Maths success for every child – for life!

Channel 4

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Maths Makes Sense Makes Make es
Developed by Richard Dunne

”Maths Makes Sense is a powerful but simple learning system that enables children to grasp, with complete clarity, the underlying sense of maths.”
Ian Laite, Maths Coordinator and Deputy Head
Maths Makes Sense
See clips of

on our website at www.oxfordprimary.co.uk

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What is Maths Makes Sense?
Maths Makes Sense is a new way of teaching maths that transforms children’s understanding and enthusiasm for maths. It does this through a powerful learning system and proven teaching strategies.

tion, guided practice and p artner teachin g embed learning effec tively, while in tegrated assessment m eans concepts are secure as child ren progress.

Proven teachin g strategies such as direct instruc

ensures clarity of understand ing and purpose for e very child.

A shared, who le maths langua school ge

ren develop a deep understa mathematica nding of l concepts.

Physical actio ns so child

which include cups, cards a nd sticks, create a really hands-on and visible representatio n of maths, so concepts are clear to a ll learners.

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taught logically and consisten tly throughou the school en t sure all childre n understand and apply ma ths effectively .

Ten big ideas

What is the M Sense learnin aths Makes g system?

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“We have seen increased enthusiasm from pupils for the subject and it has had a huge impact on children’s confidence in maths. The children seem to have a much deeper understanding of important concepts. It has also increased teacher’s enthusiasm for teaching maths. Pupils, after a short time of Maths Makes Sense, have shown confidence and pride in their work. They have been able to say ‘I am good at Maths - I love Maths’ and mean it.
William Curtis, Maths Coordinator, Bryn Primary

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Maths Makes Sense Make Makes es

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Maths Ma kes ke kes Sense es

www.oxfordprimary.co.uk

Contents
Maths Makes Sense Foundation
Daily lesson plan - Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Maths Makes Sense Makes Make es
Maths Makes Sense 3
Planning charts from Teacher’s Guide - please see Maths Makes Sense 1 for the style of the planning charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 Daily Lesson Plan – Arithmetic 1. . . . . . . . . 39-40 Screenshot - Question Time! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Daily Lesson Plan - Geometry . . . . . . . . . . 42-43 Screenshot – Question Time! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Screenshot – Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Daily Lesson Plan - Data and Measure . . 47-48 Screenshot – Question Time! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Screenshot – Drawing a Circle . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Daily Lesson Plan – Arithmetic 2 . . . . . . . . 52-53 Activities from Progress Book 3A . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Screenshot – Fractions and Word Problems . . 56 Daily Lesson Plan - Reasoning. . . . . . . . . . 57-58 Screenshot – Question Time! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Screenshot – Real-life Stories for Division. . . . . 60 Activities from Progress Book 3A . . . . . . . . . . . 61

Maths Makes Sense 1
Planning chart from Teacher’s Guide . . . . . . . . . 9 Planning charts from Teacher’s Guide . . . . . 10-11 Daily lesson plan – Arithmetic 1 . . . . . . . . . . 12-13 Screenshot – Oval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Screenshot – Adding and Taking Away . . . . . . . 16 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Daily lesson plan – Geometry. . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 Screenshot – Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Screenshot – Clock Face . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Screenshot – Open and Closed Shapes. . . . . . 22 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Daily lesson plan – Data and Measure . . . 24-25 Screenshot – 2D Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Screenshot – Making Open and Closed Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Daily lesson plan – Arithmetic 2 . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Screenshot – Adding and Taking Away . . . . . . 30 Screenshot – Adding and Taking Away . . . . . . . 31 Activities from Progress Book 1A. . . . . . . . . . 32-33 Daily lesson plan – Arithmetic 1 . . . . . . . . . 34-35 Screenshot – 0-99 Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Screenshot – Adding and Taking Away . . . . . . .37 Photocopiable master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Maths Makes Sense Component Chart . . . . . 62 Maths Makes Sense Testimonials . . . . . . . . . . 63

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide Foundation.

Block 1
Resources

Counting
End-of-week objectives

Week 4
Count and match arrangements of up to six items, e.g. dots on dominoes Count beyond ten in everyday contexts, e.g. footsteps and pennies.

Clear pot of 30 real pennies, large domino floor set

Clear pot of 10–30 pennies

Daily warm-up
Count footsteps Count footsteps each day, e.g. in from the playground, from the hall, down the corridor. Count forwards and backwards making sure each step matches the counting. Praise counting at every opportunity.

CD
DVD

Count pennies (0–30) Show children a clear pot of ten real pennies. Say: This is Baby Bear’s money. He wants us to count the pennies for him. Pour the pennies into your hand and count each penny back into the pot. Make sure all children are counting with you. Use individuals who are uncertain about counting to come to the front and help you count the pennies into the pot. Teacher How many pennies did we count? Children Ten. Teacher How much is there here? Encircle the pot. My turn, your turn: ten pennies. Children Ten pennies. Continue counting pennies during the rest of the week. Increase the number to 15, 20, 25, and 30. By the end of the week, the number of pennies could be increased to match the number of children, so that 1p could be counted out to each child and back again.

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Script

Large floor domino set

Main teaching
Direct instruction
Sit children in a large circle. Introduce the large floor dominoes. Show children that a domino has two sides, then the dots on the tiles. Start with the two–one tile.

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This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide Foundation.

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Script
CD
DVD

Teacher How many dots can you see on this side of the domino? Point to each dot. Children Two. Teacher How many dots can you see on this side of the domino? Point to the dot. Children One. Repeat for other domino tiles, including doubles. Teacher To start our game of dominoes I’m going to give you one domino each. Give each child a domino tile. Keep back the double six. Teacher Put your domino on the floor in front of you so we can all see it and wait for me to start the game. Does anyone have a six on one side and a six on the other? Look carefully and count the dots. Children You do! Teacher Oh yes! Count with me: One, two, three, four, five, six on this side. One, two, three, four, five, six on this side! We always start the game with a double six – the domino with six dots on each side. Place the six-six domino tile in the middle of the circle. Does anyone have a domino with six dots on one side? As children are checking, walk around the circle and six. check for domino tiles with a six You’ve got a six, you’ve got a six. Teacher Choose a child to pick up their domino and place it end to end with the double six. What we are going to do now is make a long train of matching dominoes. Does anyone have a 6 or a [number]? Say the number at the other end of the train. Continue to match tiles to either end of the train. Complete the train for as many tiles as possible. If there are dominoes left over, count all the dots on the left-over dominoes and say how many there are. Play the game once more. Throughout the week, continue to play the domino game. As children become more confident with the rules of the game and counting dots, expect them to start the game without your help and identify which tiles could be placed at either end.

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children, ask them to share dominoes for this game.

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? i Six children should have a
domino tile with a six.

Review
Together, tidy up the domino train. Ask a child to fetch a particular domino and add it to a pile, e.g. Would you fetch me the three-one domino? It’s next to the one-five domino.

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This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide Foundation.

CD
DVD

Group work
Getting started
Area 1: outdoor Tell children the three bears want to build an
extension for Baby Bear’s new bedroom. Say there are lots of different sorts of bricks outside to help them do this.
PCM 6

Resources
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PB Construction brick sets (large and small), pot of real pennies, dominoes (include floor and shape dominoes), plastic counters, real pennies, pots and purses, coloured pencils, table domino set

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Area 2: role play Make sure children see you place Baby Bear’s
pot of pennies into the bears’ cottage and suggest they count his pennies.

Area 3: floor Show children the floor and shape domino sets. Also show them the pots and purses for counting counters and real pennies in and out of. Area 4: table Show PCM 6. Show children how they need to count the number of objects, count the number of dots on each domino, and then add dots to match. Area 5: guided practice Say that they will be playing another game
of dominoes.

Look, listen and note:
reactions to new activities, understanding that for some children such experiences can be both exciting and worrying Personal, Social and Emotional Development ways in which children use language in their pretend and imaginary play. Communication, Language and Literacy

Construction brick sets

Area 1: outdoor
Independent Children build and position a house extension for Baby
Bear’s bedroom.

Guided Help children decide where to build Baby Bear’s new
bedroom. Talk about how high and wide the room will be. Say, for example: We mustn’t forget to have a window. Where shall we put it? Where will the bed go? Count out loud the number of bricks used. It may be possible for children to work with the role-play group to move all of Baby Bear’s furniture to the new bedroom.

Steps for assessment Note the level of assistance needed to:
use positional language when deciding where to put the construction pieces count how many bricks they use.
Pot of real pennies

Area 2: role play
Independent Children count Baby Bear’s pot of money. Guided Count out loud the pennies as you take them out/put them
back into the pot. Make sure children keep to the correct sequence of counting. Say that, as Baby Bear has a new bedroom, you need to count the things he needs to put into his new room, e.g. one bed, three toys. Help children write a list, if appropriate.

Steps for assessment Note the level of assistance needed to:

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count each penny as it is put back into the pot
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This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide Foundation.

Dominoes, real pennies, pots and purses

say the total amount of pennies (up to 30) correctly.

Area 3: oor
Independent Children play dominoes or count pennies or counters
into a pot or a purse.

Guided Organise a game of dominoes; play with the whole group
or individuals. Repeat the game rules. Play a number of games and encourage children to play independently. Help children count the counters and pennies accurately (out loud and in sequence).

Steps for assessment Note the level of assistance needed to:
CD
DVD

match dots on dominoes to make trains recognise the order they need to complete steps to play a game successfully
PCM 6

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count pennies and counters (up to 30) accurately.

PB Coloured pencils

Area 4: table
Independent Children complete PCM 6. Guided For each question, count out loud the number of objects and
then the number of dots on the domino. Say, for example: There are six apples but only five dots. We need to draw some more dots. If I draw one more, do I have enough dots? Count the dots after you have drawn one to help children answer the question.

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Steps for assessment Note the level of assistance needed to:
count the dots (1–6) accurately on each domino
Table domino set

CD
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count the number of objects (1–6) and draw more dots to match the number.

Area 5: guided practice
Explain that they are going to play dominoes again, but these dominoes are smaller. Give out the dominoes as before, including yourself. This time each child will have more than one. Make sure dominoes are face up. Begin and continue the game in the same way as the class game. Count all the dots on any remaining dominoes together. Say with children: This time we’ve got [number] dots left! Repeat the game.

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checking their dominoes as the game develops.

Steps for assessment Note the level of assistance needed to:
count the dots (0-6) accurately on each domino match dots on other dominoes to make a train.

Review
Ask each group who have made a bedroom for Baby Bear to show the rest of the class and talk about their model, e.g. where the door and window are, where Baby Bear’s bed will be.

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This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Foundation, for children to complete.

PCM

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Name

Date

Count and draw. 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Maths Makes Sense F • Block 1 • Week 4 • Counting
© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

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Count the objects and dots. Draw dots to make the number of objects and dots match

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This is a planning chart from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.
Maths Makes Sense 1 Arithmetic 1

Medium-term Planning:

End-of-Block Objectives

Arithmetic 1

Block 1 Arithmetic 1 | End-of-block objectives
1 1 • Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + — + — = 3 2 2 1 1 • Act the Real Story for addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + — + — = 3 2 2

• Look at a Maths Story and read what it says, e.g. two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups.
Lesson 1 | Steps for assessment Lesson 2 | Steps for assessment • point to the Resources Table and the Maths Table when asked and use the add action when asked and to Get ready to get some more • count the cups out loud when asked to Look at the Maths Table and count • say [number] cups when asked How much is there here? • count the cups, gather them together and slide them from the pupil Resources Table to the pupil Maths Table • clear the pupil Maths Table by sliding the cups to the pupil Resources Table • read the written instructions, e.g. 3 + 2 = 5 to act the Real Story with pupil cups. Lesson 3 | Steps for assessment • copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, including 0, as the Real Story is acted. Lesson 4 | Steps for assessment • copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + — + — = 3 2 2 • act the Real Story with addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + — + — = 3 2 2 • look at a Maths Story and read what it says, e.g. two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups. Lesson 3 | Daily practice • Count on and back in ones on a 0–99 grid • Find one more than and add one on the 0–99 grid • Find one less than and take away one on the 0–99 grid. Lesson 4 | Daily practice • Practise writing numbers 6 mm tall
1 1 • Practise writing — and — 2 4 9 mm tall.

Lesson 5 Individual Assessment

Lesson 1 | Daily practice • Practise writing numbers 9 mm tall.

Lesson 2 | Daily practice • Count on and back in ones on a 0–99 grid • Find one more than and add one on the 0–99 grid • Find one less than and taking away one on the 0–99 grid.

Lesson 5 | Daily practice • Count on and back in ones on a 0–99 grid • Find one more than and add one on a 0–99 grid • Find one less than and take away one on a 0–99 grid.

Block 2 Arithmetic 1 | End-of-block objectives
• Copy a written addition Maths Story with multiples of ten, a hundred or a thousand, e.g. 200 + 500 = 700 • Look at an addition Maths Story with multiples of ten, a hundred or a thousand and read what it says, e.g two (pause) hundred, add five (pause) hundred, equals seven (pause) hundred.
Lesson 1 | Steps for assessment Lesson 2 | Steps for assessment • look at an addition Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers to say related Maths Stories using multiples of a thousand • look at an addition Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers to say related Maths Stories using multiples of a hundred. • read an addition Maths Story with multiples of a thousand or a hundred, e.g. four (pause) hundred, add two (pause) hundred, equals six (pause) hundred • copy an addition Maths Story with a multiple of a hundred or a thousand, e.g. 400 + 200 = 600. Lesson 3 | Steps for assessment • look at an addition Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers and say the related Maths Stories using a multiple of ten • look at an addition Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers and copy the related Maths Stories using a multiple of ten. Lesson 4 | Steps for assessment • copy written addition Maths Stories using multiples of ten, a hundred or a thousand, e.g. 40 + 20 = 60 • read addition Maths Stories using multiples of ten, a hundred or a thousand, e.g. four (pause) ty, (pause) add (pause) two (pause) ty, (pause) equals (pause) six (pause) ty. Lesson 4 | Daily practice • Count on in ones from 3-digit whole numbers • Find one more than and add one for 3-digit whole numbers. Lesson 5 | Daily practice • Count back in ones for 3-digit whole numbers • Find one less than and take away one for 3-digit whole numbers. Lesson 5 Individual Assessment

Lesson 1 | Daily practice • Count on and back in ones on a 0–99 grid • Find one more than and add one on a 0–99 grid.

Lesson 2 | Daily practice • Find one more than and add one on a 0–99 grid • Find one more than and add one with 3-digit whole numbers.

Lesson 3 | Daily practice • Count on and back in ones on a 0–99 grid • Find one less than and take away one on a 0–99 grid • Find one less than and take away one for 3-digit numbers.

Maths Makes Sense Year 1 • planning

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This is how Maths Makes Sense maps to the renewed Framework

Maths Makes Sense and the Renewed
Arithmetic 1
S1 Using and applying mathematics S1.1. Solve problems involving counting, adding, subtracting, doubling or halving in the context of numbers, measures or money, for example to ‘pay’ and ‘give change’ S1.2. Describe a puzzle or problem using numbers, practical materials and diagrams; use these to solve the problem and set the solution in the original context S1.3. Answer a question by selecting and using suitable equipment, and sorting information, shapes or objects; display results using tables and pictures S1.4. Describe simple patterns and relationships involving numbers or shapes; decide whether examples satisfy given conditions S1.5. Describe ways of solving puzzles and problems, explaining choices and decisions orally or using pictures
S2 Counting and understanding number

Geometry
L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5

Data and Measure
L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1

Arithmetic 2
L2 L3 L4 L5 L1

Reasoning
L2 L3 L4 L5

L1

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L4

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

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S2.1. Count reliably at least 20 objects, recognising that when rearranged the number of objects stays the same; estimate a number of objects that can be checked by counting S2.2. Compare and order numbers, using the related vocabulary; use the equals (=) sign S2.3. *Read and write numerals from 0 to 20, then beyond; use knowledge of place value to position these numbers on a number track and number line S2.4. Say the number that is 1 more or less than any given number, and 10 more or less for multiples of 10 S2.5. Use the vocabulary of halves and quarters in context S3 Knowing and using number facts S3.1. * Derive and recall all pairs of numbers with a total of 10 and addition facts for totals to at least 5; work out the corresponding subtraction facts S3.2. Count on or back in ones, twos, fives and tens and use this knowledge to derive the multiples of 2, 5 and 10 to the tenth multiple S3.3. Recall the doubles of all numbers to at least 10 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks. Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.
Key to symbols:

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Maths Makes Sense Year 1 • planning

= Objective covered in Daily practice

= Objective covered in Main teaching

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This is how Maths Makes Sense maps to the renewed Framework

Framework for Mathematics
Arithmetic 1
S4 Calculating - Year 1 S4.1. Relate addition to counting on; recognise that addition can be done in any order; use practical and informal written methods to support the addition of a one-digit number or a multiple of 10 to a one-digit or two-digit number S4.2. Understand subtraction as 'take away' and find a 'difference' by counting up; use practical and informal written methods to support the subtraction of a one-digit number from a one digit or two-digit number and a multiple of 10 from a two-digit number S4.3. * Use the vocabulary related to addition and subtraction and symbols to describe and record addition and subtraction number sentences S4.4. Solve practical problems that involve combining groups of 2, 5 or 10, or sharing into equal groups
S5 Understanding shape

Block 1
Arithmetic 2 Reasoning
L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L2 L3 L4

Geometry
L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5

Data and Measure
L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1

L1

L2

L3

L4

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.
L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L1 L2 L3 L4 L5

S5.1. *Visualise and name common 2-D shapes and 3-D solids and describe their features; use them to make patterns, pictures and models S5.2. Identify objects that turn about a point (e.g. scissors) or about a line (e.g. a door ); recognise and make whole, half and quarter turns S5.3. Visualise and use everyday language to describe the position of objects and direction and distance when moving them, for example when placing or moving objects on a game board
S6 Measuring

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

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S6.1. *Estimate, measure, weigh and compare objects, choosing and using suitable uniform non-standard or standard units and measuring instruments (e.g. a lever balance, metre stick or measuring jug) S6.2. Use vocabulary related to time; order days of the week and months; read the time to the hour and half hour
S7 Handling data

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S7.1. *Answer a question by recording information in lists and tables; present outcomes using practical resources, pictures, block graphs or pictograms S7.2. Use diagrams to sort objects into groups according to a given criterion; suggest a different criterion for grouping the same objects

Note: This objective is covered in later blocks.

Maths Makes Sense Year 1 • planning

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This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Block 1
Resources
CD
DVD Daily practice

Arithmetic 1
Daily practice
Practise writing numbers 6 mm tall

Lesson 4

CD Display: Oval Template
DVD PCM
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CD PCM 6

Give one copy of PCM 6 to each child. Display Oval Template and model with children writing numbers 0–9 on PCM 6. Support individuals with their number formation, particularly number 8. Continually praise children for their accurately formed numbers.

DVD PB Main teaching
PCM CD Activity 9 C

DVD PCM PB

Resources Table, Maths Table

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PCM 7 Whole cups, half cups, quarter cups, pupil tables, pupil whole cups, pupil half cups, pupil quarter cups

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PCM

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End-of-block objectives
Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole 1 1 numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
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Act the Real Story for addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
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Look at a Maths Story and read what it says, e.g. two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole 1 1 numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
— —

act the Real Story with addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
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look at a Maths Story and read what it says, for example two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups. Monitor the children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! A half and a quarter are deliberately used as names, or nouns, at this stage.

Main teaching
Guided practice
Give PCM 7 to each child, together with pupil tables, pupil whole cups, half cups and quarter cups. Display Activity 9, question 1 (2 + 1 + 2 =). Say: Look at question one. We are going to copy it very carefully while I act the Real Story. Tell children to watch you carefully as you act the Real Story and reveal each symbol in the Maths Story. Ask children to copy each number and symbol on their PCM.

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This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1. . Ask children to Look at the Maths Table and count. Agree the answer is 5. Ask: How much is there here? Make sure children say: five cups. Reveal the answer to check. When the Maths Story is fully displayed, say: Look at the Maths Story. Read what it says. Use My turn, your turn. Say: Two, add one, add two, equals five. Say: Look at the Maths Story. Read what it means. Use My turn, your turn. Say: Two cups, add one cup, add two cups, equals five cups. Make sure all children join in.
1 ‘A half’, and 2 , is the name of an object. There should be no mention at this stage of ‘cutting’ or ‘dividing’ or ‘halving’.

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Direct instruction
1 1 Repeat the modelling with Activity 9, question 2 (2 − 1 + 2 + 2 − 0 =). 1 Reveal ‘ 2 ’. Pick up a half cup from the Resources Table. Ask: How much is there here? Use My turn, your turn. Say: A half cup. Ask: What are you going to write? Use My turn, your turn. Say: A half. Say: Look carefully at how we write it. Write on the board as you say: Start at the top (write 1) and go down (write horizontal line for fraction) and go down (write 2).
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Pretending to glue cups
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PCM

PB

Continue to the end of the Maths Story. Reveal ‘=’, raise your finger and count. When you reach the first half cup, stop in surprise. Say: Ooo! (Point to each half cup in turn.) But this is not a cup and this is not a cup! Pick up the two half cups. We need the mathematical . glue. Pretend to glue the two halves together to make a whole cup. Glue… glue… glue… stick! That’s a cup. Same Value, Different Appearance Appearance. Finish counting and reveal the answer. Make sure children have copied the Maths Story. Say: Look at the Maths Story. Read what it says. Look at the Maths Story. Read what it means. Use My turn, your turn for all children to join in with the responses.
1 1 1 1 Repeat with Activity 9, question 3 (3 + 2 + 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 ). 1 1 Demonstrate writing 4 in the same way as 2 . Pretend to glue the four quarter cups together to make a whole cup. Let the cup fall apart and say: One cup. Same Value: Different Appearance.
— — — — — —

i The? imaginary gluing really
helps understanding. Children especially like Ooo ... the glue as a reminder.

1 1 1 Repeat the modelling with question 4 (2 − 1 + 2 + 4 + 4 ), pretending to glue the two quarter cups together first to make a half cup and then glue to the half cup to make a whole cup.
— — —

Partner teaching
Say: Let’s see if you can teach this to your partner. I’m looking for accurate teaching today! Model how you want Partner As to act the Real Story for question 2. Then observe closely as you ask all Partner As to act the Real Story to teach Partner Bs. Then Partner Bs act the same Real Story. Continue for questions 3 and 4, with partners swapping roles after each question. Check the steps for assessment as you monitor the teaching partners. If Partner Bs need more support, go back to Partner As teaching. If Partner As need more support, repeat the Direct instruction above.

Review
Hold up a half cup or quarter cup and ask: How much is there here? Ensure all children say a half cup or a quarter cup. Speed up and alternate between half and quarter cups to quicken responses.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide Foundation, for children to complete.

PCM

6

Name

Date

Copy.

Take care!

Maths Makes Sense 1 • Block 1 • Lesson 4 • Daily practice
© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Write 6 mm numbers

15

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

16
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1, for children to complete.

PCM

7

Name

Date

Copy.

Take care!

1. 2 + 1 + 2 = 5 1. 2 + 1 + 2 = 5
1 1 2. 2 − 1 + — + — – 0 = 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 3. 3 + 2 + — + — + — + — = 6 4 4 4 4

1 1 1 4. 2 − 1 + — + — + — = 2 2 4 4

Maths Makes Sense 1 • Block 1 • Lesson 4 • Arithmetic 1
© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories accurately, including fractions

17

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Block 1
Resources
Daily practice

Geometry
Daily practice
Count days and dates on a calendar

Lesson 4

CD Display: Calendar 1
DVD CD

CD Display: Clock Face

Main teaching
PCM CD Activity 10

DVD
C

Display Calendar 1 and model with the class counting on a calendar. Say: Let’s count from one to thirty together. Point to each number in turn as you count. Say: Let’s count the dates - first of April; second of April… Point to each number and the word ‘April’ as you count. Say: Now, let’s count the days and dates – Thursday, first of April; Friday, second of April... Point to each day and date as you count. Use different start dates and stop dates. Play a game of pointing to a day at random for the class to say the complete day and date. Count hours on a clock face Display Clock Face. Say: Let’s count from one to twelve together. Point to each number in turn and count together. Now say: Let’s count the o’clocks, (point to each number) one o’clock, two o’clock… Play a game of pointing to numbers at random for the class to say the o’clock number.

DVD PCM PCM PB
C

PCM 8

PB Metre ruler, 15 cm ruler per child PCM

i i i
C

PB

? ? ?

End-of-block objectives
Draw straight lines by joining named dots using a ruler, e.g. draw line AB Use a ruler to draw open or closed shapes by joining named dots, e.g. draw closed shape ABCD.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: draw straight lines between named dots to form open or closed shapes, e.g. ABCD. Monitor the children and check this step for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! Work on ruler skills will now become more complex. This lesson focuses on drawing shapes.

Main teaching
Guided practice
A C B D
An open shape

Display Activity 10, question 1 (open shape ABCD). Give PCM 8 and a ruler to each child. Say: Question one says draw open shape ABCD. Let’s draw each line with a finger first to make the open shape ABCD. Use My turn, your turn with the class. Say: Draw open shape ABCD. Children copy the speech.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

C

PCM

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1. Say: AB. Run a finger from A to B on the board. Children copy the speech and the action on their PCM. Click ‘next’ to reveal line AB. Say: BC. Run a finger from B to C. Children copy the speech and the action on their PCM. Reveal line BC. Say: CD. Run a finger from C to D. Children copy the speech and the action on their PCM. Reveal line CD. Say: Oh no! There is no more drawing because it has to be an open shape. Repeat the script above for question 2 but, this time, say: We must draw DA because it has to be a closed shape. Return to questions 1 and 2. Run your finger along AB and say: Draw straight line AB. Remind children how to use their rulers and model for them if necessary. Reveal each line in turn and give the class enough time to draw each line accurately.

PB

? i Open shape ABCD starts at A
and finishes at D. Do not join D to A as this would make it a closed shape.

Partner teaching
Say: Let’s see if you can teach this to your partner. I’m looking for accurate teaching today! Display questions 3 and 4 and model drawing the lines with a ruler to make open and closed shapes XYZ. Model how you want Partner As to run a finger from X to Y on their PCM and say: Draw straight line XY to teach Partner Bs where to draw the line. Ask Partner Bs to draw straight line XY with a ruler to teach Partner As.
CD
DVD

Now ask Partner As to complete teaching question 3. Partners swap roles. Ask Partner Bs to teach question 4. If Partner Bs need support, go back to Partner As teaching. If Partner As need more support, repeat the Guided practice. Check the steps for assessment as you monitor the teaching partners.

C

PCM

PB

i ?
Script

Review
Display Activity 10, screen 5. Only use My turn, your turn if necessary. Teacher Is shape one an open or closed shape? Turn to your partner and tell me. Children Open. Teacher Is question two an open or closed shape? Turn to your partner and tell me. Children Closed. Repeat for the shapes on Activity 10, screen 6.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

20
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

21
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

22
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1, for children to complete.

PCM

8

Name

Date

1. Draw open shape ABCD. A B

2. Draw closed shape ABCD. A

C 3. Draw open shape XYZ. X Z 4. Draw closed shape XYZ.
Keep the ruler still!

Y
Maths Makes Sense 1 • Block 1 • Lesson 4 • Geometry
© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Draw open and closed shapes by joining dots with a ruler

23

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Block 1
Resources
Daily practice

Data and Measure
Daily practice
Identify and name 2D shapes

Lesson 4

CD Display: 2D Shapes 3
DVD 2D shapes (triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons and hexagons)
C CD Main teaching
PCM

Display 2D Shapes 3. Also show children 2D models of triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons and hexagons. Say: This grid shows the number of sides each of the shapes has. Model with the 2D shapes how to count the sides of each shape by running a finger along each side (rather than pointing to each side). Point to the cells in the grid and read the name of shape and number of sides together. Repeat a number of times so that all shapes are discussed.

PB DVD CD DVD
PCM

Activity 6 Pupil Tables, dm sticks

C

i ?
C
PCM PB

PB

End-of-block objectives
Make shapes with dm sticks from written instructions specifying the number of sides, number of sticks and whether the shape should be open or closed Find the length of a shape by counting dm sticks Find the perimeter, in decimetres, of a closed shape made with dm sticks. Say that open shapes do not have a perimeter.

i ? i ?

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: make shapes with dm sticks from written instructions specifying the number of sides, number of sticks and whether the shape should be open or closed find the length of a shape by counting dm sticks find the perimeter in decimetres for closed shapes recognise that open shapes do not have a perimeter. Monitor the children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! Vocabulary makes further learning accessible. We use the vocabulary long, far, distance and total length persistently.

Main teaching
Guided practice
Give a pupil table to each pair with eight dm sticks placed on the Resources Table side. Secure eight sticks to a pupil Resources Table with modelling clay to model at the front of the class. Say: Partners work together. Display Activity 6, question 1 (3 sticks, 3 sides, open). Use My turn, your turn to make this shape with both partners working together each time.

24

Say: I need three sticks. Move three sticks from the pupil Resources
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Table to the pupil Maths Table. Children copy speech and slide three sticks. Say: I must make three sides. Place the sticks end to end to make an open shape. Children copy speech and action. Say: It has got to be open. It is! Children copy speech. Run a finger along each of the three sides in turn and say: This side is one decimetre long. Children copy action and speech. Run a finger from one end of the shape to the other. Say: This shape is three decimetres long. Children copy action and speech.
An open shape

Ask each of the following questions one by one: How long is this shape? How far is it from one end to the other? What is the distance from one end to the other? What is the total length of the sticks? What is the total length of the sides? Children answer each time: three decimetres. Repeat the modelling with Activity 6, question 2 (3 sticks, 3 sides, closed). Run a finger all round the closed shape and repeat the questions above for all children to reply: three decimetres. Now run your finger around the shape again and ask: What is the perimeter of this shape? Children respond chorally: three decimetres. Remake the (open) shape for question 1. Say: This is an open shape. If I say ‘What is the perimeter of this shape?’ you have to say ‘It hasn’t got one’. It is only the closed shapes which have a perimeter.

A closed shape

In all subsequent questions, whether the shape is open or closed, make sure partners include the question What is the perimeter of this shape? so that children get used to saying It hasn’t got one when the shape is open, and giving the perimeter when it is closed.

Partner teaching
Say: Let’s see if you can teach this to your partner. I’m looking for accurate teaching today! Model how you want Partner As to slide the correct number of sticks onto the Maths Table, and make the correct shape to teach Partner Bs. Say: When you have made the shape, Partner A asks Partner B ‘What is the perimeter of this shape?’ Observe closely as Partner As do the teaching for Activity 6, questions 3–5. Partners swap roles for Activity 6, questions 6–8. Keep all pairs working at the same rate to ensure accuracy. Monitor especially for the answer It hasn’t got one (to the question What is the perimeter of this shape?) when the shape is open. If Partner As need more support, repeat the Guided practice above. If Partner Bs need more support, go back to Partner As teaching. Check the steps for assessment as you monitor the teaching partners.

25
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

26
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

27
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Block 1
CD
DVD

Arithmetic 2
Daily practice

Lesson 4

Resources
Daily practice C
PCM

PB

Progress Book 1A, pages 8-9 Activity 12 Pupil tables, pupil whole cups, pupil half cups, pupil quarter cups

Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with fractions accurately Give out the Progress Books to each child and ask children to open at page 8 and write the date. Ask children to complete page 8 by copying the Maths Stories accurately. Remind children how to copy Maths Stories symbol by symbol. Help them to copy the fractions if necessary. Draw open and closed shapes and name 2D shapes Ask children to complete page 9 by following the instructions to draw open and closed shapes. Remind children how to use a ruler to draw a straight line between the named dots. Support individuals where necessary. Praise children for their neatness and accuracy. Ask children to TTYP and check each other’s work.

Main teaching CD
CD DVD
DVD

i ?
PCM PCM

C

Resources Table, Maths Table, PB lined exercise books

PB C

i ? i ?

End-of-block objectives
Look at a Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter and read what it says, e.g. three, add a half, add a half, add zero, equals four Look at a Maths Story with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter and read what it means, e.g. three cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, add zero cups, equals four cups Act the Real Story using addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 3 + 2 + 2 + 0 = 4.
— —

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: act the Real Story at pupil tables in response to I will write the Maths Story. You act the Real Story for addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers including zero, a half 1 1 1 and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 4 + 4 − 0 = 3
— — —

copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole 1 1 1 numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 4 + 4 − 0 = 3.
— — —

Monitor the children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! Half cups and quarter cups were introduced in Block 1, Arithmetic 1, Lesson 4.

28
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Main teaching
Guided practice
Use Activity 12, question 1 (2 + 1 + 2 = 5). Give a pupil table, whole cups, half cups and quarter cups to each pair. Give each child a lined exercise book. Partner As will act as the teacher and write the Maths Story for Partner Bs to act the Real Story. Then they will swap roles. Say: Partner As. You will be the teacher, like me. I will write the Maths Story. You copy it in your exercise books. Reveal ‘2’. Monitor Partner As for accurate copying. Say: Partner Bs. You act the Real Story. Monitor Partner Bs for accurate sliding of two cups. Reveal ‘+’. Monitor Partner As for accurate copying. Say: Partner Bs. You act the Real Story. Monitor Partner Bs for accurate raising of hands. Continue to reveal the symbols and monitor the children for accurate writing and acting. When you reveal the equals sign and Partner As write it, make sure Partner Bs briefly act counting by wiggling a finger at the Maths Table before they actually count: One, two, three, four, five. Then show them how to use two hands to encircle all the cups on the Maths Table and say: five cups. Reveal ‘5’ for Partner As to copy. Partner Bs clear the Maths Table. Partners swap roles. Reset question 1 and reveal it again symbol by symbol, for Partner Bs to copy the Maths Story and Partner As to act the Real Story. Monitor the writing and acting closely as before. Continue in exactly the same way so that both partners write the Maths Story and act the Real Story for Activity 12, questions 2–4.

CD
DVD

C

PCM

PB

? i Monitor children carefully for
accurate writing and acting.

Partner teaching
For Activity 12, questions 5–8, explain that the partner who is writing is teaching the partner who is acting. Say: Let’s see if you can teach this to your partner. I’m looking for accurate teaching! Ask all Partner As to be the teacher and write the Maths Story for question 5. Tell Partner B that they must look at the writing that Partner A is doing to act the Real Story. Only Partner A should look at the board. Reveal Activity 12, question 5 (3 − 0 + 2 + 2 = 7) symbol by symbol and observe closely as children write the Maths Story and act the Real Story. Take care that when a partner writes a symbol, the other partner acts the Real Story while looking at their partner’s writing, not the question on the board. Partners swap roles to repeat question 5. Continue for questions 6–8, swapping roles so that both partners write the Maths Story and act the Real Story each question. If Partner As need more support, repeat the Guided practice above. If Partner Bs need more support, go back to Partner As teaching. Check the steps for assessment as you monitor the teaching partners.

29
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

30
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

These are activities from Maths Makes Sense Progress Book 1A, for children to complete.

Take care!

1 — 2 1 — 2 1 — 2

1 — 2 1 — 2 1 — 2

1 — 4

1 — 4

1 — 2

1 — 2

1 — 2

1 — 2

1 — 4

1 — 2

1 — 4

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These are activities from Maths Makes Sense Progress Book 1A, for children to complete.

B

D

C

B

Remember to draw a closed shape!

D

C

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

Block 1
Resources
Daily practice

Arithmetic 1
Daily practice
Count on back in ones on a 0–99 grid

Lesson 5

CD Display: 0-99 Grid

Individual assessment
CD Activity 14
DVD PCM
C

DVD

Display 0–99 Grid. Model counting forwards from zero in ones with the class, stopping at 28. Repeat with different finishing points but always start at 0. Point to the number 28 and model with the class how to count backwards, stopping at 0. Count with the children. Repeat with different starting points but always stop at 0. Praise children for counting clearly and accurately. Find one more than and add one on a 0–99 grid Point to 6 on the 0–99 Grid. Ask: What’s one more than six? You say seven. Point to 7. What’s six add one? You say seven. Point to 7. Repeat with different 1-digit numbers and ensure all children are joining in. Find one less than and take away 1 on a 0–99 grid Point to 5 on the 0–99 Grid. Ask: What’s one less than six? You say five. Point to 5. What’s six take away one? Point to 5. Repeat with different 1-digit numbers and ensure all children are joining in.

PCM 9 Whole cups

PB

PCM Resources Table, Maths Table C

i ? i ?
PB

End-of-block objectives
Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole 1 1 numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
— —

Act the Real Story for addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
— —

Look at a Maths Story and read what it says, e.g. two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups.

Individual assessment
Assessment notes
In this lesson, each child will be individually assessed using the end-of-block objectives. Don’t forget! These objectives summarise the learning that has taken place during this block – and this learning builds up over the year. Tell the children that we are going to celebrate how clever we are at copying the Maths Story, acting the Real Story and reading what a Maths Story says and means. Make sure the few children who need support are sitting near you, so you can help them throughout the assessment.

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Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

C

PCM

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1.

PB

? i Children continue to practise
their skills during the Individual assessment lesson. Provide the support they need and record the level.

Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole 1 1 numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
— —

Give PCM 9 to each child and display a copy. Say: Look at the first Maths Story. You’re going to copy it accurately. Indicate on the PCM where it should be copied. Say: When you have finished question one, carry on with copying the rest of the questions. Remember to copy each one accurately. Stop the class as some children finish question 8, even though some children may not have finished. Collect in the PCMs for marking after the lesson. For children who can complete at least three quarters of the questions correctly, record I (Independent). For children who need your support, record M (Moderate level of assistance) or H (High level of assistance). See section xx for guidance. Act the Real Story using addition and subtraction Maths Stories with 1-digit whole numbers, zero, a half and a quarter, 1 1 e.g. 2 + 2 + 2 = 3
— —

Look at a Maths Story and read what it says, e.g. two, add a half, add a half, equals three. Look at a Maths Story and read . what it means, e.g. two cups, add a half cup, add a half cup, equals three cups. Say: Partner As, I will write the Maths Story. You act the Real Story. 1 1 Reveal Activity 14, question 1 (2 − 0 + 2 + 2 − 0 = 3) symbol by symbol. Monitor closely as Partner As act the Real Story and Partner Bs watch.
— —

When ‘=’ is revealed, wait for Partner As to wiggle their fingers at the Maths Table and count the cups before revealing the answer and asking: How much is there here? Say: Partner As, look at the Maths Story. Read what it says. Look at the Maths Story. Read what it means. Monitor closely as Partner As respond chorally. Continue with partners in the same roles for question 2 1 1 1 (2 + 4 + 2 + 4 + 1 = 4).
— — —

Say: Partner Bs, I will write the Maths Story. You act the Real Story. Reveal question 3 (3 − 0 + 4 + 2 = 9) symbol by symbol. Monitor closely as Partner Bs act the Real Story and Partner As watch. When ‘=’ is revealed, wait for Partner Bs to wiggle their fingers at the Maths Table and count the cups before revealing the answer and asking: How much is there here? Say: Partner Bs, look at the Maths Story. Read what it says. Look at the Maths Story. Read what it means. Monitor closely as Partner Bs respond chorally. Continue with partners in these roles for question 4 1 1 (2 − 1 + 2 + 1 + 2 = 3).
— —

Monitor children’s work closely and judge whether to record I: Independent, M: Moderate level of assistance or H: High level of assistance. See section xx for guidance.

35
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

36
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 1. Use on the interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

37
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 1, for children to complete.

PCM

9

Name

Date

Copy.

Take care!

1. 2 + 2 + 2 = 6 1. 2 + 2 + 2 = 6
1 1 2. 2 − 0 + — + — − 0 = 3 2 2

1 1 1 3. 2 + — + — + — + 1 = 4 4 2 4

4. 3 − 0 + 4 + 2 = 9
1 1 5. 2 − 1 + — + 1 + — = 3 2 2

1 1 1 1 6. 0 + — + — + — + — = 2 2 2 2 2

1 1 1 1 1 7. 4 − 1 + — + — + — + — + — = 5 2 2 2 4 4

1 1 1 8. 2 + 0 − 1 + — + — + — = 2 2 4 4

Maths Makes Sense 1 • Block 1 • Lesson 5 • Arithmetic 1

38

© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Copy addition and subtraction Maths Stories accurately symbol by symbol, including fractions

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Block 2
Resources
Daily practice Activity 22

Arithmetic 1
Daily practice

Lesson 2

Add and take away pairs of numbers up to and from a total of 19 and check answers with a calculator (Grade 2) Give a calculator and an exercise book to each child. Ask children to draw a margin and write the question numbers down the page. Display Activity 22. Say: Partner As – you’re going to say and write down the answer as quickly as you can. Partner Bs – you’re going to work out the answer on the calculator. Then Partner Bs – I want you to show Partner As the answer so they can check if they’re right. Ask Partner As to say ‘Question One’ so that both partners look at the same question and are ready to start. Partners swap roles after each question. Continue to complete all questions, all partners working at their own pace. Chant times tables Throughout the day, chant a selection of times tables (up to 10) forwards and backwards with children. Then ask children random question from the times tables, for example, What is ten times six? Eight times nine is…?

Calculators, lined exercise books Main teaching cards, wooden stand, pupil tables
5 1 Pupil _ cards, lined exercise 5 books 1 _

End-of-block objectives
Write Maths Stories for all four operations (+, −, ×, ÷) using fifths Write Maths Stories as vertical additions and subtractions and calculate with tricky tens columns, using number pairs for reference if necessary.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: for an acted Real Story, say the addition, subtraction, multiplication and division Maths Story, including fifths copy an addition, subtraction, multiplication or division Maths Story act the Real Story using fifths fraction cards for an addition, subtraction, multiplication or division Maths Story say the answer for an addition, subtraction, multiplication or division Maths Story, including fifths, that has been acted using fractions cards. Monitor children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson.
6 Don’t forget! We are not teaching that _ is ‘six cups cut into five’. 5 Teaching at this stage must focus on ‘six of those previously made things called fifths’ – and we can make as many of those things as we like!

39
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Main teaching
Direct instruction
Give a lined exercise book to each child.
Script

Teacher

Today we will be using fifths. Remember these are small pieces of a cup. How many fifths of a cup can we cut from one cup? Five. We are pretending that these cards with the name of 1 the teeny pieces (show a _ card) are small pieces of a 5 cup. I will act the Real Story using these cards, you 1 say the Maths Story. Take three _ cards, from the 5 Resources Table. Hold them up in a fan and place them side-by-side in the stand on the Maths Table. My turn, your turn. Three fifths. Three fifths. Return to the Resources Table. Use the appropriate action. My turn, your turn. Get ready to get some more.

Children Teacher

Children Teacher

Children Get ready to get some more.
1 Teacher Take a _ card from the Resources Table. Hold it up and 5 place it beside, but separate from, the cards in the stand on the Maths Table. My turn, your turn. One fifth. Table.

Children One fifth. Teacher Use the finger-wiggling action for ‘equals’. Encircle the batches of cards in the stand. Children Four fifths. Teacher My turn, your turn. Three fifths add one fifth equals four fifths.

Children Three fifths add one fifth equals four fifths. Return the cards to the Resources Table. Say: I’ll act a Real Story again using these cards, you write the Maths Story. Act the Real 3 1 4 Story for _ + _ = _. Give children time to write each symbol in their 5 5 5 books as you act it out. After each symbol say: Read what it says. Ask individuals or the whole class to reply, for example, Three fifths. Write their answer on the board to make the Maths Story for children to check they have written the correct symbols. Address any misconceptions as you go along. Repeat for questions 1–3 in the margin.

Example questions
4 2 2 1. _ – _ = _ 5 5 5 6 2 2. _ × 3 = _ 5 5 6 2 3. _ ÷ _ = 3 5 5

Remember to use the actions for multiplication and division.

Guided practice
1 Give out pupil tables and at least six _ cards to each pair. Ask 5 children to spread out the cards on their Resources Tables. Say: I’ll write the Maths Story. Partner As copy the Maths Story into your books. Partner Bs act the Real Story.

Example questions
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
3 1 2 4 _−_+_=_ 5 5 5 5 3 4 2 1 _−_+_=_ 5 5 5 5 1 4 _×4=_ 5 5 3 6 _×2=_ 5 5 4 1 _÷_=4 5 5 6 3 _÷_=2 5 5

Write out question 1 (see margin) on the board, symbol by symbol. 3 Partner As copy _ for Partner Bs to act. Continue until the equals 5 sign is acted, when Partner Bs encircle the cards with both hands 4 and both partners say: Four fifths. Write _ for Partner As to copy. 5 Partners swap roles alternately for questions 2–6.

40
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

41
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Block 2
Resources
Daily practice Activity 23

Geometry
Daily practice

Lesson 2
Add and take away pairs up to and from a total of to 99, with pence, and check answers with a calculator (Grade 2)

Calculators, lined exercise books Main teaching Activity 24
PCM 13 dm stick 15-cm rulers, flipchart

Give a calculator and an exercise book to each child. Ask children to draw a margin and write the question numbers down the page. Display Activity 23. Say: Partner As – you’re going to say and write down the answer as quickly as you can. Partner Bs – you’re going to work out the answer on the calculator. Then Partner Bs – I want you to show Partner As the answer so they can check if they’re right. Ask Partner As to say ‘Question One’ so that both partners look at the same question and are ready to start. Partners swap roles after each question. Continue to complete all questions, all partners working at their own pace. Chant times tables Throughout the day, chant a selection of times tables (up to 10) forwards and backwards with children. Then ask children random question from the times tables, for example, What is ten times six? Eight times nine is…?

End-of-block objectives
Draw a pair of axes (one quadrant) and label the axes ‘x axis’ ‘ and ‘y axis’ ‘ Plot points specified by their names and their coordinates, e.g. A (3,5) Plot and label specified points, to draw polygons and measure sides and diagonals.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: recognise that named points and their coordinates, e.g. A (3,4), ‘speak to us’, telling us the name of a point and where it is place a named point (A, B, etc.) on a prepared axis, which is a specified distance in the x direction and a specified distance in the y direction, and label the point (A, B etc.). Monitor children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! The idea of the coordinates ‘speaking to you’ is one aspect of the Maths Makes Sense Big Idea, ‘the symbols speak to you’.

Main teaching
Guided practice
2D action

42

Give each child a copy of PCM 13. Display Activity 24, screen 1. Say: Look at the x-axis. Look at the y-axis. How many axes have we got?
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Use hand movements to remind children of the ‘space’ they are working in. This is particularly important when working with a 2D representation of 3D space.

Two. We have a pair of axes. Look at your PCM. You have a pair of axes. One axis here. One axis here. A pair of axes. Two directions. 2D. Use the 2D hand motion. A pair of axes. Use My turn, your turn for children to reply chorally as you say: Look at point M. Point to ‘M’ on the screen. How far in the x direction is it? My turn, your turn. Six. Look at point M. How far in the y direction is it? My turn, your turn. One. I am going to ask you the same questions again – in a different way. Look at point M. What is the x number? Six. What is the y number? One. Repeat for points P (x number 3, y number 5) and W (x number 2, y number 2). Write ‘A (6,1)’ on a flipchart. Say: My turn, your turn. The symbols are speaking to us. Say: I’ll show you what they mean. It tells us the name of the point we have to plot (point to ‘A’), that we have to use a pair of axes (point to the brackets) and where to plot the point (point to ‘6’ and ‘1’). Six is the x number. One is the y number. Say: I’m going to teach you another way of saying this. Point to ‘6’ and say: My turn, your turn. Six is the x coordinate. Point to ‘1’ and say: My turn, your turn. One is the x coordinate. Run a pointer from left to right under (6,1) and say: These are the coordinates of A. Using PCM 13, ask children to draw and label the axes and number the axes 0–6. (Note: ‘0’ needs to be written only once.) Display Activity 24, screen 2.

Script

Teacher

How many points have we got to plot? Ensure that children can see that the names A, B, C, D tell us there are four points to plot. Tell me the names of the four points. Think about the point called A. What is the x distance? Six. What is the y distance? One. Start with your finger on the zero. What is the x distance? Six. In which direction must I go? Children indicate a movement to the right. Count along to the 6 on the x-axis. What is the y distance? One. In which direction must I go? Children indicate a movement upwards. Count one unit upwards. This is where point A must be. Click ‘next’ to reveal the point A marked with a cross.

Children A, B, C, D. Teacher Children Teacher Children Teacher Children Teacher

Teacher Children Teacher Teacher

Use My turn, your turn for children to repeat this, plot the point A on their PCM and write the letter next to it. Repeat the procedure in the same detail for points B, C, and D.
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43

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

44
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

45
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3, for children to complete.

PCM

13

Name

Date

Draw and label the x axis and y axis. Draw these points: A (6,1) B (2,3) C (3,2) D (4,4) y axis

1 0 1 x axis

Draw and label carefully!

46

Maths Makes Sense 3 • Block 2 • Lesson 2 • Geometry

© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Draw a pair of axes and mark the points A, B, C and D

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Block 2
Resources
Daily practice Activity 25

Data and Measure
Daily practice

Lesson 2

Recall multiplication facts from the two, three, four and five times tables (Grade 2) Give a calculator and an exercise book to each child. Ask children to draw a margin and write the question numbers down the page. Display Activity 25. Say: Partner As – you’re going to say and write down the answer as quickly as you can. Partner Bs – you’re going to work out the answer on the calculator. Then Partner Bs – I want you to show Partner As the answer so they can check if they’re right. Ask Partner As to say ‘Question One’ so that both partners look at the same question and are ready to start. Partners swap roles after each question. Continue to complete all questions, all partners working at their own pace. Chant times tables Throughout the day, chant a selection of times tables (up to 10) forwards and backwards with children. Then ask children random question from the times tables, for example, What is ten times six? Eight times nine is…?

Calculators, lined exercise books Main teaching Activity 26
PCM 14

Board compasses, flipchart, compasses (1-per child), 15-cm rulers

End-of-block objectives
Draw and label points and measure accurately to draw line segments from written instructions, e.g. Draw line segment AB = 3 cm; Draw point C Use a pair of compasses and pencil to accurately measure and draw a circle specified in writing, e.g. Draw a circle with centre C and a radius of 3 cm Accurately measure and draw a regular hexagon using a pair of compasses and a ruler.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: open the compasses to a specified amount using a prepared line segment draw a circle by placing the compass pin in a prepared labelled point. Monitor children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! Children have been introduced to line segments in Maths Makes Sense 3, Block 1, Geometry, Lesson 1.

Main teaching
Guided practice
Give a ruler, compasses and PCM 14 to each child. Display Activity 26, screen 1. Say: Look at question 1. Look at the line that goes through A and B.
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

47

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Say: Here is a point called A, where two lines cross (point to the point A, not the letter). Here is a point called B, where two lines cross (point to the point B, not the letter). This is the line segment AB (run a finger from A to B). Remind children that the line goes on forever that way (point into the distance to the left) and it goes on forever that way (point into the distance to the right). Say: Find the line segment AB on your PCM. Use your ruler to measure AB. Agree that AB is 3 cm or 30 mm. Say: Write three centimetres under line segment AB. Children write ‘3 cm’ on their PCMs. Say: I will draw the line segment and the point C on the flipchart. Pretend it is the same size as on your PCM. Draw the line segment AB and the centre C on the flipchart, write ‘3 cm’ under the line segment. Say: Now we are going to open the compasses to three centimetres. Use board compasses to show how to open the compasses to (pretend) three centimetres, by using the line segment AB you have drawn on the flipchart. Children copy actions on their PCM. Use the board compasses to use C as the centre and draw a circle. Say: You’ve opened your compasses to three centimetres. Hold your compasses at the top so you don’t change the measurement. Now place the compass pin in C and draw a smooth circle. Children draw the circle on their PCM. Use the line segment AB drawn on the flipchart. Run a pointer from A to B and say: How far is it from A to B (pretend)? Children say chorally: Three centimetres. Place the board compasses with the pin at A and the ‘pencil’ at B. Run a pointer from the pin to the ‘pencil’ B and say: How far is it from here to here (pretend)? Children say chorally: Three centimetres.
centre

Place the board compasses so that the pin is at C and the ‘pencil’ is on the circumference. Run a pointer from the pin to the ‘pencil’ and circumference say: How far is it from here to here (pretend)? Children say chorally: Three centimetres. Run a pointer from the centre C to the circumference and say: How far is it from here to here (pretend)? Children say chorally: Three centimetres. Repeat the movement from the centre to several different points on the circumference and each time repeat the script. Say: We say the circle has centre C and a radius of three centimetres, we could have said it had a radius of thirty millimetres but in this case we’ll say three centimetres. Same Value, Different Appearance. Say: Radius means how far it is from the centre of the circle to the edge or circumference. We drew a circle with centre C and radius three centimetres. Next to the circle write ‘Circle centre: C. Radius: 30 mm’. Ask children to look at question 2 on their PCMs and measure line segment PQ. Agree that it is 2.5 cm long. Say: Now I want you to draw a circle with centre R and a radius of twenty-five millimetres. How can you do that? Agree that they can use line segment PQ to open their compass to 25 mm and draw a circle with the compass pin in point R. Children draw the circle. Display Activity 26, screen 2. Point to the circle and say: My turn, your turn. Circle centre: R. Radius: twenty-five millimetres.

radius circumference
Labelled parts of a circle

Review
48
Display Activity 26, screen 3. Click through to review how to use a line segment to draw a circle.
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

49
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

50
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3, for children to complete.

14

PCM

Name

Date

1. Use line segment AB and your compasses to draw a circle with centre C and radius AB.

A

B

C

2. Use line segment PQ and your compasses to draw a circle with centre R and radius PQ.

P

Q

R

Draw carefully!

Maths Makes Sense 3 • Block 2 • Lesson 2 • Data and Measure

© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Use a line segment and compasses to draw a circle

51
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Block 2
Resources
Daily practice

Arithmetic 2
Daily practice

Lesson 2

Progress Book 3A, pages 14–15 15-cm rulers, compasses Main teaching Activity 27
PCM 15

Measure a line segment in millimetres and draw a circle with the same radius Give Progress Book 3A to each child. Ask children to open it to page 14 and write the date. Ask them to complete page 14 by measuring the line segments in millimetres with their rulers and recording the measurement, and then copying the line segment below. Then remind children how to open their compasses to the distance AB and draw a circle with that radius, using point C as the centre. Embellish a Real-Life Story about everyday objects by giving it a context Ask children to complete page 15. Ask children to read out the basic Real-Life Story and then remind them that in order to embellish it, they need to give it a context. Assist children to choose a context and embellish the Real-Life Story where necessary. Ask children to TTYP and check each other’s work.

Metre ruler, flipchart, lined exercise books

End-of-block objective
Solve word problems involving fractions of quantities.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: identify a question or instruction distinguish between the basic Real-Life Story and the Real Story, e.g. Two to three of six metres equals four metres and Two to three of six cups equals four cups distinguish between explicit information e.g. Beryl bought six metres of wood, and implicit information e.g. she bought more than she needed. Monitor children and check these steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson. Don’t forget! This work with fractions of quantities is related to multiplication and division, but this is not made explicit during this work with word problems.

Main teaching
Guided practice
Say: We’re going to look at word problems today and we’re going to use the Think About the Word Problem! steps to help us. Give out copies of PCM 15 and display it on the board. Read through each of the steps, one by one, expanding on the points as necessary. Display Activity 27, screen 1, Say: Let’s read this word problem together. Read chorally: Beryl bought a piece of wood six metres long to make a shelf. She only used two-thirds of it. How long is Beryl’s shelf?
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52

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Direct children back to PCM 15 and say: Now, we’re going to ‘Think about the word problem!’ to solve it. We’ve read the word problem. Let’s find the question or instruction. Agree it is: How long is Beryl’s shelf? Say: When we see this we know that we’ve got to think about length. In this case, metres. Let’s get a feel for it now. Look for explicit information. Use My turn, your turn. Say: Beryl bought some wood; she bought six metres of wood; she needed the wood to make a shelf; she used two-thirds of the wood. Now, let’s look for implicit information. Take suggestions to make a list. Use My turn, you turn to say examples, e.g. Beryl bought more wood than she needed. She didn’t use all the wood. Beryl’s shelf is 2 less than six metres long. Two-thirds in numbers is _. This is two to 3 three: smaller! Say: Now, step two: say what the basic Real-Life Story is about. Talk to your partner about what the basic Real-Life Story is about and what the context is. Agree that it is about metres and the context is making a shelf.
7 8

Drawing of the Real-Life Story

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Diagram of the Real-Life Story

Say: We can start thinking about putting six metres on the Maths Table and replacing with smaller. We can act out the Real-Life Story or draw it to help us do this. Shall we draw it? Work together to draw a 6 m long piece of wood on a flipchart and explain how to use it to find the answer. Repeat with a number line. Next, draw another number line diagram (see margin). Draw two arcs (0–3 and 3–6) and label them ‘3’ and ‘3’. Draw a second set of arcs (0–2 and 2– 4) to represent ‘zonking’ every three to make two. Say: Now, step three, let’s write the Maths Story Refer back to the Story. diagram to remind children how you zonked every ‘three’ to make 2 ‘two’. Write ‘_ of 6 =’ on the flipchart, saying each symbol aloud as 3 you write. Display Activity 27, screen 1. Click to reveal the completed Maths Story below the word problem. Read the Maths Story aloud together. Say: Now, let’s say the Real Story together (point to the Maths Story as you say it together) Two thirds of six cups equal four cups. And now, step four, let’s speak the basic Real-Life Story together. Two thirds of six metres equals four metres. The answer is (click to reveal text), let’s read it together, Beryl’s shelf is four metres long. Read through the ‘Think About the Word Problem!’ steps again and discuss in relation to the word problem.

2 3

2 3

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

Diagram to show ‘zonking’

‘Zonk’ is a light-hearted Maths Makes Sense term. It’s used to name each group that is made in preparation for a ‘replacement’. A replacement is necessary when calculating a fraction of a quantity. For 1 example, for _ of 6, children 2 need to ‘zonk’ the six cups into groups of 2 cups ready to replace each group with 1 cup.

53
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54
3. Embellish the basic basic Real-life Story. 3. Embellish the Real-life Story. a)
3 – 4 3 – 4

22
Make the basic basic Make the Real-Life Story Story Real-Life more interesting. more interesting.

Date Date

1. Measure line segment AB in AB in mm. 1. Measure line segment mm. WriteWrite the length. AB mm mm the length. AB Copy Copy the line segment beneath AB. the line segment beneath AB. Open Open compass to this distance your your compass to this distance and draw draw a circle centre C. and a circle with with centre C.

Remember Remember to adjust adjust to and check.check. and

of 8 =of 8 = 6 a) 6 The basic basic Real-Life Story The Real-Life Story aboutabout cakes is three toof eight eight cakes equals six cakes. cakes is three to four four of cakes equals six cakes.

A C b)
2 – 3

A C

B

B

These are activities from Maths Makes Sense Progress Book 3A, for children to complete.

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

2. Measure line segment XY in mm. mm. 2. Measure line segment XY in WriteWrite the length. XY mm mm the length. XY Copy Copy the line segment beneath XY. the line segment beneath XY. Open Open compass to this distance your your compass to this distance and draw draw a circle centre Z. and a circle with with centre Z.

2 of 12– = 8 12 = 8 b) 3 of The basic basic Real-Life Story about sheep is The Real-Life Story about sheep is two to three three of twelve sheep equals eight sheep. two to of twelve sheep equals eight sheep.

X Z Z

X

Y

Y

14

14

Focus Focus Measure the line segment in mm. Draw awith the same radius. radius. Measure the line segment in mm. Draw a circle circle with the same

Focus Focus Embellish a basic Real-Life story everyday objectsobjects using a context. Embellish a basic Real-Life story about about everyday using a context. 15

15

This is a photocopiable master from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3, for children to complete.

15

PCM

Think About the Word Problem!
Step 1

Read the word problem.
• Find the question or instruction. • Look for the explicit information. • Look for implicit information.

Step 2 Say what the basic Real-Life Story is about.
• Describe the context. • Draw or act out the Real-Life Story.

Step 3 Write the Maths Story.
• Act the Real Story with cups.

Step 4 Speak the basic Real-Life Story. Step 5 Write the answer.
Maths Makes Sense 3 • Block 2 • Lesson 2 • Arithmetic 2
© Oxford University Press 2010. This page can be copied for use in the purchasing school.

Use ‘Think About the Word Problem!’ to solve word problems

55

Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

56
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Block 2
Resources
Daily practice Activity 28

Reasoning
Daily practice

Lesson 2

Practise adding and taking away up to and from a total of 99 and multiplication facts from the two, three, four and five times tables (Grade 2) Give an exercise book to each child. Ask children to draw a margin in their books and write question numbers down the page. Display Activity 28. Say: We have been practising adding, taking away and multiplying. Today, we’re going to practise writing the answers to these questions again as quickly as we can. Remember - we need to make sure we’re accurate too. We might be even quicker when we practise again next week. Children write the question and answers in their books. Reveal the answers for children to write the answer. Collect exercise books for marking after the lesson. Chant times tables Throughout the day, chant a selection of times tables (up to 10) forwards and backwards with children. Then ask children random question from the times tables, for example, What is ten times five? Three times four is…?

Lined exercise books Main teaching Activity 29 Lined exercise books

End-of-block objectives
Calculate answers to word problems using multiplication Maths Stories Calculate answers to word problems using division Maths Stories Solve a word problem using a division Maths Story and state whether the implied basic Real-Life Story is Type 1 or Type 2.

Steps for assessment
Note the level of assistance needed to: give a Type 1 basic Real-Life Story for a division Maths Story, about, for example, metres (e.g. 12 metres of rope is cut into pieces 3 metres long) give a Type 2 basic Real-Life Story for a division Maths Story, about, for example, metres (e.g. 12 metres of rope is cut into 3 equal pieces) practise embellishing each basic Real-Life Story. Monitor children and check the steps for assessment at every stage of the lesson.

57
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a daily lesson plan from Maths Makes Sense Teacher’s Guide 3.

Main Teaching
Guided Practice
Display Activity 29, screen 1.
Script

Look at the Maths Story. Point to the Maths Story (6 ÷ 2 = 3). Read what it says. Children Six divided by two equals three. Teacher Now, let’s think about what it means. We have two types of Real Stories. Type 1 (click ‘next’ to reveal the text, the diagram and the text). We have three piles of two cups (point to each pile of two cups in turn). Let’s say the Real-Story. Children Six cups divided by two cups equals three. Display Activity 29, screen 2. Teacher And Type 2 (click ‘next’ to reveal the text, the diagram and the text). We have two piles of three cups (point to each pile and count the cups). Let’s say the Real Story. Children Six cups divided by two equals three cups. Discuss how, for a Type 1 division, we think about and know the size of each part and, for a Type 2 division, we think about and know how many parts (all equal size) there are. Display Activity 29, screen 3 (6 ÷ 2 = 3). Read what the Maths Story says together and then say the Real Story. Say: Now we’re going to think about the basic Real-Life Story. We can have two types of Real-Life Stories, Type 1 and Type 2. Remember, the Real-Life Story can be about one thing and one thing only. Read the Type 1 Real-Life ( Story (Six books divided by two books equals three) and (go to screen 4) the Type 2 Real-Life Story (Six books divided by two equals three books). Ask: What are the basic Real-Life Stories about? Discuss the two ways of thinking about the basic Real-Life Story. Display Activity 29, screens 5 and 6. Say: So we’ve looked at the Maths Story, we’ve read what it says and means and we’ve thought about Type 1 and Type 2 basic Real-Life Stories. Let’s see what each one could look like if we embellished them. Reveal and read each of the embellished Real-Life Stories. Display Activity 29, screen 7. Say: Here we have three Maths Stories. For the second and third Maths Story I want you to work with your partner to follow each of the steps. Let’s look at the first Maths Story together. Read through each of the steps. Remind children a basic Real-Life Story is about one thing and one thing only. To decide what a basic RealLife Story is about they should look for two pieces of information about the same thing. For each step, ask children to work with their partner to work out the answer, and then ask individual pairs to share their answers. Use this as an opportunity to identify any pairs who may need additional support. Say: Now, for the second and third Maths Story work through the steps in the same way with your partner. Monitor children as they work together to find the answers.

Teacher

58

Work through each of the steps for the two Maths Stories as a class. Discuss the stories the partners have made up.
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

59
Please note this is an uncorrected preview sample and not actual size.

This is a screenshot from Maths Makes Sense Software 3. Use on an interactive whiteboard with the whole class.

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I can! I can!
4. Draw and label the x axis and the y axis from 0 from 0 to 6. 4. Draw and label the x axis and the y axis to 6.

Date

Date

1. How much is thereis there here? 1. How much here?

5137

5137

5137

5137

5137

5137

5137

5137

2. Complete. 2. Complete. 6471 + 2384 = 2384 = 6471 +

4738 – 1261 =– 1261 = 4738

6471 + 2384 = 2384 = 6471 +

4738 – 1261 =– 1261 = 4738

5. Plot5. Plot and label the points. and label the points. A (2, 1),AB(2, 1), BC (2, 5), D (5, 5). (5, 5). (5, 1), (5, 1), C (2, 5), D the points. 6. Join6. Join the points. Name the shape. shape. Name the

3. Ali read 6 books6with 10with 10in eachin eachHow many many 3. Ali read books pages pages book. book. How pages did Ali read? read? pages did Ali

These are activities from the I Can pages of Maths Makes Sense Progress Book 3A, for children to complete.

20

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What is the basic Real-Life Story about? about? What is the basic Real-Life Story

Write the Maths Story. Story. Write the Maths

Write the answer. Write the answer.

I can! can! I

20

Focus Monitor the level of the level ofgiven: Independent, Moderate, High Focus Monitor assistance assistance given: Independent, Moderate, High

21

21

61

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“Suddenly, children who had not previously engaged with maths were fully involved. They were laughing and enjoying their learning and could comprehend by concretizing the abstract concepts they previously did not understand.“
Ben Davis, Deputy Headteacher, St Martins Primary School

“Maths Makes Sense has ensured teachers’ professional knowledge is secure and appropriate. It has allowed staff to respond to differentiated needs in the classroom creatively and immediately. It has ensured high expectations and understanding of children’s knowledge. The planning is simple and effective and the pace of lessons has increased.“
Iain George, Headteacher, Springfield Primary school

“Progression, using same language and techniques, means that children are able easily to build on previous classes’ teaching and learning especially in number work. Key aspects of Maths Makes Sense such as the teaching of negative numbers, giving change, using a ruler to draw lines, shapes, giving the visual image of cups using operations, formal layout of calculations, have increased confidence in maths and children are more willing to use what they know to tackle problems.“
Maxine Gray, Maths Coordinator, Wroxall Primary School

“Using Maths Makes Sense means more and more children are able to access the maths curriculum, especially the less able. Having the concrete examples (cups) early on, they are able to visualise and make connections much more easily than with previous schemes.”
Lyn Parkes, Maths Coordinator, St John Primary School

“Maths Makes Sense has increased teachers’ expectations of what the National Curriculum perceives children to be able to do. Our pupils work out fractions of a quantity with ease and confidence. They are well versed in the equivalence of decimals and fractions. The levels and expectations of the geometry work in the pupils’ books reflect more towards the expectations you would witness in a secondary school, rather than a primary school.“
Heidi McGinty, Victoria College Prep School

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