Sample ESL Lesson Plans for Authentic Communication

This section includes the following topics:
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Overview of Sample Lesson Plans Beginning Level Lessons Intermediate Level Lessons Multi-level Lessons

Overview of Sample Lesson Plans
This collection of sample lesson plans is designed for use with either beginning or intermediate level ESL students. In addition, some lessons are designed for use in classes that include students at mixed levels of ESL proficiency. These may be multi-level ESL classes or career technical classes that include ELLs. If you do not have classes with students at various levels of English proficiency, you can still use these activities in your beginning or intermediate level classrooms. While this guide provides ESL instructors with information on program and course planning, assessment and evaluation, no lesson plan can take the place of thoughtful planning by the classroom instructor. The sample lesson plans provided in this program guide are not a comprehensive collection. Rather, they are designed as examples that instructors can use as a model for creating their own lesson plans. All the lesson plans included here are designed to be used as culmination activities for instructional units that focus on a theme related to life skills, pre-employment, or employment skills. Ideally, instructors should select and modify lessons to fit the unit they are planning and the level of the students in the classroom. Most of these lessons could be modified to fit a variety of unit themes and used on a regular basis as part of a weekly, monthly or quarterly routine. Standards and Objectives Standards and objectives are included at the end of the lesson plans as a model for instructors as they develop their own plans. Lessons should be designed to address a specific standard, and the objective for the lesson should be made explicit to the students. Technology

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Several of the sample lessons and activities rely on the use of technology such as audio and video recording equipment as well as the Internet. Instructors may need to modify these activities according to the availability of technology at their centers. Texts and Core Materials There are many good textbook series and software programs that cover key grammar structures, functions and vocabulary. These series typically have teacher’s manuals with many suggested activities. The goal of the sample lesson plans in this section is to incorporate the use of authentic materials (items in print or video found in everyday life, which have not been modified for learners of the English language), create an interactive context for authentic communication, and provide opportunities for formal and informal assessment of students’ communicative competence. These lessons do not attempt to duplicate or replace what textbooks, computer programs, or conventional tests can provide. Instructors are expected to use their regular texts and core materials to teach the vocabulary, grammar, and language functions required by the sample lessons. The sample lessons listed below can be used as culminating activities after of unit of materials has been studied. The instructor should carefully review the lesson plan to be aware of any preparation, which must be carried out beforehand. The instructor can print out the lesson plans individually for easier use or print them all together and keep them in a binder for easier access.
A. Beginning Level

English language learners need to meet the prerequisite of basic literacy in order to have a positive learning experience during these three beginning-level sample lessons. 1. Color-Coordinated Quiz 2. Course of Events 3. Performing A Skit
B. Intermediate Level

These three sample lessons build on the foundation of grammar, thus far, and are more interactive in content. It is up to the instructor to make clear the expectations for the students at this level. 1. Interviewing 2. Something I’m Good At 3. Video Segments
C. Multi-level

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These five sample lessons can be used in a classroom with students at various levels of English proficiency. It is up to the instructor to make clear the expectations for the students at various levels. 1. Extra! Extra! Read all about it. 2. Internet Scavenger Hunt 3. It's on the label 4. Raise Your Hand 5. Traveling Instructor

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A.1 Beginning Level
“Color Coordinated Quiz” This activity should be used as a culminating activity for reviewing vocabulary on clothing, colors, and adjectives. It may focus on attire for specific vocations or for clothing worn during different times of the years. By using photos from advertisements, students can chose to describe many aspects of the person pictured, provide as many details as possible and incorporate new vocabulary into those descriptions.
Objective: Students will use authentic materials, such as newspaper sales ads or catalogues, to demonstrate their knowledge of vocabulary and word order. This lesson will help students describe objects using adjectives. Topic: Shopping for clothing (furniture, appliances, tools, etc.) Stage of the Unit: Evaluation/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Present tense simple statements Examples: The jacket is blue. She has a purse; Present tense continuous statements Examples: He is wearing a blue jacket. She is carrying a purse Vocabulary: Adjectives (colors), Nouns (clothing, furniture, appliances, tools, etc.) Prerequisites: Familiarity with objects presented on the picture sheets and related vocabulary. Materials: Photos from newspaper ads or catalogues, scissors, glue, paper. Approximate time for activity: 15-30 minutes Before Class: 1. From multicolored department store advertising inserts in the Sunday newspaper or from supply catalogues or other industry catalogues, cut out 12 pictures of different items (e.g., articles of clothing). Choose items in a wide selection of colors that the students have studied. Try not to choose articles of clothing or objects with unusual colors or hard-to-describe designs (e.g., a paisley tie). 2. Depending on the size of pictures, glue 2 to 4 items each on six sheets of paper. Number the items from 1 to 12, or more if 4 on a sheet. If you have more than 6 students, then create a second set of picture sheets with items.

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STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. If your class has 6 students, then give each student a sheet with pictures, and ask the student to write a description of each item (e.g., A woman is wearing blue jeans and a red t-shirt) on a separate sheet of paper. Tell the student to pass the sheet of pictures on to the next person in class after finishing the descriptions. If there are fewer then 6 students, leave the extra sheets on another desk for students to retrieve after they finish with their initial sheet. If there are more than 6 students, then break the class into two groups using the 2 sets of quiz sheets. 2. Continue until everybody has had a chance to respond to all 12 items, and collect the students’ descriptions. Feedback and Scoring 1. Assess each response on accuracy of vocabulary, spelling, word order, content, or all of these features (depending on student level and lesson focus). 2. As a group activity, the instructor could write sentences created by various students on the board/overhead, and the class together could correct the sentences. Another option is to ask student volunteers to take turns writing a sentence on the board/overhead for the class to evaluate. 3. Then return responses to students and review the response sheets with the entire class, asking for volunteers to share their response for an item. Correct as necessary. Emphasize that there is more than one way to describe each picture and that detail and creativity are as valuable as correctness. Variations 1. Glue pictures to file folders (rather than paper) and laminate for reuse. Build up a collection of pictures over time to use as a resource for future instruction and review activities. 2. Have students work in pairs or small groups to revise incorrect or incomplete responses. This may be done in primary language pairs. 3. Depending on the level of the student and the pictures you select, you can ask the students to be more descriptive in their answers, or to exchange papers and suggest details to add to improve their partner’s descriptions. 4. If there are several students that are interested in the same trade, you can create a set of sheets particular to that vocation with work clothing, specific tools/equipment, and safety gear that might be used.
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The exercise could include an oral component such as having each student taking the role of a television commentator and explaining the attire of the people in the pictures. Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON ● ● ● ● Speaking / Writing (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Teaching others (Interpersonal skills) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 1. This activity can be used by career technical instructors to assess the vocabulary comprehension of their ELL students with regard to work attire. and safety gear. Continue to include picture sheets from previous units to support vocabulary retention. Page 6 of 58 . 8. D. Add new picture sheets that relate to the instructional units covered in class. through. 6. and with spoken and written English for personal expression and enjoyment. Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. by including accessories or focusing on uniforms for different occupations with specialized gear. J.5. Standard 2: To use English to communicate in social settings: Students will interact in. 7. This activity could be modified for higher levels. There could be audience participation in commenting if the clothes are in style or not/suggesting what the person pictured might need to change about his/her attire for different jobs. tools/equipment.

present tense (for Steps in a Process or Phenomenon) Vocabulary: Approximately 10 terms related to the story. A series of events can also occur in the telling of a story (how a student applied for a job or came to the United States). or phenomenon by examining the relationships between events.) 4. Approximate time for activity: 45 minutes Tips for the Instructor: This activity works best when it follows lessons that teach sequencing concepts and vocabulary ahead of time. Objective: Students will develop their overall understanding of a story. for this activity. Materials: Reading passage that includes a sequence of events. Instructors can use a story as short as a paragraph. 2.A. 3. chronological order. Before Class: 1.g. familiarity with the context of the story or significance of the process or phenomenon being studied. Analyze the story. process.2 Beginning Level “The Course of Events” Whether Job Corps students are baking pastries in a culinary program or building a storage shed in the trades. vocabulary such as “first”. as long as there is clear sequence of events. Put the following events in order from first to last by numbering them from 1 to 11. literature. etc. instructor made handout.g. sequence words (e. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills/Pre-Employment Structures: Past tense (for Story Plot). as well as in academic subjects (e.) Prerequisites: Beginning ESL literacy. or phenomenon your class is about to study. last. Scramble the items by cutting and pasting them onto another document. as students build their vocabulary and grammar knowledge. for example: what is sequence. Topic: Varies according to story. Over time. process.. This lesson will promote the student’s ability to synthesize information. and make a list of the 11 most significant events. “after”. process or phenomenon. second. add a set of directions to guide students (e. The purposed of this exercise is for students to review vocabulary they have learned and to examine the relationship between events. social studies. etc. etc. “next”. (To reduce unconscious bias. the stories can get longer. first. Incorporate visual materials when possible. they are following steps to finish a project. sciences. process or phenomenon. Type up your list with a blank line to the left of each item (for numbering). At the top of the paper. you can arrange them from the shortest to the longest utterance.).g. next. see Page 7 of 58 .

e. 2. and specific trades). In your instruction and assessment. 1. but should not be used merely to Page 8 of 58 . Hand out the activity sheet. This activity can be used in career technical class to discuss a multi-step task or process. Middle and End” Chart) can be excellent tools for ESL students at all levels of proficiency. process or phenomenon by using the 11 most significant events to describe how the story plot develops or process/phenomenon occurs. language arts. “Sequencing Chart” or “Beginning. Graphic Organizers (for example.Sample Handout: The Coin). STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. The purpose is to promote higher order thinking. Use available texts and any visual materials you have collected/created beforehand to promote comprehension. Feedback and Scoring 1. Variations Adapt this activity to focus on either reading comprehension or listening comprehension according to your students’ learning needs. de-emphasize factual details and stress context and causal relationships. or phenomenon. Therefore. In the classroom context it refers to the use of teacher assistance and intervention to enable learners towards greater independence. This exercise is applicable to a wide variety of content areas (i. Use synonyms and paraphrases in the activity sheet (rather than exact wording) to increase task difficulty and discourage memorization. science. process. and especially sequencing. 2. Teach the story. Special Note When executing a lesson requiring students to put events in sequence. They help ESL students learn vocabulary and encourage students to think about information in new ways. history. Review the answers with the whole class and let students score their own papers.. organizing. in your scoring stress comprehension of the context and logic of the story. Another option is to have students exchange papers and score their partners paper as part of a whole class review activity. Most importantly they provide consistent scaffolding. They also help improve clarity in thinking. and have the students complete it. “Story String”. 3. 2.

Marie got a sore throat and began to cough. Page 9 of 58 . For example. Have the whole class participate by negotiating the place of each event in the sequence. or the use of various dictionaries. It can also be used as a cooperative learning tool. Ask them to put the cards in order by forming a line at the front of the room. Have them work together in pairs or small groups to decipher the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases through context clues. 3. With the help of a special doctor. Give 11 students one index card each. After dinner Marie’s family ate the cake. Allow the class to discuss and evaluate the responses collectively. write the events in the story or process on eleven index cards. Brown (1998) Sample Handout: The Coin “The Coin” Directions: Put the following events in order from first to last by numbering them from 1 to 11. Twelve years later. This exercise can be used as an individual activity or as part of a larger test. Marie’s mother put four coins into the cake for good luck. copy the answer sheet onto an overhead transparency. She coughed up the coin from so many years ago. The doctors couldn’t help Marie. After she felt better. D. To promote vocabulary development. They only found three of the coins. She coughed a lot and couldn’t speak. Marie learned to speak again. J. To promote class interaction. After students have completed their answer sheets individually. Later Marie got sick. 5. ask volunteers to come to write their responses on the overhead. Marie still could not speak. 4.memorize a list of events. choose a reading that is slightly above the comprehension level of the students. Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. instead of creating a worksheet.

her mother made a special cake for dessert. from Longman. and provide subject matter information in spoken and written form. Page 10 of 58 . Standard 2: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to obtain.When Marie was thirteen years old. construct. process. The story “The Coin” appears in the text True Stories in the News: A Beginning Reader By S. Heyer (1996). SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON ● ● ● ● ● Listening / Reading (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Sociability (Personal Qualities) Acquire and evaluate information (Information) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARD ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2.

At other centers. In such cases. debit card.A. shirt. Approximate time for the activity: Preparation time of approximately an hour. Structures: Present tense simple statements/ Present continuous statements Vocabulary: Adjectives (colors.). group activities can break up the monotony of instructor directed instruction and individual or pair practice work. Objective: Students will perform a drama or skit.). and fill out a brief critique. home shopping channel. instructor made handouts. three class periods of 45 minutes over a three-day period. This activity requires that students depend on their group members to be present several days in a row. telephone order). shoes. oversized. Evaluate students based on participation to reduce anxiety. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Varies depending on the topic of the presentation Vocabulary: Varies depending on the topic of presentation Prerequisites: Ability to give constructive feedback to peers Materials: Authentic materials to be used in skits (see examples in Sample of Structures below). Page 11 of 58 . tight. sizes. well made. Topic: Topic of interest to the student. stylish. big. At many centers. Materials: Store catalogues. Other students listen attentively. Different modes of paying (credit card. girlfriend. students’ schedules change often and students are pulled out for various services without warning. cash. catalogs.3 Beginning to Intermediate Levels “Performing a Skit” Group activities like performing a skit are problematic at some centers due to scheduling constraints. etc. ask questions about the presentation. small. sporty. trendy. pretty. Sufficient instructional time should be devoted to establishing peer feedback norms prior to this lesson. or friend. Different modes of shopping (on-line. It is important to make this a fun and informal activity. using authentic materials as props in the presentation to the class. gift certificate). Nouns (pants. blouse. Consider your program context before attempting this activity. ugly. check. ESL students are segregated from the general program and spend weeks or months together in the ESL classroom. etc. If the schedules of your students are predictable an activity like this might be used effectively in your class. Samples of Structures: #1 Students will perform a skit about buying a present for their boyfriend. Tips for the Instructor: Some students can be very shy or reluctant to get up and perform in front of their peers. Students will need instruction and modeling on how to give feedback in constructive and appropriate ways. seasonal. baggy.

would.#2 Students will perform a skit about ordering in a restaurant. An idiom can’t be understood by knowing the meaning of each word in the phrase. Page 12 of 58 . Development: Instructor will explain that idioms are phrases that are used in a special way that may be different from their literal meaning.  Requesting permission using can.). dancing. cooking. American. total loss. and magazines (pop-culture. waiter’s notepad. have in mind.). too good to be true. Structure: Idioms Looking for. pamphlet/brochures of local companies (from a job fair or from placement specialist on-center). could. Authentic materials are those that have not been tailored for ELLs and are examples of print materials from the real world. You should try to get authentic materials. etc. etc. utensils. including artwork. Italian.) #3 Students will perform a drama or skit using idioms at the Mall. It must be learned as a whole. and please. look around. pictures. Students will make polite requests using Modal Auxiliaries. Before Class #1: 1. can’t afford it. etc. Materials: Menu from restaurant (Chinese. hold on. items commonly used in restaurants (water pitcher. take your pick. next door. Tell the class they will be putting on a skit for the rest of the class the following day and that they can include anything they like. Spanish. plates. Instructor will explain the meaning of the idioms and give examples of how they can be used. etc. and may. Materials can include: to-go menus from restaurants. Materials: Items commonly found in a clothing store. home decorating. Structures: Modal Auxiliaries  Making polite requests using could. Tell them to bring in those items for the following day’s class.). and music and any materials or props they want to bring in (magazines. local newspapers. which may be used for skits. 2.

Place students in groups of 2-3 students. dancing. the total time for the skit will be approximately 6 minutes (2 minutes X 3 people= 6 minutes). if a group has three members. etc. bank. 1. including artwork. For instance. Be sure to check grammatical accuracy and word choice in the scenario and provide feedback while the groups are working. “First-timers”. supermarket. tell the students to make a list of words in their skit (with their definitions) that might be difficult for the other students to understand. etc. 3. each member of the group should speak for at least 2 minutes in the group’s skit. For homework. 4. (15 minutes) Tell the students to discuss the theme of their skit and to give their skit group a name related to the theme (e. Have the students sit with their skit groups. Explain that the expected time for each skit will be 2 minutes times the number of member in the group. You can choose to provide a topic for the skit. a poster. Tell the students that they will be putting on a skit for the rest of the class and that they can include anything they like.Class #1: Planning the skit STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: Introduction (5 minutes) 1. Present a mini-lesson that clarifies your expectations before they begin the activity for Class #1. assign as homework 5. 3. 2. (20 minutes) Have the students write and submit a 150 to 200-word summary of their skit.)  The job interview  The post office. 2. 4. “Chef Rudy”). restaurant. Preparation (35 minutes) Caveat Page 13 of 58 . If the group has not finished the summary. Students may need guidance on how to write a scenario for their skit. and music. a bookcase. for example:  The first day at Job Corps  At the workplace  How to make… (a food dish.g. That is..

and overall performance). characters. Have students read over their summary. Have the group assess its preparation of the skit using the space in the third column of the Skit Assessment Sheet (Sample Handout A: Skit Assessment Sheet). Instead each skit participant should try to speak ‘naturally’ (rather than read from a prepared script). it is crucial for the students to record each step of the Skit Assessment Sheet. Explain to the students that they will fill in each step in the sheet according to the schedule. 3. pronunciation. etc. 1.).Class #2: Planning the skit STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: Review (5 minutes) 1. language use and fluency. Preparation (30 minutes) Self-Evaluation (10 minutes) Special Note Page 14 of 58 . grammatical correctness. They do not have to write the dialogue down word for word. stage directions. Pass out the Skit Assessment Sheet (see Sample Handout A: Skit Assessment Sheet) to each group. Mention that the group will be assessed in its final performance using the same areas as in the rehearsal (Step 8 in the Skit Assessment Sheet: the scenario. Have students write out the scenario (setting. Because the activity lasts several days. 2. nonverbal expressions. 2. Recap the time expectation and need for props in the skit groups are creating.

Include positive feedback from the Comments sheet in section 9 of the Skit Assessment sheet. and then collect Comments sheets. Give students 10 minutes to rehearse their skit. 2. Peer-Evaluation (during presentation) Evaluation Caveat Page 15 of 58 . Let the first group perform. and general acting. 2. Use the Final Performance section to score the skit. 1. Review the features of constructive comments before they begin the activity for Class #3. Ask for volunteers from the class. Review the list of the steps that all of the groups have completed. 2. 4. Present a mini-lesson on peer feedback prior to the first presentation. 4. and not all groups have gone. pronunciation. collect the Comments sheets from the audience. Collect the Skit Assessment Sheets from all the groups. See below for more details. Peer evaluation will take place during presentations. Have the students write comments as the audience on the skit. Return Skit Assessment sheets to all the groups after all groups have performed their skit. 1. language use. Make sure that there are sufficient comments sheets so that each student can comment on each group he or she sees. If time runs out. Continue with this process. Allow the second group to perform. 3. tell the class the final groups will present the following day. Pass out the Comments Sheet (see Sample Handout B: Peer Comment Sheet) at the time of the final performance. After their skit.Class #3: Presenting the skit STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: Review (15 minutes) Presentation (30 minutes) 1. Students may need guidance on how to give constructive comments.

Use separate sheet. Language 1 2 3 Comments: Grammar 123 Pronunciation 1 2 3 Fluency 123 Nonverbal 123 Overall acting 123 1= Need more help 2= Good 3= Very good 9 Peer comments Sample Handout B: Peer Comment Sheet Name of Group: Title of Skit: 1. J. What did you like best about this skit? 2. Use separate sheet. Was there something that you didn’t understand? Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”.Sample Handout A: Skit Assessment Sheet Directions: Complete steps 1 – 7 as a group. Steps 8 and will be completed by the instructor after your performance. Brown (1998) Page 16 of 58 . D. Steps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Date Group Members Theme (goal of the skit) Title Summary Vocabulary list Scenario Final performance Signature Use separate sheet. What did the group do well? 3.

Standard 3: To use English in socially and culturally appropriate ways: Students will use appropriate learning strategies to extend their communicative competence.SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON • • • • Writing/ Speaking (Basic Skills) Creative Thinking (Thinking Skills) Team member participation/ Teaching others (Interpersonal skills) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 1. Page 17 of 58 . Goal 3. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to participate in social interactions.

will got feedback on their pronunciation by hearing themselves on tape.1 Intermediate Level “Interviewing” Part of the purpose of this activity is to bring native English speakers into the learning experience of ESL students and break down barriers to interaction with ELLs. Vocabulary: Varies depending on the person being interview. will become confident as they execute proper procedures. if you have a small class of 46 students with visiting volunteers or students that are native English speakers pairing off with the ELLs. Students will take notes and write a list in response to the interview. etc. If you feel that this portion of the activity may not be completed outside of class. Students will be able to practice correct tenses in speaking and writing. The ESL instructor should let other staff know that this activity is being conducted. and use recorded data appropriately prior to this lesson. you may want to complete it as a class session. ask for permission to tape record interviews. why and how). Topic: Hobbies/ Life before Job Corps/ Hometown. Prerequisites: Ability to understand conversational English spoken at a slow pace. where. Materials: Audio-recording equipment for student use. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Open-ended questions (who. what. will practice good social skills in an American context. when. and will take notes on relevant information. This activity takes place over two class periods. with an assignment for students to interview a native speaker on their own. instructor-made handouts Approximate time for activity: Two class periods of 45 minutes each. Objective: Students will speak with native speakers of English on center with increasing confidence. Page 18 of 58 . Tips for Instructors: Choose visitors for model interview who are willing to slow down their speech. Make sure visitors understand that you will be taping the model interview so that students can listen to it again. Students will conduct and audio-tape an interview with a native speaker. Students will need instruction on how to use tape recorders.B.

a fellow trainee in their trade. Introduce the guest. 8. 10 minutes for intermediate/advanced) b. Class #1 STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. Make enough copies of the Sample Interview Guide (see Sample Handout: Sample Interview Guide) to hand out to each student. 7. Point out the difference between an open-ended question and a yes/no question.) 2. A second choice is to have a Job Corps graduate or community volunteer visit the class. 5.Before Class #1: 1. etc. they should write a list of three things to be turned in: (a) what they learned from interviewing the person. or (for non-residential students) a native speaker they know. how long. grammar. Types of questions to ask (where. preferably a staff member that is not in the academic department and has not had regular interactions with students in the ESL class. Length of the interview. thank your guest and allow him/her to leave. Explain how to conduct the interview: a. (Confirm in advance that the visitor agrees for the interview to be tape-recorded. Point out the similarities to questions used in the mock interview. visit the class for the purpose of being interviewed. 2. The instructor should conduct an interview that takes 5 minutes and tape record the interview. fluency. Explain that you will demonstrate an interview for the class. 6. life before Job Corps. take notes. Present possible interview topics: a hobby. 3.) c. This is a demonstration or model of what the student will do on his or her own. Show students how to use a tape recorder in preparation for their individual interviews. Explain that students are to conduct and audiotape (if available) an interview with a native speaker of English outside of class.can vary depending on level of ability (5 minutes for beginner. Introduce the activity to students. Once the interview is over. The student can interview an instructor. Arrange to have a Job Corps staff member. Set a date for turning in the tape and recording equipment back to you. when. Explain what categories they will be graded on (e. and (c) one thing they did not understand in the person’s speech. etc. and comprehensibility). Give students a Sample Handout: Interview Instructions and Sample Handout: Sample Interview Guide. Check to see if cassette records with cassette tapes are available for use by students. and thank you) 4. Play back the audiotape of the interview. 10. (if they are a career technical instructor) trade/career/job.g. hometown. questions. Afterwards. what kind. Students should take notes of the responses from the person they are interviewing. 3. they will interview a person. 9. what type. vocational/trade vocabulary (if applicable to a prior lesson). social skills. (b) one item that was a surprise to him/her. Explain that open-ended questions are designed to draw out the interviewing and get him/her to talk more freely. a student trainee that lives with them in the dorms. Page 19 of 58 . and report back to the class. The structure of the interview (an introduction.

4. 8. if available. but read them over for insight into students’ note taking skills. Ask for volunteers. their hometown or county they come from. Page 20 of 58 . 6. Explain that in this lesson.Before Class#2: Collect the audiotapes from the students. the interviewer should take notes while he/she is asking questions. collect students’ notes on their peer interviews. allow for 2 or 3 questions from the audience for the students. students will learn about each other by interviewing each other. 5. Have as many pairs present as times allows. etc. Present possible interview topics: a hobby. Do not score student notes. 3. Give the pairs about 5 minutes to organize their notes. At the end of class. Afterwards. the students switch roles and spend another 5 minutes in an interview. Student A has 5 minutes to interview student B. 9. Afterwards. with the interviewer taking notes. Put students into pairs. Then pick another pair of students and repeat the process. 7. Class #2 STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. Have the first pair come to the front of the room and have the students present each other and the information they gathered from the interview. Consider presenting a follow-up lesson on note taking if needed. life before Job Corps. 2.

the types of questions asked and their role as interviewer). 3. The visiting students would each be paired up with and ESL student in order for the ESL student to interviewing the native English speaker. Collect the audiotapes from the student trainees on the due date. explain that the audiotapes will be used by the instructor only to evaluate the student interviewer’s oral communication skills. Variations 1. show students short video clips from T. you can have students focus on only one topic. Brainstorm the characteristics of a good interview. Grade the audiotapes according to the criteria on the scoring card (see Sample Scoring Card). students can make a presentation on the person they interviewed and what they learned. 2. In the description. Let the students know what you are evaluating them on (i. interviews (Oprah.V. After interviews. As a follow-up writing activity. 60 Minutes. If you feel that 5 minutes is not enough for all the questions. Talk with a career technical or academic instructor about allowing some of the native English students from his or her class to visit the ESL class. E!). Before the activity. A question and answer period can follow. 2. 2.Scoring 1. Page 21 of 58 . have students write an article on the person they interviewed for the center or class newsletter. have the students brainstorm questions and role-play how they think the discussion will go. Review questions or discussion points to use in the interviews so that the students have an outline to follow. 3. Before the activity.e.. 4. 5. Write up a description of the activity and its purpose for the students to share with their interviewees prior to the interview. Caveats 1.

Listen to the interviewee’s answers and modify your questions if you like 6.Sample Handout: Interview Instructions Steps for the Activity 1. 2. 3.) Assignment Write about these three things: 1. Tell student the topic of the interview questions. Ask if he/she minds if you tape the interview. and • Comprehensibility (etc. 5. One thing you did not understand in the person’s speech Due Friday morning: Your interview audiotape. 7. Page 22 of 58 . Thank the interviewee. your notes. Explain that you would like to interview him or her for 5 to 10 minutes in order to practice interview skills. One item that was a surprise to you 3. Qualities of a good interview • Fluency • Good grammar • Good social skills. and the assignment. Take notes of the responses from the interviewee. Open-ended questions b. Introduce yourself to the interviewee. Ask the questions you have prepared: a. 4. What you learned from interviewing the person 2.

When is the best time to visit there? It looks like our time is up.Sample Handout: Sample Interview Guide Interviewer: (student name) Interviewee: (person being interviewed) I would like to ask you some questions about yourself. computer technician. What did you do before you came to work at Job Corps? 2. Did you enjoy that type of work? 3. etc. some sort of activity that you like to do during your free time? 2. Do you have a hobby. What is your hometown? 2. How long have you been doing this? 3. How long did you live there? 3. What do you enjoy about it? [Experience/Vocation] 1. Page 23 of 58 .)? [Hometown] 1. What is that town known for? 4. Thank you for answering my questions and sharing some of your experience with me. Where did you learn to be a (plumber. What kind of places do tourists visit there? 6. What county do you come from? 5. Do you have 5 minutes? [Hobby] 1.

etc. especially structures taught in class) Vocational vocabulary (use of terms studied in class or in trade class) Social skills (appropriate levels of politeness. lack of significant pauses) Grammar (accuracy of grammar.) Comprehensibility (ability to make self understood) Grading: A= B= C= Fail = 16-20 11-15 6-10 5 Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. Standard 3: To use English in socially and culturally appropriate ways: Students will use appropriate learning strategies to extend their communicative competence Page 24 of 58 . J. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to participate in social interactions Goal 3. Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON ● ● ● ● ● Speaking / Listening / Writing (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Sociability (Personal Qualities) Acquire and evaluate information (Information) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 1. D.Sample Scoring Card Circle the appropriate number: 1 = no competency 2 = some competency 3 = competency 4 = above average competency 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 Fluency (smoothness of speech.

then you may want to bring in a CD with some of the music you like in order to demonstrate some steps). Because this activity allows students to share their knowledge of a topic that interests them with their peers.2 High Beginning and Intermediate Level “Something I’m Good at Doing” Presenting a topic in front of an audience can be difficult for anyone. whether a second language learner or native speaker. Objective: Students will use authentic materials to make a presentation to the class. Keep in mind that you will need to bring in a prop or an example of your final product (if you are good at dancing. 3. Topic: Topic of interest to the student. last. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: First person present tense and past tense Vocabulary: Varies depending on the topic of presentation. Preparation time is built into class time. sequence words (first. Other students listen attentively. then. This lesson will promote student confidence with regard to public speaking. ask questions about the presentation. Page 25 of 58 . next. instructor-made handouts Approximate time for the activity: Two class periods of 45 minutes Before Class #1: 1.B.) Prerequisites: Familiarity with the content to be presented. Materials: Authentic prop for model presentation. Print out enough copies of the Sample Oral Presentation Outline (see Sample Handout A: Oral Presentation Outline) to give one to each student. and fill out a brief critique. anxiety should be somewhat reduced. etc. 2. Using the Sample Oral Presentation Outline. prepare a 5-minute presentation on something you are good at.

Give students a sample outline for organizing their thoughts into an oral presentation (see Sample Handout A: Oral Presentation Outline for an example). making things with their hands). The students will be expected to do the same (provide props) in their presentations.g.” 3. Give students class time to use the sample outline to organize their thoughts and at least one night to prepare their presentations. drawing. 5. During your presentation. Make it clear to the students that they will be doing a similar activity. 2. Make it clear that you allow questions during the presentation or after the presentation. You may provide students with ideas for topics to help them get started (e. Explain that each student is to prepare a 5. dancing. 8. 6. singing. either give the students an example of the final product (freshly baked cookies) or do a demonstration (juggling). Page 26 of 58 .to 10-minute presentation on the topic “Something I’m Good at Doing. Let students know that they will need to turn in their presentation outline to you the day of their presentation. Deliver such a presentation to the class yourself: 4. though students can chose a topic other than those you list. 7. 9.. Provide an outline of key points you will cover in your presentation.STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. Encourage students to write down their questions to ask for clarification and explanation.

Repeat this presentation activity with more challenging topics as student proficiency and confidence increases. Variations 1. 5-15 students is ideal. return all of the critiques to the student presenters. 4. 5. etc. You can chose by volunteers or use a random system.Before Class #2: Print out enough copies of the Presentation Feedback Sheet (see Sample Handout B: Active Listening) to give one to each student. what they like to do in their spare time. If it seems that this activity may be too intimidating for some students. Then the second student spends 5 minutes practicing his or her presentation.such as music. The activity can work in a larger class. before each presentation. you can use the first 10-15 minute as practice time for students to run through their presentation in pairs. 3. brief review of the presentation (see Sample Handout B: Active Listening). The first student takes 5 minutes to practice the presentation. 3. then the listener can give feedback for a 2 minutes. or where there are sitting. You may also want to grade their outlines or provide feedback on the presentation using the presentation review (Sample Handout B: Active Listening). but the presentations should be very brief and perhaps done in pairs or groups. The listener provides feedback for 2 minutes. Next. such as last name order. 2. consider putting students in pairs to present on a common interest. Class #2 STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. If you wish. 4. This activity works best in a small class. After each presentation. SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON ● ● Speaking / Writing (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Page 27 of 58 . See what each student understood. Other suitable topics include movie or book reviews. Congratulate the speakers and collect the critiques. have the student give you his/her outline of the presentation topic to you. first name order. or cultural events/history. give the students a few minutes to fill out a simple. Have the students take turns making their presentations to the class. Ask the rest of the class to listen and to write down questions to ask after the presentation. 2. but not to the other students. spread the presentations out over a period of time (one or two per class over a week) so that each student has more of the spotlight and doesn’t need to rush. Depending on the size of the class. Scoring As feedback. current events.

Standard 2: To use English to communicate in social settings: Students will interact in. Here are the cookies I made for today. What do you think? V. Sample Handout A: Oral Presentation Outline Topic: (Something I am good at doing) I’m Good at Baking Cookies Prop to bring in to class: Two dozen chocolate chip cookies I. and then I get out my pans and bowls. It takes me a whole afternoon to making about 12 dozen cookies takes. I like to send boxes to my sisters each Christmas. I set the oven timer for 12 minutes. She loved to bake and so… II. Ask the class if there are any questions. I grease a baking sheet and put 1-inch balls of dough about 2 inches apart. How did you get interested in this activity? My mother wasn’t a great cook. I mix everything by hand. through. Demonstrate your activity or give out a sample product. Give a step-by-step description of your activity.● ● Teaching others (Interpersonal skills) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 1. because my family loves chocolate. I mix the items for about 5 minutes. Does anyone have questions? Page 28 of 58 . about 5-6 hours… III. but my grandmother was. Each batch makes two dozen and takes about 20 minutes to make. First I buy the ingredients. and with spoken and written English for personal expression and enjoyment. I always add extra chocolate chips. How and when do you do this activity? I bake cookies every holiday season. IV. I put together the dry ingredients first. and then add the liquid ones.

Who is the student or speaker? 2. What was good about the presentation? 6. What could the student (speaker) improve about the presentation? Other comments: Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. When does the student (speaker) do this activity? 4. Brown (1998) Page 29 of 58 . D.Sample Handout B: Active Listening 1. J. What is the topic (subject)? 3. Why does the student (speaker) do this activity? 5.

cultural events on center or in the community).. but rather to recognize key ideas from a small amount of oral language. basic familiarity with the content presented in the video clips. instructor-made handouts Approximate time for the activity: 45-minute class period and 15 minute review of clips the following class session. Stage of the Unit: Evaluation/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Varies according to video clips Vocabulary: Varies depending on the topic of the video clip Prerequisites: Basic comprehension of spoken English. Each time the student is exposed to the dialogue.3 Intermediate Level “Video Segments” This activity uses another authentic material.g. This lesson will promote students’ ability to comprehend the speech of native speakers. SST topics. video segments. The intent is not to have students watch videos and answer questions about them. and to make inferences from the information provided. students will have the opportunity to see and hear an authentic clip three times.B. as a learning tool for English language learners. Consider your lesson objective and the proficiency level of your students carefully when selecting clips. or from popular commercials or television shows. may be customized to fit a seasonal or thematic unit. Objective: Students will watch short (30-60-second) video segments. commercials that rely on oral language rather than visuals.’s Birthday. short dialogues from TV dramas. to find main ideas and supporting details. Examples include: introductions to TV shows like Oprah. (e. Materials: Video recording equipment. a news preview telling the viewers what is coming up. Clips can be pulled from local news segments. Tips for the Instructor: This activity works best if the video segments are very short. Topic: Varies according to video clips selected. he or she is able to focus on different aspects of the conversation. Page 30 of 58 . Jr. By using recorded video segments from English language media sources. focusing on recognizing key words and key details as they are linked in speech. while reinforcing grammar points. which may be of interest to students. Martin Luther King.

Part 2.Making inferences 1.Video #2. Play the video clip once again. 4. and collect it when they have finished. 5. Ask the students to complete Part 2 of the handout. For example.. Play the video clip once again. they should clear their desks.seconds long. 2.Video #1. 3. each 30-60. especially in a functional curriculum. (2) finding main ideas and supporting details. 2. Commercials are short and must use language and visuals to create a scene or context within seconds. Ask the students to sit where they can see the monitor and hear well. Movies or scenes from television programs can work well. Have the students take notes on their listening handouts. Ask the students to sit where they can see the monitor and hear well. 2. Choose video clips that are short and focused rather than feature-length films. Part 3. Play the second video clip.Video #3. Read the instructions for Part 3 to the students. Give students Part 3 of the listening assessment.. materials originally made for native speakers of English). Page 31 of 58 . as the visuals set the context of the topic within seconds. Try to choose video clips that are on a subject the students have had exposure to in class or about a local event that they are most likely familiar with.e. Allow 5 minutes to complete the exercise. Ask the students to sit where they can see the monitor and hear well. Prepare a listening assessment (see Sample Listening Handout) such that each video clip and the accompanying handout corresponds to one of the three main sets of skills: (1) recognizing key words and key details. Play the first video clip. Allow 5-10 minutes to complete the exercise. and (3) making inferences. Have the students watch and listen without taking notes. Have the students watch and listen without taking notes. Choose specific scenes for the contexts the students are studying (e. b. Give students Part 2 of the listening handout. STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: (First class session) Part 1. how to work with co-workers. from authentic sources (i. Read the instructions for Part 2 to the students. Locate three appropriate video clips. and collect it when they have finished. 5.Finding main ideas 1.Recognizing key words 1. they should clear their desks. 3. 3. appropriate topics for small talk at work). Play the third video clip. 4. Choose commercials of products that students would likely be familiar with.Before Class: 1. 2. Give students Part 1 of the listening handout. Have the students take notes on their listening handouts. Read the instructions for Part 1 to the students. a. c.g. they should clear their desks. how to greet a customer. Ask the students to complete Part 1 of the handout. Special television news reports. Have the students watch and listen without taking notes.

and collect it when they have finished. thereby enabling them to communicate better with native speakers in real situations. create follow-up lessons to be used by individuals or pairs at the computer. record each video segment for as many consecutive viewings as required. If your center has the technological capability (digital video editing and file management software. review the answers. Feedback 1. you do not have to score it as you would a discrete point test. Score Part 1-3 separately. review the answers.) store video segments on a computer and conduct this as a computer-based activity. Although the activity is designed to assess listening skills. etc. Answer any questions that come up. Then play Video #3.Review of Video Segments (second class session): 1. Then play Video #1. and put all three scores and comments on a scoring sheet (see Sample Scoring Sheet) for the instructor’s notes. record the first video clip two times in a row. 2. and add up the scores to arrive at one integrated listening score. once they are taught listening skills and strategies through this type of lesson. 2. Page 32 of 58 . Play the video clip once again. Once students are familiar with the format of this activity and the technology required. 4. Variations 1. and answer any questions about that video.4. You should have scored the 3 handouts of students. If you wish. headphones. The Next Class . Special Considerations 1. 2. Return the handouts to students. Although it is natural for the students to feel that video clips played at natural speed are far too fast. Have the students take notes on their listening handouts. Ask the students to complete Part 3 of the handout. Afterwards. they will be able to listen both for the gist and for key information. 3. Then play Video #2. 5.. 2. Hand back the scoring sheet to the students with the listening assessment. review the answers. Rather than rewinding the videotape during the administration of the assessment. and answer any questions about that video. break down the students’ proficiency assessment by scoring each skill separately. Allow 5 minutes to complete the exercise. 3. For example.

_____ 4. Both Nike and Reebok have testing centers to keep up with the latest technology. Instructions: Watch the video clip. _____ 3. Nike is more serious about sports than Reebok. E. _____ 2.Sample Listening Handout Part 1 The students watch a video clip featuring a woman and a travel agent discussing the woman’s itinerary. Page 33 of 58 . Nike promotes its products with professional team.m. Nike and Reebok like to compete with one another. Sneakers appeal to many different types of people for different reasons. Fashion is a key element of sneaker sales. B. _____ 5. C: Women wear them to work. Sample Listening Handout Part 2 The students watch the 2nd video clip from a news story called “Sneaker Wars. Fill in the chart. Supporting Details A. Reebok with families or casual exercisers. Select the supporting detail from the right column that justifies the main idea in the left column. Day Thursday Time Place Action Visit the Great Wall Hong Kong 7:30 a. and athletes wear them to compete. kids love to play soccer in them. Nike and Reebok both have design teams. The colors and styles change every season.” Instructions: Watch the second video clip. Main Idea _____ 1. Write in the letter of supporting detail in the blank in front of the main idea. Sneakers are popular with trendy teenagers. D.

3. Instructions: Watch the third video clip. Is Bob indoors or outdoors? 3. process. Total Score ____/ ____ ____/ ____ ____/ ____ ____/ ____ Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. They cannot hear Bob’s end of the conversation. Making inferences. J. Standard 2: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to obtain. Recognizing key words 2. named Bob (not pictured). Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON • • • Listening / Writing (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARD ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2. Is Bob the boss or the caller? Sample Instructor Scoring Sheet Part (Video segments 1-3) 1. construct. C.1 Multi-Level Page 34 of 58 . 1. What is the topic of the conversation? 2. and provide subject matter information in spoken and written form. D. Finding main ideas. Answer the following questions in one or two words.Sample Listening Handout Part 3 The students watch the third video clip of a man on the telephone with another man.

It is. While simplified texts. Depending on the length of the articles and time required to read and answer questions. sports. local news). perhaps only 2 or 3 articles can be studied during a 45 minute class period. Focus on articles that will stimulate discussion. 3. By incorporating the use of newspapers in the classroom on a regular basis. By providing an introduction to the way the text is organized and constructing thoughtful worksheets or questions. chose sections that would be interesting to your students. such as ESL magazines and newsletters. (See the Sample Handout: Questions for Daily Newspaper Activity for sample questions). you model the practice of reading for information and provide students with access to an information resource that will be valuable to them long after they leave Job Corps. Prerequisites: Beginning ESL literacy Materials: Class set of a local newspaper. Topic: Current Events Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application or Evaluation General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Varies depending upon article or feature. instructor-made handout Approximate time for activity: 45 minutes Before class: 1. Authentic texts are those found in the ‘real world’ and that are not designed with language learners in mind. for this activity you should provide the students with an authentic local newspaper. Vocabulary: Approximately 10 terms related to the section of the newspaper. Such materials are often confusing and overwhelming to ELLs at first. Make sure you have copies of the publication for yourself and the students in your class. the instructor provides a scaffold for student learning and models good reading strategies. containing stories that relate to their lives. Prepare questions about the section that are appropriate to your students’ levels of proficiency. The newspaper has several sections (entertainment. Print out the questions and make copies for all. the role of the ESL instructor to provide a targeted activity that assists students in locating relevant information from a challenging text. are generally good supplemental materials. Objective: Students will learn about how to find information in a newspaper by reading and answering questions about articles and ads from the local newspaper. Page 35 of 58 . you could also use that for this activity. Weekly delivery of class sets can often be obtained from the publisher at no cost to instructors.“Extra! Extra! Read All About It!” The objective of the lesson is to provide a scaffolded activity that builds familiarity with the authentic text of the local newspaper. or with a local slant. If your Center has a monthly newsletter. Order a class set of a daily newspaper. 2. therefore.

Encourage students to underline new words and keep reading for the main idea (without stopping to look up definitions). the front page. along with the newspapers. standings. You may want to write them ahead of time on the board. 5. Have students identify the page where the article was found. graphs) or sections of the newspaper (e. 3. Bring marked answer sheets to class for the next lesson. For example. Students can work together and discuss the articles or ads with their groups. sports. headlines. to make copies for all students. Vocabulary study can make a good follow-up or homework assignment. 4. You can narrow the focus of this activity by focusing the class session on a different aspect of the newspaper.. and collect the newspapers/newsletters for the next class.g. 4. Allow time for students to study the vocabulary they have underlined while reading. You can use the newspaper as the basis of a 1-month course of study. articles. If you are teaching this lesson to several classes on the same day. Select 10 words that students may need to know for the articles and find their definitions. Have students write their names on their answer sheets and newspapers. Page 36 of 58 . entertainment. 6. Handout the newspapers or newsletters and have the students answer the questions individually. Pass out the handout of questions and review with the class to make sure student understand the questions. captions. have students write their names on the answer sheet. Scoring 1. 3. features of the newspaper (e. international news. 2. Once the class has learned about the various sections. assess the students with questions based on that day’s entire paper that they must answer without the help of the group. Give students time to explore sections of the newspaper that interest them.. 2. Allow students to correct their own answers. and the business section). local news. Place the students in groups of 2 or 3. Mark the incorrect responses on the answer sheets.g. national news. Variations 1. STEPS FOR THIS ACTIVITY: 1. and elicit answers from the class. but do not correct them. 5. or put them on sheet a paper. 2. and collect them.4.

Write a letter of advice to the author. 3. 3. (Note: Give the page numbers sometimes to help the students find the article. Page 37 of 58 . The word (…) probably means a. 2. Read the advice column. c.) 1. For skimming and scanning questions. Read the first letter in the advice column. do not give page numbers. Advice Column 1.Sample Handout: Questions for Daily Newspaper Activity General 1. Do not use a dictionary to answer these questions. (add meaning and distractors) b. Explain why you agree or disagree with the advice in one of the letters. 6. How much does the (select a sample item) cost? Where is (store) located? How much does it cost to fly to (international location)? Vocabulary Look at the headline (…) on page (number). Look for words that mean the same as the following words: (add synonyms and distractors) a. Why do you think that letter was put in first? 4. b. 2. Read the article entitled (…). 5. How much does the newspaper cost? What is the weather for today? How many sections are there in the newspaper? On what pages are the sports articles? What is the exchange rate for the dollar and the Japanese Yen today? What is the theme for today’s editorial? Skimming and Scanning Look at the advertisements and answer the questions. 2. 4.

Write the titles of the movies that are reviewed today. When did it happen? 4. What was the score of the ________ game last night? Summarizing Specific Articles Read the article entitled “xxx” and answer the following questions. How many movies are reviewed? 2. What will happen as a result of the event? 6. Where will the new building be located? 5. For example: 1. Why is it important for us to know about this event? Customize these questions to fit the article(s) you have chosen. negative or mixed? 3. What organization needs a new building? 2. 1. Why is it important for this organization to have a new building? 1. Where did the event take place? 5. Who is the article about? 2. Read the editorial and write whether you agree or disagree with the writer. Which reviews are positive.Entertainment Section 1. Who is in first place in (sport)? 2. When does (event) start? Where can I get tickets? How much does each ticket cost? Sports Look at the sports standings and answer the following questions: 1. Page 38 of 58 . 3. 2. 4. Whom does the organization help? 3. What is the editorial item for today? 2. What young man and what old man died yesterday? How did each man die? What job did each man have? Why are each of their deaths important? Editorial 1. How much will the new building cost? 6. Where is the old building located? 4. What happened? 3.

Have the student write a completely different story for the picture. Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. Look at the picture on page X. Write a different headline for any article in the newspaper/newsletter. D. Also write the original title and page of the article. Standard 2: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to obtain. process. Have the student write his or her own caption for the picture. construct. 2. J.Imagination 1. and provide subject matter information in spoken and written form. Look at the picture on page X. 3. Page 39 of 58 . Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON • • • • Reading (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Acquire and evaluate information (Information) Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARD ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2.

2 Multi-Level “Internet Scavenger Hunt” Using the Internet as a source of authentic materials is one way to incorporate technology in the ESL classroom.g. Provide headphones if available. internet. search engine. this activity should be conducted only after all students have had some practice using a computer and are familiar with basic terminology and idioms (e. Stage of the Lesson: Practice/Application Structures: Vary according to websites visited. website. If you have only one or two computers available with Internet access. close screen. Make enough copies of the scavenger list for all students (see Sample Handout: Internet Scavenger Hunt). Prerequisites: Basic familiarity with computers (i. drag. Most important for this activity is that students are to find websites as directed by the instructions. Topic: Finding information online. and audio files. content vocabulary varies according to the websites visited. Basic literacy in English.e. the Internet can be a way to learn new information through the use of key words. Materials: Computers with internet access. pictures.). etc. Tips for Instructors: This activity works well in a computer lab or classroom with sufficient computers for students to work in pairs. instructor-made handout Approximate time for activity: 45 minutes Before Class: 1. 2. to look for information. Page 40 of 58 . Vocabulary: scavenger hunt. consider having pairs of students take turns doing this activity on different days. mouse. point and click. right click.C. key word. Objective: Students will use the Internet to search for information in English. Make sure that you have enough computers so that students can pair up and do this scavenger hunt. URL. using a mouse and accessing internet). and then to use the information to answer a question. Some students may not be familiar with using computers and therefore. For English language learners. The computers should have speakers so that students can listen to the audio component of some websites.

STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. you should walk around to answer questions. 6. 4. If you want to find a bowling alley in your town or some other town. They will work to find information and will write down the information they find on the handout.) to search for information by using key words. If there is an odd number. 5. The can use the back of the sheet if necessary. While the students are searching for information.com. www.com . Each student should write down the information gathered on his or her own copy of the handout. and name of state. Page 41 of 58 .com . etc.google. 2. Explain to the students that today they will be using the computer as an informationgathering tool. you might use the key words. For example. Explain that the computer is useful for finding information even if you don’t know the exact site that has that information. www. have the student with the highest proficiency of written English work independently. Group the students in pairs. etc. www. “bowling” “alley”. This search skill will be used in the Internet Scavenger Hunt. Pass out copies of Internet Scavenger Hunt handout (see Sample Handout: Internet Scavenger Hunt) to all the students.yahoo.. Tell the students they should find at least 4 of the 8 items listed and they have 25 minutes to search for the information. you can use search engines (e. 7.altavista. Collect the handouts.? Was one site more easy to use than another? 8. 3. For the remaining time in the class go through the list of questions and ask for the name of the website they used and some of the information they found. Did students go to the same site for weather. name of city.g.

As students work. Encourage partners to take turns typing in search terms and using the mouse to navigate websites. Read the headlines. Start the introduction and listen to the different topics the adult section has. For this activity. please write the name of the website and URL where you found the information. If you have time. [You will need to visit a map/directions website. Emphasize participation to the students by giving teamwork points. 4. What does “scavenger hunt”. Review the information students write by verifying the website. 3. walk around the room and encourage pairs to search for information together and talk about their answers. have them find information for all 8 items. create new scavenger hunt handouts to introduce them to web resources that support their learning goals and interests. This activity may be used repeatedly with different pairs of students focusing on certain internet functions or particular types of information. Make a list of those topics. X. Customize new scavenger hunt handouts to fit particular units or themes in your class curriculum. Y.] Find directions between the Center and X (instructor chooses a community college.] Visit this website: www.org. Take the Site Tour. What is the name of Page 42 of 58 . Participation translates into working together to use key words and find the information (not just writing the information found by someone else). and Z mean (instructor chooses 3-5 words)? [You will need to visit a dictionary website. or job/career-related destination). convention center. Click on English and visit the page for Adults. Write the directions. you should constantly walk around the classroom and be available to answer questions. have them call you over when they are finished with an item and are ready to hunt for the next item. For students at higher levels of proficiency.Feedback and Scoring 1. 2. 3.] Look at the big news for a newspaper in your state. For each answer. Variations 1.handsonbanking. Sample Handout: Internet Scavenger Hunt Use the Internet to find the information for at least 5 of the 8 items below. You can see the website they are using to gather their information and monitor their work. explore the Money in the Bank section. As students become more familiar with the Internet. What is the weather in X (instructor chooses major city nearby or in the world) today? What is the five-day forecast for the weather here? [You will need to visit a weather website. 2.

] Visit this website: http://www. try other activities until the rest of the class is finished with the scavenger hunt. Which activity did you like best? Modeled after http://www.the newspaper and which events made the news today? [You will have to visit a newspaper website.htm Page 43 of 58 . If you have time.us/webfarm/emailproject/hunt.otan. and list the ingredients. [You will need to visit a cooking or recipe website.org and select one activity at your level.us/webfarm/emailproject/folk.otan. Where is the story from? Who is the story about? How does the story end? 8. and you must bring a dish to share with everyone. Find a recipe for a salad or other dish that you might make. Visit this website: http://a4esl.] Imagine that you want are invited to a picnic.htm and select one short story to read.

Standard 2: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to obtain. construct. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to interact in the classroom Goal 2.SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON ● ● ● Reading (Basic Skills) ● Problem solving / Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Acquire and evaluate information (Information) Applying technology (Technology) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2. and provide subject matter information in spoken and written form Page 44 of 58 . process.

Page 45 of 58 . etc. forms. labels and product packaging) to demonstrate their vocabulary knowledge. or a restaurant. department stores. This will also make the fieldtrip more interesting for intermediate/advanced students.. familiarity with field trip behavior expectations and consequences Materials: Authentic marketing materials from the store to be visited. in addition to the time spent in the structured language learning activity. Prerequisites: Basic literacy.clothing. e. brochures. Objective: This is a culminating application activity in which students will use authentic materials (signs. post office. (singular and plural). and other locations that students are not aware of. For example. The fieldtrip should be used as a culmination activity where students demonstrate and apply what they have learned in class.) and a block of time to allow for travel to and from the site. authorizations. for grocery stores ..g.g. etc. There may be many “behind the scenes” careers at supermarkets. e. How do you clean the jacket? Vocabulary: Varies according to type of store. This lesson is one way of connecting Life Skills taught in the ESL classroom to a real-life setting.C.food and packaging. instructor-made handout Approximate time for activity: Two class periods of 45 minutes each. bank. forms. and newspaper sale ads into class and use them in prior lessons to prepare students for completing the activity and conducting transactions at the fieldtrip site.3 Multi-Level “It’s on the Label” Many Job Corps ESL instructors have incorporated fieldtrips related to Life Skills into their courses on a regular basis. a supermarket or department store. Arrange in advance for the manager to come out and talk to students about careers. For department stores . applications. Such trips will require special preparation (e. Besides stores. and present tense questions. Topic: Shopping Stage of the Unit: Evaluation/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills/Pre-Employment Skills Structures: Simple present tense verbs. transportation arrangements. household goods. good fieldtrip destinations include the library.g. menus. Bring authentic materials like directories. The can weighs 12 ounces. colors.

they should write down information about the product. The instructor should print out enough copies of the “It’s on the Label” worksheet for each student. When students find an item they like. Page 46 of 58 . The instructor will need to tell students where to meet and the time the shuttle will depart. Assign students to groups of 2 or 3. If the item is an electronics product. If the item is a food product. 2. If a community volunteer is available. they should note the cost and the features offered. Tell the students that they are to look for a total of 5 items located in 5 different food aisles or in 5 different areas of the store. they should note the cost. include them in this activity. 3. Upon arrival at the store. 2. pass out the worksheet for students to use for taking notes (see Sample Shopping Worksheet). 5. and how it is cleaned. they can note the cost. Show students how to use the store aisle signs or department store directory to locate items. At the end of the fieldtrip. 3.Before Class #1: 1. Using the “It’s on the Label” worksheet. and the nutritional facts. This lesson requires a fieldtrip to the store with the instructor and students. collect the worksheets or tell students to bring their completed worksheet to class the next day. Students should feel free to ask a store clerk for help in locating in item or about an item’s features. Class #1 STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. The instructor will need to request use of a Job Corps shuttle to take a fieldtrip to a grocery store or department store. 4. 4. If the item is clothing. 6. the type of fabric used. Walk around the store and assist students as needed. they are to look at the labels/packaging of the items. how it is prepared.

The other student(s) can ask questions about those products (e.g. the clerk 2. or use the Language Skills Checklist to give the students feedback. Use the lists to assess the students’ performance in a role-play in which one student is the customer and a second one. If there is additional time. The students. each group of students will make a chart (like the one below) to organize items into groups of words Types of categories for visit to grocery store: Dairy Yogurt Breads & Cereals Bagel International Food Curry Other Ski jacket Types of categories for visit to department store: Clothing Item Jacket Electronics CD player Games Playing Cards Other Backpack 4.. Together. Each student has 5 minutes to make his or her recommendations. in groups of 2 or 3. how it is cleaned. 5. with the other student recommending. 3. The instructor will need to decide 4 categories based on the store visited.) Students talk about the details of their 5 items with their classmates. The student can use 5 items from the chart or use other items they like. how much it costs. will role-play a scene where one student is giving advice about items s/he would recommend buying. The other students in the class ask questions about the item. a different student will make a recommendation.Class #2 STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. 2. Prepare a checklist of factors that you want to give feedback on. (Make sure none of the students worked together the day before. Consider having the students evaluate each other using some variant of the checklist. 7. Then students switch roles. Page 47 of 58 . where to buy it. how nutritious it is. Scoring 1. Students bring their completed worksheets from Class #1 to class. with the rest of the class asking questions. and why it is a great product). The instructor will ask for a volunteer to make a recommendation on an item. The students are put in new groups of 2 to 3 students. 6. 3.

the instructor could spend some time looking at product care labels on clothing. 4.Variations 1.. Structure the shopping worksheet as a scavenger hunt. This forces students to look for products they may not already be familiar with and stimulates vocabulary development. Depending on the level of the class. SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON Reading and Writing (Basic Skill) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Interprets and Communicates Information (Information) Organizes and Maintains Information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 1. WalMart. or completing change of address forms. If the class is not able to take a fieldtrip together. 3. Set this up ahead of time and ask the manager to emphasize some of the ‘behind the scenes’ jobs that students may not be aware of.) to browse different categories of merchandise and get information on the product. students can use the Internet to visit the website of a major department store (e. be aware that the pictures and terminology may need to be studied beforehand in order to not overwhelm students. library card. such as applying for the grocery store rewards card. Students should be given the URL to several department stores. Encourage the students to ask the store clerks for assistance.). drugstore.g. etc. rotate partners so students have to communicate with a different classmate each time. 5. office supply store. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to participate in social interactions Goal 2. However. Give each student a different list of items to find in a given type of store. a hardware store. Ask the store manager to talk to the students about employment opportunities at the store or company. You can also incorporate other related Life Skills activities. etc. Repeat this activity on a monthly basis to a different type of store (e. Macy’s. During class time. Store catalogues can also be used to study the inventory of a store prior to the Internet activity. Standard 1: To use English to achieve academically in all content areas: Students will use English to interact in the classroom Page 48 of 58 . Target. 2.g..

. Produces vocabulary related to the activity. Uses word stress correctly. Brown (1998) Page 49 of 58 .questions (e. Produces simple yes-no questions. Understands simple yes-no questions. Speaking 1. Uses peer-group language properly. Pronounces blends correctly 4.g. Pronounces vowel sounds correctly. Understands simple wh. where. 3. D. Understands vocabulary related to the activity.g. 3. 2. when.. J. why). Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. what. what. Produces simple wh. 2. Understands simple directions. when. Understands language of peers.Sample Shopping Worksheet (with 2 examples) Store Name: Safeway Name Oatmeal Ivory Aisle/Department 3 Breakfast Food Cereal 7 Health and Beauty Type of Store: Supermarket Description Hot cereal Facial soap Details Cooks in 3 minutes Lowers cholesterol Low in fat Moisturizes skin No artificial colors Economy pack Language Skills Checklist Listening 1. 5. 4. 6. 5. why). Understands contractions and common shortened forms. 8. Pronounces consonant sounds correctly. 6. where. 7.questions (e.

students will build up their confidence to volunteer answers in other classes. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application or Review General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Vary according to the content of the reading. to collect items (colored paper or colored chips). Since some students may be more reluctant to raise their hands. pamphlets. and poetry can be used for this activity. newspapers. a small group of the same students may tend to do most of the talking.C. etc. Approximate time for activity: 45 minutes Tips for the Instructor: Many students may be uncomfortable raising their hand and speaking in front of the whole class. Through this activity. instructor-made handout. Handing out slips of colored paper or colored chips as a reward for volunteering to be called on can be reinforcing and encourage participation. squares of colored paper/poker chips/raffle tickets. such as magazine articles.) and participating in class discussion.4 Multi-Level “Raise Your Hand and Be Counted” This lesson promotes the participation of all students by having students focus on a goal. It is important to make this as fun and informal an activity as you can. Raffling off a small item can stimulate student interest. Page 50 of 58 . Objective: Students will develop the confidence to become more active participants in academic and career technical classes. The instructor will ask questions based on different degrees of difficulty. A variety of reading materials. Vocabulary: Approximately 10 words particular to the news article Prerequisites: Basic literacy Materials: Reading passage. Topic: Reading a news article (section of a vocational manual. For this reason it is important to recognize that this should be used as only one of many strategies for promoting participation. The goal is to create a routine of active participation in class.

give him/her a slip or paper worth 1 point. 3.) b. you should have 10 slips of paper (for example. (Once the instructor has called on a student. so that each student receives a copy of each. Cut out slips of colored paper large enough for a student to write his or her name. Prepare and copy a list of 1015 questions based on the information in the article. The handout is to be used only as a guide. Alternatively. d. The students cannot read their answers from their handout. for 10 students. Have the students write their names on the slips of paper. you should have 100 slips). No points will be given to students who call out answers during another’s turn. The student will then be given a slip of paper that is worth 1 point. he/she must ask a follow-up question or make a comment about the article. When the student answers a question either correctly. Page 51 of 58 . Ask the questions on the handout.see above) and tell the students to write the answers on the sheet. Pass out copies of the article/chapter and assign the reading to the class. Give the students the following information: a. After all the questions have been asked. distribute the prepared handout (created before class. For every student. STEPS FOR THE ACTIVITY: 1. 2. 2. provide at least 20 minutes for silent reading. No point is given for an incorrect answer.Before Class 1. Award each student with a slip of paper for the correct answers and/or for asking a question. Choose and read an article/chapter appropriate to the class’ level and interests. After the students have finished the reading. Tell the students to review the article for 5 minutes or so. c. Make enough photocopies of the article and of the list of questions. After you ask a question on the handout. collect all the slips of paper. all others must remain silent. you can use colored index cards or colored chips. the first student to raise a hand will be given the chance to answer. but whether the student answers your question correctly or incorrectly.

To keep students from guessing what the next question will be. D. Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. Special Notes 1. such as magazine articles. Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON • • • Reading / Writing / Listening / Speaking (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Acquire and evaluate information (Information) TESOL STANDARD ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2.Feedback and Scoring 1. Points received translate into a better grade. Consider the proficiency levels of your students when selecting the reading and constructing the questions. Use this activity for a variety of reading materials. newspapers. consider calling on each student one at a time to answer questions and award points as described above. It makes the grading of students’ oral participation very easy and unbiased. J. 2. Make sure there are at least four questions that every student can answer. and poetry. This will create a routine of active participation in class. Assess the students’ ability to answer questions by counting the points as represented by the slips of paper. Emphasize participation to the students. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to interact in the classroom Page 52 of 58 . relevant question or comment. Participation translates into points received for a correct answer. Label the more difficult questions as “Challenge” questions and explain that only more advanced students are expected to answer those questions. 2. pamphlets. Variations For classes that are very reluctant to speak up. do not ask the questions in the same order as they appear on the handout.

and modify their speech style and rate in order to increase comprehensibility for ELLs. Although you can use this format for any kind of speaker. career counselors.C. Topic: Topic can vary from career-related to Job Corps-related. Vocabulary: Varies depending on the topic of presentation (ask the visiting instructors for a list of 5 to 10 key terms) Prerequisites: Basic literacy Materials: Instructor-made handout for students. use visuals. This is not currently happening at most centers. That way. academic instructors.5 Multi-Level “The Traveling Instructor” Part of the purpose of a visiting speaker and questions session is to bring non-ESL staff into the ESL classroom and break down institutional barriers to their interaction with ELLs. such as asking him/her to talk slowly. The activity presents students with an authentic approach to listening: a real instructor in a real classroom in a real teaching situation. Approximate time for the activity: Preparation time of approximately an hour. class time of 45 minutes. not only will ESL students have a good introduction to those center staff. Tips for the Instructor: Talk to the speaker ahead of time to provide guidance. consider focusing on bringing in center staff with whom students are likely to have contact later on. Objective: Students will listen to a visiting instructor give a short talk. Stage of the Unit: Practice/Application General Skills Area: Life Skills Structures: Vary according to the presentation. such as career technical instructors. The ESL instructor’s role includes training other center staff on how to work effectively with ELLs and shelter content in career technical and academic courses. The ESL instructor will need to provide visiting staff members with guidance on how to use visual aids and gestures. etc. handout for the visiting instructor. and keep language at a simple level. One way to begin this cross-training effort is to invite career technical and academic instructors and other staff who are motivated to better serve ELLs into the ESL classroom. but the center staff can also benefit by learning some skills in communicating with ELL students. Page 53 of 58 .

When the talk is finished. 2. Health and Wellness Nurse or Page 54 of 58 Presentation (10 minutes) Comprehens ion Check (10 minutes) Evaluation (5 minutes) Special Notes . see #5 on previous page). 3. The visiting instructor may then return to his or her regular class. The ESL instructor will set up a group of instructors (a minimum of two. Give the students the questions written by the instructor who will speak to them. Ask students if they have any questions about your talk. Try to set up this lesson to have the 2 instructors come in during the same week or to have one instructor to come in one week and the other instructor the following week. Set the scene: Today we have an instructor visiting our class to tell us about.10 minutes. asking additional questions after the talk. For the visiting instructor: 1. 2. who will give talks in the ESL class. Write your name on the blackboard in the classroom you are visiting. Discuss any ideas that they did not understand or review some of the talk as necessary. keeping in mind the questions you wrote and the length of time decided upon. Give your talk. etc.) 3. 5. Let them know that their goal is to answer the worksheet questions. The visiting instructor will go over the answers with the students for 5. 1. 2.. 4. The ESL instructor will take up any outstanding questions or comments.(fill in depending on what the visiting instructor decides. STEPS TO THE ACTIVITY: Introduction (20 minutes) 1. This lesson should be used as a collaborative activity with career technical instructors or other center staff (e. to be reviewed by you and presented to the instructor. and ask questions after the talk. Your index cards can help you in providing an outline. identify key points.g. how many questions to answer on paper. Introduce the instructor briefly. the more the better).Before Class: 1. 4.. Discuss the experience with your students. Review the students’ answer sheets with them. 1. Detailed instructions for the instructor are provided as the end of this lesson. 2. and have them read the questions over. give the students 5 minutes to write the answers to the questions. Ask them what it felt like to listen to another speaker. Prepare the students for the exercise by informing them how the visiting instructor program works (the length of the talk.

D. the ESL instructor can create a handout for focused listening and note-taking skills development. J. It can be repeated multiple times over several months since the pool of instructors at the center is large. from Human Resources and Finance to the Career Technical department. As students become more familiar with the visiting instructor activity and advance in proficiency. Job Corps often hires graduates as staff in various departments. The plan offers listening support for ELLs by teaching necessary vocabulary and discussing review questions before the lesson. 1. Though there may be some hesitation among career technical instructors and staff due to busy schedules. Learning about these graduates can be a way of setting goals and providing models of success for English language learners. You can repeat for Class #2 in the same week or the following week. 3. Modified from “New Ways of Classroom Assessment”. Brown (1998) SCANS SKILLS AND COMPETENCIES RELATED TO THIS LESSON • • Listening/ Speaking (Basic Skills) Reasoning (Thinking Skills) Page 55 of 58 . stress the importance of providing an opportunity for English language learners to interact with a variety of staff. Give students points for raising their hands to respond to the visitors questions (See the “Raise Your Hand and Be Counted” activity) or asking good questions related to the topic of the presentation. Invite these staff members to talk about their backgrounds.Variations Placement Specialist). Some of these new staff were at one time in the ESL program. It is also very important to emphasize to your visiting instructor that they need to do a little bit of planning for their short talk. When students can think about the questions beforehand. phrases. add a participation element. and then schedule 2 more sets of classes for the following month. 2. 2. Listing key terms and creating 5 questions provides structure for the students during the activity. they are prepared to listen for keywords. Rather than having the visiting instructor prepare questions. and ideas.

Page 56 of 58 . and provide subject matter information in spoken and written form. Standard 1: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to interact in the classroom Goal 2. construct. process.• Organize and maintain information (Information) TESOL STANDARDS ADDRESSED BY THIS LESSON Goal 2. Standard 3: To use English to communicate in all content areas: Students will use English to obtain.

The ESL instructor will inform you about the English level of the class. so that instructor can cover the terms with students prior to you visit. or true-false) based on your talk.Directions for the Visiting Instructor Objective: Students will listen to you give a short talk. Preparing for the Talk: 1. What do you think this word means? a. Prepare 5 questions (fill-in. Prepare your talk ahead of time. multiple-choice. use visuals if possible. • What is the main idea of the talk? • The instructor used the word [_______] several times in the talk. a self-introduction. The purpose of the lesson is to improve the students’ listening skills. […] b. (You may want to use index cards provided by the ESL instructor) Create an outline and list the key terms you will use. The activity presents students with an authentic approach to listening: a non-ESL instructor talking about a topic of interest. […] b. including a chalkboard or dry erase board. […] c. or give an introduction to a trade or center service.” By this. or an informal lecture on any topic (possibly related to center services. and career paths of former Job Corps graduates. ______ talked about__________________. • Examples of topics used include. 3. or strange). […] • The speaker […] True or False • The instructor used gestures several times. a vocation/trade or a past employment experience). Provide the key terms to the ESL instructor at least one day before the visit. your talk should take between 5-10 minutes. and keep language at a simple level. as a tool for staying on track during the actual talk. “[exact phrase]. relate a personal experience. a driver’s education instructor talking about using turn signals. For example: • Mr. […] d. […] Page 57 of 58 . therefore keep your discussion to the 5 or 10-minute limit. Tips for the Talk: Be mindful to talk slowly. a health occupation talking about how to use a walker. and have specific information you want the students to remember. Depending on the level English proficiency of the class. he/she meant: a. You can tell a story (funny. Have a good introduction and conclusion. 4. 2. What do you think this means? • The instructor said. sad. He/ she [describe the gesture]./Ms. […] c. 5.

) Page 58 of 58 . Give your talk. • an introduction to a trade or center service. or • an informal lecture on any topic (possibly related to center services. 4. Write your name on the blackboard in the classroom you are visiting. Identify what type of talk this will be and let the ESL instructor know in advance: • a story relating a personal experience. 5. Your index cards or outline can help you in providing an outline. Answer their questions and encourage dialogue about your topic. When the talk is finished. Go over the answers with the students for 5. 2. keeping in mind the questions you wrote and the length of time decided upon. The visiting instructor may then return to his or her regular class. 7. 3.6. Give the list of questions to the ESL instructor at least a day before your talk.10 minutes. ask students if they have any questions about your talk. Then have the students answer the 5 questions you prepared beforehand. • a self-introduction. a vocation/trade or a past employment experience) The Day of the Talk: 1. (The ESL instructor will handle any remaining questions.

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