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Higher Secondary School Certificate

Examination Syllabus

CHEMISTRY
CLASSES XI-XII

(based on National Curriculum 2006)


Published by
Aga Khan University Examination Board
Bungalow # 233 / E.1 Lines,
Daudpota Road, Karachi, Pakistan.

November 2004
Latest revision July 2009

All rights reserved


This syllabus is developed by Aga Khan University Examination Board for distribution
to all its affiliated schools.
Higher Secondary School Certificate
Examination Syllabus

CHEMISTRY
CLASSES XI-XII
S. No. Table of Contents Page No.

Preface 5

1. Aims/Objectives of the National Curriculum (2006) 7

2. Rationale of the AKU-EB Examination Syllabus 9

3. Topics and Student Learning Outcomes of the Examination Syllabus 11

4. Scheme of Assessment 65

5. Teaching-Learning Approaches and Classroom Activities 71

6. Recommended Texts and Reference Materials 72

Definition of Cognitive Levels and Command Words in the Student


7. 72
Learning Outcomes in Examination Papers

Annex A: HSSC Scheme of Studies 75

Annex B: List of Practical Activities 80

For queries and feedback

Address: AKU-Examination Board


Bungalow No. 233/ E.1 Lines, Daudpota Road, Karachi-Pakistan.
Phone: (92-21) 35224702-09
Fax: (92-21) 35224711
E-mail: examination.board@aku.edu
Website: www.aku.edu/akueb

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PREFACE
In pursuance of National Education Policy (1998-2010), the Curriculum Wing of the Federal
Ministry of Education has begun a process of curriculum reform to improve the quality of
education through curriculum revision and textbook development (Preface, National
Curriculum documents 2000 and 2002).

AKU-EB was founded in August 2003 with the same aim of improving the quality of
education nationwide. As befits an examination board it seeks to reinforce the National
Curriculum revision through the development of appropriate examinations for the Secondary
School Certificate (SSC) and Higher Secondary School Certificate (HSSC) based on the
latest National Curriculum and subject syllabus guidance.

AKU-EB has a mandate by Ordinance CXIV of 2002 to offer such examination services to
English and Urdu medium candidates for SSC and HSSC from private schools anywhere in
Pakistan or abroad, and from government schools with the relevant permissions. It has been
accorded this mandate to introduce a choice of examination and associated educational
approach for schools, thus fulfilling a key objective of the National Curriculum of Pakistan:
“Autonomy will be given to the Examination Boards and Research and Development cells
will be established in each Board to improve the system” (ibid. para. 6.5.3 (ii)).

AKU-EB is committed to creating continuity of educational experience and the best possible
opportunities for its students. In consequence it offered HSSC for the first time in September,
2007 to coincide with the arrival of its first SSC students in college or higher secondary
school. Needless to say this is not an exclusive offer. Private candidates and students joining
AKU-EB affiliated schools and colleges for HSSC Part 1 are eligible to register as AKU-EB
candidates even though they have not hitherto been associated with AKU-EB.

This examination syllabus exemplifies AKU-EB’s commitment to national educational goals.

• It is in large part a reproduction, with some elaboration, of the Class XI and XII
National Curriculum of the subject.

• It makes the National Curriculum freely available to the general public.

• The syllabus recommends a range of suitable textbooks already in print for student
purchase and additional texts for the school library.

• It identifies areas where teachers should work together to generate classroom


activities and materials for their students as a step towards the introduction of multiple
textbooks, another of the Ministry of Education’s policy provisions for the
improvement of higher secondary education (ibid. para. 6.3.4).

This examination syllabus brings together all those cognitive outcomes of the National
Curriculum statement which can be reliably and validly assessed. While the focus is on the
cognitive domain, particular emphasis is given to the application of knowledge and
understanding, a fundamental activity in fostering “attitudes befitting useful and peaceful
citizens and the skills for and commitment to lifelong learning which is the cornerstone of

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national economic development” (Preface to National Curriculum documents 2000 and
2002).

To achieve this end AKU-EB has brought together university academicians, teacher trainers,
writers of learning materials and above all, experienced teachers, in regular workshops and
subject panel meetings.

AKU-EB provides copies of the examination syllabus to subject teachers in affiliated schools
to help them in planning their teaching. It is the syllabus, not the prescribed textbook which is
the basis of AKU-EB examinations. In addition, the AKU-EB examination syllabus can be
used to identify the training needs of subject teachers and to develop learning support
materials for students. Involving classroom teachers in these activities is an important part of
the AKU-EB strategy for improving the quality of learning in schools.

The Curriculum Wing of the Federal Ministry of Education has recently released new subject
specifications and schemes of study to take effect in September, 2008. These documents are a
major step forward towards a standards-related curriculum and have been welcomed by
AKU-EB. Our current HSSC syllabuses have been revised to ensure conformity with the new
National Curriculum 2006.

We stand committed to all students who have embarked upon the HSSC courses in
facilitating their learning outcomes. Our examination syllabus document ensures all possible
support.

Dr. Thomas Christie


Director,
Aga Khan University Examination Board
July 2009

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1. Aims/Objectives of the National Curriculum (2006)1

Aims
This two-year study of chemistry aims to develop in all students:

• A scientific understanding of the physical world.


• Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor abilities appropriate to the acquisition and
use of chemical knowledge, understanding, attitude, and skills.
• An appreciation for the products and influences of science and technology,
balanced by a concern for their appropriate application.
• An understanding of the nature and limitations of scientific activity.
• An ability to apply the understanding of chemistry to relevant problems (including
those from everyday real-life) and to approach those problems in rational ways
• Respect for evidence, rationality and intellectual honesty.
• The capacities to express themselves coherently and logically, both orally and in
writing and to use appropriate modes of communication characteristic of scientific
work.
• The ability to work effectively with others.

Objectives:
A statement of objectives relevant to each of the general aims is listed below. The
sequence is in no particular order.

Understanding the physical world:


Students should understand the scientific concepts inherent in the theme for each
chapter and be able to:

• State, exemplify, and interpret the concepts.


• Use appropriately, fundamental terms and classification related to the concepts.
• Cite, explain or interpret, scientific evidence in support of the concepts.

Using appropriate cognitive, affective and psychomotor abilities:


Students should show ability to:

• Formulate questions that can be investigated by gathering first or second – hand


data.
• Find relevant published background information.
• Formulate hypotheses and make predictions from them.
• Plan an investigation and carry out the planned procedure.
• Use appropriate and relevant motor skills in carrying out investigations.
• Observe phenomena and describe, measure and record these as data.
• Classify, collate and display data.
• Construct and or interpret visual representations of phenomena and relationships
(diagrams, graphs, flowcharts, physical models).
• Analyze data and draw conclusions.

1
Government of Pakistan (2006), National Curriculum; Chemistry Classes XI-XII, Islamabad, Ministry
of Education (Curriculum Wing)

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• Evaluate investigative procedures and the conclusions drawn from such
investigations.

Understanding the nature and limitations of scientific activity:


For each facet of scientific activity selected for study, students should:

• Describe and exemplify it.


• Use appropriately any fundamental terms and classification related to it.
• Recognize that the problem-solving nature of science has limitations.
• Acknowledge that people engaged in science, a particularly human enterprise,
have the characteristics of people in general.

Appreciating influences of science and technology


Student should:

• Recognize that the technology resulting from scientific activity influences the
quality of life and economic development through or by improvements in medical
/ health care nutrition and agricultural techniques.
• Explain that these influences may be the result of unforeseen consequences, rapid
exploitation, or rapid cultural changes.
• Realize that advances in technology requires judicious applications.

Respecting evidence, rationality and intellectual honesty:


Student should:

• Display respect for evidence, rationality and intellectual honesty given the number
of emotive issues in the area of chemistry.

Showing capacities to communicate:


Students should:

• Comprehend the intention of a scientific communication, the relationship among


its parts and its relationship to what they already know.
• Select and use the relevant parts of a communication.
• Translate information fro communications in particular modes (spoken, written,
tables, graphs flowcharts, diagrams) to other modes.
• Structure information using appropriate modes to communicates.

Working with others:


Students should actively participate in group work and:

• Share the responsibility for achieving the group.


• Show concern for the fullest possible involvement of each group member.

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2. Rationale of the AKU-EB Examination Syllabus

2.1 General Rationale

2.1.1 In 2007, the Curriculum Wing of the Federal Ministry of Education (MoE)
issued a revised part-wise Scheme of Studies according to which the total
marks for the HSSC examination are 1100 from the year 2008 and onwards.
All subjects are to be taught and examined in both classes XI and XII. It is
therefore important for teachers, students, parents and other stakeholders to
know:

(a) that the AKU-EB Scheme of Studies for its HSSC examination (Annex
A) derives directly from the 2007 Ministry of Education Scheme of
Studies;
(b) which topics will be examined in Class XI and in Class XII;
(c) at which cognitive level or levels (Knowledge, Understanding,
Application and other higher order skills) the topics and sub-topics will
be taught and examined;

2.1.2 This AKU-EB examination syllabus addresses these concerns. Without such
guidance teachers and students have little option other than following a single
textbook to prepare for an external examination. The result is a culture of rote
memorization as the preferred method of examination preparation. The
pedagogically desirable objectives of the National Curriculum which
encourage “observation, creativity and other higher order thinking [skills]” are
generally ignored. AKU-EB recommends that teachers and students use
multiple teaching-learning resources for achieving the specific objectives of
the National Curriculum reproduced in the AKU-EB examination syllabuses.

2.1.3 The AKU-EB examination syllabuses use a uniform layout for all subjects to
make them easier for teachers to follow. Blank sheets are provided in each
syllabus for writing notes on potential lesson plans. It is expected that this
arrangement will also be found helpful by teachers in developing classroom
assessments as well as by question setters preparing material for the AKU-EB
external examinations. The AKU-EB aims to enhance the quality of education
through improved classroom practices and improved examinations.

2.1.4 The Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) in Section 3 start with command
words such as list, describe, relate, explain, etc. The purpose of the command
words is to direct the attention of teachers and students to specific tasks that
candidates following the AKU-EB examination syllabuses are expected to
undertake in the course of their subject studies. The examination questions
will be framed using the same command words, but not necessarily the same
content, to elicit evidence of these competencies in candidates’ responses. The
definitions of command words used in this syllabus are given in Section 8. It is
hoped that teachers will find these definitions useful in planning their lessons
and classroom assessments.

2.1.5 The AKU-EB has classified SLOs under the three cognitive levels Knowledge
(K), Understanding (U) and Application of knowledge and skills (A) in order

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to derive multiple choice questions and constructed response questions on a
rational basis from the subject syllabuses ensuring that the intentions of the
National Curriculum should be met in full. The weighting of marks to the
Multiple Choice and Constructed Response Papers is also derived from the
SLOs, command words and cognitive levels. In effect the SLOs derived from
the National Curriculum determine the structure of the AKU-EB subject
examination set out in Section 4 and 5.

2.1.6 Some topics from the National Curriculum have been elaborated and enriched
for better understanding of the subject and/or to better meet the needs of
students in the twenty-first century. These additional topics have been
italicized in Section 3 of this syllabus.

2.2. Specific Rationale of the AKU-EB Chemistry Examination Syllabus


2.2.1 The National Education Policy (1998-2010) outlines the following
objectives for higher secondary education:

a. To prepare the students well for the pursuit of professional and


specialized education;

b. To make available such teaching and learning materials that will


make learning rewarding and attractive.

c. To introduce a system of evaluation that emphasizes learning of


concepts and discourages rote memorization.

2.2.2 In line with National Education Policy, the AKU-Examination Board


syllabuses in science subject focus on the following:

a. Broadening student’s conceptual understanding through


opportunities for enhancing their scientific skills, inquiry and
experimentation.

b. Allocating marks for each cognitive level of learning such as


knowledge, understanding and application. The importance of
content has been clearly elaborated as student learning outcomes.

c. Reducing overloading and repetition. There is a need to look at the


syllabus critically with due consideration to the fundamental
concepts of secondary level science.

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3. Topics and Student Learning Outcomes of the Examination Syllabus

Part–I (Class XI)

Topics Student Learning Outcomes Cognitive Level2


K U A
1. Stoichiometry Candidates should be able to:

1.1 Mole and Avogadro’s 1.1.1 define moles and Avagadro’s Number; *
number 1.1.2 define moles concept with the help of Avagadro’s Number; *
1.1.3 calculate the number of moles of substance; *
1.1.4 interpret balance chemical equation in terms of interacting moles, *
representative particle, masses and volume of gases at STP (22.4 L);

1.2 Mole calculation 1.2.1 calculate mole ratio from balance equation for use as conversion factors in *
stoichiometric problems;

1.3 Percentage 1.3.1 calculate % (percentage) by mass of elements in compounds; *


composition
1.4.1 identify limiting reagent in reactions; *
1.4 Excess and Limiting 1.4.2 calculate maximum amount of product produced and amount of any *
reagent excess reagent, knowing the limiting reagent in reaction;
1.4.3 calculate the gram molecular mass of a gas from density measurement of *
gases at STP;

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K = Knowledge, U = Understanding, A= Application (for explanation see section 8: Definition of command words used in Student Learning Outcomes and in Examination
Questions).

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NOTES

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K U A
1.5 Chemistry as a 1.5.1 list down the significance of chemistry as quantitative science in daily life; *
Quantitative Science
1.6.1 differentiate between actual yield, % age yield and theoretical yield; *
1.6 Theoretical and 1.6.2 calculate the percentage yield of a product in a given reaction. *
Actual yield

2. Atomic Structure Candidates should be able to:

2.1 Discharge tube 2.1.1 explain the construction, working of discharge tube and also its * *
experiment consequences;
2.2.1 summarize the Bohr’s atomic theory; * *
2.2 Application of Bohr’s 2.2.2 concept of Bohr’s model to calculate the radius and energy in the orbits; *
model 2.2.3 explain spectrual line of Hydrogenatom; *
2.2.4 by using the concept of Bohr’s theory calculate wave numbers of photons *
of various spectral series.
2.2.5 discuss the defects of Bohr’s atomic model *

2.3.1 using Plank’s theory interpreter relation between energy frequency and *
2.3 Plank’s quantum wave length;
theory.
2.4.1 describe the Moseley’s experiment with reference to X-rays; * *
2.4.2 explain the production, properties and types of X-rays; * *
2.4 X-Rays and Atomic 2.4.3 explain the uses of x-rays; *
Numbers
2.5 Quantum number and 2.5.1 describe the concepts of orbitals on the basis of uncertainty principal; *
orbitals / Hersen berg 2.5.2 compare orbit and orbital; *
2.5.3 apply the concept of quantum number for the position of electron/for *
distribution of electrons;

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NOTES

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2.6 Dual nature of 2.6.1 explain the dual nature of electron with reference to De-borgliy equation; *
electron
2.7 Electronic 2.7.1 state the following rules of Electronic configuration (sufban, Hurd’s, and *
configuration Pauli’s exclusion);
2.7.2 write correct electronic configuration based on above rules. * *

3. Theories of Covalent Candidates should be able to:


bonding and Shape of
Molecules
3.1.1 discuss the postulate of VSEPR; *
3.1 Shape of Molecular 3.1.2 use VSEPR theory to describe the shape of simple covalent molecular; *
Resonance 3.1.3 explain the phenomenon of resonance with reference to Sp2 hybrid orbital; *

3.2.1 compare V.B.T and M.O.T; *


3.2 VBT and 3.2.2 predict the shapes of molecules with the help of M.O.T; *
hybridization 3.2.3 explain hybridization (sp, sp2, sp3, dsp3); *

3.3 Bond Characteristics 3.3.1 define bond energy; *


3.3.2 relate bond energy with bond strength; *
3.3.3 define bond length; *
3.3.4 explain ionic character of covalent bond; *
3.3.5 predict the nature of bonding on the basis of electro negativity; *
3.3.6 describe the change in bond length of hetronuclear molecules due to the *
difference of E.N in bonded atoms
3.3.7 explain dipole moment;
3.3.8 predict geometry dipole moment of different molecules on the basis of * *
moleculer theory;
3.4 Effect of bonding on 3.4.1 explain the solubility of ionic and covalent compounds on the nature of *
physical and bonding;
chemical properties 3.4.2 explain chemical properties of ionic and covalent compound; *
3.4.3 compare directional and non-directional nature of ionic and covalent bond. *

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4. States of Matter: Gases Candidates should be able to: K U A

4.1 Kinetic Molecular 4.1.1 list down the postulate of Kinetic Molecular Theory (K.M.T) of Gases; *
Theory of gases 4.1.2 state and explain the Gas laws; *
4.1.3 describe the gas laws with reference to Kinetic Molecular Theory *
(K.M.T);
4.2 Absolute 4.2.1 explain absolute zero on the basis of Charles’s laws; *
Temperature scale on 4.2.2 convert the temperature into different scales; *
the basis of Charles’s
law
4.3 Avogadro’s law 4.3.1 state and explain the significance of Avogadro. Law; *

4.4 Ideal Gas Equation 4.4.1 derive ideal gas equation; *


4.4.2 apply ideal gas equation for calculation of gas co-efficient; *
4.4.3 explain the significance of ideal gas equation; *
4.4.4 explain the significance of different units of ideal gas constant; *
4.5 Deviation from ideal 4.5.1 explain why gases deviate from their ideal behaviour; *
behaviour. 4.5.2 explain the significance of ideal gas equation(using example of pressure *
cooker and scuba diver);
4.6 Vander Waal’s 4.6.1 derive Vander Waal’s equation; *
Equation 4.6.2 explain pressure and volume correction for non ideal gases; *
4.7 Liquefaction of gases 4.7.1 explain the general principle of liquefaction of gases; *
4.7.2 discuss Linde’s method for the liquefication of air; *
4.8 Fourth State of water 4.8.1 define and explain (properties) of plasma and plasma formation. * *
plasma

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5. States of Matter II liquids Candidates should be able to: K U A

5.1 Kinetic molecular 5.1.1 using kinetic molecular theory explain the term diffusion, compression * *
interpretation of expansion ,motion of molecular, intermolecular forces, kinetic energy in
liquid liquids;

5.2 Intermolecular forces 5.2.1 explain applications of dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonding and *
London forces;
5.2.2 explain physical properties of liquids such as evaporation ,vapour *
pressure ,boiling point, viscosity and surface tension;
5.2.3 use the concept of hydrogen bonding to explain the following properties *
of water; high surface tension, high specific heat, low vapour pressure,
high heat of vapourisation and high boiling point, anomalous behaviour
of water when its density shows maximum at 4°C;
5.2.4 compare the volatility of different liquids at same temperature based on *
inter molecular forces;

5.3 Energetic of phase 5.3.1 define molar heat of fusion, heat of vaporization, molar heat of *
charge sublimation;
5.3.2 relate energy change and intermolecular forces; *
5.3.3 describe dynamic equilibrium between different physical states of matter; *

5.4 Liquid Crystals 5.4.1 explain the formation of liquid crystal; *


5.4.2 differentiate liquid crystals from pure liquids and crystalline solid; *
5.4.3 explain anomalous behaviour of water according to hydrogen bonding; *
5.4.4 state the uses of liquid crystals (wrist watches and calculator). *

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NOTES

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6. States of Mater III Solids Candidates should be able to: K U A

6.1. Kinetic molecular 6.1.1 describe simple properties of solid e.g. diffusion, compression, expansion, *
interpretation of motion of molecular spaces between inter molecular forces and
solids kinematics energy with reference to Kinetic molecular theory;

6.2. Types of solids 6.2.1 differentiate between crystalline and amorphous solid; *
6.2.2 differentiate between isomorphism and polymorphism; *
6.2.3 relate polymorphism and allotropy; *
6.2.4 define transition temperature; *

6.3. Properties of solids 6.3.1 describe different properties of crystalline solid e.g., symmetry, melting *
point, anisotropy, cleavage plane, crystal growth, geometrical shape, habit
of crystals;

6.4. Crystal Lattice 6.4.1 define unit cell and lattice energy; *
6.4.2 explain energy changes in the formation of sodium chloride crystals *
lattice;
6.4.3 predict the energy changes for the formation of MgCl2 and CaCl2 by the *
given I.P and E.A value;

6.5. Types of Crystalline 6.5.1 differentiate between different types of crystalline solid (ionic, molecular, *
Solid metallic, covalent);
6.5.2 list example of crystalline amorphous solid along with their uses in daily *
life.

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NOTES

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7. Chemical Equilibrium Candidates should be able to: K U A

7.1 Reversible reaction 7.1.1 define reversible reaction; *


and Dynamic 7.1.2 define equilibrium reaction; *
Equilibrium 7.1.3 write equilibrium expression for different given reaction; *
7.1.4 relate the equilibrium expressions in terms of concentration, partial *
pressure, no of moles and mole fraction;
7.1.5 give expression for reaction quotient; *

7.2 Factor affecting the 7.2.1 define Le-Chatelier principle; *


Equilibrium 7.2.2 explain the conditions favourable for equilibrium (concentration, *
temperature, pressure, catalyst) to focus the high yield of industrial
products;
7.2.3 recognize the equilibrium state from the given value of Kc; *
7.2.4 relate the equilibrium constant with ratio between concentration product *
and reactant;

7.3 Industrial application 7.3.1 apply Le-Chatler’s principle on different example; *


of Le-Chateller’s 7.3.2 discuss the effect of temperature, pressure and concentration on the *
Principle equilibrium state of given reversible reactions;

7.4 Solubility product 7.4.1 define the solubility product; *


and Precipitation 7.4.2 differentiate between solubility and solubility product; *
reactions 7.4.3 explain why some substances are more soluble and some are less soluble; *

7.5 Common Ion Effect 7.5.1 define the common ion effect; *
7.5.2 discuss common ion effect and its application. *

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NOTES

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8. Acid, Base and Salts Candidates should be able to: K U A

8.1 Acids, Bases and 8.1.1 define acid, bases and amphoteric compounds; *
Amphoteric 8.1.2 explain the significance of acid base reaction in daily life (Food *
Substances preservation, allergic reactions, importance of iodine in salt, gastric
acidity, curdling of milk);
8.1.3 perform acid base titration to calculate molarity, molality and strength of *
given sample solutions;

8.2 Lowery - Bronsted 8.2.1 define acids and base on the bases Lowery – Bronsted theory; *
Definitions of Acids
and Bases

8.3 Conjugate Acid and 8.3.1 define conjugate acid and conjugate base; *
Base 8.3.2 compare the strength of conjugate acids and bases; *

8.4 Strengths of Acids 8.4.1 explain the ionization constant of water (Kw); *
and Bases 8.4.2 compare the strength of acid and base on the bases of pH and pOH; *
8.4.3 derive the dissociation constants of acid, base and water (Ka, Kb and *
Kw);
8.4.4 calculate the H 3 O + concentration by using the given Ka and molar *
concentration of weak acid;
8.5 Lewis Concept of 8.5.1 define Lewis acids and Lewis bases along with examples; *
Acid and Base 8.5.2 identify Lewis acid and base from given compounds (e.g. NH3, AlCl3, *
BF3);

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NOTES

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K U A
8.6 Buffer Solution 8.6.1 define the buffer solution; *
8.6.2 state the importance of buffer in daily life; *
8.6.3 describe the preparation of different types of buffer; *
8.6.4 explain the buffer action to maintain pH of solution (with the help of *
equations);
8.6.5 explain levelling effect; *

8.7 Hydrolysis / 8.7.1 define hydrolysis; *


Hydration 8.7.2 explain the types of salt on the basis of hydrolysis; *
8.7.3 differentiate between hydrolysis and hydration; *
8.7.4 calculate concentration of ions of slightly soluble salts. *

9. Chemical Kinetics Candidates should be able to:

9.1 Chemical Kinetics 9.1.1 define chemical kinetics; *

9.2 Rate of Reaction and 9.2.1 explain the relation of speed of reaction with the time; *
Activation Energy 9.2.2 define the terms like rate of reaction, rate equation, order of reactions, rate *
constant and rate determining step;
9.2.3 explain the significance of the rate determining step on the overall rate of *
a multistep reaction;
9.2.4 write the rate law for the given reaction; *
9.2.5 relate activation energy and activated complex with the rate of reaction; *
9.2.6 calculate the initial rate using concentration data of given reaction; *
9.2.7 draw an energy diagram that represents the activation energy and show *
the effect of catalyst;
9.2.8 deduce the order of reaction using the method of initial rate; *

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NOTES

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K U A
9.3 Collision theory and 9.3.1 explain the effects of concentration, temperature and surface area on *
transition state reaction rate by using collision theory;

9.4 Catalysis 9.4.1 explain how homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst work; *
9.4.2 explain effect of catalyst on the rate of reaction; *
9.4.3 explain the significance of enzymes in daily life (Biological catalyst, *
removing stains from fabrics).

10. Solution and Colloids Candidates should be able to:

10.1 General properties of 10.1.1 list the characteristics of colloids and suspension that distinguish these *
solutions from solution;
10.1.2 differentiate hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules; *
10.1.3 predict the nature of solution in liquid phase in the given examples (w.r.t *
miscible, immiscible, partially miscible solution);
10.1.4 identify the solutions, colloids and suspensions in given examples; *
10.1.5 interpret the solubility graph on the basis of temperature for different *
solutions;
10.1.6 draw and interpret the solubility curves from given experimental data; *

10.2 Concentration Units 10.2.1 calculate the different concentration units (molarity, molality, mole *
fraction, ppm, ppb, ppt) from the given data;
10.3 Roult’s Law 10.3.1 state Roult’s law (all three definitions); *
10.3.2 identify volatile and non volatile components of solution by plotting *
graph;
10.3.3 draw a graph using Roult’s law from the given data; *

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NOTES

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K U A
10.4 Colligative properties 10.4.1 define colligative properties of liquids with examples; *
10.4.2 explain lowering of vapour pressure, elevation of boiling point and *
depression of freezing point;
10.4.3 calculate molar mass of a substance using ebullioscopic and cryoscopic *
methods;
10.4.4 differentiate osmotic pressure and reverse osmosis; *

10.5 Colloids 10.5.1 write down the properties of colloids; *


10.5.2 explain the types of colloids. *

11. Thermochemistry Candidates should be able to:

11.1 Thermodynamics 11.1.1 define thermodynamics; *


11.1.2 define the terms, system, surrounding, state function, heat, heat capacity, *
internal energy, work, and enthalpy;

11.2 First law of 11.2.1 state and explain the first law of thermodynamic with the help of daily life *
thermodynamic examples;
11.2.2 relate change in internal energy of system with thermal energy at constant *
temperature and pressure;
11.2.3 calculate internal energy and work done of a system by applying the 1st *
law of thermodynamics;

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NOTES

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K U A
11.3 Hess’s Law 11.3.1 state and explain Hess’s law of heat summation; *
11.3.2 construct simple energy cycle by using Hess’s law from the given *
reactions;
11.3.3 calculate standard heat of formation and heat of reaction by using Hess’s *
law;
11.3.4 calculate the heat of reaction using experimental data (Cm∆t=q); *
11.3.5 explain working of a calorimeter; *

11.4 Born-Haber cycle 11.4.1 explain Born-Haber cycle(by using pathway diagram and explain in terms *
of enthalpy changes of the reaction);

11.5 Heat Capacity 11.5.1 explain the following terms; heat capacity, specific heat capacity and *
molar heat capacity.

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NOTES

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12. Electrochemistry Candidates should be able to: K U A

12.1 Oxidation - 12.1.1 define terms like reduction, oxidation, oxidation number, reducing agent, *
Reduction concept oxidizing agent;
12.1.2 determine oxidation number of an atom in pure substance or in a *
compound;
12.1.3 identify reducing and oxidizing agent by using oxidation –number change *
method;
12.1.4 balance the equation using oxidation number change method; *
12.1.5 identify oxidation and reduction half reaction; *
12.1.6 balance the equation using half reaction method; *
12.1.7 explain the uses of redox reactions in daily life (protection of metal *
surfaces from corrosion and other harmful agents, solar cell as a source of
energy);

12.2 Electrode Potential 12.2.1 define cathode, anode, electrode potential, Standard Hydrogen Electrode *
and Electrochemical and electrochemical series;
Series

12.3 Types of 12.3.1 define cell potential; *


electrochemical cells 12.3.2 determine the potential of electrochemical cell from the given data; *
12.3.3 describe reaction occurring within a lead storage batteries; *
12.3.4 explain production of electrical energy in a fuel cell; *
12.3.5 define in standard electrode potential; *

12.4 Faraday’s law 12.4.1 state and explain the Faraday’s law (1st and 2nd); *
12.4.2 calculate the quantity of charge passed in an electrochemical cell during *
electrolysis;
12.4.3 calculate the mass or volume of substance liberated during electrolysis. *

35
NOTES

36
Part–II (Class XII)

13. s-and p-Block Elements Candidates should be able to: K U A

13.1 Period (Na to Ar) 13.1.1 identify the demarcation of the periodic table into s, p, d and f-blocks; *
13.1.2 identify group, period and block of given elements by using electronic *
configuration;
13.1.3 list down the elements in period 3; *
13.1.4 explain the periodicity of physical properties (like atomic radius, *
Ionization energy, electro negativity, electron affinity, electrical
conductivity, melting and boiling points);
13.1.5 describe the anomalous behaviour in periodic trend of different elements *
in 3rd periods;
13.1.6 describe the reaction of period 3 elements with water, oxygen and *
chlorine;
13.1.7 describe the reaction of oxides, hydroxides and chloride of period 3 *
elements with water;
13.1.8 describe the physical properties of period 3 element (such as solubility *
and behaviours of oxides);

13.2 Group 1 13.2.1 describe oxidation state and trend of physical properties in group 1 (such *
as Ionization energy, electro-negativity, atomic radius, melting and
boiling point);
13.2.2 describe the chemical reaction of group 1 elements with H 2 O , Oxygen *
and chlorine;
13.2.3 explain effect of heat on nitrates, carbonates and hydrogen carbonates of *
group 1 elements;

37
NOTES

38
K U A
13.3 Group 2 13.3.1 describe oxidation state and trend of physical properties in group 2 *
elements (such as Ionization energy, electro-negativity, atomic radius,
melting and boiling point);
13.3.2 describe the chemical reaction of group 2 elements with water, oxygen *
and nitrogen;
13.3.3 discuss the trend on solubility of hydroxides, sulphates and carbonates of *
group 2 elements;
13.3.4 discus the trends in thermal stability of the nitrates and carbonates of *
group 2 elements;
13.3.5 differentiate Beryllium from other members of its group; *

13.4 Group 4 13.4.1 describe oxidation state and trend of physical properties of group 4 *
elements (Ionization energy, electro-negativity, atomic radius, metallic
character, melting and boiling property);
13.4.2 explain the variation of oxidation state in group 4 element; *
13.4.3 describe the reaction of water with chlorides of carbon, silicon and lead; *
13.4.4 compare the structure and stability of chlorides of carbon, silicon and *
lead;
13.4.5 describe the structure of CO2 and SiO2; *
13.4.6 discuss the acid base behaviour of oxide of group 4 elements; *

13.5 Group 7 13.5.1 discuss the oxidation state and trend of physical property of group 7 *
elements (atomic radius, electro negativity, electron-affinity, meting and
boiling point, bond energy);
13.5.2 discuss the bond enthalpies and acidity in hydrogen halide; *
13.5.3 compare the strength of halide ion as a reducing agent; *
13.5.4 explain the significance of following elements in daily life (Iodine in *
Goitre, Fluoride toxicity and deficiency, use of steel, tin, aluminium and
glass in beverage and food industry).

39
NOTES

40
14. d- and f- Block Elements Candidates should be able to: K U A
(Transition)

14.1 General feature of 14.1.1 describe the general features of transition element. (colour, variable *
transition element oxidation states, use as catalyst);

14.2 Electronic Structure 14.2.1 describe the electronic structure of elements and ions of d-block element; *
14.2.2 explain anomalous behaviour of chromium and copper with respect to *
electronic configuration;
14.2.3 write down electronic configuration of given elements and ions of d – *
block elements;

14.3 Chemistry of some 14.3.1 describe the important reactions (redox reaction) and uses of Vanadium, *
specific transition Chromium, Copper, Manganese and Iron (as catalyst);
element

14.4 Co-ordination 14.4.1 explain shapes, origin, colour and nomenclature of Co-ordination *
Compound compounds;
14.4.2 relate the co-ordination number of ion through the crystal structure of a *
compound of which they are apart;
14.4.3 describe properties of alloys with reference to its composite metal atom; *
14.4.4 describe the reaction of K2Cr2O7 with oxalic acid and Mohr Salts; *
14.4.5 describe the reaction of KMnO4 with FeSO4, oxalic acid and Mohr Salts; *
14.4.6 calculate concentration of Fe(II) ions with in a solution by titration with *
KMnO4;
14.4.7 explain the reaction of Hexaaquacopper(II)ion with iodide and determine *
the concentration of copper ion in the solution.

41
NOTES

42
15. Organic Compounds Candidates should be able to: K U A

15.1 Sources: Fossils, fuel, 15.1.1 explain diversity and magnitude of organic compounds and their general *
coal, petroleum and properties;
natural gas.

15.2 Coal as a source of 15.2.1 explain the destructive distillation of coal; *


organic compound

15.3 Classification of 15.3.1 classify the organic compound on structural basis; *


organic compound 15.3.2 explain the use of coal as a source of both aliphatic and aromatic *
compounds;

15.4 Detection of element 15.4.1 give the methods to detect the elements present in organic compound. *
in organic compound (C, H, N, S, Halogen);

15.5 Functional Group and 15.5.1 define the Functional Group and homologous series. *
Homologous series

16. Hydrocarbons Candidates should be able to:

16.1 Nomenclature and 16.1.1 describe the nomenclature and shapes of molecule (alkane, alkene, cyclo- *
Shapes of molecule alkane, alkynes, benzenes and substituted benzene);

16.2 Alkanes and 16.2.1 explain unreactive nature of alkanes and cycloalkanes exemplified by *
Cycloalkanes ethane and cyclopropane;
16.2.2 explain homolytic and hetrolytic fission,free radical initiation,propagation *
and termination;

16.3 Free radical 16.3.1 describe the mechanism of free radical substitution with reference to *
substitution reaction methane and ethane;

43
NOTES

44
K U A
16.4 Oxidation of organic 16.4.1 identify and complete the redox reaction of organic compound; * *
compounds

16.5 Isomerism 16.5.1 explain what is meant by chiral centre and show that such a centre gives *
rise to optical isomerism.
16.5.2 identify chiral centres in given structural formula of a molecule *

16.6 Alkenes 16.6.1 explain the term sigma and pi carbon-carbon bonds with reference to *
ethene molecule;
16.6.2 describe the reactivity of alkene exemplified by ethane; *
16.6.3 explain the terms with suitable example: (isomerism, stereo isomerism *
and structural isomerism);
16.6.4 give the preparation: ethene from dehydration of alcohol and dehydro *
halogenations of alkyl halide;
16.6.5 describe the reactions of ethene (hydrogenation, Hydration, *
Hydrohalogenation, halogenation, halohydration, epooxidation,
Ozonolysis, polymerization);

16.7 Alkynes 16.7.1 compare the reactivity of alkynes with alkanes, alkenes and arenes *
(Aromatic compounds);
16.7.2 describe the preparation of alkynes using elimination reaction; *
16.7.3 explain the acidity of alkynes (w.r.t its reaction with metal); *
16.7.4 explain the chemistry of alkynes by hydrogenation, hydrohalogenation, *
hydration, bromination, ozonolysis);

16.8 Benzene and 16.8.1 compare the reactivity of benzene with alkene and alkane; *
Substituted Benzene 16.8.2 describe the mechanism of electrophilic substitution reaction of benzene; *
16.8.3 discuss the chemistry of benzene and methyl benzene by nitration, *
sulphonation, halogenation, Friedal craft alkylation and acylation.

45
NOTES

46
17. Alkyl halides and Amines Candidates should be able to: K U A

17.1 Alkyl halides 17.1.1 name alkyl halides using IUPAC system for naming; *
17.1.2 discuss physical properties and reactivity of different alkyl halides on the *
basis of bond energy;
17.1.3 draw the structure of different alky halides by the given formula; *
17.1.4 describe the preparations of alkyl halide by the reaction of alcohol with *
HX, SOCl2, PX3 and by radical halogenations of alkane;

17.2 Nucleophilic 17.2.1 describe the mechanism of SN reaction; *


substitution reaction 17.2.2 compare SN1 and SN2 reaction; *
17.2.3 write down the mechanism of SN reaction for the given alkyl halide; *
17.2.4 identify Nucleophile (base), substrate and leaving group from the given *
reaction;
17.2.5 discuss carbo-cation and its stability; *

17.3 Elimination Reaction 17.3.1 describe the mechanism of different types of elimination reaction; *
17.3.2 compare E1 and E2 reaction; *
17.3.3 write down the mechanism of elimination reaction in the given alkyl *
halide;
17.3.4 compare substitution reaction and elimination reaction; *

17.4 Organo-metallic 17.4.1 describe the preparation and reactivity of grignard reagent; *
Compounds 17.4.2 describe chemical reaction of grignard reagent with aldehyde, ketones, *
(Grignard reagent) esters and CO2;

47
NOTES

48
K U A
17.5 Amines 17.5.1 name amines applying IUPAC system; *
17.5.2 discuss physical properties of amines (M.P, B.P and solubility); *
17.5.3 draw the structure of Amines (Primary, secondary and tertiary) from the *
given formula;
17.5.4 explain basicity of amines (basic character); *
17.5.5 describe preparation of amines by alkylation of NH3, by alkyl halide and *
reduction of nitrile, nitro and amide functional groups;
17.5.5 describe chemical reaction of amines (alkylation with RX, reaction with *
aldehyde and ketones);
17.5.6 describe preparation of amides and diazonium salts; *
17.5.7 describe isomerism in alkyl halides and amines; *
17.5.8 describe the test to detect nitrogen in the given organic compound. *

18. Alcohol, Phenols and Candidates should be able to:


Ethers

18.1 Alcohols 18.1.1 name different alcohols using IUPAC system; *


18.1.2 describe the physical properties and structure of alcohol; *
18.1.3 discuss the preparation of alcohol by reduction of aldehyde, ketone, *
carboxylic acid and esters;
18.1.4 discuss the acidic character of alcohol (as exemplified by ethanol); *
18.1.5 describe the chemistry of alcohol by preparation of ether, esters, oxidative *
cleavage of 1-2-diols;
18.1.6 define thiols (RSH); *
18.1.7 describe the use of alcohol (disinfectant and antiseptic); *

49
NOTES

50
K U A
18.2 Phenols 18.2.1 apply IUPAC system for naming phenols; *
18.2.2 discuss physical properties, structure and acidic behaviour of phenol; *
18.2.3 prepare phenols from the given compound in the form of equation *
(benzene sulphonic acid, chlorobenzene, acidic oxidation of cumene and
hydrolysis of diozomium salts;
18.2.4 discuss the chemistry of phenol (electrophilic aromatic substitution, *
reaction with Na metal and oxidation);
18.2.5 differentiate between alcohols and phenol; *
18.2.6 explain isomerism in alcohol and phenol; *

18.3 Ether 18.3.1 apply IUPAC system for naming ether from the given formula; *
18.3.2 describe the physical and chemical properties of ether; *
18.3.3 give chemical equation for the preparation of ether (Williamson *
Synthesis, reaction of alcohol and excess H2SO4);
18.3.4 explain the use of ether in medicine (for anaesthesia). *

51
NOTES

52
19. Carbonyl Compound I: Candidates should be able to: K U A
Aldelyde and ketones

19.1 Nomenclature / 19.1.1 write the IUPAC nomenclature of aldelydes and ketones; *
Structure 19.1.2 draw the structure of given aldehydes and ketones; *

19.2 Physical Properties 19.2.1 explain the physical properties of aldehydes and ketones; *

19.3 Preparation of 19.3.1 write chemical equations for the preparation of aldehydes and ketones (by *
Aldehyde and Ketone ozonolysis of alkene, hydration of alkyne, oxidation of alcohol, Friedal
Craft acylation of aromatics;

19.4 Reaction of Aldehyde 19.4.1 discuss the role of ά – hydrogen for comparing the reactivity of aldehyde *
and Ketone. and ketones;
19.4.2 describe acid / base catalysed nucleophilic addition reaction of aldehyde *
and ketones;
19.4.3 discuss the chemistry of aldeyde and ketons by their reduction to *
hydrocarbon, alcohols, by using carbon nucleophiles, nitrogen
nucleophiles and oxygen neucleophiles;
19.4.4 describe the oxidation reactions of aldelyde and ketones; *

19.5 Isomerism 19.5.1 draw all possible isomers of given aldehydes and ketones; *
19.5.2 describe glucose and fructose as example of aldeydes and ketones; *

19.6 Use 19.6.1 list down the use of formaldehyde vapours in adhesives, varnishes, paints, *
foam insulations, permanent press clothing;

53
NOTES

54
20. Carbony l Compound 2: Candidates should be able to: K U A
Carboxylic acid and
functional derivatives

20.1 Nomenclature 20.1.1 apply IUPAC system for naming carboxylic acid and their derivatives; *

20.2 Structure and 20.2.1 describe the structure and physical properties (solubility M.P and B.P) of *
Physical Properties carboxylic acid;
20.2.2 draw the structure of given compounds of carboxylic acids and their *
derivatives;

20.3 Acidity 20.3.1 discuss the acidic behaviour of carboxylic acid (on the basis of alpha *
carbon) and derivatives of carboxylic acid;

20.4 Preparation of 20.4.1 give chemical equation for the preparation of carboxylic acid by Grignard *
Carboxylic Acid. Reagent, hydrolysis of nitriles, oxidation of primary alcohol, aldehydes
and alkyl benzene;

20.5 Reactivity 20.5.1 describe the reactivity of carboxylic acid; *


20.5.2 compare the reactivity in different derivatives of carboxylic acid; *

20.6 Reaction of 20.6.1 give the equations for the preparation of following (acyl halides, acid *
Carboxylic Acid. anhydrides, esters, amides);
20.6.2 write the inter-conversion reactions of carboxylic acids derivatives *
(mentioned above);
20.6.3 describe reaction of carboxylic acid derivatives (mentioned above); *

55
NOTES

56
K U A
20.7 Isomers 20.7.1 describe isomerism in carboxylic acids (chain and functional); *
20.7.2 draw all possible isomers of carboxylic acid (given formula); *

20.8 Uses 20.8.1 list carboxylic acids present in fruits, vegetables and other natural products; *
20.8.2 list the use of carboxylic acid (as preservatives in food and food products, *
leather industry).

21. Biochemistry Candidates should be able to:

21.1 Carbohydrates, 21.1.1 explain the basis of classification of carbohydrates and protein; *
Protein and lipids 21.1.2 describe structure-function relationship of carbohydrates, protein and *
lipids;
21.1.3 explain role of carbohydrate in health and disease; *
21.1.4 explain the nutritional important of protein and lipids; *
21.1.5 explain different types of lipids (simple, conjugate, steroids); *
21.1.6 explain the effect of lowering of pH (by using lemon juice) on the process *
of precipitation of milk protein;

21.2. Enzymes 21.2.1 describe the role of enzymes as biological catalyst (in conversion of food); *
21.2.2 explain the factors effecting the enzymes activity; *
21.2.3 explain the role of enzymes as inhibitors; *

21.3 Nucleic acid 21.3.1 identify the structural components of DNA and RNA; *
21.3.2 state the role of DNA in terms of genetic informations; *
21.3.4 explain the role of RNA in terms of protein synthesis; *

21.4 Mineral of biological 21.4.1 describe the role of Fe, Ca, P and Zn in nutrition; *
significance 21.4.2 explain the role of biochemical compounds (insulin, cholesterol) to *
regulate human health.

57
NOTES

58
22. Industrial Chemistry Candidates should be able to: K U A

22.1 Introduction 22.1.1 discuss the importance of chemical industries in the economy of Pakistan; *
22.1.2 list the raw materials available in Pakistan for various chemical industries *
pharmaceutical, textile, petrochemicals);

22.2 Safety measurement 22.2.1 discuss the safety measurement for industrial process according to ISO *
certification for the given industry (as mentioned above);
22.2.2 identify risks associated with the manufacturing of chemicals (as *
mentioned above);

22.3 Dyes and Pesticides 22.3.1 discuss the importance of dyes and pesticides; *

22.4 Petro-chemicals 22.4.1 describe the fractional distillation and refining of petroleum; *
22.4.2 describe the basic building block process in petrochemical technology *
(polymerization with its examples);
22.4.3 identify in the given equation the petrochemicals and chemicals derived *
from them (monomer and polymer);
22.4.4 list some major petrochemicals; *

22.5 Synthetic Polymers 22.5.1 describe the chemical process of addition and condensation *
(PVC and nylon) polymerization;
22.5.2 describe the formation and Uses of PVC and nylon; *
22.5.3 describe preparation and application of various cosmetics like shampoos, *
sun blocks and fairness creams;

22.6 Synthetic Adhesive 22.6.1 describe types and application of synthetic adhesive; *

22.7 Cosmetics 22.7.1 describe preparation and applications of various cosmetics like nail *
varnish, nail polish remover and lipsticks.

59
NOTES

60
23. Environmental Candidates should be able to: K U A
Chemistry

23.1 Chemistry of 23.1.1 write down the various chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere *
Troposphere and (w.r.t depletion of ozone);
Stratosphere 23.1.2 discuss the release of oxide of C, S, N and VOCs which are associated *
with combustion of hydrocarbon based fuel;
23.1.3 outline problems associated with release of pollutants ( e.g. acid rain and *
hazardous inorganic and organic compound like PAN (Peroxy Acetylic
Nitrate);
23.1.4 describe causes and impacts of urban smog; *
23.1.5 describe the role of CFCs in destroying ozone in the stratosphere; *
23.1.6 list possible alternatives for the use of CFCs; *
23.1.7 explain green house effect and global warming as resulting in climate *
change;

23.2 Water pollution and 23.2.1 explain the various techniques / methods of water analysis (using pH *
Water treatment meter, TDS meter, titration method);
23.2.2 explain the methods of treatment for water purification (filtration, sewage *
treatment, Zeolite process, Reverse Osmosis);

23.3 Green Chemistry 23.3.1 describe green chemistry and its significance; *
23.3.2 write some micro wave reactions (green chemistry) with their industrial *
applications.

61
NOTES

62
24. Analytical Chemistry Candidates should be able to: K U A

24.1 Classical and modern 24.1.1 compare the classical and modern methods of analysis (w.r.t structural *
methods of analysis analysis of compounds);
24.1.2 discuss the procedure of combustion analysis of hydrocarbon; *
24.1.3 define spectroscopy and discuss its application in analytical chemistry; *
24.1.4 explain the different regions of electromagnetic spectrum (according to *
wavelength);
24.1.5 explain the basic principle of IR Spectroscopy; *
24.1.6 identify benzene, acetone, carboxylic acid and ethanol from given IR *
spectra;
24.1.7 predict whether a given molecule will absorb in the UV / visible region; *
24.1.8 outline in simple terms the principles of proton NMR spectroscopy; *
24.1.9 explain instrumentation and working of mass spectroscopy. (MS); *
24.1.10 outline the use of MS in determination of relative isotopic masses; *
24.1.11 explain atomic emission and atomic absorption spectrum; *
24.1.12 discuss the use of MS in determination of drug abuse in forensic sciences. *

63
NOTES

64
4. Scheme of Assessment

Class XI

Table 1: Number of Student Learning Outcomes by Cognitive level


Topic Topics No. of SLOs Total
No. Sub- K U A
Topics
1 Stiochiometry 6 3 1 8 12
2 Atomic Structure 7 6 10 5 21
3 Theories of Covalent Bonding and 4 4 11 2 17
Shapes of Molecules
4 States of Matter I (Gases) 8 8 8 2 18
5 States of Matter II (Liquids) 4 3 7 3 13
6 States of Matter III (Solid) 5 3 6 2 11
7 Chemical Equilibrium 5 6 7 3 16
8 Acids, Bases and Salts 7 8 8 5 21
9 Chemical Kinetics 4 2 7 4 13
10 Solution and Colloids 5 4 4 8 16
11 Thermochemistry 5 4 4 4 12
12 Electrochemistry 4 4 4 8 16
Total 64 55 77 54 186
Percentage 30 41 29 100

65
Table 2: Allocation of Marks for the Objective Test,
Constructed Response Paper and Extended Response Question

Marks
Topic No. of Constructed
Topics Objective Total
No. Sub-Topics Response ERQ
Test
Paper
1 Stiochiometry 6
5 8 5 18
2 Atomic Structure 7
3 Theories of Covalent 4
Bonding and Shapes 3 6 - 9
of Molecules
4 States of Matter I 8
(Gases)
5 States of Matter II 4
6 5 - 11
(Liquids)
6 States of Matter III 5
(Solid)
7 Chemical Equilibrium 5 2 4 - 6
8 Acids, Bases and Salts 7
7 8 5 20
10 Solution and Colloids 5
9 Chemical Kinetics 4 2 4 - 6
11 Thermo-chemistry 5
5 5 5 15
12 Electrochemistry 4
Total 64 30 40 15 85
Practical 15
Total 100

66
Table 3: Paper Specifications

Topic Topic Marks Distribution Total


No. Marks

1 Stiochiometry MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark


CRQ 1 @ 8 Marks
18
ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
2 Atomic Structure Choose any ONE from TWO

Theories of Covalent Bonding and


3 MCQs 3 @ 1 Mark 9
Shapes of Molecules
CRQ 1 @ 6 Marks
4 States of Matter I (Gases)
MCQs 6 @ 1 Mark
5 States of Matter II (Liquids) 11
CRQ 1 @ 5 Marks
6 States of Matter III (Solid)

MCQs 2 @ 1 Mark
7 Chemical Equilibrium 6
CRQ 1 @ 4 Marks

MCQs 7 @ 1 Mark
8 Acids, Bases and Salts
CRQ 1 @ 8 Marks 20
ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
10 Solutions and Colloids Choose any ONE from TWO
MCQs 2 @ 1 Mark
9 Chemical Kinetics 6
CRQ 1 @ 4 Marks
11 Thermo-chemistry MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark
CRQ 1 @ 5 Marks
15
12 Electrochemistry ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
Choose any ONE from TWO
MCQs CRQs ERQs
Total 85
30 40 15
Practical 15
Total Marks 100

• Extended response questions (ERQs) will require answers in more descriptive form.
The answers will be in a paragraph rather than a word or a single sentence.

* There will be TWO questions and the candidates will be required to attempt any ONE
by making a choice out of the TWO.

67
Class XII

Table 4: Number of Student Learning Outcomes by Cognitive level

Topic No. of SLOs


Topics Total
No. Sub-Topics K U A
13 s-and p-Block Elements 5 1 24 1 26
d- and f- Block Elements
14 4 0 8 4 12
(Transition)
15 Organic Compound 5 2 4 0 6
16 Hydrocarbons 8 1 12 7 20
17 Alkyl halides and Amines 5 1 18 5 24
18 Alcohol, Phenols and Ethers 3 3 10 4 17
Carbonyl compound
19 6 1 6 4 11
1. Aldehydes and Ketones
Carboyl Compound
20 2. Carboxyl acid and functional 8 3 6 5 14
derivative
21 Biochemistry 4 2 12 0 14
22 Industrial chemistry 7 2 12 0 14
23 Environmental chemistry 3 3 8 0 11
24 Analytical chemistry 1 4 8 0 12
Total 59 23 128 30 181
Percentage 13 70 17 100

68
Table 5: Allocation of Marks for the Objective Test,
Constructed Response Paper and Extended Response Question

Marks
No. of
Topic Constructed
Topics Sub- Objective Total
No. Response ERQ
Topics Test
Paper
13 s-and p-Block Elements 5 -
d- and f- Block 5 10 15
14 4 -
Elements (Transition)
15 Organic Compound 5
5 6 5 16
16 Hydrocarbons 8
Alkyl halides and
17 5 3 4 - 7
Amines
Alcohol, Phenol and
18 3 4 4 - 8
Ether
Carbonyl compound
19 1. Aldehydes and 6
Ketones
5 6 5 16
Carboyl Compound
20 2. Carboxyl acid and 8
functional derivative
21 Biochemistry 4 3 4 - 7
22 Industrial chemistry 7
Environmental
23 3 5 6 5 16
chemistry
24 Analytical chemistry 1
Total 59 30 40 15 85
Practical 15
Total 100

69
Table 6: Paper Specifications
Topic Total
Topic Marks Distribution
No. Marks
13 S-and P-Block elements
MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark
d and f block elements 15
14 CRQ 1 @ 10 Marks
(Transition)
15 Organic Compounds MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark
CRQ 1 @ 6 Marks
16
16 Hydrocarbons *ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
Choose any ONE from TWO
MCQs 3 @ 1 Mark
17 Alkyl Halides and Amines 7
CRQ 1 @ 4 Marks
MCQs 4 @ 1 Mark
18 Alcohol, Phenol and Ethers 8
CRQ 1 @ 4 Marks
Carbonyl compound
19 MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark
1. Aldehydes and Ketones
CRQ 1 @ 6 Marks
Carboyl Compound 16
*ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
20 2. Carboxyl acid and functional
Choose any ONE from TWO
derivative
MCQs 3 @ 1 Mark
21 Biochemistry 7
CRQ 1 @ 4 Marks
22 Industrial Chemistry MCQs 5 @ 1 Mark
CRQ 1 @ 6 Marks
23 Environmental Chemistry 16
*ERQ 1 @ 5 Marks
Analytical Chemistry Choose any ONE from TWO
MCQs CRQs ERQs
Total 85
30 40 15
Practical 15
Total Marks 100

• Extended response questions (ERQs) will require answers in more descriptive form.
The answers will be in a paragraph rather than a word or a single sentence.

* There will be TWO questions and the candidates will be required to attempt any
ONE by making a choice out of the TWO.

4.1 Tables 1 and 4 summarize the number and nature of SLOs in each topic in classes XI
and XII. This will serve as a guide in the construction of the examination paper. It
also indicates that more emphasis has been given to Understanding (40% and 70%),
Application and higher order skills (30% and 17%) to discourage rote memorization.
In class XII there is a gradual increase in higher order skills. Tables 1 and 4 however
do not translate directly into marks.

4.2 There will be two examinations, one at the end of Class XI and one at the end of
Class XII.

4.3 In each class, the theory paper will be in two parts: paper I and paper II. Both papers
will be administrated within 3 hours.

70
4.4 Paper I theory will consist of 30 compulsory, multiple choice items. These questions
will involve four response options.

4.5 Paper II theory will carry 55 marks and consist of a number of compulsory, structured
questions and a number of extended response questions. Each extended response
question will be presented in an either/or form.

4.6 Practical examination will be conducted separate from the theory paper. It will be
based on the list of practical activities listed in the syllabus.

4.7 All constructed response questions will be in a booklet which will also serve as an
answer script.

4.8 Practicals to assess performance skills will carry 15 marks in class XI and 15 marks
in class XII.

4.9 The practicals identified in the SLOs by a “P” should be carried out throughout the
academic year. It is essential for each school to equip its laboratories with chemicals,
instruments, apparatus, specimens etc. according to the requirements of the
practicals marked in the syllabus as “P”. Each school will be responsible to make
sure that each student is provided the opportunity to do the practicals.

List of practicals is attached as annex B.

5. Teaching-Learning Approaches and Classroom Activities

1. Concept of Celebration Day


Celebration of Mole day on 23 October of every year at 6.02 P.M. Charts, models,
debates and other activities related to the theme can be organised.
2. Group based assignments specially on numerical problems.
3. Experiments and demonstration on atomic structure/ gas laws/solution and
solubility colligative properties/ radox reactions and batteries
4. Models of bonding/ shape of molecules,
5. ICT integration
• simulation of bond formation
• gas law
• Graph plot ….. chemical kinetics
6. Field trips
• Steel mill
• Cement factory
• Textile industry
7. Project on environment / pollution / chemical
8. Experiments: functional group-reaction and spectroscopy

71
6. Recommended Texts, Reference Materials

Recommended Book

1. Anwar, J. and Ahmed, I, (2003). Chemistry 11 and 12. Lahore: Sheikh Ali and
Sons.

Reference Books

1. Bukhari, S and Taj, R. A (2003). Chemistry for 11 and 12. Lahore: Chaudhary
Ghulam Rasul and Sons.
2. Muhammad, A. and Qureshi, S, (2003), Chemistry 11 and 12 (2nd edition).
Lahore: Punjab Textbook Board.
3. Mathews, Philip. (1996). Advance Chemistry.UK: Cambridge Press
4. Julian L. Robert, J. Leland Hollenberg, James M. Postma. (1975). Chemistry in
the laboratory. USA: W H Freeman
5. Sheikh, M. (2006). Practical Textbook. Lahore: Punjab Textbook Board.

7. Definition of Cognitive Levels and Command Words in the Student Learning


Outcomes and in Examination Papers

7.1. Definitions of Cognitive Levels (Knowledge, Understanding and Application)

Knowledge:

This requires knowing and remembering facts and figures, vocabulary and contexts,
and the ability to recall key ideas, concepts, trends, sequences, categories, etc. It can
be taught and evaluated through questions based on: who, when, where, what, list,
define, describe, identify, label, tabulate, quote, name, state, etc.

Understanding:

This requires understanding information, grasping meaning, interpreting facts,


comparing, contrasting, grouping, inferring causes/reasons, seeing patterns,
organizing parts, making links, summarizing, solving, identifying motives, finding
evidence, etc. It can be taught and evaluated through questions based on: why, how,
show, demonstrate, paraphrase, interpret, summarize, explain, prove, identify the
main idea/theme, predict, compare, differentiate, discuss, chart the course/direction,
report, solve, etc.

Application:

This requires using information or concepts in new situations, solving problems,


organizing information and ideas, using old ideas to create new ones, generalizing
from given facts, analyzing relationships, relating knowledge from several areas,
drawing conclusions, evaluating worth, etc. It can be taught and evaluated through
questions based on: differentiate, analyse, show relationship, propose an alternative,
prioritize, give reasons for, categorize, illustrate, corroborate, compare and contrast,

72
create, design, formulate, integrate, rearrange, reconstruct/recreate, reorganize,
predict consequences etc.

7.2 Definition of Command Words:

Knowledge
Define Only a formal statement or equivalent paraphrase is required.
No examples need to be given

Find: A general terms that may variously be interpreted as calculate,


measure, determine etc.

List/Enlist: Requires a number of points, generally each of one word, with no


elaboration. Where a given number of points are specified, this should
not be exceeded.

Outline: Implies brevity, i.e. restricting the answer to giving essentials.

Identify: Describe with specific examples of how a given term or concept is


applied in daily life

State: Implies concise answer with little or no supporting argument, for


example a numerical answer that can be obtained by inspection.

Recall: To bring back to mind and write down, as it is given in the text that
you have already memorized.

Write: To construct full sentence of continuous prose, not abbreviated


text.

Understanding
Show: Demonstrate with evidence.

Demonstrate: Implies that the candidate is expected to show how is one thing related
to another, usually it is a reference to theory but sometimes it is by
physical manipulation or experiment.

Describe: To state in words (Using diagrams where appropriate) the main points
of the topic. It is often used with reference wither to particular
phenomena or to particular experiments. In the former instance, the
term usually implies that the answer should include reference to
(visual) observations associated with the phenomena.

Determine: Often implies that the quantity concerned cannot be measured directly
but is obtained by calculation, substituting measured or known values
of other quantities into standard formula, for e.g. relative molecular
mass.

73
Discuss: To give a critical account of the point involved in the topic.

Draw/construct: Implies a simple freehand sketch or diagram. Care should be taken


with proportions and the clear labeling of parts.

Explain: May imply reasoning or some reference to theory, depending on the


context.

Application
Classify: State the basis for categorization of a set of related entities and assign
example to categories.

Calculate: Is used when a numerical answer is required. In general, working


should be shown, especially where two or more steps are involved

Compare: List the main characteristics of two entities clearly identifying


similarities (and differences)

Differentiate: To identify those characteristics which are always or sometimes


distinguish between two categories.

Recognize: Involves looking at a given example and stating what it most probably
is.

Measure: To determine extent, quantity, amount or degree of something as


determine by measurement or calculation.

Narrate: To write down the facts and explanation as given or provided in the
text.

Predict or Implies that the candidates is not expected to produce the required
answer
Deduce: By recall but by making a logical connection between other pieces of
information. Such information may be wholly given in the question or
may depend on answer extracted in an early part of the question.

Purify: Implies a practical activity in which the candidates is expected to apply


an approved methodology with appropriate safety precautious.

Relate: Describe how things depend upon, follow from or are part of another.

Explore: to examine thoroughly and systematically to be able to make a


statement about a phenomenon or concept.

74
Annex A

HSSC Scheme of Studies3

AKU-EB as a national board offers SSC and HSSC qualifications for both English medium
and Urdu medium schools. The revised HSSC Scheme of Studies issued by the Curriculum
Wing was implemented from September 2007. At the HSSC level the marks allocated to
subjects are based on the revised National Scheme of Studies of 2006. The first HSSC-I part
wise (Class XI) examination based on 2006 national curriculum was held in 2009 and
HSSC-II (Class XII) will be held in 2010.

HSSC I-II (Classes XI-XII) subjects on offer for the examination

HSSC Part-I (Class XI) Science Group (Pre-Medical)

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-I 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-I OR Pakistan Culture-I a 100 - 100
Physics-I 85 15 100
Chemistry-I 85 15 100
Biology-I 85 15 100
Total: 455 45 500

HSSC Part-II (Class XII) Science Group (Pre-Medical)

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-II 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-II OR Pakistan Culture-II a 100 - 100
Islamiyat OR Ethics b 50 - 50
Pakistan Studies 50 - 50
Physics-II 85 15 100
Chemistry-II 85 15 100
Biology-II 85 15 100
Total: 555 45 600

a Foreign students may opt Pakistan Culture in lieu of Urdu Compulsory, subject to
the board’s approval.
b For non-Muslim candidates in lieu of Islamiyat.
Note: Pakistan Studies, Islamiyat / Ethics will be taught in both Classes XI and XII,
but the examination will be conducted at the end of Class XII.

3
Government of Pakistan September 2007 and May 2003. Scheme of Studies for SSC and HSSC (Classes IX-
XII), Islamabad: Ministry of Education, Curriculum Wing.

75
HSSC Part-I (Class XI) Science Group (Pre-Engineering)

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-I 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-I OR Pakistan Culture-I a 100 - 100
Physics-I 85 15 100
Chemistry-I 85 15 100
Mathematics-I 100 - 100
Total: 470 30 500

HSSC Part-II (Class XII) Science Group (Pre-Engineering)

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-II 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-II OR Pakistan Culture-II a 100 - 100
Islamiyat OR Ethics b 50 - 50
Pakistan Studies 50 - 50
Physics-II 85 15 100
Chemistry-II 85 15 100
Mathematics –II 100 - 100
Total: 570 30 600

a Foreign students may opt Pakistan Culture in lieu of Urdu Compulsory, subject to
the board’s approval.
b For non-Muslim candidates in lieu of Islamiyat.
Note: Pakistan Studies, Islamiyat / Ethics will be taught in both Classes XI and XII,
but the examination will be conducted at the end of Class XII.

76
HSSC Part-I (Class XI) Science Group (Science General)
Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-I 100 - 100
a
Urdu Compulsory-I OR Pakistan Culture-I 100 - 100
Any one subject combinations of the following:
Physics-I 85 15
Mathematics-I 100 - 300/
Statistics-I 85 15
Economics-I 100 -
Mathematics-I 100 - 300/
Statistics-I 85 15
Economics-I 100 -
Mathematics-I 100 - 300/
Computer Science-I 75 25
Physics-I 85 15
Mathematics-I 100 - 300/
Computer Science-I 75 25
Mathematics-I 100 -
Statistics-I 85 15 300
Computer Science-I 75 25
Total: 500
HSSC Part-II (Class XII) Science Group (Science General)
Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-II 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-II OR Pakistan Culture-II a 100 - 100
Islamiyat OR Ethics b 50 - 50
Pakistan Studies 50 - 50
Any one subject combinations of the following:
Physics-II 85 15
Mathematics-II 100 - 300/
Statistics-II 85 15
Economics-II 100 -
Mathematics-II 100 - 300/
Statistics-II 85 15
Economics-II 100 -
Mathematics-II 100 - 300/
Computer Science-II 75 25
Physics-II 85 15
Mathematics-II 100 - 300/
Computer Science-II 75 25
Mathematics-II 100 -
Statistics-II 85 15 300
Computer Science-II 75 25
Total: 600
a Foreign students may opt Pakistan Culture in lieu of Urdu Compulsory, subject to
the board’s approval.
b For non-Muslim candidates in lieu of Islamiyat.
Note: Pakistan Studies, Islamiyat / Ethics will be taught in both Classes XI and XII,
but the examination will be conducted at the end of Class XII.
77
HSSC Part-I (Class XI) Commerce Group

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-I 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-I OR Pakistan Culture-I a 100 - 100
Principles of Accounting-I 100 - 100
Principles of Economics 75 - 75
Principles of Commerce 75 - 75
Business Mathematics 50 - 50
Total: 500 - 500

HSSC Part-II (Class XII) Commerce Group

Marks
Subjects
Theory Practical Total
English Compulsory-II 100 - 100
Urdu Compulsory-II OR Pakistan Culture-II a 100 - 100
Islamiyat OR Ethics b 50 - 50
Pakistan Studies 50 - 50
Principles of Accounting-II 100 - 100
Commercial Geography 75 75
Computer Studies 60/ 15
OR 75
Banking 75 -
Business Statistics 50 - 50
Total: 600 600

a Foreign students may opt Pakistan Culture in lieu of Urdu Compulsory, subject to
the board’s approval.
b For non-Muslim candidates in lieu of Islamiyat.
Note: Pakistan Studies, Islamiyat / Ethics will be taught in both Classes XI and XII,
but the examination will be conducted at the end of Class XII.

78
HSSC Part-I (Class XI) Humanities Group

Subjects Marks
English Compulsory-I 100
Urdu Compulsory-I OR Pakistan Culture-I a 100
Any three of the following Elective Subjects 300
1. Civics Elective-I (100 each)
2. Computer Science-I (75+25 practical)
3. Economics-I
4. Education-I
5. History of Muslim India-I
6. Islamic Studies-I
7. Mathematics-I
8. Statistics-I (85+15 practical)
9. Psychology-I (85+15 practical)
10. Sociology-I
11. English Literature-I
12. Urdu Literature-I
Total: 500

HSSC Part-II (Class XII) Humanities Group

Subjects Marks
English Compulsory-II 100
Urdu Compulsory-II OR Pakistan Culture-II a 100
Islamiyat OR Ethics b 50
Pakistan Studies 50
Any three of the following Elective Subjects 300
1. Civics Elective-II (100 each)
2. Computer Science-II (75+25 practical)
3. Economics-II
4. Education-II
5. History of Muslim India-II
6. Islamic Studies-II
7. Mathematics-II
8. Statistics-II (85+15 practical)
9. Psychology-II (85+15 practical)
10. Sociology-II
11. English Literature-II
12. Urdu Literature-II
Total: 600

a Foreign students may opt Pakistan Culture in lieu of Urdu Compulsory, subject to
the board’s approval.
b For non-Muslim candidates in lieu of Islamiyat.
Note: Pakistan Studies, Islamiyat / Ethics will be taught in both Classes XI and XII,
but the examination will be conducted at the end of Class XII.

79
Annex B

List of Practical Activities

Class XI

EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION


CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO STOICHIOMETRY
1 Estimate the Amount of Ba +2 in the Analytical balance, oven funnel, Distilled water, potassium 40x2
Given Solution of Bacl 2 Gravimetrically wash bottle, Whatman filter chromate solution, barium
paper # 42, glass rod, beakers, chloride solution
desiccators, pipette, burner,
matches, safety goggles.

CHAPTER 4: STATES OF MATTER I: GASES


2 Demonstrate that Gases spread by Glass tube 40cm long and 1 cm Concentrated NH 3 solution, 40x2
diffusion to Areas of lower in internal diameter, ring stand, concentrated HCl
Concentration. clamp, clamp holder, cotton
balls, forceps, dropper, rubber
stoppers, safety goggles.

80
EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION
CHAPTER 5: STATES OF MATTER II: LIQUIDS
3 Separate the Given Mixture of lnks by Whatman filter paper # 1, glass water – alcohol mixture, 40 x2
Paper Chromatography. cylinder with a glass support, mixture of inks
4 Separate the Following lons from a given Whatman filter paper # 1, glass 1% solution of the chlorides 40x 2
Mixture of their Salts (Ni +2 , Co +2 , Cu +2 ) clinder with a glass support, of Ni, Co, Cu +2 , spraying
by paper Chromatography rubber bung, lead pencil solution (0.1% rubeanic acid
in ethyl alcohol), solvent
mixture (acetone, distilled
water and concentrated HCI
mixed in ratio 43:3:4)
5 Separate Lead and Cadmium in a mixture rubber bung, lead pencil Sample reagent (mixture of 40 x 2
solution by paper Chromatography solutions of PbCl 2 and
CdCl 2 ) , solvent mixture (n-
butanol + 3M HNO 3 ),
spraying agent (H 2 S gas)
6 Prove that the Loss of Thermal Energy beaker, thermometer, safety acetone 40 x2
When a Liquid Evaporates Will Lower goggles
the Temperature of the Liquid.

CHAPTER 6: STATES OF MATER III: SOLIDS


7 Crystallize Benzoic Acid from water China dish, burner, tripod stand, Distilled water and benzoic 40 x2
wire gauze, matches, beakers, acid
funnel, filter paper, stirrer,
safety goggles

81
EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION
CHAPTER 7:CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM
8 Purify a Given Sample of Sodium beaker 500ml, funnel, round- Distilled water, common salt, 40 x 2
Chloride by Passing HCI Gas. bottom flask, glass tubing, wire concentrated H 2 SO 4
(Application of common ion effect) gauze, thistle funnel, burner,
stirrer, graduated flask and
physical balance
CHAPTER 8:ACIDS, BASES AND SALTS
9 Determine the Exact Morality of the Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Phenolphthalein, 0.1M 40 x2
Given Solution of H 2 SO 4 and the flask, beakers, iron stand NaOH, 0.2M
Volume of this acid required to prepare H 2 SO 4 distilled water
500 ml of 0.02 M Acid by Volumetric
Method
10 Determine the Percentage of NaOH in the Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Phenolphthalein, 0.1M 40 x2
Given Solution by Volumetric Method flask, beakers, iron stand NaOH, 0.1M HCI, distilled
water, solution containing
8gms of a mixture of NaCI
and NaOH
11 The given solution contains 6gms of Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Methyl orange, 40 x2
Na 2 CO 3 dissolved per dm 3 . Determine flask, beakers, iron stand 0.1M Na 2 CO 3 , 0.1M HCI,
the Percentage Purity of the Sample Distilled water, solution of 6
Solution by Volume Method. gms of Na 2 CO 3 in 1 liter.
12 Determine the Value of X by Volumetric Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Phenolphthalein , 0.1M 40 x2
Method in the Given Sample of 6.3g of flask, beakers, iron stand NaOH, 0.1 (COOH) 2 .
(COOH) 2 . XH 2 O Dissolved per dm 3 2H 2 O, Distilled water
13 Determine the Solubility of Oxalic Acid Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Phenolphthalein, 0.1M 40 x2
at Room Temperature Volumetrically flask, beakers, iron stand NaOH, 0.1 (COOH) 2.2H 2 O,
Distilled water.

82
EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION
CHAPTER 11:THERMOCHEMISTRY
14 Determine the Heat of Neutralization of Calorimeter with stirrer, 1M NaOH, 1M HCI, distilled 40 x2
NaOH and HCI thermometer, balance water
CHAPTER 12: ELECTROCHEMISTRY
15 Standardize the Given Solution of Burette, pipette, funnel, conical 0.1M FeSO 4 solution 40 x 2
KMnO 4 and Calculate the Volume of flask, beakers, iron stand, test 0.02MKMnO 4 solution dilute
KMnO 4 Required for Preparing 1 dm 3 of tube
H 2 SO 4 , distilled water.
0.01M KMnO 4 Solution Volumetrically
16 Determine the Amount of Iron in the Burette, pipette, funnel, conical 0.05M FeSO 4 solution 0.01M 40 x2
Given Sample Volumetrically flask, beakers, iron stand, test KMnO 4 solution dilute
tube
H 2 SO 4 , distilled water.
17 Determine the Percentage Composition Burette, pipette, funnel, conical Solution mixture of 40 x2
Volumetrically of a Solution Mixture of flask, beakers, iron stand, test K 2 C 2 O 4 and K 2 SO 4 0.01M
K 2 C 2 O 4 and K 2 SO tube KMnO 4 solution, dilute
H 2 SO 4 , distilled water
18 Determine the Solubility of Mohr’s Salt Burette, pipette, funnel, conical 0.05M Mohr’s salts solution, 40 x2
at Room Temperature Volumetrically. flask, beakers, iron stand, test 0.01M KMnO 4 solution,
tube dilute H 2 SO 4 distilled water

83
Class XII

EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION


CHAPTER 13:S-AND P- BLOCK ELEMENTS
1 Prepare Potassium Xanthate Beakers, funnel, filter paper, Potassium hydroxide, 40x 2
measuring cylinder, safety alcohol, carbon disulphide,
goggles ether (for washing of
crystals), distilled water,
copper sulphate solution
2 .Detect the Following Cations: NH 4 + , Test tubes, test tube holder, test Sodium hydroxide,
Mg 2 + , Al 3+ , Cu 2 + , Zn 2 + , Ba 2 + , Pb 2 + , tube rack, delivery tube, ammonium hydroxide, 40x2
measuring clinder, match box, dilute acids, barium, lead,
Detect the following Anions: CO 3 2 − , wooden splint, Bunsen burner, silver salt solutions, Al foil,
NO 3 , NO 2 , SO 4 2 , SO 3 2 , Cl − , Br − , safety goggles, glass rod, filter lime water and other
I − , CrO 4 2 − Perform Tests for the paper, litmus paper necessary chemical
solutions for the
following Gases: NH 3 , CO 2 , CI 2 , H 2 ,
identification of these ions
O 2 , SO 2 and gases

CHAPTER 14: D-F- BLOCK ELEMENTS


3 Prepare Nickel Dimethyl Glyoxime Test tubes, test tube holder, test Dimethyl glyoxime solution, 40x2
tube rack, measuring clinder, nickel salt solution, distilled
Bunsen burner, safety goggles, water and NH 4 OH
filter paper, funnel

84
EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION
CHAPTER 16: HYDROCARBONS
4 Prepare Ethylene from Ethylene Bromide Test tubes, test tube holder, test Pieces of zinc metal, 40 x2
tubes rack, delivery tube, alcohol, ethylene bromide
measuring cylinder, Bunsen
burner safety goggles
CHAPTER 17: ALKYL HALIDES AND AMINES
5 Prepare Azo dye from Amine Test tubes, test tube rack, test Amine, phenol, 40 x2
tube holder, measuring cylinder, hydrochloric acid, ice,
balance, filter paper, funnel. sodium nitrite, alcohol,
distilled water
6 1. Identify the Amine Functional Test tubes, test tube rack, test Hinsberg test: 40 2
Group. tube holder, measuring cylinder, benzenesulfony chloride,
balance, filter paper, funnel sodium hydroxide, HCl
CHAPTER 18: ALCOHOLS, PHENOLS AND ETHERS
7 Prepare Iodoform. Test tubes, test tube holder, test Alcohol, sodium hydroxide, 40 x2
tube rack, Bunsen burner, safety water, solution of iodine in
goggles potassium iodide
8 Identify the Phenol Function Group. Test tubes, test tube holder, test Litmus solution, Ferric 40 2
tube rack, measuring cylinder, Chloride solution
safety goggles.

85
EXP# OBJECTIVE EQUIPMENT CHEMICALS DURATION
CHAPTER 19: CARBONYL COMPOUNDS I: ALDEHYDES AND KETONES
9 Prepare Glucosazone. Beakers, test tubes, measuring Glucose solution, 2,4 – 40 x 2
cylinder balance, Bunsen burner, dinitrophenyl hydrazine
match box, funnel filter paper solution, distilled water
10 identify the aldehyde and Ketone Beakers, test tubes, measuring Fehling’s solution, Tollen’s 40 x2
functional Group. cylinders, Bunsen burner, match reagent, Benedict solution
box, funnel, filter papers
CHAPTER 20: CARBONYL COMPOUNDS II CARBOXYLIC ACIDS AND FUNCTIONAL
DERIVATIVES.
11 Prepare Benzannilide from Benzoic Beaker, test tubes, measuring Benzoic acid, phosphorous 40 x2
Acid. cylinders, Bunsen burner, match pentachloride, ice, alcohol,
box, funnel, filter paper. distilled water
12 Identify the Carboxylic Acid Functional Test tubes, beakers, balance, Dilute sodium hydroxide 40 x2
Group. measuring cylinders, funnel, filter saturated potassium
paper bicarbonate
CHAPTER 21: BIOCHEMISTRY
13 Detect glucose as reducing sugar in urine Test tubes, beaker conical flask, Benedict Reagent Fehling’s 40 x2
sample of diabetic patients pipette Solution.
14 Detect Protein Urea denaturation Test tubes, beaker conical flask, Urea, egg white 40 x2
pipette
15 Observe the digestion of starch with Test tubes, beakers, conical flask Freshly prepared starch 40 x 2
salivary amylase pipette, slides. solution, iodine solution
16 Determine the lodine number of an oil Test tubes, beakers, conical flask, iodine solution, oil 40 x 2
pipette, beakers

86