ starters-guide-to-freeweb-tools The page that refers to wallwisher from this document is provided.

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Identifying Your Multiple Intelligences: Survey 1
This survey will help you identify your areas of strongest intelligence. Read each statement. If it expresses some characteristic of yours and sounds true for the most part, write T. If it doesn’t, write F. If the statement is sometimes true and sometimes false, leave it blank. Everyone will have different answers. Think about what is true for you. 1. ____ I’d rather draw a map than give someone verbal directions. 2. ____ If I am angry or happy, I usually know why. 3. ____ I can play (or used to play) a musical instrument. 4. ____ I compose songs or raps and perform them. 5. ____ I can add or multiply quickly in my head. 6. ____ I help friends deal with feelings because I deal with my own feelings well. 7. ____ I like to work with calculators and computers. 8. ____ I pick up new dance steps quickly. 9. ____ It’s easy for me to say what I think in an argument or debate. 10. ____ I enjoy a good lecture, speech, or sermon. 11. ____ I always know north from south no matter where I am. 12. ____ I like to gather together groups of people for parties or special events. 13. ____ I listen to music for much of the day, on the radio, CDs, or other media. 14. ____ I always understand the drawings that come with new gadgets or appliances. 15. ____ I like to work puzzles and play games. 16. ____ Learning to ride a bike (or to skate) was easy. 17. ____ I am irritated when I hear an argument or statement that sounds illogical. 18. ____ I can convince other people to follow my plans. 19. ____ My sense of balance and coordination is good. 20. ____ I often see patterns and relationships between numbers faster than other people. 21. ____ I enjoy building models (or sculpting). 22. ____ I like word games and puns. 23. ____ I can look at an object one way and see it turned backward just as easily. 24. ____ I can identify when there is a key change in a song. 25. ____ I like to work with numbers and figures. 26. ____ I like to sit quietly and reflect on my feelings. 27. ____ Just looking at the shapes of buildings and structures is pleasurable to me. 28. ____ I like to hum, whistle, and sing in the shower or when I’m alone. 29. ____ I’m good at athletics. 30. ____ I enjoy writing detailed letters to friends. 31. ____ I’m usually aware of the expression on my face. 32. ____ I’m sensitive to the expressions on other people’s faces. 33. ____ I stay in touch with my moods. I have no trouble identifying them. 34. ____ I am sensitive to the moods of others. 35. ____ I have a good sense of what others think of me.

Creating a Cooperative, Tolerant Classroom

149

Scoring Your Multiple Intelligences: Survey 1
The numbers in the boxes below correspond to the numbered statements in the survey. Put an X in the box for each item you marked T. For example: The first box in row A is for statement 9. If you marked 9 with a T, put an X in that box. If you marked it F, leave the box empty. When you have finished, add up the Xs in each row. A total of four Xs in any row indicates strong ability. (Your teacher will tell you which intelligence to write for each row.)

A

9

10

17

22

30 =

_________ intelligence

B

5

7

15

20

25 =

_________ intelligence

C

1

11

14

23

27 =

_________ intelligence

D

8

16

19

21

29 =

_________ intelligence

E

3

4

13

24

28 =

_________ intelligence

F

2

6

26

31

33 =

_________ intelligence

G 12

18

32

34

35 =

_________ intelligence

Teacher Answer Key: Do not reveal to students until after they have scored their tests. E = musical-rhythmic A = verbal-linguistic B = logical-mathematical F = intrapersonal C = visual-spatial G = interpersonal

D = body-kinesthetic

150

Bring Learning Alive!

Student Handout

C1

Directions: Use these directions to complete the creation of a commercial that touts
the importance of teamwork. Your commercial must include the following design elements: •The commercial must be no longer than 60 seconds. •The commercial must be entirely made by the group members. •The commercial should be creative and appealing to teenagers.

Steps for Creating the Commercial
Step 1: Assign Group Roles: Place your initials by the role you will assume. ___ Writer ___ Producer ___ Director ___ Designer Responsible for writing the commercial Responsible for editing the commercial video Responsible for directing the shooting of the video Responsible for getting/creating any needed props or art _____ Teacher’s Initials Step 2: Conduct a commercial conception meeting. The writer is responsible for leading the team in a brainstorming session on ideas for a commercial. The writer will keep notes on possible ideas as they are discussed and be prepared to share them with the teacher. The writer will be responsible for providing a rough outline of the commercial to the teacher before moving to step three. _____ Teacher’s Initials Step 3: Create and gather the needed items/props for the commercial. The designer is responsible for coming up with the items that will be needed during the filming of the commercial. Other group members should assist the designer in this process where appropriate. When ready, the group will showcase their prop list to the teacher prior to moving onto step four. _____ Teacher’s Initials

Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

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Student Handout

C1

Step 4: Rehearse and then film the commercial. The director is responsible for getting the group to rehearse and then film the commercial. Rough footage will be shown to the teacher before the group can move to step five. _____ Teacher’s Initials
Step 5: Edit and finalize the commercial. The producer is responsible for taking the rough footage for the commercial and editing it for time. The other group members should assist in this process. The group will have completed it’s work when a completed video is uploaded for and/or given to the teacher. _____ Teacher’s Initials

Sample Commercial Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDzZTX_t5uo

Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

6

 

 

FREE WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR TEACHERS 

 

Wallwisher 
What is it?  Wallwisher is a free application that acts as a virtual bulletin board. Students can easily comment on a  topic posted by the teacher (and they don’t have to set up an account).  How do I get started?  Go to www.wallwisher.com and click “build a wall.” Insert a title and subtitle, choose a background  color, and decide whether your wall is public or private. You can create a wall as a guest or, if you want  to save walls for future use, simply create a password for your account.  

  How can I use it with my students?  • Use with TCI’s Response Group strategy. Post a thought provoking question (such as your unit  Essential Question) for students to discuss or debate.  Find out students’ prior knowledge of a topic—a tech version of a KWL chart.  During a TCI Problem Solving Groupwork activity, encourage students to use Wallwisher to  divide up tasks, post progress, and discuss ideas.  Have students create a wall, post a link to a project or presentation, and solicit feedback from  their peers and community.  Review this collaborative presentation that gives 17+ ideas about how to use Wallwisher:   http://sharein.com/shares/157317‐15‐interesting‐ways‐to‐use‐wallwisher‐in‐the‐classroom. 

• •

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY WITH THE TCI APPROACH   

 

Starting the School Year Right

LESSON

Automating Classroom Procedures to Save Time
How can I play a role in saving instructional time in class?
Overview
Students participate in a series of activities that will assist the class into saving instructional time and minimize disruption. Preview Students clumsily try to group themselves for a game show only to find that their grouping cuts into the amount of time they have for the game. Activity In an Experiential Exercise, students will participate in a game where they are challenged with activities that will help the class reduce disruption and save instructional time. Processing Students will respond to the essential question as an exit slip to class.

D

Materials
•Hotel Room Key Cards (1 per student) •Downloaded countdown from “Minute to Win It” Gameshow •Projected copy of Desk Olympics

Objectives
In the course of this lesson and participating classroom activity, students will • experience the difficulty in placing themselves in groups and arranging their materials quickly. • move quickly as they enter class to “check in” and get to their seat. • learn the importance of moving quickly, quietly, and correctly into place for paired, triad, and quad cooperative activities.

Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

1

Procedures

Preview
Suggested time: 10 minutes 1. Start Timer and Conduct attendance. Using a stopwatch or timer function, begin at the tardy bell. Call out the names of student in a methodical manner. 2. Clumsily group students into pairs. • Tell students that they are about to play a game. It will be important to get into groups quickly for this activity. Students will need to get into groups of four, including their desks, and have all their belongings in place, and be ready. • Ask them if they understand the directions and then have them try to move into groups. 3. Once students are finally in groups: Explain to the students that you were timing how long it took to get into doing an activity today from the start of class to when groups were ready. Show them their time. Ask the students: • Why do you think it took so long to get into the activity? • What could we do to save time in class? 4. Explain the purpose for the rest of class. Ask the students to rearrange themselves to how the class originally looked. Project the essential question for the lesson and tell the students that they will play a game today as they learn how to help save instructional time with a couple of class procedures they will use throughout the year.

Experiential Exercise
Suggested time: 30 minutes 1. Distribute blank hotel key cards. Give each student a blank hotel key card. Have students use a marker to print their first initial and last name on the hotel key.

Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

2

Procedures

2. Phase 1: Attendance Procedure • Collect all the hotel keys from the students. • Have the students gather their belongings and step into the hall. • While students move into the hall, place the hotel key cards in a prominent location along with an index card box close by. • Once in the hall, quietly tell the students that at your direction, they will enter the room, find their key card, drop it in the box, and then have a seat. • Tell the students that this will be the daily attendance procedure. Once the tardy bell rings, any key cards left out will indicate who is tardy or absent. • Ring a bell and have the students practice the procedure.

Alternate Suggestion
Substitute the hotel key cards with novelty dogtags. Have the students grab them and wear them around their neck during class. Depositing them in a box as they leave for the next day.

3. Phase 2: Desk Olympics • Tell the students that they will now compete as a class against all your other classes in a timed activity similar to a gameshow. • Explain that when in your class, they will be moving into groups many times during the year and that the groups will vary in makeup and size. To maximize instructional time, you have created a procedure that will allow students to move quickly, quietly, and correctly. Desk Olympics • Project Desk Olympics master and timer. • Tell students that their first event is side by side pairs. Have students get their student notebook out and find their buddy clock. (See Starting the Year Right: Lesson B for details). Have students make eye contact with their 5 o’clock buddy. Tell the students that you will now time how long it takes for the class to all be arranged in pairs. Tell the students the rules are that they must move quickly, quietly, and correctly. If there is any talking, you will add 5 seconds to the class total. • Using the timer, tell the class to begin. Start the music clip too. When completely settled and quiet, show them the time. No matter how quickly the time, tell them they must do much better. Allow them the chance to do the activity once more, but let them know that this one counts. Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

3

Procedures

• • •

• •

Write down the final class time for the event side by side pairs. Have students move the desks back into their original place. Using the same procedure, conduct an event for face to face pairs, triads (remember to group students in advance of class and project), and then quads (which could be two pairs finding each other). Be sure to emphasize the importance of moving quickly, quietly, and correctly. After the last event, ask the students how knowing how to move into groups will save time. Phase 3: Procedure, Procedure Place the hotel key cards back out. Have the students exit the room. Tell the students that they will now enter the room and be challenged to move into groups once the tardy bell rings. Explain that they must “check in,” find their seat, and be ready. This is the last event and will count toward the class standings. Start the timer and get the class moving from the hall to your room. Once the appropriate amount of time has elapsed, ring a tardy bell, BUT keep your timer moving. Project an image showing that students will work in side by side pairs with their 10 o’clock buddy. Get them to move quickly, quietly, and correctly. Add 5 seconds for any unnecessary chatter.

Teacher Tip
Procedures are only as valuable as they are routinely used. Conduct a Desk Olympics time each group activity you do throughout the year.

4. • • •

Going Digital Suggestion
Polleverywhere is a free web tool that allows teachers to create text or multiple choice questions and have students use smart devices such as their cell phones or computers to respond. If your school does not allow students to use cell phones while in session, consider using responder units, or good old fashioned strips of paper.

Processing
Suggested time: 5 – 10 Minutes 1. Have students complete a “Texit Slip” activity. Project the essential question via www.polleverywhere.com and ask the students to use their cell phones to text in a response to the question. 2. Debrief the essential question. Call out a few of the texted responses as a closing. Have students move desks back into place.

Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right

4

Desk Olympics
You will be working in groups of different sizes throughout this course and must practice moving into groups efficiently. When your teacher says “Go!” you must move into whatever configuration is shown below and bring everything—backpacks, notebooks, pens, jackets—with you. You will be timed on how fast you get into perfect formation.

Event 1

Time

Side-by-Side Pairs

Event 2

Time

Face-to-Face Pairs

Event 3

Time

Groups of Three

Event 4

Time

Groups of Four

Event 5

Time

Groups of Five

144

Bring Learning Alive!

 

 

FREE WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR TEACHERS 

 

Poll Everywhere 
What is it?  Poll Everywhere is a free application that allows students to respond via text message to a poll created  by the teacher. Polls can be downloaded into a PowerPoint or shown live online.  How do I get started?  Go to www.polleverywhere.com. You will need to create an account. Additional features are available  for purchase, but all the basics are free. The website has step‐by‐step instructions with screenshots to  walk you through setting up a poll and having students answer (it’s NOT difficult):  http://www.polleverywhere.com/how‐it‐works.  

  How can I use it with my students?  • Use during TCI Preview activities to hook students in, assess their prior knowledge, and get them  interested in the upcoming lesson.   Sprinkle in a few polls to check for understanding during lectures or as students complete their  Reading Notes. Leave up an open‐ended poll during instruction to let students ask questions.   Instead of an exit slip, create a “text‐it slip” by having students answer the Essential Question at  the end of class. Or, at the beginning of class, use a poll as a quiz over previous material.  Encourage students to use polls as part of class presentations. 

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY WITH THE TCI APPROACH   

 

 

 

FREE WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR TEACHERS 

   

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INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY WITH THE TCI APPROACH