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Anglo-Chinese Junior College


Physics Preliminary Examination
Higher 2

PHYSICS 9646/01
Paper 1 Multiple Choice 31 Aug 2010
1 hour 15 minutes
Additional Materials: Multiple Choice Answer Sheet

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write in soft pencil.


Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
Write your Name and Index number in the answer sheet provided.

There are forty questions in this section. Answer all questions. For each question there are
four possible answers A, B, C and D.
Choose the one you consider correct and circle your choice in soft pencil on the separate
Answer Sheet.

Read the instructions on the Answer sheet very carefully.

Each correct answer will score one mark. A mark will not be deducted for a wrong answer.
Any rough working should be done in this Question Paper.

This paper consists of 20 printed pages


2

DATA AND FORMULAE


Data
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 × 108 m s−1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π × 10−7 H m−1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 × 10−12 F m−1
(1/(36π)) × 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 × 10−19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 × 10−34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 × 10−27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 × 10−31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 × 10−27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K−1 mol−1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 × 1023 mol−1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 × 10−23 J K−1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg−2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s−2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + 1
2
at 2
2
v = u 2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
Gm
gravitational potential, φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos ωt
= ± ω xo2 − x 2
3
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas E = kT
2
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
Q
electric potential, V =
4πε o r
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin ωt
transmission coefficient, T ∝ exp(−2kd)
8 π 2 m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(−λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ = t1
2

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


3

1 Which of the following SI units can be expressed in exactly two base SI units?

A coulomb
B tesla
C newton
D hertz

2 The viscosity of a fluid, μ, can be determined by measuring the terminal velocity, vT, of
a sphere when it descends in the fluid. The fluid has a density ρf while the sphere has
a density ρs and a diameter of d. The viscosity can then be calculated by the formula

5( ρs ρf )
μ= d2
9v T

The values measured are


vT = (1.60 ± 0.04) m s−1
ρs = (2700 ± 20) kg m−3
ρf = (900 ± 10) kg m−3
d = (20.0 ± 0.4) mm

What is the percentage uncertainty in the value of μ?

A 6.2 % B 7.1 % C 8.2 % D 8.4 %

3 A car is travelling at a velocity of 24 m s-1 due west initially. At a later time, it is seen
travelling at a velocity of 10 m s-1 due south.

Given that the direction North N, points vertically upwards, which of the following vector
R represents the change in velocity of the car?

A B C D
N N N N

R R
R R

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


4

4 Which displacement-time graph best represents the motion of a falling sphere, the
initial acceleration of which eventually reduces until it begins to travel at constant
terminal velocity?

A B

C D

5 A motorist travelling at 10 m s–1 can bring his car to rest in a braking distance of 10 m.
In what distance could he bring the car to rest from a speed of 30 m s–1 using the same
braking force?

A 17 m B 30 m C 52 m D 90 m

6 Two equal masses travel towards each other on a frictionless air track at speeds of 60
cm s–1 and 30 cm s–1. They stick together on impact.

What is the speed of the masses after impact?

A 15 cm s–1
B 20 cm s–1
C 30 cm s–1
D 45 cm s–1

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


5

7 In 2001, the leaning tower of Pisa was stabilised by a bundle of steel cable anchored to
the ground as shown by the simplified sketch below.

Tower

Steel Cable
ground

The weight of the tower is W, the tension in the cable is T and the reaction from the
ground is R.

Which vector triangle best represents the forces acting on the tower?

A B
T T

W R R W

C D
T T

R W W R

8 The area of the horizontal cross-section of a barge is 97 m2 and the sides of the barge
are vertical. The flat bottom of the barge is 70 cm under water when it is loaded with
2.0 x 104 kg of cargo.

How deep would the bottom of the barge below the water surface when the cargo is
unloaded off the barge? Density of sea water is 1030 kg m-3.

A 20 cm B 50 cm
C 70 cm D 90 cm

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


6

9 The moon remains in its orbit around the Earth rather than falls to the Earth because

A it is also attracted by the gravitational forces from the sun and other planets
B the net force on the Moon is zero
C the gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the moon provides a net force
that provides the Moon’s centripetal acceleration.
D the magnitude of the gravitational force from the Earth is too small to cause any
appreciable acceleration of the Moon

10 A person of weight 500 N does a bungee jump using an elastic rope of unstretched
length 40 m and having a spring constant k equal to 50 N m-1. During the initial fall
there is a transfer of energy from gravitational potential energy to kinetic energy and
elastic potential energy. The person falls through a distance of 80 m before beginning
to move upwards.

Which set of graphs correctly represent the variation of the three energies?

A B
50 50

45 45

40 40

35 35
Energy / kJ

Energy / kJ

30 30

25 25

20 20

15 15

10 10

5 5

0 0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Distance of fall / m Distance of fall / m

C D
50 50

45 45

40 40

35 35
Energy / kJ

Energy / kJ

30 30

25 25

20 20

15 15

10 10

5 5

0 0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Distance of fall / m Distance of fall / m

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


7

11 A satellite orbits the Earth 200 km above its surface. The satellite's acceleration
towards the centre of the Earth is 9.2 m s−2 and the radius of the Earth is 6400 km. The
speed of the satellite is

A 246 km s−1 B 7.79 km s−1 C 7.67 km s−1 D 1.36 km s−1

12 The gravitational field strength at a point P on the Earth's surface is numerically equal
to

A the acceleration of free fall at P.


B the change in potential energy per unit distance from P.
C the force acting on any body placed at P
D the work done in bringing unit mass from infinity to P

13 Planet Z has a mass of 8.0 × 10 24 kg and a radius of 6.2 × 10 7 m. Neglecting air


resistance, the energy required to lift a mass of 10 kg from its surface into outer space
is

A 46.1 × 10 6 J
B 64.1 × 10 6 J
C 86.1 × 10 6 J
D 96.1 × 10 6 J

14 The escape speed of a nitrogen molecule at the Earth's surface is 0.90 × 10 4 m s-1.
What is the escape speed at a height 0.30 RE above the Earth's surface, where RE is
the radius of the Earth?

A 0.49 × 10 4 m s-1
B 0.59 × 10 4 m s-1
C 0.69 × 10 4 m s-1
D 0.79 × 10 4 m s-1

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


8

15 The graphs in Fig. 15 show how the displacement x, velocity v and the acceleration a
of a body vary with time t when it is oscillating with simple harmonic motion.
What is the value of T?

Fig. 15
π 2π π 2π
A s B s C s D s
9 9 3 3

16 Because of air resistance, the amplitude of oscillation of a simple pendulum decays


exponentially with time. How does the total energy of the pendulum vary with time?

A It varies sinusoidally with time at the same frequency as that of the pendulum
B It varies sinusoidally with time at a frequency twice that of the pendulum
C It decreases at a steady rate
D It decreases exponentially with time

17 A constant power supply is used to melt 1 kg. of ice, to heat the water produced, and
finally to turn all the water to steam.

Specific heat capacity of water = 4 x 103 J kg-1 K-1


Specific latent heat of fusion of ice = 3 x 105 J kg-1
Specific latent heat of vaporization of water = 2 x 106 J kg-1

Which graph in Fig.17, best shows how the thermodynamic temperature T varies with
time t for this sequence?

A B C D

Fig. 17

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


9

18 Which statement about internal energy is correct?

A The internal energy of a system can be increased without transfer of


energy by heating
B The internal energy of a system depends only on its temperature
C When the internal energy of a system is increased, its temperature
always rises.
D When two systems have the same internal energy, they must be at the
same temperature.

19 The diagram below shows the relation between the pressure and the volume of
the gas in an engine for one cycle of operation of the engine.

Work is done by the gas in the engine during

A Q→R only.
B Q→R and R→S.
C S→T only.
D S→T and Q→R.

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


10

20 The diagram shows the snapshot of a transverse wave at a particular instant. The
wave is traveling to the right. The frequency of the wave is 12.5 Hz.

Q P

At the instant shown the displacement is zero at the point P.


What is the shortest time to elapse before the displacement is zero at point Q?

A 0.01 s B 0.02 s C 0.03 s D 0.07 s

21 A sound wave of frequency 400 Hz is traveling in a gas at a speed of 320 ms-1.

What is the phase difference between two points 0.1 m apart in the direction of travel?

π π 2π 4π
A rad B rad C rad D rad
4 2 5 5

22 Two coherent monochromatic waves of equal amplitude are brought together to form
an interference pattern on a screen. Which of the following graphs could represent the
variation of intensity with position (x) across the pattern of fringes.

A B

C D

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


11

23 Fig 23 shows the formation of the first order spectrum when parallel rays of
monochromatic light fall perpendicularly on a non-uniform spacing diffraction grating
PQR. For the part of the grating between P and Q, the angle of deviation θ is constant,
whilst for that between Q and R, θ decreases.
diffraction grating
R
θ

x Q
Angle of deviation, θ
decreases
P

Incident rays Diffracted parallel


rays

Fig 23

Which diagram best shows how the grating interval d varies with distance x, the
distance from P?

A B
d d

P Q R x Q x
P R
C D

d d

P Q R x P Q R x

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


12

24 In the figure shown, a point charge +Q is placed at X and another point charge -2Q is
placed at Y.

X Z Y
+Q - 2Q
r

Which of the following correctly gives the magnitude of the electric field strength and
1
electric potential at point Z, a distance of r from X assuming they are isolated
4
charges.

Electric field strength Electric potential


44Q 5Q
A
9πε 0 r 2 3πε 0 r
44Q Q
B
9πε 0 r 2 3πε 0 r
28Q Q
C
9πε 0 r 2 3πε 0 r
28Q 5Q
D
9πε 0 r 2 3πε 0 r

25 The figure shows a uniform electric field.

-60V -40V -20V 0V 20V

X Y direction of motion of the


charge

A charge of -5 µC placed at point X is projected horizontally towards Y. Which one of


the following statements is correct?

A The electric field is directed from X to Y and there is a loss of kinetic energy as
the charge moves from X to Y
B The electric field is directed from Y to X and there is a loss of kinetic energy as
the charge moves from X to Y
C The electric field is directed from X to Y and there is a gain of kinetic energy as
the charge moves from X to Y
D The electric field is directed from Y to X and there is a gain of kinetic energy as
the charge moves from X to Y

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


13

26 The graph below shows the variation with current I of the potential difference V across
a filament lamp.

I/mA 2.0

1.5

1.0

0.5

0.0
0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2
V/V

The resistance of the lamp when I = 1.5 mA is

A 950 Ω
B 400 Ω
C 0.40 Ω
D 0.0025 Ω

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


14

27 In the circuit below, the battery has negligible internal resistance. Three identical lamps
L, M and N having the same resistance are connected as shown.

The filament of lamp N breaks. Which one of the following shows the subsequent
changes to the brightness of lamp L and lamp M?

Lamp L Lamp M
A stays the same Decreases
B increases stays the same
C increases Decreases
D decreases Increases

28 The diagram shows a light-dependent resistor (LDR) and a thermistor (with a negative
temperature coefficient of resistance) forming a potential divider.

Under which set of conditions will the potential difference across the thermistor have
the greatest value?

Light intensity Temperature


A Low Low
B High Low
C Low High
D High High

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


15

29 In the potentiometer circuit below, the moveable contact is placed at N on the bare wire
XY, such that the galvanometer shows zero deflection.

The resistance of the variable resistor is now decreased.

What is the effect of this decrease on the potential difference across the wire XY and
on the position of the moveable contact for zero deflection?

Potential Difference across XY Position of moveable contact


A Increases Nearer to X
B Increases Nearer to Y
C Decreases Nearer to X
D Decreases Nearer to Y

30 A proton beam of velocity 2.00 × 107 m s-1 enters a velocity selector with a plate
separation of 2.00 cm, and has a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T directed out-of-
plane of the paper.
If the protons pass through the velocity selector undeflected, what would be the
direction and magnitude of the electric field? You may ignore any relativistic effects
and assume no electrical breakdown occurs.

proton beam

direction magnitude

A downwards 6.00 x 105 N C-1

B upwards 6.00 x 105 N C-1

C downwards 3.00 x 107 N C-1

D upwards 3.00 x 107 N C-1

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


16

31 A compass is placed above a wire. The compass needle is seen to point toward
the north. When a current is made to flow through the wire, the needle deflects to
point along the northwest direction.

The orientation of the wire and direction of the current are

orientation of wire direction of current

A north-south south to north

B north-south north to south

C east-west west to east

D east-west east to west

32 A current balance is used to measure the magnetic flux density B of a electromagnet. The
side PQ of a current balance is inserted inside a large electromagnet. The direction of
magnetic field is as shown in Fig 32. Length of PQ is L. PQ and RS are d1 and d2
respectively from the pivot. A load of mass m is placed along side RS. Take acceleration
due to gravity to be g.

The direction and magnitude of the current along PQ are

P
S
B

Q R

Fig 32

direction magnitude

m d2
A from P to Q
B L d1

m g d2
B from P to Q
B L d1

m d2
C from Q to P
B L d1

m g d2
D from Q to P
B L d1

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


17

33 The diagram below shows two concentric loops in the same plane.

outer loop

inner loop

The variation of the magnitude of the current in the inner loop varies with time as
shown below and it is flowing clockwise.

current

time

The effect on the induced current in the outer loop is such that it is

A increasing in the anticlockwise direction


B constant in the anticlockwise direction
C constant in the clockwise direction
D decreasing in the clockwise direction

34 A lamp of resistance R is connected in series to a source of alternating voltage. The


r.m.s. value of the voltage is 20 V. The variation with time t of the power P dissipated in
the light bulb is shown below

The best estimate for the value of the peak current of the filament of the lamp is

A 2.5 A B 2.5 2 A C 5A D 5 2 A

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


18

35 An ideal transformer has a primary coil with Np turns and a secondary coil with Ns
turns. An alternating voltage supply of frequency f and average power of Po is
connected to the primary coil.

Which of the following correctly gives the frequency and average power in the
secondary coil?

Frequency Average Power


Ns Ns
A f Po
Np Np
Ns
B f Po
Np
Ns
C f Po
Np

D f Po

36 Which one of the following shows the correct sequence of events in a helium-neon laser?

A Neon atoms excite helium atoms to a metastable state. Excited helium atoms
undergo stimulated emission of red light to a lower energy state followed by
spontaneous emission to ground state.
B Neon atoms excite helium atoms to a higher energy state. Excited helium atoms
undergo spontaneous emission to a metastable state followed by stimulated
emission of red light to ground state.
C Helium atoms excite neon atoms to a metastable state. Excited neon atoms
undergo stimulated emission of red light to a lower energy state followed by
spontaneous emission to ground state.
D Helium atoms excite neon atoms to a higher energy state. Excited neon atoms
undergo spontaneous emission to a metastable state followed by stimulated
emission of red light to ground state.

37 Which of the following statements below is NOT true regarding an intrinsic semiconductor?

A The total current flow is the sum of both ‘hole’ and ‘electron’ currents.

B In a p–n junction, free electrons near the junction in the n–type material diffuse
across the junction into the p–type material. Diffusion occurs because of different
thermal agitation of atoms in the n–type and p–type material.
C Metals and semiconductors have different electrical properties because
semiconductors have a small energy gap.
D In an intrinsic semiconductor, the valence band is completely filled and the
conduction band is empty at room temperature.

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


19

38 The following graph shows the spectrum of X-rays emitted from an X-ray tube.

intensity

wavelength

If the potential difference between the target and cathode is increased, which one of the
following combinations represents a possible change in minimum wavelength, and the
wavelengths of the peaks?

minimum wavelength wavelengths of the peaks

A decrease increase

B decrease remain the same

C increase increase

D increase remain the same

39 The graph represents the decay of a newly prepared sample of radioactive nuclide X to
a stable nuclide Y. The half-life of X is τ. The growth curve for Y intersects the decay
curve for X after time T.

What is the time T ?


τ ⎛τ ⎞
A B ln⎜ ⎟ C τ D 2τ
2 ⎝2⎠

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1 [Turn over


20

40 The graph shows how the binding energy per nucleon of a nucleon of a nucleus varies
with nucleon number, A.

Which of the following statements is not true?

A Energy is released in nuclear fission reactions from nuclei in region P.


B Nuclei in region Q are more stable than nuclei in region R.
C Nuclear fusion reactions bring nuclei closer to region Q.
D The binding energy per nucleon increases most significantly at lower nucleon
numbers.

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P1


1

Anglo-Chinese Junior College


Physics Preliminary Examination
Higher 2

CANDIDATE
CLASS
NAME

CENTRE INDEX
S
NUMBER NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/02
Paper 2 Structured Questions
20 Aug 2010
Candidates answer on the Question Paper. 1 hour 45 minutes
No Additional Materials are required

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Name and Index number in the spaces on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.

Section A
Answer all questions.
It is recommended that you spend about 1 hour 15 minutes on this section

Section B
Answer Question 8. For Examiners’ use
It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this section only
1 / 6
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each 2 / 9
question or part question. 3 / 7
4 / 7
5 / 7
6 / 6
7 / 18
8 / 12
Total / 72

This paper consists of 20 printed pages


2

DATA AND FORMULAE


Data
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 × 108 m s−1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π × 10−7 H m−1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 × 10−12 F m−1
(1/(36π)) × 10−9 F m−1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 × 10−19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 × 10−34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 × 10−27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 × 10−31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 × 10−27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K−1 mol−1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 × 1023 mol−1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 × 10−23 J K−1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg−2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s−2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + 1
2
at 2
2
v = u 2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
Gm
gravitational potential, φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos ωt
= ± ω xo2 − x 2
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an 3
ideal gas
E = kT
2
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
Q
electric potential, V =
4πε o r
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin ωt
transmission coefficient, T ∝ exp(−2kd)
8 π 2 m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(−λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ = t1
2

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


3 For
Examiner’s
Section A Use

Answer all questions


It is recommended that you spend about 1 hour 15 minutes on this section.

1 (a) Give reasonable estimates of the following quantities. In each case, give your
answer in an SI unit.

(i) The volume of the 2010 official World Cup soccer ball.

volume = m3 [1]

(ii) The kinetic energy of an olympic sprinter near the ending point of a 100-
metre dash.

Kinetic energy = J [1]

(iii) The density of the head of a human being.

density = kg m-3 [1]

(b) An experiment is conducted to determine the density of cooking oil, which floats
on water. Three sets of results are obtained from the experiment. The unit for
density is kg m−3.

A B C
810 1500 740
800 1490 870
805 1495 790

(i) Which set of results is precise but inaccurate? Explain your reasoning.

[2]

(ii) Assuming the measurement of volume has been done correctly, suggest
one possible source of experimental error that causes the aforementioned
set of results inaccurate.

[1]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over


For
4 Examiner’s
Use
2 (a) A mass oscillates on the end of a spring in simple harmonic motion. The graph of
the acceleration a of the mass against its displacement x from its equilibrium
position is shown in Fig 2.1

Fig. 2.1

(i) Explain how the graph shows that the object is oscillating in simple
harmonic motion.

[2]

(ii) Show that the period of oscillation of the particle is about 0.40 s.

[2]

(iii) The mass is released when it is at a displacement x = + 0.050 m. Draw a


fully labeled graph on the axes of Fig. 2.2 of the displacement of the mass
until t = 1.0 s.

Fig 2.2

[2]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


5 For
Examiner’s
Use
(b) In order to check the speed of a camera shutter, the camera was used to
photograph the bob of a simple pendulum moving in front of a horizontal scale.
The extreme positions of the bob were at 600 mm and 700 mm marks. The
photograph showed that while the shutter was open the bob moved from the 650
mm mark to the 675 mm mark. If the period of the pendulum is 2 s, find the time
interval during which the shutter remained open.

[3]

3 A large horseshoe magnet produces a uniform magnetic field of flux density B between
its poles. Outside the region of the poles, the flux density is zero. The magnet is placed
on a top-pan balance and a stiff wire XY is situated between its poles, as shown in
Fig 3.1 below.

Fig 3.1

The wire XY is horizontal and normal to the magnetic field. The length of wire between
the poles is 4.4 cm. A direct current of magnitude 2.6 A is passed through the wire in
the direction from X to Y. The reading on the top-pan balance increases by 2.3 g.

(a) Deduce the direction of the force acting on wire XY.

Direction is [2]

(b) Deduce the polarity of the pole P of the magnet.

Polarity of P is [1]
2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over
For
6 Examiner’s
Use
(c) Draw the resultant magnetic field lines acting on the wire XY within the poles of
the magnet on Fig 3.2 which shows the current flowing into the page.

Fig 3.2
[2]

(d) Calculate the magnetic flux density between the poles.

Magnetic flux density = …………. T [2]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


7 For
Examiner’s
4 You are tasked to investigates how the current through a 6.0 V filament lamp varies as Use
the potential difference across it is changed up to 6.0 V. You are supplied with the
following apparatus: a rheostat, a 9 V cell, an ammeter, voltmeter and connecting wires

(a) Draw a suitable circuit diagram for this investigation using only the above given
apparatus.

[2]

(b) (i) Use the axes below to sketch the graph showing how the current through
the lamp varies with the potential difference across it.

Current

Potential
difference
[2]

(ii) Justify the shape of the graph.

[2]
(iii) Explain how your graph shows that the resistivity of the filament is unique
at a specific temperature.

[1]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over


For
8 Examiner’s
Use

5  (a) Fig 5 shows the variation of the photocurrent I with the potential of the anode with
respect to the cathode V, in the photoelectric experiment.  
I/nA

Fig 5

- Vs 0 V1 V/V

Suggest possible reasons for the following observations as seen from Fig 5.

(i) no photocurrent is detected for values of V lower than − Vs

(ii) increasing photocurrent for values of V between − Vs and 0 V.

(iii) saturation current was not achieved immediately when V became greater
than 0 V.

[3]

(b) An orbiting satellite can become charged by the photoelectric effect when
sunlight ejects electrons from its outer surface. Satellites must be designed to
minimise such charging. Suppose a satellite is coated with platinum, a metal with
a very large work function of 5.32 eV.

(i) Determine the longest wavelength of incident sunlight that can eject an
electron from platinum which has a work function energy of 5.32 eV.

λ = ……………… m [2]

(ii) The incident photon has a particle like nature. Determine the momentum of the
photon.

p = ……………… Ns [2]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


9 For
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Use
6 (a) The uncertainty in the measurement of the momentum, Δp of a bullet and an
electron are 2 x 10−3 kg m s−1 and 2.7 x 10−32 kg m s−1 when they have the
same speed of 300 m s-1 respectively.

(i) The Heisenberg position-momentum uncertainty principle can be stated


as follows:
h
ΔxΔp ≥
2
where Δx and Δp represents the uncertainty in the position and
momentum respectively.

Hence determine the uncertainty of locating the position of the bullet and
electron using the Heiserberg Uncertainty Principle.

Uncertainty in position for bullet


Uncertainty in position for electron [1]

(ii) Discuss the implication of your answers found in (i).

[1]

(b) The shaded region in Fig 6 shows the coulomb potential barrier as seen by the
alpha particle during its decay in polonium-212 and also the wave functions of
the alpha particle in regions I, II and III respectively.

Region I: Potential energy of


alpha particle due
to presence of
Nuclear and
Coulomb force

I Region II:Potential energy of


alpha particles
II when it is still within
the atom but
III experiences mainly
the Coulomb
repulsive force.

Region III: Potential energy


of alpha when out
Fig 6 of atom.
Note that 1 fermi metre = 10−15 m

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over


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10 Examiner’s
Use

(i) Explain the phenomenon that tells us that alpha particle have the
probability of appearing in Region III.

[1]

(ii) Assuming a rectangular potential barrier of height 26.4 MeV taken at the
peak of the coulomb barrier and width 17.9 fm as shown by the dotted
lines, the half-life is determined to be 1.5 x 107 s. However, the actual
half-life is only about 0.30 μs.

Comment on the large difference on the order of magnitude of 13 using


the concept of the transmission probability and decay constant of the
alpha particles.

[2]

(iii) State a possible improvement to the method of determining the


transmission probability to get a better estimate of the half-life.

[1]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


11 For
Examiner’s
−1
7 (a) The vertical electric field E in the air is normally in the region about 100 V m Use
outdoors with negative charges on the earth’s surface. Ordinarily, the
equipotentials are parallel to the surface as shown in Fig. 7.1.

+300V

+200V
E = 100 V m-1
+100V

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Ground

Fig. 7.1

This means that outdoors the potential at the height of your nose is about 200
volts higher than the potential at your feet.

(i) By drawing equipotential lines on Fig 7.2 explain why a man standing in the
electric field similar to that in Fig. 7.1 do not get a shock when you go out
into the street if indeed the above discussion is correct.

Fig. 7.2

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over


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[2]

(ii) During fair weather, the total potential difference from the surface of the
earth to the top of the atmosphere is about 400 000 volts. A current
caused by the electric field may pass from the sky down to the earth.

If the total electric current reaching the earth’s surface at any time is very
nearly constant at 1800 amperes, show that the current-density (current
per unit normal surface area) in the air is of the order of 10−12 amperes per
metre square. (Radius of the earth is taken to be 6380 km)

[1]

(iii) Estimate the electrical power reaching the earth’s surface.

[1]

(b) With such a large current coming down, the negative charge on the earth should
take only about half an hour to discharge. It is the thunderstorm and its lightning
that provides the “batteries” that keeps charging the earth up negatively. There
are about 40 000 thunderstorms per day all over the earth. Lightning storms
carry negative charges to the earth.

Thunderstorms occur when moist, warm air near the ground becomes buoyant
and rises to form clouds. Inside the clouds are millions of small water droplets
and ice suspended in air.

We will assume that we have a cumulus cloud that is 2 km deep with a similar
diameter and that it contains the order of 50-500 million water droplets per cubic
metre as shown in Fig 7.3.

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


13 For
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Fig. 7.3

(i) If each of these droplet is about 10 μm in radius show that the mass of the
cloud at the lowest reasonable density of the droplets is about 1.3 x 106 kg.
(density of water is 1000 kg m-3)

[3]

(ii) Hence determine the depth of rainfall recorded at the lowest reasonable
density of droplets should the cloud release all its water in one instant.
(Assume the area covered by the rain is the same as the cloud base)

[1]

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(c) Collisions among the water droplets and ice particles cause them to become
charged. The higher portion of the cloud acquires a net positive charge while the
lower portion of the cloud a net negative charge. Through induction, the earth
becomes positively charged.

The electrical potential difference between the earth surface and the base of a
cloud may be about several hundred millions volts in magnitude (108 V). Dry air
breaks down and becomes ionised at 3 millions volts per metre. When there is
an impending thunderstorm, the air is not dry. At a few hundreds of thousands
volts per metre, the conditions are ripe for resistance in the air to begin breaking
down and lightning, the electrical discharge between the regions of the cloud or
between the cloud and the ground, is formed. Electrons begin to flow from the
cloud to earth through a path of least resistance. They formed a funnel called the
step leader. It creates a channel of ionised air, which is an extremely good
conductor. When the step leader reaches the ground or any tall object near the
ground, the electrons quickly discharge to earth, followed quickly by electrons
higher up in the channel and followed again by the electrons in the next higher
successive levels in the channel. This results in a spectacular return stroke from
ground to the cloud which causes the intense lightning flashes that we observed
during an electrical storm.

Fig. 7.4 Formation of “Step Leader” Fig.7.5 Return Stroke

In a typical lightning flash, exchange of charges between the clouds and the
earth may be about 20 coulombs. The time which the lightning flash is estimated
to be about 1 millisecond.

(i) Show that the energy involved in the lightning discharge is in the order of
109 joules.

[1]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


15 For
Examiner’s
(ii) Hence, estimate the order of magnitude of the electrical power reaching Use
the earth’s surface during a thunderstorm.

[1]

(iii) Fig. 7.3 shows the magnitudes of the equipotential surfaces over the tower
at the time of a gathering storm.

Fig. 7.3
Estimate the magnitude of the electric field near the top of the tower and
hence explain if a return stroke is likely to occur at the top of the tower.

[2]

(d) The electrical discharge, results in an explosion of the air around the lightning
channel. Thunder is the sound wave produced as a result of the compression
wave propagating through the surrounding air.

(i) Explain why the explosion of the air occur.

[2]

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(ii) As light travels faster than sound (3.00 x 108 m s-1 vs. 330 m s-1) you see
lightning before you hear the thunder. The rule of thumb is if you count the
seconds between seeing the flash and hearing the thunder, take the
seconds and divide it by 3, it will give the distance of the lightning from
where you are standing in km. Explain using the appropriate data.

[1]

(e) Absolute measurements of sound intensity can be expressed in W m−2. However,


the human ear has a non-linear response to the energy content of sound. Hence
a logarithmic scale is used to describe the response of the ear in terms of sound
level L which is measured in decibels, dB where
⎛ I ⎞
L = 10 log⎜⎜ ⎟⎟ dB
⎝ I0 ⎠
where Io = 10−12 W m−2 is the values for the threshold of hearing and I = the
intensity of the sound being measured.

If the thunder produces 120 dB in the decibel meter when the lightning is
2.00 km away, determine the distance of the source of the lightning if you record
a reading of 124.8 dB assuming that sound energy is distributed uniformly from
the source of the thunder.

Distance = km [3]

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


17 For
Examiner’s
Section B Use

It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this section.

8 Many homes have smoke detectors fitted to the ceilings of certain rooms to provide an
early warning of a fire. These detectors contain a weak radioactive source that ionises
the air between two metal plates. See Fig. 8.

Fig 8

A low voltage battery in the detector causes the ions to move. This produces a very small
ionisation current in a circuit containing the battery and the plates. Any reduction in this
ionisation current due to smoke is detected and an alarm sounds.

An airline company wishes to install some of these smoke detectors in its aircraft and
needs to know if changes in air pressure will affect the ionisation current.

Design a laboratory experiment to investigate how the ionisation current depends on air
pressure.

The equipment available includes the following:

Alpha Radioactive source


Beta Radioactive source
Milliammeter /microammeter
Galvanometer
Ammeter
Power Supply
Bourdon Gauge
Manometer
Pressure gauge
Vacuum pump
Source handling tool
Lead container

You should draw diagrams to show the arrangement of your apparatus. In your account you
should pay attention to

(a) the equipment you would use for the investigation,


(b) the procedure to be followed,
(c) the control of variables,
(d) any safety precautions,
(e) any precautions that you would take to improve the accuracy of the experiment.
2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over
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Use
Diagram

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


19 For
Examiner’s
Use

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2 [Turn over


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20 Examiner’s
Use

2010 ACJC H2 9646/2


Anglo-Chinese Junior College
Physics Preliminary Examination
Higher 2

CANDIDATE
CLASS
NAME

CENTRE INDEX
S
NUMBER NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/03
Paper 3 Longer Structured Questions 27 Aug 2010
2 hours
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Name and Index number in the spaces on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.

Section A
Answer all questions.

Section B
Answer any two questions.

You are advised to spend about one hour on each section For Examiners’ use
only
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. Section A
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each
question or part question. 1 / 10
2 / 10
3 / 10
4 / 10
Section B
5 / 20
6 / 20
7 / 20
Total / 80

This paper consists of 18 printed pages


2 For
Examiner’s
DATA AND FORMULAE Use
Data
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 × 108 m s−1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π × 10−7 H m−1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 × 10−12 F m−1
(1/(36π)) × 10−9 F m−1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 × 10−19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 × 10−34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 × 10−27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 × 10−31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 × 10−27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K−1 mol−1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 × 1023 mol−1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 × 10−23 J K−1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg−2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s−2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + 1
2
at 2
2
v = u 2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
Gm
gravitational potential, φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos ωt
= ± ω xo2 − x 2
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an 3
ideal gas
E = kT
2
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
Q
electric potential, V =
4πε o r
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin ωt
transmission coefficient, T ∝ exp(−2kd)
8 π 2 m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(−λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ = t1
2

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


3 For
Examiner’s
Section A Use

Answer all the questions in the spaces provided.


It is recommended that you spend about one hour on this section.

1 David had used a shepherd's sling to defeat Goliath. A shepherd's sling is a weapon
typically used to throw an object such as a stone to a location some distance away.

Suppose a modern day sling is used to set a stone of mass 52 g in horizontal


circular motion and when the stone reaches a speed v, it is released from the sling.
The stone travels in a parabolic path and hits the ground at point G which is at a
vertical distance H below the point of release of the stone from the sling and G is at
a horizontal distance X away from the point of release of the stone as shown in
Fig 1.

v
stone
position Y
Fig 1 H

X
G

(a) State three conditions necessary for the stone to move in a horizontal circular
path with constant speed.

[3]

(b) State and explain the change if any on the radius of the path and the tension
in the string when the stone is suddenly swirled at a lower speed.

[3]

(c) Suppose the stone is released from the sling at position Y with a speed of
22.8 m s−1 at a height H, of 42.5 m above the point of impact G, find the
horizontal distance X travelled by the stone when it hits the ground at G.

X= m [4]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


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2 (a) Explain what is meant by an elastic collision. Use

[2]

(b) An ideal gas is contained in a thermally insulated cylinder by means of a


piston as shown in Fig 2.1. An atom of the gas collides with the piston, as
illustrated.

Fig 2.1
The piston in (b) is lowered so that the volume of the gas is reduced.
(i) Explain the difference in the speed of an atom of ideal gas after an
elastic collision with a moving piston and with a stationary piston
(assume mass of piston much greater than mass of an atom of the gas).
and hence use the kinetic theory to explain the changes to the
temperature of the gas as the piston is lowered.

[4]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


5 For
st
Examiner’s
(ii) Use the 1 law of thermodynamics to support your answer obtained in (i). Use

[3]

(c) Sketch on Fig 2.2, with the help of the two isotherms given, the variation in the
pressure of the gas in the cylinder as its volume is decreased.

Pressure

Volume
Fig 2.2

[1]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


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3 A microwave oven, shown in Fig 3.1 consists of a reflective casing on the opposite Use
wall of the microwave source and a turntable at the bottom that rotates. It produces
microwave of frequency 2.45 GHz within the oven.

Control
Reflective panel
casing

Turntable Microwave source


Fig 3.1 (behind control panel)

Water molecules are electric dipoles (that is, they have one positive end and one
negative end). In the oscillating field of the microwave oven, the water molecules in
trying to align with the changing field, oscillate rapidly. Thus the water molecules in
the food get heated up and hence the food gets heated up.

(a) Explain how are standing waves formed inside the microwave oven.

[3]

(b) The turntable of the oven is removed from the oven so that oven’s content
will not rotate during heating. A wet piece of cardboard is placed flat in a
microwave oven. The cardboard is then micro-waved for a short while. Stripes
of dry regions regularly spaced apart are seen on the cardboard.

(i) Explain the formation of these dry stripes and hence deduce their
distances apart.

[3]

(ii) If the interior of the microwave oven is 30.5 cm wide, draw a amplitude-
position graph of the standing wave pattern in the oven. Mark the
positions on the graph with “D” that would produce dry patches on the
wet cardboard as mentioned.

[2]
ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3
7 For
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Use
(c) The turntable of the oven is now placed back in the oven. After five minutes of
cooking a dish in a microwave wave, and upon removing it, it is noticed that
several ants are inside the oven apparently unharmed by the intense
microwave radiation. Deduce why some of the ants did not die.

[1]

(d) Explain the purpose of the turntable of the microwave oven?

[1]

4 A metal spring of natural length 20.0 cm fixed to the ceiling such that the bottom end
is at a height of 30.0 cm from the ground as shown in Fig 4.

20.0 cm

30.0 cm

Fig 4

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


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Examiner’s
(a) When the box of mass 5.00 kg hangs in equilibrium, the bottom end of the Use
spring is at a distance of 25.0 cm from the ground. Determine the spring
constant of the spring.

Spring constant = …………….. N m−1 [3]

(b) The box was then brought to a higher point, such that the bottom of the spring
was 40.0 cm above the ground. The box was subsequently released from rest.

(i) Calculate the speed of the box when the bottom of the spring is 30.0 cm
above the ground.

Speed = ……………… m s−1 [3]

(ii) Determine the nearest distance of the bottom of the spring from the
ground.

Distance = ……………… m [3]

(c) Explain why in practice, we expect the answer obtain in (b)(ii) to be larger.

[1]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


9 For
Examiner’s
Section B Use
Answer any two questions

5 A magnet, labeled Magnet A, is suspended vertically from a fixed point by means of


a spring, as shown in Fig. 5.1.

Fig. 5.1

One end of the magnet hangs inside a circular coil of wire. The coil is connected in
series with a resistor R.

(a) The magnet is displaced vertically downwards a small distance D and then
released. Fig. 5.2 shows the variation with time t of the vertical displacement d
of Magnet A from its equilibrium position.

Displacem ent / cm
D

Tim e / s

0 0.5 1 1.5 2

-D

Fig. 5.2

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


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Examiner’s
(i) Over the period t = 0.12s to t = 0.16s, the student estimates that the Use
magnetic flux density within the coil decreases from 120 mT to 30 mT.
Given the circular coil has a total of 80 turns and has a radius of 5.0 cm,
calculate the magnitude of the average emf induced in the coil during this
time.

Average emf = V [2]

(ii) Explain why the amplitude of the oscillation of Magnet A decreases with
time as shown in Fig 5.2.

[3]

(b) The student replaces Magnet A with another magnet labeled Magnet B of
exactly the same dimensions and mass. The student then repeats the
experiment as described in (a). Fig. 5.3 shows the variation with time t of the
vertical displacement d of Magnet A and Magnet B from its equilibrium position.
Displacem ent / cm
D

Magnet A
Tim e / s

Magnet B
0 0.5 1 1.5 2

-D

Magnet A Magnet B
Fig 5.3

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


11 For
Examiner’s
(i) Deduce from Fig 5.3 that the magnet field strength of Magnet B is Use
stronger compared to that of Magnet A.

[2]

(ii) State 2 adjustments that the student can apply to the apparatus in Fig
5.1 such that the amplitude of the oscillation using Magnet B (as shown
in Fig 5.3) could be increased.

[2]

(c) Magnet B is now replaced with the original Magnet A. The circular coil in Fig
5.1 is now removed and a flat horizontal coil is setup as shown in Fig 5.4.
When an alternating current is passed through the coil, the magnet vibrates
under forced oscillations. The graph, Fig. 5.5, shows how the amplitude of the
oscillations varies with f, the frequency of the alternating current where fo is the
natural frequency of the spring-magnet system.

Flat
horizontal
coil

Fig 5.4 Fig 5.5

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


12 For
Examiner’s
5 (c) (i) Explain why the magnet in the setup given in Fig 5.4 will undergo forced Use
oscillation.

[3]

(ii) State 2 parameters that will affect the amplitude of the forced oscillation.

[2]

(iii) Explain why the maximum amplitude of the forced oscillation occurs
when the driving frequency is at fo.

[1]

(iv) Suggest how the apparatus in Fig. 5.4 could be modified to make the
peak on Fig. 5.5 flatter, without significantly changing the frequency fo at
which the peak occurs.

[2]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


13 For
Examiner’s
(d) The frequency of the alternating current is now fixed at a certain frequency. Use
The displacement time graph of the magnet is as shown in Fig 5.6.
Displacem ent / cm
2

Tim e / s
0
0 0.5 1 1.5 2

-1

-2

Fig. 5.6

The same setup in Fig 5.1 is now placed back to its original position as shown
in Fig 5.7.

Fig. 5.7

Sketch, on Fig 5.8, the new displacement time graph of the magnet’s
oscillation.

[3]
Fig. 5.8

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


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Examiner’s
6 Fig 6.1 shows a spectroscope used to observe the emission line spectrum for a Use
hydrogen discharged tube subjected to a high voltage of 5000 V. The light emitted
from the discharged tube is passed through the collimator of the spectroscope and is
incident normally on a diffraction grating of 600 lines per mm.
Rotating Diffraction
table grating
Hydrogen
discharge Straight through
lamp θ position, θo

collimator

Diffracted
Telescope ray, θ1

Fig 6.1
(a) Four first order diffraction lines from the visible regions of the emission
spectrum of atomic hydrogen were observed on one side of the straight
through position. The reading of the straight through position and three of the
lines was recorded with the help of the telescope and the vernier scale on the
spectroscope. The data are as given in Fig 6.2.

Straight through position, θo = 289.3o

Line Readings, θ1 /o θ/ ο Wavelength Photon energy /J


number λ / nm
1 303.6 14.3 410.3 4.85 x 10-19
2
3 306.3 17.0 486.3 4.09 x 10-19 J
4 312.5

Fig 6.2

(i) Explain how the observation of the emission line spectrum provide
evidence of the existence of energy levels in atoms.

[3]

(ii) Explain clearly why we can use the term "atomic" given above even
though hydrogen gases exist as molecules.

[1]

(iii) Determine θ and hence the wavelength of line 4 for the spectrum given
to 4 sf and fill in your answer in Fig 6.2.

θ = …………o [2]
ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3
15 For
Examiner’s
(b) The telescope was replaced by a camera and a photograph taken of the same Use
spectrum. The emission line spectrum was superimposed on a scale shown in
Fig 6.3.

Line number

5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Scale readings / cm
Fig 6.3

(i) Fill in the line number which each line corresponds to in the boxes in
Fig 6.3. [1]

(ii) Hence complete the table given in Fig 6.4 with the corresponding line
number and the wavelength for Line number 1, 3 and 4.
0 cm on the scale coincides with the straight through position.
Line number Scale reading / cm Wavelength / nm
6.35
6.75
7.63
10.73
Fig 6.4 [1]

(iii) Plot a graph of wavelength against scale reading on Fig 6.5 and complete
Fig 6.4 for Line number 2.

[3]
Fig 6.5

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


16 For
Examiner’s
(c) (i) Determine the photon energies for Line 2 and 4. Use

Photon energies of Line 2 = ………....J


Line 4 = ……....... J [3]

(ii) Hence draw to scale a partial energy level map diagram for hydrogen
from your answer in (i) given that the the transitions are to level 2 of the
energy levels of atomic hydrogen, which belongs to the Balmer Series.
Show, and label clearly, the electron transitions responsible for the
emission lines observed.
Note that the energy value for Level 2 is − 5.44 x 10−19 J.

[4]

(d) (i) Explain why the size of each slit in the grating must be narrow.

[1]

(ii) State one advantage of having a large number of rulings (lines) on the
grating.

[1]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


17 For
Examiner’s
Use
7 (a) Explain what is meant by nuclear decay being spontaneous and random in nature.

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

(b) The 226Ra nucleus undergoes alpha decay according to


226 222 4
88 Ra→ 86 Rn+2 He

Particle Rest mass / u


226
88 Ra
226.0254
222 222.0176
86 Rn
4 4.0026
2 He

(i) Show that the energy released in this decay, Q, is 4.86 MeV.

[2]

(ii) This energy Q must be shared by the alpha particle and the daughter
nucleus. Use conservation of energy and momentum to show that
⎛ M ⎞
Q = K α ⎜1+ α ⎟
⎝ M ⎠
where Kα is the kinetic energy of the alpha particle,
Mα is the mass of the alpha particle, and
M is the mass of the daughter nucleus.

[3]

(iii) Hence find the kinetic energy of the alpha particle emitted in this decay
process. Comment on your answer with reference to (b)(i)

Kα = …………… MeV [3]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3 [Turn over


18 For
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Use
(c) Many radioisotopes have important industrial, medical and research applications.
One of these is 60Co, which has a half-life of 5.2 years and each 60Co nucleus
decays by emission of a beta particle (energy 0.31 MeV) and two gamma photons
(energies 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV respectively).

A scientist wishes to prepare a 60Co sealed source that will have an activity of at
least 37 x 1010 Bq after 30 months of use.

(i) Show that the initial minimum activity of 60Co when the scientist is preparing
the radioisotopes is 5.2 x 1011 Bq

[2]

(ii) Hence calculate the minimum initial mass in milligrams of 60Co required?

Minimum initial mass = …………. mg [4]

(iii) At what rate will the source emit energy after 30 months if its activity is
37 x 1010 Bq after 30 months of use.

Rate of energy emitted ……….. W [3]

(iv) With reference to the type and energies of the radiations emitted, suggest
which of the radiations emitted by 60Co decay could be used to detect the
uniformity of thickness of metal sheets.

………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………[1]

ACJC 2010 H2 9646 Prelim Exam P3


ACJC 2010 Prelims

H2 P1 Ans
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 Q11 Q12 Q13 Q14 Q15 Q16 Q17 Q18 Q19 Q20
A C B D D A D B C A B A C D D D D A B C
Q21 Q22 Q23 Q24 Q25 Q26 Q27 Q28 Q29 Q30 Q31 Q32 Q33 Q34 Q35 Q36 Q37 Q38 Q39 Q40
A A B B D B C B A D B D C B D C D B C A

H2P P2 Ans
1(a)(i) π
V= × d 3 , where d = 22 cm (accept values from18 cm to 24 cm)
6
∴V = 5.6 x 10-3 m3 (accept values from 3.0 to 7.5 x 10-3 m3 ); accept
corresponding values if alternative units are used (e.g. mm3 or m3)

1(a)(ii) 1
KE = mv 2 , where v = 10 m s-1 (accept values from 8 m s-1 to 12 m s-1) and
2
mass = 60 kg (accept values from 40 kg to 100 kg)
∴KE = 3000 J (accept values from 1900 J to 7200 J); accept corresponding
values if alternative units are used (e.g. kJ)

(iii) Density is between 800 to 1100 kg m-3

1(b)(i) The values are close to each other but very far from the expected value
which should be less than density of water (1000 kg m3).
Therefore, set B is precise but inaccurate.

1(b)(ii) - mass of beaker is included in the measurement of mass


- balance calibrated incorrectly
- negligence in zero-ing the weighing balance
(either one of the above)

2a(i) Graph is a straight line through the origin ⇒ a is directly proportional x


Graph is a straight line with negative gradient
⇒ a is in the opposite direction of x

(ii) ω2 = 250 rad s-1


Τ = 2π/ω
Τ = 0.40 s

(iii) Cosine curve


1
correct amplitude of 0.050 m and with 2 complete waves
2

(b) 2π 2π
ω= = =π rad s-1
T 2
Apply x = x0 sin ωt where x0 = 50 mm and x = 25 mm
Time interval when shuttle remains open ,
ACJC 2010 Prelims


⇒ 25 = 50 sin t
2
1
t= s ⇒ t = 0.167s
6

3 (a) force on magnet/ balance is downwards since reading increases


(so by Newton’s third law)force on the wire is upwards

(b) pole P is a north pole (using Fleming’s left hand rule) (allows ecf from (a))
(c) Egg shape field lines closer at the bottom and spread out at the top
Direction is clockwise

(d) F = B I L sin 90° and F = mg


2.3 x 10-3 x 9.8 = B x 2.6 x 4.4 x 10-2 ( g missing, then 0/2 in this mark)

∴ B = 0.20 T

4ai Draw a suitable circuit diagram for this investigation.

aii
I

V
ACJC 2010 Prelims

aiii As I and V increases, rate of atomic vibration increases


Number of free electrons remains the same, hence resistance increases

aiv ρl
Know that R = ; or mention that R depends on ρ
A
Therefore ρ must have been unique as R is unique at each temperature.

5(a)(i) Vs is (stopping potential). Electrons with max KE cannot reach the anode/cannot be
collected (as even they do not have enough energy to overcome the electrostatic
repulsive force between cathode and anode.)
(ii) (Electrons are emitted with a range of KE), hence when anode is make less negative
with respect to cathode, some electrons may be able to (overcome the electrostatic
repulsive force and) reach the anode
(iii) Saturation not achieved immediately once V is +ve because the electrons are
scattered randomly in different directions. (Hence with higher V, the path of more
electrons may be altered so that it is able to reach the anode due to the increased in
the magnitude of the electric force.)
(Saturation current is achieved at V1 when all emitted electrons are collected.)
5(b)(i) φ = 5.32 x 1.6 x 10-19 = 8.51 x 10-19 J
hc/λ = 8.51 x 10-19 J
λ= 2.34 x 10-7 m
(ii)
r
p =h/λ
r
p =2.83 x 10-27 N s (allow ecf)

6(a)(i) For bullet : Δx = 2.64 x 10-32 m (allow if given to 1 sf)


For electron Δx = 1.95 x 10-3 m (allow if given to 1 sf)
Both correct

(ii) For bullet, HUP sets no practical limit to the locating of the position of the bullet
accurately.
About 10-17 times diameter of nucleus
For electron, (the position of the electron is probabilistic.) Cannot determine its exact
position at any instant of time.
About 107 times diameter of an atom.

Explanation related to reasonable estimates on order of magnitude stated implicitly or


explicitly.

(b)(i) Quantum tunneling which is the phenomenon where the probability of the alpha particle
passing through the barrier is non-zero where classically it is unable to overcome the
barrier as it has less energy than the barrier.

(ii) The long half-life implies low decay constant which is the probability of decay per unit
time,
due to the error in the (huge) underestimate of the transmission probability of the
alpha particle.
ACJC 2010 Prelims

(iii) breaking the barrier into segments and (multiplying the successive tunneling
probabilities) or
r2
8 π 2m (U (r ) − E )
Use T proportional to exp ∫ −2 dr
r1 h2

(Note r is d in the formula) to account for the change of U with r.


(In this case r is from 9.01 to 26.90 fm

7(a)(i)

The body is a relatively good conductor. If the body is in contact with the
ground, the body and the ground will tend to make one equipotential surface.
So the body still have very nearly 0 potential difference between the head and
the feet.
(ii) 1800
Current Density =
4πr 2
1800
= (for correct substitutions)
(
4 × π × 6380 × 10 3 )
2

= 3.5 x 10-12 A m-2


Hence current density near the surface of earth is in the order of about 10-12 A
m-2
(iii) P = 4 x105 x 1800
= 720 MW (2 sf) (Accept 700 MW)
(b)(i) πd 2 H
Volume of cloud =
4
π (2 × 10 3 ) (2 × 10 3 )
2

=
4
= 6.283 x 109 m3
No. of droplets at lowest density = 50 x 106 m-3

Vol. of each droplet =


4
3
(
π 10 × 10 −6 )
3

= 4.189 x 10-15 m3
No. of droplets in the cloud = 50x106x6.283x109
= 3.14 x 1017
Total volume of water droplets = 3.14 x 1017x4.189x10-15
= 1.315 x 103 m3
ACJC 2010 Prelims

Mass of cloud = 1.315x103 ρ w


= 1.315x106 kg
(b) (ii) Volume
Rainfall =
Area
1.315 × 10 3
=
π (1 × 10 3 )
2

= 0.42 mm
(c) W = Q ×V
(i)
= 20 x 1 x 108
= 2 x 109 J
(ii) W
P = VI or P=
t
2 x109
=108 x 20 000 =
10−3
= 2 x 1012 W = 2 x 1012 W
Accept approx 109 / 10-3
(iii) dV
E=−
dr
80 × 10 3
E = (Accept 60 x 103 / 0.07)
0.07
= 1.14 x 106 V m-1
Since the electric field at the top of the tower is greater than the order of 105 (a
few hundred thousands V m-1), a return stroke is likely to occur.
(d) (i) The electrical discharge results in heating up of the atmosphere around the
lightning channel.
The sudden rise in pressure causes the air around it to expand rapidly resulting
in an explosion of the air.
(ii) Distance (m) = 330 (m s-1) x t (s)
(Assuming time taken by light is
negligible)
= 330t m

330 (3 x108 − 330)d


= t km t=
1000 9.9 x1010
t
= km
3
(e)(i) ⎛I ⎞
120 = 10 log⎜⎜ 1 ⎟⎟
⎝ I0 ⎠
⎛I ⎞
124.8 = 10 log⎜⎜ 2 ⎟⎟
⎝ I0 ⎠
⎛I ⎞ ⎛I ⎞ I1 = 1.0 W m-2 and
124.8 − 120 = 10 log⎜⎜ 2 ⎟⎟ − 10 log⎜⎜ 1 ⎟⎟
⎝ I0 ⎠ ⎝ I0 ⎠ I2 = 100.48 W m-2 found separately
ACJC 2010 Prelims

⎛I ⎞
4.8 = 10 log⎜⎜ 2 ⎟⎟
⎝ I1 ⎠
⎛I ⎞
0.48 = log⎜⎜ 2 ⎟⎟
⎝ I1 ⎠
I2
10 0.48 =
I1
1

r2
I 1 r1 = I 2 r2
2 2

2
I 2 r1
= = 10 0.48
I 1 r2 2
2
2
2
= 10 0.48
r2
r2 = 1.15 km
ACJC 2010 Prelims

.
Basic procedure
Mentioned that ionisation current and air pressure measured or
B1
State IV is P and DV is ionization current
Explain how pressure is varied using vacuum pump B1

[2]

Diagram shows
Correct electrical circuit; power supply must be shown. B1
Alpha source between electrodes, Pressure gauge/Bourdon Gauge and Vacuum pump/ air
B1
pump shown connected correctly.
[2]

Measurements
Measure ionisation current using milliammeter / microammeter / galvanometer B1
Measure air pressure using pressure sensor with datalogger or direct reading from
B1
pressure gauge / Bourdon gauge
(accepted if shown on diagram) [2]

Control of variables
Measure that activity of source is ensured to be constant by using a source with long half-
B1
life / high activity / checked by using radiation detector.
Separation of parallel metal plates is kept constant throughout the experiment B1

Position of source is kept constant wrt plates B1

[max 2]

Any further detail


Use Americium 241, 185 kBq as alpha particle emitter (a relatively pure alpha emitter) B1
Source of 185 kBq is also relatively safe to use in a school laboratory with standard basic
B1
precautions
Use high voltage (50 V to 1000 V) power supply as current is very small B1

Place source close to plates as alpha particles have short range in air B1

Electrical insulation between electrode plates and walls of metal case B1

8 sets of data is collected (4 below and 4 above atmospheric pressure) B1


Count recorded over a fixed duration of 1 or 2 minutes if using detector to check for
B1
constant activity
Source placed near to detector if using detector to check for constant activity. B1

Tap pressure gauge /Bourdon gauge when taking readings in case needle sticks B1
Plot suitable graph to verify proposed relationship (eg log I vs log P) with suggested conclusion
given B1
(Do not accept if mention plot I against P)
[max 3]

Safety

Use of source handling tool B1

Source kept in lead container when not in use B1

Do not point source at anyone / do not look directly at source B1

Use safety goggles when working with low/high pressure (Do not award if no explanations given) B1

Use safety screen in case of explosions B1

[max 1]
2010 H2 Prelims  

H2 P3 

1(a) Vertical component of tension = weight of stone


Horizontal component of tension/centripetal force is perpendicular to the
velocity or direction of motion.
Horizontal component of tension/Centripetal force/constant net force points
towards a fixed point.
Constant tension supplied to maintain constant centripetal force
Horizontal component of tension/Centripetal force/constant net force just
sufficient to provide circular motion for a given v and r
Constant energy supplied to stone (Do not accept Apply const v)

(b) H = ½ g t2

T sin θ > mv2/r when v decreases, hence at this instant r decreases.


When r decreases, θ decreases.
Hence from T cos θ > W, therefore T must decrease so that there will be
vertical equilibrium

(c) X = v t and H = ½ g t2 . Use H = ½ g t2

gX2
H= t = 2.944 s
2v2

2H
X=v
g
2 (42.5)
= (22.8) (for correct
9.81 Use X = ut
substitutions)

= 67.1 m X = 67.1 m
2010 H2 Prelims  

2a An elastic collision is a collision in which the (total) kinetic energy of system


is conserved,
total linear momentum and total energy of the system are all conserved

b(i)
m  M  v m M 
v
u   vv   V v

Before Collision  After collision 
For an elastic collision with a stationary piston, the speed of the gas remains
the same when it bounce off in the opp direction
With a piston moving down, using the fact that relative speed of approach =
rel speed of separation, its rebound speed will be greater than that earlier

Since for ideal gas, T is dependent on ave KE of molecule alone,


Higher ave speed implies higher ave KE, hence Temperature rises

(ii) Apply ∆U=Q+W where


ΔU = Increase in internal energy, Q is heat supplied to system + W is WD
on system
mentions that Q=0 and work done is done on gas(or W is +ve), hence
higher internal energy,
For ideal gas, Internal energy depends on temp alone
thus higher temperature

(iii)

Process shown correctly

 
 
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
3(a) There are standing waves produced in the microwave oven during the
cooking process because incident wave from the left gets reflected by the
reflective wall on the right and they superimpose /overlap /interfere
The conditions must be right such that the distance between the source and
wall must be integral multiples of half the wavelength of the microwave.to
form standing wave
as they have the same speed, frequency and almost the same amplitude

(b)(i) Intensity of the microwave is strongest (largest amplitudes) at the


antinodes, hence the dry regions are the regions of antinodes
Wavelength = 3.0 x 108/2.45 x 109
= 0.1224 m = 12.2 cm
Hence distance apart is 6.1 cm

(ii)

D D D D D
Standing wave pattern drawn with ends as nodes
(need not have 5 loops)
5 Ds shown
(c) So there are regions in the oven where the microwave has high amplitude
(antinodes) and there are region where the microwave has no displacement
(node). Thus ants can stay away from the regions of high amplitude which
has high heat and thus stay alive.
Understand that the ants will stay away from the position of antinodes to stay
alive.

(d) The turntable enables different parts of the food to move to the antinodes of
the standing wave and get heated up. Thus it helps heat up the food more
uniformly.

     
2010 H2 Prelims  

4a) F spring= kx

5 x 9.81 = k(0.05)
k=.981 N m-1
(No not penalize for inconsistent –ve sign that appears) – Pls annotate BOD

4b By conservation of energy,
(i) At a height 40cm, the contraction of spring is 10 cm.
Energy stored in spring = ½ (981)(0.1)2
= 4.905 J
Energy gain = Energy lost
½ mv2= mgh + 4.905
 
½ (5)v2= (5)(9.81)(0.1)+4.905 = 9.81
v= 1.98 m s-1
(ii) By conservation of energy,
Let final extension be x (measured from natural length)
Energy at natural length= Energy at lowest point Initial energies = final energies
2
9.81 = - (5)(9.81)x + ½ (981)x 4.905 =-5 (9.81)(x+0.1) + ½ (981)x2
490.5 x2 – 49.05 x – 9.81 = 0
50 x2 – 5x – 1 = 0
Hence x = -0.10 (initial released point) or + 0.20 (lowest point)
Hence lowest point is (0.30 – 0.20) = 0.10 m above the ground.

4c In reality, it is larger. There will be some energy lost due presence of air
resistance/friction in spring and thus less energy will be available for
conversion to elastic potential energy.

 
2010 H2 Prelims  

5  (a)(i)  | ε | = | - dΦ/dt |
 
= | - NA dB/dt |
    = | - (80) * (π * 0.052) * (30-120)*10-3 / (0.16-0.12) |  
    = 1.41 V  
    (ignore –ve sign)  
  (a)(ii)  When the magnet is oscillating, an emf will be induced in the coils and
thus induced current will flow since circuit is closed resulting in  
either electrical energy being dissipated or heating effect of coils
    Hence total (mechanical) energy of the magnet-spring system
decreases continuously as it is being converted into the electrical  
energy in the coil
    As amplitude of oscillations depends on amount of mechanical
 
energy present,
    Hence the amplitude decreases continuously  
     

  (b)(i)  A lower amplitude indicates that


more ME is converted into
A lower amplitude indicates that
electrical energy over each cycle,
there is greater damping /induced  
(that can only be the result of a
force,
higher induced emf, hence induced
current)
    (Since system has same frequency (Since system has same frequency
and started with same amplitude) and started with same amplitude)
and N and A are constant, higher This is due to greater induced  
induced emf must be due to higher emf/current which must be due to
rate of change of B. greater rate of change of B
    Magnet field strength of Magnet B
   
is stronger than that of Magnet A

  (b)(ii)  • Reduce the number of coil. Since | ε | = | - NA dB/dt |, a lower N will  


result in a lower induced emf, therefore higher amplitude for the  
oscillation  
• Use a wire with higher resistance. Same emf will result in a lower  
induced current  
• Use a resistor with higher resistance. Same emf will result in a lower  
induced current  
• Use coil of smaller cross-sectional area  
• Use spring of smaller k  
 
 
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
c (i) As the current pass through the coil, the coil will generate a magnetic field  
and will behave like a magnet. As the current is alternating, the polarity of
this coil will change as the direction of the current flow changes.
The magnet will then be attracted and repelled by the coil as the current
changes direction.

As the alternating current in sinusoidal, the force exerted on the magnet  


will also be sinusoidal and therefore, the magnet will be forced into a
sinusoidal motion.
Idea that coil generates an alternating(sinusoidal) field  
Idea that magnetic force created is hence also alternating  
(and its magnitude is proportional to I at that instant.)  
with the same frequency as the ac supply.  
    Hence magnet is undergoing forced oscillation.   
(ii) • Amount of damping on the driven system
• The relative values of the natural frequency of the driven system and
the value of the frequency of the external driving force
• Amplitude of the periodic driving force
• More turns used in the coil

(iii) Maximum energy transfer to driven system when driving frequency is


equal to (approaches the) natural frequency of system.
(iv) Mention that method is to increase damping on system
Any suitable method that increases damping, examples
• Attached an object of large surface area to the magnet
• submerged magnet in a viscous fluid
Alternative:
Use AC of lower amplitude
This will result in lower amplitude for all frequencies, hence flatter
peak.    
  (d)    Displacem ent / cm
 
  2
 
 
 
1
 
 
  Tim e / s

  0
  0 0.5 1 1.5 2
 
  -1
 
 
 
-2
 
 
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
6  (a)(i)  The distinct lines shows that only photons of certain frequency are emitted.   
    This took place for electron transition from  higher energy levels to a lower energy   
levels. 
    This electron transition results in the release of a photon from the atom of an   
amount of energy (E = hν) equal to the difference in energy of the electronic energy 
levels involved in the transition. 
    Hence showing the energy levels are quantised.   
  (ii)  The high voltage applied broke the bonds of the hydrogen molecules into its   
(isolated) atoms (and promote the electrons into higher energy levels.) 
       
  (iii)  θ = 23.2o   
    λ = 656.6 nm   
       
  (b)(i)  1,2,3,4 L to R   
  (ii)  1 – 410.3 nm; 3 – 486.3 nm; 4 – 656.6 nm (no ecf)   
  (iii)  All 3 points plotted correctly  

    Axes given to correct units   
    Wavelength read correctly as 435 nm (theoretical  value 434 nm)   
(accept 430 to 440 nm as read correctly from graph) 
       
  (c)(i)  E = hc/λ   
    E = 6.63 x 10‐34 x 3 x 108/λ  
(correct sub for h and c)
    E2 = 4.57 x 10‐19 J(allow ecf) 
    E4 = 3.03 x 10‐19 J   
  (credit given only if both calculations are correct) 
 
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
  (ii)     
  6 (‐0.59 x 10‐19
‐19
 J) 
5 (‐0.87 x 10‐19  J) 
  4 (‐1.35 x 10  J) 
  3 (‐2.41 x 10‐19 J) 
 
1  2  3 4
 
 
  2 (‐5.44 x 10‐19 J) 
 
 
    5 energy levels draw with decreasing spacing   
    Scale correct   
    Transitions all correct    
    Energy values all correct    
       
  (d)(i)  For significant diffraction to occur so that higher wavelength photons could be   
observed. 
Accept (so that lines further away from straight through position are observable) 
  (ii)  Brighter line spectrum / better contrast   
Any other acceptable answer 
       
       
       
 
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
7a Random
Impossible to predict when and which individual nuclide will decay
OR
There is a constant probability or decay
Or
Unable to predict which atom and how many will decay at the next instant
of time

Spontaneous: Decay is unaffected by environmental changes such as temp


/ pressure, external source of energy supplied etc.
7bi Q = (MRa − MRn − Mα )c 2

( ) (
= ( 226.0254 − 222.0176 − 4.0026 ) × 1.66 × 10−27 × 3 × 108 )
2

= 7.7688 × 10−13 J
= 4.86 MeV
ii COM: MV + MαV = 0 --------- (1)
1 1 2
COE: Q = MV 2 + MαVα --------- (2)
2 2
⎛M ⎞
From (1): V = −⎜ α ⎟Vα -------------- (3)
⎝M ⎠
Subst (3) into (2)

2
1 ⎛ ⎛ Mα ⎞ ⎞ 1 2
Q = M⎜ −⎜ ⎟Vα ⎟ + MαVα
2 ⎝ ⎝M ⎠ ⎠ 2
1 2⎛ M ⎞
= MαVα ⎜ α + 1⎟
2 ⎝M ⎠
⎛M ⎞
= K α ⎜ α + 1⎟
⎝M ⎠
 
   

iii ⎛ 4.0026 ⎞
4.86 = Kα ⎜ + 1⎟ (correct substitution shown)
⎝ 222.0176 ⎠
Kα = 4.77 MeV
The alpha particles carries away most of the energy – 98 %
7ci ⎛ ln2
-⎜

×2.5 ⎟
A0 e ⎝ 5.2 ⎠
≥ 37 × 1010
A0 ≥ 5.16(3) × 1011 Bq
A0 = 5.2 × 1011 Bq
2010 H2 Prelims  

 
ii λ = ln2 (5.2 × 365 × 24 × 60 × 60)
= 4.2268 x 10-9 s-1
A0 = λ N0
5.2 × 1011 Bq
N0 =
ln2 (5.2 × 365 × 24 × 60 × 60)
= 1.23 x 1020
m
1.23 × 1020 = 6.02 × 1023 ×
60
m = 12.3 mg
iii Energy emitted per decay = 0.31+1.17+1.33=2.81 MeV
Rate =( 2.81 x 1.6 x 10-13 J) x 37 x 1010 decay per second
= 166 mW
iv The β-decay energy is low compared to the γ-ray.

Hence the (2) strong γ-lines, could be used as a γ-ray source to check for
uniformity of the thickness of metal sheets in the industries
 
 
Name: ……………………….…………………. HT group: …………...

CATHOLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE


JC2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2010

PHYSICS 9646/ 01
Higher 2

Paper 1 Multiple Choice Questions Friday 17 September 2010


1 hour 15 minutes

Additional materials: MCQ answer sheet

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write in soft pencil.


Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
Write your name, HT group and NRIC/ Fin number on the MCQ Answer Sheet. Shade
your NRIC/ Fin number correctly on the MCQ Answer Sheet in the spaces provided.

There are 40 questions on this paper. Answer all questions. For each question there
are four possible answers A, B, C, D.
Choose the one you consider correct and record your choice in soft pencil on the
separate Answer Sheet.

Read the instructions on the Answer Sheet very carefully.

Each correct answer will score one mark. A mark will not be deducted for a wrong
answer. Any rough working should be done in this booklet.

This question paper consists of 15 printed pages.


PHYSICS DATA:

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1


permeability of free space, μ0 = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space, ε0 = 8.85 x 10-12 F m-1
≈ (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton, mP = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10-23 mol-1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s-2

PHYSICS FORMULAE:

uniformly accelerated motion, s = u t + ½ a t2


v2 = u2 + 2 a s
work done on / by a gas, W = p ΔV
Hydrostatic pressure P = ρgh
gravitational potential, φ = –Gm/r
Displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = x0 sin ωt
Velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = v0 cos ωt

= 2
± ω x0 − x2
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + ...
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ...
electric potential, V = Q / 4 π ε0 r
alternating current / voltage, x = x0 sin ωt
Transmission coefficient T = exp (-2kd)

8 π2 m (U – E )
where k =
h2

radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(-λt)


decay constant, λ = 0.693
t1
2

2
1. The power loss P through a resistor is found by measuring the potential difference V across the
resistor and the current I through it. The equation is given by P = VI. The voltmeter has a 4%
uncertainty and the ammeter reading has a 3% uncertainty. What is the uncertainty in the power
calculated?
A 3% B 4% C 7% D 12 %

2. A student made a series of measurements of the diameter d, of a wire using four micrometer
screw gauges A, B, C and D. The table shows the measurements taken.

If the actual diameter of the wire was 1.49 mm, which micrometer screw gauge produced a set of
readings that could be described as accurate but not precise?

micrometer screw
Readings d/ mm
gauge
A 1.49 1.46 1.52 1.50
B 1.48 1.58 1.51 1.40
C 1.35 1.37 1.42 1.42
D 1.32 1.37 1.41 1.50

3. A man stands on the edge of a cliff. He throws a stone upwards with a velocity of 19.6 m s-1 at
time t = 0. The stone reaches the top of the trajectory after 2.00 s and then falls towards the
bottom of the cliff. Air resistance is negligible.

Which row shows the correct velocity v and acceleration a of the stone at different times?

t /s v / m s-1 a / m s-2
A 2.00 0 0
B 1.00 9.81 9.81
C 5.00 -29.4 -9.81
D 3.00 9.81 -9.81

4. The sketch graph below describes the motion of a ball rebounding from a horizontal surface after
being released from a point above the surface.

The quantity represented on the y-axis is the ball’s


A Velocity C Acceleration
B Kinetic energy D Displacement

3
5. Two objects, X and Y, were dropped from rest from a tall tower on a wind-free day. In the graph
below are plotted their squared velocities as a function of their height above the ground.

From the information given in the graph and knowledge of the properties of bodies falling under
the influence of gravity, it is possible to say that the two objects

A experienced unequal viscous drag


B had different masses
C hit the ground at the same time
D were not dropped simultaneously

6. A proton (mass 1 u) travelling with velocity +0.100 c collides elastically head-on with a helium
nucleus (mass 4 u) travelling with velocity -0.050 c.

What are the velocities of each particle after the collision?


proton Helium nucleus
A +0.140 c +0.010 c
B -0.140 c +0.010 c
C +0.233 c -0.083 c
D -0.233 c +0.083 c

7. Which of the following pairs of forces is an action-reaction pair?

A Weight of a floating object and the upthrust acting on it.


B The force a ladder leaning on a smooth wall exerts on the rough floor and the normal
reaction from the floor
C The force a ladder leaning on a smooth wall exerts on the wall and the normal reaction force
from the wall
D Weight of a parachutist and the pull of the parachute on him when he is moving with
terminal velocity

4
8. The given diagram shows a column of dry air trapped by mercury in a narrow test tube.

Which graph best shows how the length l of the air column varies with the angle θ of the tube to
the vertical?
A C

B D

9. A right-angle rule hangs at rest from a peg P as shown below. It is made from a metal sheet of
uniform density. One arm is L cm long while the other is 2L cm long.

The angle θ at which it will hang is


A 8o B 14o C 42o D 76o

10. An object in a space capsule orbiting the Earth seems to be floating.

Which statement describes the forces acting on the object?

A There are no forces on the object.


B The centrifugal force on the object is equal and opposite to its weight.
C The centripetal force on the object is equal and opposite to its weight.
D The weight of the object is the only force acting on it.

5
11. A spring fixed at one end, has a mass attached to the other end. The mass bounces up and
down. It is shown in the diagram at three positions X, Y and Z.

Which line gives the kinetic, gravitational potential and elastic potential energies?

Kinetic energy Gravitational potential Elastic potential energy


energy
A zero at X maximum at X maximum at X
B maximum at Y zero at Z maximum at Y
C zero at Z zero at Z zero at X
D maximum at Y maximum at X maximum at Z

12. A space vehicle of mass m re-enters the Earth’s atmosphere at an angle θ to the horizontal.
Because of air resistance, the vehicle travels at a constant speed v.

The heat shield of the vehicle dissipates heat at a rate P, so that the mean temperature of the
vehicle remains constant.

Taking g as the relevant value of the acceleration of free fall, which expression is equal to P.

A mgv
B mgv sinθ
C 1
mv 2
2
D 1
mgv 2 sin 2 θ
2

6
13. A segment of the rollercoaster track in an amusement park is illustrated.

In this segment, the carriage descends from rest at H, moves through the vertical loop with its
top at A, and then over a hump at B. The friction between the carriage and the track may be
taken as negligible.

If the carriage is to complete the loop without leaving the track, what is the minimum value of the
height y?

A 30 m B 27 m C 25 m D 23 m

14 A comet of mass m is moving around Planet X in an elliptical orbit. It is moving with a speed v
when it is at P at a distance r from the Planet’s centre. What is the total energy of the comet at P
(Mass of Planet X is M)
P
Comet

r
Planet X

A GMm 1 B GMm 1 C GMm D GMm 1


+ mv 2 − + mv 2 −( + mv 2 )
r 2 r 2 r r 2

15. Points X and Y are two points at a distance of R and 3R from the centre of the Earth
respectively. The gravitational potential is -1.0 MJ kg-1 at point X. What is the change in potential
energy when a 30 kg mass is moved from Y to X?

A -20 MJ B 20 MJ C -40 MJ D 40 MJ

7
16. The graphs below show how the displacement x, velocity v and the acceleration a of a body vary
with time t when it is oscillating with simple harmonic motion.

What is the value of T?

A π/ 9 B 2π / 9 C 2π / 3 D 2π

17. A mass hanging from a spring suspended from the ceiling is pulled down and released. The
mass then oscillates vertically with simple harmonic motion of period T. The graph shows how
its distance from the ceiling varies with time t.
Distance from
ceiling /cm
100

30

t
0 T/4 T/2

What can be deduced from this graph?

A The amplitude of the oscillation is 70 cm C The kinetic energy is a maximum at t =


T/2
B The restoring force on the mass increases D The speed is a maximum at t = T/4
between t = 0 and t = T/4

18. A metal block X, of mass m, at 0oC comes into contact with another metal block Y, of mass 2m,
at 100 oC. Heat conduction takes place with no loss to the surroundings. The final equilibrium
temperature of the blocks is 20 oC. If the specific heat capacities of the two metals are cx and cy
respectively, then

A cx = 8 cy B cx = 4 cy C cx = 2 cy D cx = ½ cy
8
19. Air is enclosed in a cylinder by a gas-tight, frictionless piston of cross-sectional area 3.0 × 10–3
m2. When atmospheric pressure is 100 kPa, the piston settles 80 mm from the end of the
cylinder. The piston is then pulled out until it is 320 mm from the end of the cylinder and is held
there. The temperature of the air in the cylinder returns to its original value.
80 mm piston 320 mm
air
F

What is the force F required to hold the piston in its new position?

A 75 N B 100 N C 225 N D 300 N

20. Which one of the following statements is not correct?

A Boiling always occurs at a higher temperature than evaporation.


B In boiling, the most energetic molecules of the liquid escape leaving behind molecules with
lower energies while in evaporation, all molecules have the same energy.
C Evaporation occurs at any temperature but the boiling point depends on the external
pressure.
D The rates of evaporation and boiling are dependent on the surface area of the liquid.

21. A mechanical wave of frequency 300 Hz travels along a railway line at 6 km s-1. Two points on
the rail which are 250 cm apart are out of phase by

A 0 rad B π rad C π / 2 rad D π / 4 rad

22. A boy blows gently across the top of a piece of glass tubing the low end of which is closed by his
finger so that the tube gives its fundamental note of frequency, f. While blowing, he removes his
finger from the lower end. The note he then hears will have a frequency of approximately

A ¼f B ½f C 2f D 4f

23. Two loudspeakers L1 and L2, driven by a common oscillator and amplifier, are set up as shown.
As the frequency of the oscillator increases from zero, the detector at D recorded a series of
maximum and minimum signals. At what frequency is the first maximum observed?
(Speed of sound = 330 m s-1)

40 m
L1
D

9m

L2

A 165 Hz B 330 Hz C 495 Hz D 660 Hz

9
24. A sphere of weight 1.6 x 10-3 N has an electric charge of 2.0 μC. It is released from rest, in
vacuum between two parallel, vertical metal plates. The separation of the plates is 0.10 m and
the potential difference between them is 80 V. The point of release of the sphere is within the
region of uniform electric field between the plates. The arrangement is shown in the diagram.

Which path does the sphere follow after release?

+2.0 μC

25. The diagram below shows the variation of the electric potential V with the distance d along a
straight line in a particular electric field.

At which point is the magnitude of the electric field greatest?

26. Two wires P and Q, each of the same length and the same material, are connected in parallel to
a battery. The diameter of P is half that of Q.

What fraction of the total current passes through P?

A 0.20 B 0.25 C 0.33 D 0.50

10
27. The diagram shows three resistors of resistances 2 Ω, 20 Ω and 3 Ω connected in series. A
potential difference of 20 V is maintained across them. Point Q is earthed.

20 V

P Q R S
2Ω 20 Ω 3Ω

Which of the following gives the potentials at points P, Q, R and S?

Potential at
P Q R S
A 20 V 18.4 V 2.4 V 0V
B 1.6 V 0V 16 V 18.4 V
C 20 V 16 V -6V - 20 V
D 1.6 V 0V - 16 V - 18.4 V

28. A battery of e.m.f. E and internal resistance r delivers a current I through a variable resistance R.

E r

A
I

R
R is set at two different values and the corresponding currents I are measured using an ammeter
of negligible resistance.

R/Ω I/A
1.0 3.0
2.0 2.0

What is the value of e.m.f E?

A 3.0 V B 3.5 V C 4.0 V D 6.0 V

11
29. An electric heater can be represented as two resistors of resistances R1 and R2 and two
switches S1 and S2. The resistance R2 is greater than that of R1.

S1
R1

S2
R2

Which switches must be closed so that the heater produces the maximum possible power and
the minimum non-zero power?

maximum possible power minimum non-zero power


A S1 and S2 S2
B S1 and S2 S1
C S1 S2
D S2 S1

30. A bar magnet is to be placed in a non-uniform magnetic field as shown.

Which line of the table describes the subsequent motion of the magnet?

Rotation Movement
A anticlockwise to the left
B anticlockwise to the right
C clockwise to the left
D clockwise to the right

31. When an alternating current flows through a resistor of 5 Ω, heat is dissipated a rate of 20 W.
What is the peak value of this alternating current?

A 1.41 A B 2.00 A C 2.83 A D 4.00 A

12
32. A sinusoidal alternating current has period T. The r.m.s. value of the current in a resistor is I and
the mean power dissipated in the resistor is P.

Which statement is correct?

A 2π
The frequency is .
T
B The maximum power dissipated in the resistor is P 2 .
C I
The peak current is .
2
D P
The r.m.s. voltage is .
I

33. The graph shows the variation with time of the magnetic flux linking a coil.

flux

0
0 t 2t time
Which graph shows the variation with time of the e.m.f. induced in the coil?

A C
e.m.f

e.m.f

0
0
0 t 2t time
0 t 2t time
B D
e.m.f e.m.f

0 0
0 t 2t time 0 t 2t time

34. The de Broglie wavelength of a rifle bullet of mass 0.02 kg which is moving at a speed of
300 m s-1 is

A 7.3 x 10-36 m B 1.8 x 10-35 m C 1.1 x 10-34 m D 9.9 x 10-33 m

13
35. Which of the following statements is true?

A A beam of electrons directed at a vessel of cold gas can cause the formation of either an
absorption or emission line spectrum.
B A beam of white light directed at a vessel of cold gas can cause the formation of either an
absorption or emission line spectrum.
C A beam of electrons directed at a vessel of cold gas can only cause the formation of an
absorption line spectrum.
D A beam of electrons directed at a vessel of cold gas can only cause the formation of an
emission line spectrum.

36. A beam of 5.0 eV electrons strikes a potential energy barrier of height 6.5 eV and thickness
0.70 nm, at a rate equivalent to a current of 1000 A. How long would it take for an electron to be
transmitted?

A 0 B 1.03 x 10-18 s C 1.55 x 10-4 s D 6.27 x 109 s

37. One of the characteristics of laser light is that it is monochromatic. Which of the following
statement explains this characteristic?

A The excited electrons are in a metastable state.


B The system is in a state of population inversion.
C Stimulated emission causes the emitted photon and the incident photon to be of the same
phase.
D Photons of the same energy as that of the incident photons are emitted when the electrons
transit down from a higher energy level.

38. The diagram below is a representation of a diode.


p-n junction

P-type N-type

A B C D

Depletion
region

Which of the following statements is false?

A The overall charge in Region B is negative.


B When Group III atoms in region B accept electrons from neighbouring Group IV atoms, a
depletion region is formed.
C The potential barrier decreases when a positive potential is applied to region A and a
negative potential is applied to region D.
D Under forward-biased condition, electrons moves from D to A.

14
39. In an experiment to investigate the nature of the atom, a very thin gold film was bombarded with
α-particles.

Which pattern of deflection of the α-particles was observed?

A A few α-particles were deflected through angles greater than a right angle.
B All α-particles were deflected from their original path.
C No α-particle was deflected through an angle greater than a right angle.
D An interference pattern was observed.

40. A sample of pure potassium chloride is found to be radioactive due to the presence of 40K. The
sample contains 9.49 x 1019 atoms of 40K when the activity is measured to be 1600 Bq. The
half-life of the radioactive decay of 40K is

A 1.67 x 10-17 s B 5.93 x 1016 s C 4.11 x 1016 s D 1.30 years

END OF PAPER 1

15
Name: ……………………….…………………. HT group: …………...

CATHOLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE


JC2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2010

PHYSICS 9646/ 2
Higher 2

Paper 2 Structured Questions Monday 30 August 2010


1 hours 45 minutes

Candidates answer on the Question Papers provided

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your name and tutorial group on all the work you hand in.

Write in dark blue or black pen in the spaces provided on the Question Paper.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staple, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.

Answer all questions.

The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.
Total marks for Paper 2 is 72 marks.

A total of 2 marks will be deducted for mistakes made in units and significant figures.

Paper 2 consists of 18 printed pages.

Marks
Awarded
Sec A 1 5
2 10
3 11
4 8
5 8
6 18
Sec B 7 12
Total 72
PHYSICS DATA:

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1


permeability of free space, μ0 = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space, ε0 = 8.85 x 10-12 F m-1
≈ (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton, mP = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10-23 mol-1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s-2

PHYSICS FORMULAE:

uniformly accelerated motion, s = u t + ½ a t2


v2 = u2 + 2 a s
work done on / by a gas, W = p ΔV
Hydrostatic pressure P = ρgh
gravitational potential, φ = –Gm/r
Displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = x0 sin ωt
Velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = v0 cos ωt

= 2
± ω x0 − x2
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + ...
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ...
electric potential, V = Q / 4 π ε0 r
alternating current / voltage, x = x0 sin ωt
Transmission coefficient T = exp (-2kd)

8 π2 m (U – E )
where k =
h2

radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(-λt)


decay constant, λ = 0.693
t1
2

2
SECTION A
ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS
IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU SPEND ABOUT 1 HOUR AND 15 MINUTES ON THIS SECTION.

1 When a solid is heated, the thermal energy required is given by the expression

gain in thermal energy = mass X c X temperature rise, where c is a constant.

(a) Name the quantities in the expression that are SI base quantities.

…………………………………………………….......................................................................... [1]

(b) Express, in terms of SI base units, the units of

(i) thermal energy,

unit of thermal energy = ………………………… [2]

(ii) the constant c.

unit of c = …………………………
[2]

3
2 An aeroplane is flying horizontally at a steady speed of 67 m s-1 and an object is dropped off from the
aeroplane.

(a) Assume that the air resistance is negligible.

(i) Show that the vertical component of the velocity of the object is approximately 40 m s-1
when it has fallen 80 m.

[2]
(ii) Determine the magnitude and direction of the resultant velocity of the object at this point.

Magnitude of velocity =........................................................ m s-1

[3]
Direction of velocity =.................................................................

4
(b) In practice, air resistance acts on the object during the fall. The air resistance may be
assumed to be proportional to the square of the speed.

State and explain how the magnitude of the horizontal and vertical components of the velocity
of the object vary with time.

Horizontal component of velocity:

............……………………………………………………………………………………………....

............……………………………………………………………………………………………....

............…………………………………………………………………………………………….... [1]

Vertical component of velocity:

...........…………………………………………………………………………………………….....

...........…………………………………………………………………………………………….....

............……………………………………………………………………………………………....

............……………………………………………………………………………………………....

............……………………………………………………………………………………………....

............…………………………………………………………………………………………….... [2]

(c) Sketch and label the path of the object in Fig. 2

(i) without air resistance,

(ii) with air resistance.

Horizontal distance from the point of drop off [2]

Start of fall

vertical
distance from
the point of
drop off

Fig. 2

5
3 (a) A train of mass 2.2 x 105 kg is traveling at a speed of 20 km h-1 and it requires a power of
900 kW.

(i) Calculate the driving force exerted on the train.

driving force = …………..……………... N [2]

(ii) What additional power must be supplied if the train is to maintain at a speed of 20 km h-1
on a slope which rises 1 m for every 60 m of track?

additional power = ………………………….. W [2]

(iii) A simple pendulum hangs from the roof of one of the compartments. Calculate the
inclination of the string to the vertical as seen by a passenger as it slows down and
reaching station at a rate of 0.667 m s-2. Explain your reasoning with a suitable diagram.

angle of inclination = ………………..°

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
[3]

6
(b) A student wishes to find the volume of stone. He suspends the stone in air from a cord which is
attached to a force sensor as shown in Fig. 2.a. He then submerges the stone fully in a beaker
of water (see Fig. 2.b).

Force Force
sensor Sensor

Cord

Stone Beaker of
water

Fig. 2.a Fig. 2.b

(i) State and explain the change in the force sensor reading.

…………………………………………………………………………….......................................

................................................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) Explain how volume of the stone can be determined from the readings of the force sensor
and the density of water.

…………………………………………………………………………….......................................

................................................................................................................................................

…………………………………………………………………………….......................................

................................................................................................................................................ [3]

7
4 A student sets up the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 4.1 in order to determine a value for the specific
latent heat of fusion of ice.

Fig 4.1

A heater is placed in the funnel, surrounded by pure melting ice. The student measures the mass
of melted ice in the beaker at regular time intervals before and after switching on the heater. The
variation with time t of the mass m of melted ice in the beaker is shown in Fig. 4.2.

Fig 4.2

During the heating process, the current is adjusted so that the readings on the ammeter and
voltmeter are constant.

8
(a) By reference to Fig. 4.2,
(i) Suggest a time at which the heater is switched on,

time = ………………….. minutes [1]

(ii) Determine the mass of ice melted in 1.0 minute

1. with the heater switched off,

mass = ……………………. kg [1]

2. with the heater switched on.

mass = ……………………. kg [1]

(b) The readings of the ammeter and the voltmeter are 5.2 A and 11.5 V respectively. Use your
answers in (a) to calculate a value for the specific latent heat of fusion of ice.

specific latent heat of fusion = ……………………….. J kg-1 [3]

(c) State and explain the effect on your calculated value for the specific latent heat of fusion if ice
taken directly from a freezer were used to replace the ice in the funnel.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. [2]

9
5 (a) A set of coloured lamps are designed for use with a 240 V supply. The set up have 12 lamps
connected as seen in Fig 5 below.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
Fig. 5

240 V a.c.

However, the lamps do not light up when the set is plugged in. Therefore, a voltmeter is used
to test the circuit. For each of the following observations, identify the fault.

(i) The potential difference is zero across every lamp except EF, across which the potential
difference is 240 V.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….
[1]
(ii) The potential difference between A and M is 240 V but the potential difference is zero
across every lamp.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………………..
[1]
(b) (i) Some lamps are designed so that when the filament fails the resistance of the lamp
drops to zero. If this happens to one of the lamps in the above set up, calculate the
fractional increase in the power dissipated in each of the remaining lamps, assuming
that the resistance of these lamps does not change.

Fractional increase = _______________ [4]


(ii) What is likely to happen if failed lamps are not replaced?

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….. [2]

10
6 Dangers associated with exposure to radiation have been recognised for many years. As a result
of these hazards, measures have been adopted to reduce exposure to radiation to as low a level
as possible. One such measure is to shield individuals from radioactive sources using radiation
absorbing materials.

Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effectiveness of materials as absorbers of
γ-ray photons. One possible experiment is illustrated in Fig. 6.1

The count rate Cx of γ-ray photons is measured for various thickness x of the absorber, together
with the count rate C0 for no absorber. Fig. 6.1 shows the variation with thickness x of the ratio
Cx/C0 for lead.

1.0

0.8

0.6
Cx/C0

0.4

0.2

0
0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0

x/cm

Fig. 6.1

(a) (i) What is a photon?

…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
[1]

(ii) Suggest why it is necessary, in the experiment, to have a parallel beam of γ-radiation.

…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………................................... [2]

11
(iii) State an evidence in Fig.6.1 for the fact that, theoretically, complete shielding is not
possible.

…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
[1]

(b) Fig. 6.2 indicates that there may be an exponential decrease of the ratio Cx/ Co with
thickness x. In order to test this suggestion, a graph of ln (Cx/ Co) against x is plotted. This is
shown in Fig. 6.2
x/cm

0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0


0

-1.0
ln (Cx/ C0)

-2.0

-3.0

-4.0

-5.0

Fig. 6.2

(i) Show that Fig. 6.2 indicates a relationship of the form


Cx = Co e-μx,
Where μ is a constant.

[3]

(ii) The constant μ is known as the linear absorption coefficient. Use Fig. 6.2 to calculate
a value of μ for lead.

μ = …………………………….. cm -1 [2]

12
(c) The linear absorption coefficient μ has been found to depend on photon energy and on the
absorbing material itself. For γ-ray photons of one energy, μ is different for different
materials.

In order to assess absorption of γ-ray photons in matter such that the material of the
absorber does not have to be specified, a quantity known as the mass absorption coefficient
μm is calculated. μm is given by the expression

μm = μ/ρ

where ρ is the density of the absorbing material.

Values of μ for 2.75 MeV photons and of ρ for different materials are given in Fig. 6.3

material μ/ cm-1 ρ/ g cm-3 μm


Aluminium 0.095 2.70 0.035
Tin 0.267 7.28 0.037
Lead 11.3
Fig. 6.3

(i) give a consistent unit for μm,

unit of μm = …………………………. [1]


(ii) use your answer to (b) (ii) to complete the table of values for lead.

μ = …………………….. cm -1
μm = …………………………... [1]

(d) Concrete is a common building material which is sometimes used for shielding. The density
of concrete is 2.4 x 103 kg m-3.
(i) Use the information given in Fig. 6.3 to calculate an average value for μm and hence
show that the linear absorption coefficient μ for 2.75 MeV photons in concrete is
approximately 0.09 cm-1.

[2]

(ii) By reference to Fig. 6.1, calculate the approximate thickness of concrete which would
provide the same level of shielding, for 2.75 MeV photons, as thickness of 4.0 cm of
lead.

[3]
Thickness = …………………………… cm

13
(iii) Comment on your answer to (ii), making two suggestions as to why concrete maybe
used, in preference to lead, where radioactive sources of high activity are to be
shielded.

…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………...................................
………………………………………………………………………………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………...................................
…………………………………………………………………………………………………. [2]

14
SECTION B

IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT YOU SPEND ABOUT 30 MINUTES ON THIS SECTION.

7 An air rifle can be used to fire small cylindrical metal pellets of about 5 mm diameter and 10
mm length at a speed of about 150 m s-1 on leaving the rifle. When an absorbent material is
placed some distance from the rifle, the pellets are observed to create a hole of a diameter
slightly larger than that of the pellet in the material and penetrate it to a depth of three or four
centimeters.

Design an experiment to investigate how the depth of penetration varies with the speed of the
pellet. Your answer should include a diagram and make particular reference to

(a) how the speed of the pellets may be measured,

(b) how the depth of penetration of the pellets into the absorbent material is to be measured,
(c) how the speed of the pellets is to be changed (assuming that the pellets leave the rifle
with a fixed speed),
(d) any safety precautions which should be taken during the experiment.

You may assume that all of the following equipment is available, together with any other
standard laboratory apparatus that would be found in a school science laboratory.

Air rifle
Analogue stopwatch
Digital stopwatch
Photogates
Electronic timer capable measuring time interval to an accuracy of 0.001s
Vernier calipers
Metre rule
Measuring tape
Sheets of absorbent material (cork)
Thin aluminium foils
Sheets of papers
Loud speaker
Microphone
Cathode ray oscilloscope
Power supply with connecting wires
Video camera
Stroboscope
[12]

15
Diagram

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END OF PAPER 2

18
Name: ……………………….…………………. HT group: …………...

CATHOLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE


JC2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2010

PHYSICS 9646/ 3
Higher 2
Paper 3 Tuesday 14 September 2010
2 hours

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

There are 4 questions in Section A. Answer all questions in this section.


All essential working should be done in this booklet.
Total marks for Section A are 40 marks.

There are 3 questions in Section B. Answer 2 out of 3 questions in this section. Please
circle the 2 questions attempted on the cover page.
Write all answers to the questions on the question paper.
Write in dark blue or black pen on the writing paper provided. You may use a soft pencil for
any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.
Total marks for Section B is 40 marks.

Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.


Write your name and tutorial group on all the work you hand in.

Total marks for Section A and B is 80 marks.


A total of 2 marks will be deducted for mistakes made in units and significant figures.

This question paper consists of 20 printed pages.

AWARDED TOTAL
MARKS MARKS
SECTION A: Q1 11
Q2 10
Q3 4
Q4 15
SECTION B: Q5 20
Q6 20
Q7 20
TOTAL 80
PHYSICS DATA:

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s−1


permeability of free space, μ0 = 4π x 10−7 H m−1
permittivity of free space, ε0 = 8.85 x 10−12 F m−1
= (1/(36π)) x 10-9 Fm−1
elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10−19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10−34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10−27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10−31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 x 10−27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K−1 mol−1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol−1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10−23 J K−1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10−11 N m2 kg−2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s−2

PHYSICS FORMULAE:

uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + ½ at2


v2 = u2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
gravitational potential, φ = –Gm/r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = x0 sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vo cosωt
= ±ω√(xo2 – x2)
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential, V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage, x = x0sinω t
transmission coefficient, T = exp(-2kd)
where k = 8 π 2 m(U − E )
h2
radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(- λt)
decay constant, λ = 0.693
t1
2

2
SECTION A
Answer ALL questions in this section.

1 (a) State what is meant by a field of force.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………...… [1]

(b) Atoms of Neon-20 are ionised by the removal of one electron from each atom. These ions are
accelerated through a potential difference of 1400 V. They are then injected into a region of
space where there are uniform electric and magnetic fields acting in right angles to the original
direction of motion of the ions. The region of magnetic and electric fields and polarities of the
electric plates are shown in Fig 1.1.

Region of uniform
electric and
+ + + + + + + + magnetic fields

Path of Neon ions

- - - - - - - -

Fig 1.1

The electric field has field strength E and the flux density of the magnetic field is B.

(i) State the charge of a Neon ion.

Charge of a Neon ion: …………………………. [1]

3
(iii) Calculate the speed of the Neon ions before they enter into the region of the electric
and magnetic fields.

Speed = …………………….. m s-1 [3]

(ii) (1) State the direction of the electric force acting on a Neon ion when it enters into the
shaded region.

Direction of electric force: ……………………. [1]

(2) Draw the direction of the magnetic field onto the shaded region in Fig 1.1 such
that the Neon ions pass through the shaded region undeflected. [1]

(iv) The electric field strength E is 6.2 x 103 V m-1. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic
flux density so that the ions are not deflected in the region of the fields.

Magnetic flux density = …………………… T [2]

(c) The mechanism by which the Neon atoms in (b) are ionised is changed so that each atom
loses two electrons instead of just one. State the changes that occur in

(i) the speed of the ions entering the region of the electric and magnetic fields in (b).

……………………………………………………………………………………………...………

……………………………………………………………………………………………...……… [1]

(ii) the path of the ions in the two fields.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………………...… [1]

4
2 (a) State what is meant by the internal energy of a system.

.......................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) An ideal gas in a cylinder can be considered to undergo a cycle of changes of pressure,
volume and temperature as shown on the graph of Fig. 2.1.

7.5 x 10-3
Fig 2.1

The temperature of the gas at A and C are 623 K and 50 K respectively.

(i) Calculate the number of gas molecules in the cylinder.

Number of gas molecules = …………………………….. [2]

5
(ii) Calculate the volume of gas at C.

Volume of gas = ……………………….. m3 [2]

(iii) Calculate the net work done by the gas.

Net work done by gas = …………………….. J [2]

(iv) State with a reason the total change in internal energy of the gas when it completes a
cycle.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………. [2]

6
3 When beryllium is bombarded with α-particles of energy 8.0 x 10-13 J, carbon atoms are produced,
together with a very penetrating radiation. A student suggested that the nuclear reaction might be

9
4 Be+ 24He→136 C + γ

(a) Explain what is meant by 136 C.

.................................................................................................................................................

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. [1]

(b) (i) With the following information, calculate the energy released in the reaction as
suggested above.

Nuclide Mass/ u
9
Be 9.0150
4
4
He 4.0040
2
13
C 13.0075
6

Energy released = ……………………… J [2]


(ii) The energy of the penetrating radiation is found to be at least 8.8 x 10-12 J. Explain why
the student’s suggestion cannot be valid.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

……………………………………………………………………………………………………. [1]

7
4 (a) State what is meant by the photoelectric effect.

………….…………………………………………………………………………………………….…

……………….……………………………………………………………………………………….…

……………….……………………………………………………………………………………….… [2]

(b) A lamp is placed above a metal surface and an electron requires a minimum energy of 2eV
before it can be emitted from the metal surface.

(i) Calculate the maximum wavelength of the incident photons from the lamp.

λ = …………………………………. m [2]

(ii) State the kind of electromagnetic radiation that is emitted out from the lamp.

………………………………………………………………………………………………… [1]

(iii) The metal surface contains atoms of radius 2.0 x 10-10 m. It may be assumed that the
electron can collect energy from a circular area which has a radius equal to that of
the atom. The lamp provides energy at a rate of 0.40 W m-2 at the metal surface.
Estimate, on the basis of wave theory, the time required for an electron to collect
sufficient energy for it to be emitted from the metal.

Time required = ……………………… s [2]

(iv) Comment on your answer to (b)(iii)

…………………………………………………………………………..………………………

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…………………………………………………………………………..………………………

…………………………………………………………………………..……………………… [2]

8
(c) A light dependent resistor is made of silicon which has a band gap energy Eg = 1.1 eV. Use
band theory to explain how the interaction of photons with electrons in this resistor might
change the resistivity of the material.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. [2]

(d) The Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM) uses the principle of quantum tunnelling.
Briefly explain how this principle is used to map out the surface of a metal sample.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

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END OF SECTION A

9
SECTION B
Answer 2 out of 3 questions in this section.

5 (a) Explain how an object travelling in a circle with constant speed has an acceleration. What is
the direction of this acceleration?

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………..……………………………………………………………………………………………………. [3]

(b) (i) State the principle of conservation of momentum.

………..……………………………………………………………………………………………

………..……………………………………………………………………………………………

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

(ii) A particle of mass m moving with speed v makes a head-on collision with an identical
particle which is initially at rest. Determine the subsequent motion of the particles after
they had made a completely inelastic collision.

………..……………………………………………………………………………………………

………..……………………………………………………………………………………………

………..…………………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

(iii) A bullet of mass 0.025 kg is travelling horizontally with a speed of 150 m s-1 when it
strikes the centre of a vertical face of a cubical block of mass 2.0 kg which is hanging at
rest from vertical strings. If the bullet embeds itself in the block, calculate the vertical
height risen by the block and bullet.

[4]
Height raised =…………….. m

10
(c) A railway truck of mass 22 000 kg and moving at a speed of 3 m s-1 catches up and collides
with a truck of mass 66 000 kg moving at 1 m s-1 moving in the same direction.

3 m s-1 1 m s-1
Spring buffers

22 000 kg 66 000 kg

The graph shows the speeds of the trucks before, during and after the collision.

V/ m s-1

0
0.000 0.100 0.200 time/ s

(i) Use the information in the graph to show that the collision is elastic.

[3]

(ii) Calculate the change in the total kinetic energy between the instant halfway through the
collision and after the collision. Suggest a reason for this change.

Change in Kinetic Energy = ………………………… J

……………………………………...………………………………………………………………

……………………………………...……………………………………………………………… [3]

11
(iii) Calculate the magnitude of the impulse exerted by the lighter truck on the heavier truck.

Impulse = ………………………… N s [2]

(iv) Explain whether or not this impulse changes in value if the collision remains elastic but
takes half the time.

……………………………………...………………………………………………………………

……………………………………...……………………………………………………………… [1]

12
6 (a) The circuit below in Fig 6.1 is set up, with a 20 V driver cell and Cell P of 12 V, each with
internal resistance 2 Ω.

Driver cell, e.m.f 20 V

2Ω

J
A B

4Ω

2Ω

Cell P, e.m.f 12 V

Fig 6.1

The uniform resistance wire AB is of length 100 cm, and the balanced length AJ is found to be
64 cm.

(i) Find the potential difference across the 4 Ω resistor.

Potential difference = ……………… V [2]

(ii) Calculate the resistance of the wire AB.

Resistance of AB = ……………… Ω [3]

13
(b) Define magnetic flux density and magnetic flux linkage.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………...

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………... [3]

(c) A wire with resistance 8.66 Ω per metre and diameter 0.050 mm is used to construct an
electromagnet in the form of a hollow solenoid by winding one layer of close-packed turns
onto a plastic tube of length 200 mm and diameter 30 mm. The solenoid is connected in series
with a switch and a battery of e.m.f. 6.0 V and negligible resistance, as shown in Fig 6.2.

6.0 V

Fig 6.2

When the switch is turned on, the magnetic flux density B produced in the centre of the
solenoid is given by

B = μ0nI,

where n = number of turns per unit length.

(i) Calculate the number of turns of the solenoid.

Number of turns = ……………………… [1]

14
(ii) Calculate the resistance of the wire of the solenoid.

Resistance = ……………… Ω [2]

(iii) Calculate the maximum magnetic flux density produced by the electromagnet.

Maximum magnetic flux density = ……………… T [3]

(d) State and explain the effects on the magnetic flux density of each of the following changes.

(i) The plastic tube is filled with iron filling.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [3]

(ii) Twice the length of similar wire is used so that the coil consists of two close-packed
layers.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [3]

15
7 (a) (i) State a property that can be used to differentiate a transverse wave from a longitudinal
wave.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [1]

(ii) State one feature of electromagnetic waves which are common across the whole
spectrum.

………………………………………………………………………………………………....…

…………………………………………….…………………………………………………...… [1]

(b) Two-source interference fringes using light can only be obtained if light from the two sources is
coherent. Explain

(i) the meaning of the term coherent.

……………………………………………………..…………………………………………...…

……………………………………………………..…………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [2]

(ii) why, in practice, interference fringes can be seen only if light from a single source is
split into two.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………………...… [2]

16
(c) In an experiment on superposition, light from a laser is incident normally on a double slit, and
the interference pattern is observed on a screen situated a distance D from the slits. The
fringe spacing x is measured for a number of different values of D and the graph is plotted, as
shown in Fig. 7.1.

x/ mm

20.0

18.0

16.0

14.0

12.0

10.0

8.0

6.0

4.0

2.0

0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0

D/m

Fig. 7.1

(i) Determine the gradient of the graph shown in Fig. 7.1.

gradient = ………………………………. [1]

17
(ii) Use your result in (c)(i) to determine the slit separation a, given that the wavelength of
the light is 600 nm.

a = ………………………… m [2]

The experiment is repeated with the frequency of the light slighty decreased. State what
will happen to

1. the interference pattern,

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………...… [1]

2. the graph shown in Fig. 7.1.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…

…………………………………………………………………………………………...… [1]

18
(d) Give reasons for the following.

(i) Sound waves and water waves can go round corners but light waves seem to travel
only in straight lines.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [2]

(ii) Fig 7.2 represents a stationary sound wave in a pipe. This figure looks like a transverse
wave although sound waves are longitudinal waves.

node antinode node antinode

Fig 7.2

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [2]

19
(e) In a simple experiment to find out the wavelength of monochromatic red light emitted by a
laser, a fine beam of red laser light is shone through a diffraction grating as shown below in
Fig 7.3.

1.00 m
grating
laser

0.46 m

2.00 m

Fig 7.3

The diffraction grating has 300 000 rulings per meter and is set so that its plane is normal to
the incident light. Bright spots are observed at 0.46 m and 1.00 m from the central spot on a
screen, which is 2.00 m from the grating.

(i) From the first-order diffracted light, estimate the wavelength of the laser light.

λ = ………………………m [3]

(ii) State and explain an advantage of obtaining the wavelength of the laser light by using
the second-order diffracted light rather than the first-order diffracted light.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………...………… [2]

END OF SECTION B
20
   
 
   
  YEAR 6 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS 2010 
 
CANDIDATE
NAME

CLASS

PHYSICS 9646/01
Higher 2 27 September 2010
Paper 1 Multiple Choice Questions 1 hour 15 minutes

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST


DO NOT TURN THIS PAGE OVER UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO.

Write your name and class at the top of this page.

There are forty questions in this Section. Answer all questions. For each question
there are four possible answers A, B, C and D.

Choose the one you consider correct and record your choice in soft pencil on the
separate Answer Sheet.

Each correct answer will score one mark. A mark will not be deducted for a wrong
answer.

This question paper consists of 20 printed pages (including this cover page).

 
DATA

speed of light in free space c = 3.00 × 108 m s-1


permeability of free space μo = 4π × 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space εo = 8.85 × 10-12 F m-1
(1/(36π)) × 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge e = 1.60 × 10-19 C
the Planck constant h = 6.63 × 10-34 Js
unified atomic mass constant u = 1.66 × 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron me = 9.11 × 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton mp = 1.67 × 10-27 kg
molar gas constant R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1
the Avogadro constant NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol–1
the Boltzmann constant k = 1.38 x 10–23 J K–1
gravitational constant G = 6.67 × 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall g = 9.81 m s−2
 
 

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/01/PRELIM/10  


   

 
 

FORMULAE
uniformly accelerated motion s = ut + ½at2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas W = pΔV

hydrostatic pressure p = ρgh

gravitational potential Φ =

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xosinωt


velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vocosωt
=
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas E =
resistors in series R = R1 + R2 + ……..

resistors in parallel 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ……..

electric potential V =

alternating current/voltage x = xosinωt


transmission coefficient T exp(-2kd)

where k =

radioactive decay x = xoexp(-λt)

decay constant λ =

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/01/PRELIM/10 


   

 

1 The speed of transverse waves, v, in a stretched string is given by the


T
expression v = , where T is the tension of the string. The S.I. unit of the quantity µ
μ
is

A kg m-1 B kg-1 s2 m-1

C N m-2 D kg2 m-2

2 The velocity-time graph for a moving object is shown in the figure below.

Which of the following is the corresponding displacement-time graph?

   

A B

   

C D

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/01/PRELIM/10


[Turn over
 
   

 
3 A stone is projected with speed u from a cliff at a certain angle from the horizontal as
shown in the diagram below. The stone enters the water below at a horizontal
distance s from the side of the cliff. The diagram below shows the path of the stone
drawn to scale.

path

water surface
s
 

Assuming that air resistance is negligible, which one of the following statements is
correct?

A The distance s does not depend on the speed of projection, u, as it depends


only on the angle of projection of the stone.

B The vertical component of velocity of the stone is maximum just before the
stone hits the water.

C The velocity of the stone is instantaneously zero at the top of the stone's path.

D The acceleration of the stone reverses direction when the stone reaches the
top of its path.

4 A man is parachuting at constant speed towards the surface of the Earth. According
to Newton's third law of motion, the force that makes an action-reaction pair with the
gravitational force on the man is the

A tension in the ropes of the parachute.

B the gravitational force on the Earth due to the man.

C viscous force of the air on the man and his parachute.

D viscous force of the man and his parachute on the air.

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/01/PRELIM/10

                                               [Turn over
 
 

 
5 Three trolleys of equal mass m are stationary a short distance apart on a frictionless
track. The end trolley is given a constant velocity v towards the middle trolley. During
the collision between the end trolley and the middle trolley, the two stick together.
These two trolleys subsequently collide and stick to the third trolley.

What is the total loss of kinetic energy after these two collisions?

1 1 1 2
A mv 2 B mv 2 C mv 2 D mv 2
4 3 2 3

6 A forklift truck of weight W has dimensions shown in the diagram and its centre of
gravity G is midway between the front and rear axles.

x x x

front forks
G

w
front axle rear axle

When a uniform block of weight w (w < W) is placed on the front forks as shown, the
load on the rear axle

w
A decreases by
2

(W − w )
B decreases by
2

w
C increases by
2

(W − w )
D increases by
2

7 A ship has a horizontal cross-section of area 2.0 x 103 m2 and a mass of 6.6 x 106 kg
when unladen. It can be loaded safely until it sinks a further 1.00 m. If the density of
the sea-water is 1.20 x 103 kg m-3, what is the mass of cargo which the ship can
safely carry?

A 1.2 × 106 kg B 2.4 × 106 kg

C 4.8 × 106 kg D 6.6 × 106 kg

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/01/PRELIM/10


[Turn over
 
   

 
8 During a human heart beat, 20 g of blood is pushed into the main arties. This blood is
accelerated from a speed of 0.20 m s-1 to 0.34 m s-1. For a heart pulsing at 70 beats
per minute, the average power of the heart pump is

A 0.012 mW B 0.23 mW C 0.88 mW D 1.8 mW

 
9 The forward thrust provided by the engine of a car moving horizontally with constant
velocity of 12 m s 1 on a straight road is 500 N.

Which of the following statements is correct?

A The net force on the car is 500 N.

B The rate of work done by the engine is 6.0 kW.

C The power of the engine is zero as the car is moving at constant velocity.

D The power of the engine is 3.0 kW.


 
10 As illustrated in the figure to the right, a pendulum bob of
mass m is attached to a string which is hung from a L1  X
structure that rotates about XY at a constant angular
velocity ω. Given that the angle θ is 23.0o, L1 is 1.65 m
and L2 is 4.30 m, the number of revolutions made by the L2
pendulum in one second is θ

A 0.133 rev s-1 B 0.178 rev s-1

C 0.251 rev s-1 D 0.325 rev s-1


ω Y
 
 
11 A simple pendulum consists of a bob of mass m at the end of a light and inextensible
thread of length L. The other end of the thread is fixed at C. The bob swings through
point B with a velocity v and just reaches A, where the string is just taut.

L
A C
90°

What is the tension in the thread when the bob is at position B?

A mg B 2mg C 3mg D 4mg

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12 On the ground, the gravitational force acting on an object is 45 N. When the object is
at a height h above the ground, the gravitational force on it is 5 N. If R is the radius of
the earth, the approximate value for h is

A 2R B 3R C 4R D 5R 

13 P is a planet with centre O, as shown in the figure below. X and M are two points of
equal gravitational potential, ΦA. Y and N are two other points of equal gravitational
potential, ΦB.

Y
P
X

M
N
Which of the following statements is incorrect?

A The work done by an external agent to move a mass from Y to X is negative.

B The work done by the gravitational field to move a mass from X to N is the
same as that needed to move the same mass from M to Y.

C The work done by the gravitational field to move a mass from M to N is


positive.

φ A OY
D =
φB OX

14 Which one of the following is an effect of increased damping on a forced oscillation?

A The natural frequency of the oscillating system increases.

B The amplitude of forced oscillation at resonance increases.

C The total energy of the system remains unchanged.

D The system undergoes resonance at a lower frequency than the natural


frequency of undamped oscillation.

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15 The figure below shows an oscillating system. The system is set to oscillate in two
different fluids, water and castor oil, which is of a higher viscosity than water.

Which graph correctly shows the variation of displacement x of the mass with time t
for both fluids?
  motion

 
fluid
 
smooth contact

x/m x/m

water oil

oil water

0 t/s 0 t/s

A B

x/m x/m
water oil

t/s t/s
0 0

oil water

C D

16 Which of the following statements about thermodynamic (Kelvin) scale is incorrect?

A Conversion between Celsius scale to Kelvin scale is T/oC = T/K + 273.15

B At zero Kelvin, the total internal energy of the system is at a minimum

C Absolute zero cannot be reached due to laws of thermodynamics

D The Kelvin scale does not depend on any thermometric properties

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17 Material X of temperature TX and material Y of temperature Ty are in contact with
each other until there is no net transfer of energy between X and Y. Which of the
following statements is most correct?

A X and Y may not be in thermal equilibrium with each other

B The internal energy of X is equal to the internal energy of Y

C The specific heat capacity of X must be equal to that of Y

D The average kinetic energies of material X must be equal to that of Y

18 A sound wave of frequency 800 Hz is travelling in air at a speed of 320 m s−1. What is
the difference in phase between two points on the wave 0.10 m apart in the direction
of travel?

π π 3π
A B C D π
4 2 4
 
   

19 Which of the following effects provides direct experimental evidence that light is a
transverse, rather than longitudinal, wave motion?

A Interference patterns from the double slit experiment

B Particulate nature of light in the photoelectric effect experiment

C Polarised light from the reflection at a water surface

D Stationary microwaves obtained from microwaves emitter

20 An opaque object 10 cm wide casts a shadow when placed in a beam of light but has
little effect on a beam of sound emitted by a small source of frequency 300 Hz. This is
because

A Sound waves are longitudinal whereas light waves are transverse

B Sound waves travel much more slowly compared to light waves

C Light waves will be absorbed by the object but sound waves will not

D Sound waves have a much longer wavelength compared to light waves


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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21 The diagram below illustrates an experimental arrangement that produces
interference fringes with a double slit.
X
Thin glass plate
S1

Monochromatic S2 Screen
light source
Y

When slit S1 is covered with a very thin plate of glass as shown,

A the separation of the fringe increases

B the separation of the fringe decreases

C the fringe pattern moves towards X

D the fringe pattern moves towards Y


 
 
22 The diagrams below show 5 different arrangements of charges around a circle with
centre O. Rank in ascending order the magnitude of the electric field strength at point
O

O O O O O

1 2 3 4 5

A 12354 B 41352 C 12534 D 43521


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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23 The diagram below is a scaled drawing showing the equi-potential lines in the region
of an electric field.

‐2
10  m 

Which point has an electric field strength of the greatest magnitude?

A N B R C T D U
 
 
24  Two cylindrical resistors, one made of copper and the other of aluminum, have the
same volume. The cross-section area and the resistivity of aluminum are both three
times that of copper. What is the magnitude of the ratio
resistance of aluminium resistor
?
resistance of copper resistor

1 1
A 9 B 3 C D
3 9

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25 The figure shows the graph of current against potential difference for two electrical
devices P and Q.

P and Q are joined in series. If the potential difference across P is 10 V, which of the
following is correct?

p.d. across Q/ V p.d. across P and Q/ V

A 5.0 10

B 5.0 15

C 15 15

D 15 25

26 Two resistors, R1 and R2 are connected in parallel. R1 has a fixed value and the value
of R2 is variable but always greater than R1. The combined resistance is

A less than R1 and decreases as R2 increases

B less than R1 and decreases as R2 decreases

C greater than R1 and increases as R2 increases

D greater than R1 and decreases as R2 increases

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27 In the circuit shown, X, Y and Z are three identical lamps. Initially switch S is closed.

When switch S is opened, the brightness of

A X decreases and that of Y increases

B X increases and that of Y decreases

C X stays the same and that of Y increases

D X increases and that of Y stays the same

28 An electron moves in a circular path in a uniform magnetic field of flux density 1.0 mT.
If an α-particle of the same speed is to follow an identical path, what must be the
magnitude and direction of the magnetic field? The mass of α-particle is 7200 times
the mass of an electron

Magnitude of magnetic field/ mT Direction of magnetic field

A 3600 in opposite direction

B 1800 in opposite direction

C 1800 in same direction

D 3600 in same direction

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29 Two long straight wires X and Y are placed perpendicular to each other at a distance
d apart. A current flows out of the page in wire X. The same current flows from left to
right in wire Y. What are the directions of the forces acting on wire Y at points P and
Q due to the magnetic field produced by wire X?

Force at P Force at Q

A out of page into page

B into page out of page

C towards X away from X

D towards X towards X

30 A rectangular conductor is moving horizontally from left to right in a uniform magnetic


field perpendicular to UVWX. Which of the following pairs of points will NOT be at the
same potential?

A U and V B U and X C V and W D W and Z

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31 In Fig (a) below, a beam of particles, each of charge q and mass m, is travelling at
speed v through a region in which a magnetic field B is perpendicular to an electric
field E. The beam is undeflected by the crossed electric and magnetic fields.

In Fig (b) below, the electric field is switched off. The beam is found to form an arc of
a circle of radius r.

Which one of the following expressions gives the mass m of the charged particle?

 
qBr qBv qB 2 r qB 2
A B C D
E E E rE

32 Alternating current of sinusoidal and square waveforms, as shown below, flow in turn
through a resistor.

The power dissipated is the same in each case. Given that the peak value of the
sinusoidal current is 1.0 A, what is the peak value, in A, of the square waveform?

1 1
A 2 B 2 C D
2 2

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33 A metal rod OP of length L is rotated uniformly about O in a plane perpendicular to a
uniform magnetic field of flux density B. The rate of rotation is N rev s-1. An electron e
is found to be stationary at P.

O P

What is the magnetic and electric force acting on the electron at P?

Magnetic force Electric Force

A πeLNB πeLNB

B πeLNB 2πeLNB

C 0 0

D 2πeLNB 2πeLNB

34 In the figure below, a windmill drives a 100 V generator which produces electrical
energy at a rate of 1000 W. This energy is supplied to a distant house through two
cables of total resistance 2.0 Ω. T1 and T2 are two transformers of 100% efficiency
used to step up and step down the voltage respectively.

What is the rate of energy dissipated in the cables?

A 1.0 W B 2.0 W C 20 W D 100 W

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35 The figure on the right shows five energy levels of an atom,
one being much lower than the other four. E5 
Five transitions between the levels are indicated, E4 
each of which produces a photon of definite energy  
and frequency. E3 
 
Which one of the spectra below best corresponds to the E2 
set of transitions indicated?  
 
(high) Frequency (low)  
 
A  
E1 

36 Electrons emitted by a hot filament pass down a tube containing hydrogen and are
then collected by an anode which is maintained at a positive potential with respect to
the filament. The gas near the anode is found to emit monochromatic ultra-violet
radiation. Given that the energy levels of an electron in a hydrogen atom is

13.6
E= (eV), where n = 1, 2, 3…
n2

What is the wavelength of the monochromatic ultra-violet radiation?


 
A 122 nm B 102 nm C 97 nm D 91 nm

37 The scanning tunnelling microscope is able to obtain atomic-scale images of surface


mainly due to

A quantum tunnelling which is very sensitive to distance

B the atomic wide tip of the probe used for surface scanning

C the free electrons in the conduction band of the metallic probe

D the massive atoms at the tip which contributes to a smaller wavelength in


wave particle duality

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38 Which of the following is the correct band diagram for p-type and n-type
semiconductors?

p-type n-type

Conduction Conduction
Band Band
A − − − − − − − − − − 

− − − − − − − − − −
 
  Valence Band Valence Band
 
 
 
 
 
Conduction Conduction
Band Band
B − − − − − − − − − −
  − − − − − − − − − − 
 
  Valence Band Valence Band
 
 
 
 
 
Conduction Conduction
 
Band Band
C − − − − − − − − − −

Valence Band oooooooo


Valence Band

Conduction Conduction
Band Band
− − − − − − − − − − 
D
 
  oooooooo
  Valence Band
  Valence Band
 
 
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39 One reaction that may be used for nuclear fusion is shown

7 2 4
(
3 Li+ 1 H → 2 2 He )+ X
What is particle X?

A an α particle B an electron

C a neutron D a proton

 
40 The diagram below shows a graph of the binding energy per nucleon for a number of
naturally occurring nuclides plotted against their mass number

27
13 Al
23 238
11Na   92 U

Which of the following statements is a correct deduction from the graph?

A Uranium (U-238) is the most stable nuclides amongst the 3 plotted

B Energy will be released if sodium (Na-23) undergoes nuclear fission

C Aluminum (Al-27) will spontaneously decay to sodium (Na-23) with alpha


particle

D Nuclear fusion between sodium (Na-23) and aluminum (Al-27) will release
energy

End of Paper

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  YEAR 6 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS 2010 
 
CANDIDATE
NAME

INDEX
CLASS
NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/02
Higher 2 17 September 2010
Paper 2 Structured Questions 1 hour 45 minutes

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST For Examiner’s Use


¾ DO NOT TURN THIS PAGE OVER UNTIL YOU ARE 1 / 9
TOLD TO DO SO.
2 / 7
¾ Write your name, class and index number at the top of
this page. 3 / 6

4 / 11
¾ Answer ALL questions.
5 / 7
¾ For numerical answers, all working should be shown.
6 / 20

¾ The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end 7 / 12


of each question or part question.
S.F. Units

Total / 72
 

This question paper consists of 18 printed pages (including this cover page).

 

DATA
speed of light in free space c = 3.00 × 108 m s-1
permeability of free space μo = 4π × 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space εo = 8.85 × 10-12 F m-1
(1/(36π)) × 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge e = 1.60 × 10-19 C
the Planck constant h = 6.63 × 10-34 Js
unified atomic mass constant u = 1.66 × 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron me = 9.11 × 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton mp = 1.67 × 10-27 kg
molar gas constant R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1
the Avogadro constant NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol–1
the Boltzmann constant k = 1.38 x 10–23 J K–1
gravitational constant G = 6.67 × 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall g = 9.81 m s−2
 
 
 

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/02/Prelim/2010  


   

 
 

FORMULAE
uniformly accelerated motion s = ut + ½at2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas W = pΔV

hydrostatic pressure p = ρgh

gravitational potential Φ =

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xosinωt


velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vocosωt
=
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas E =
resistors in series R = R1 + R2 + ……..

resistors in parallel 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ……..

electric potential V =

alternating current/voltage x = xosinωt


transmission coefficient T exp(-2kd)

where k =

radioactive decay x = xoexp(-λt)

decay constant λ =

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Answer ALL questions

1. An object of mass 1.5 kg is released from a stationary hot air balloon. Fig 1 shows
how the velocity of the object varies with time.

Fig 1

(a) By considering the forces acting on the falling object, explain the shape of the
graph in the regions marked A, B and C. [3]

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(b) Using Fig 1, determine the distance fallen in the first 16 s [2]

Distance fallen in first 16 s = _______________ m

(c) (i) Using your answer from (b), calculate the change in gravitational potential
energy ∆Ep of the object that occurred during the first 16 s. [1]

∆Ep = _______________ J

(ii) Calculate the change in kinetic energy ∆Ek of the object during the same
period. [1]

∆Ek = _______________ J

(iii) Hence, determine the average resistive force acting on the object during this
period [2]

Average resistive force = _______________ N

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2. (a) Define impulse and state how it is related to the momentum of an object. [2]

(b) Fig 2 shows a steel bar being reduced in thickness as it moves between two
rollers.

Fig 2

The steel is fed into the rollers at a speed of 0.40 m s-1 and emerges at 0.50 m s-1.
The thickness of the metal is reduced from 0.30 m to 0.24 m and the width of the
metal remains a constant at 0.85 m.

(i) Show that approximately 840 kg of steel passes through the rollers in each
second given that the density of steel is 8200 kg m-3. [1]

(ii) Calculate the change in momentum of the steel that passes through the
rollers in each second. [2]

Change in momentum in 1 s = _______________ N s

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(iii) State the magnitude and direction of the force that acts on the rollers due to
the change in momentum of the steel. [2]

Magnitude = _______________ N

Direction = _________________

3. The diffraction pattern due to a single light source on a single slit is shown in the Fig
3.1 below.

source slit 

screen

Fig 3.1

(a) Explain what is meant by the term diffraction? [1]

Two additional slits were placed between the single slit and the screen as shown in
Fig 3.2 and an interference pattern is observed on the screen.

source  slits

screen
Fig 3.2

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(b) (i) Explain what is meant by term coherent? [1]

(ii) The slits are 3.5 × 10−6 m apart and the wavelength of the light is 0.65 × 10−6
m. Calculate the fringe spacing x if the screen is placed 2.5 m away from the
double slits. [2]

x = _______________ m

(iii) State and explain what will happen to the interference pattern if the single slit
is now removed. [2]

4. In Fig 4, a uniform magnetic field B pointing into the paper and a uniform electric field
E pointing upwards are applied on the left−hand side and right−hand side of y-axis
respectively.

Fig 4

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A particle of mass m and charge q enters the magnetic field with an initial velocity vo
at point P. After leaving the magnetic field, it moves into the electric field and leaves
at point S. Neglect gravitational effects.

(a) (i) What is the sign of the charge carried by the particle? [1]

(ii) Describe the motion of the particle in the two different fields. [2]

(b) Deduce an expression, in terms of m, q, B, E or vo, where appropriate, for the


time taken for the particle to travel through

(i) the magnetic field, [3]

(ii) the electric field [3]

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(c) If the velocity of the particle at point S is v, deduce an expression, in terms of m,
vo and v, for the work done on the particle by the field as the particle travel
through

(i) the magnetic field [1]

(ii) the electric field [1]

5. (a) A particular material is designed to emit photoelectrons when visible light is


incident on it. When light of wavelength 535 nm is incident on it, electrons are
emitted has a stopping potential of about 1.30 V.

(i) Calculate the energy of the photon incident onto the material. [2]

Energy of incident photon = _______________ J

(ii) Calculate the work function of the material. [2]

Work function = _______________ J

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(b) The material used in (a) is most likely metallic in nature. By considering the band
theory of materials, state and explain what will happen if the experiment is
repeated for a semiconductor instead of a metal. [3]

6. Since Albert Einstein established the theoretical foundations for the laser in his 1917
paper “On the Quantum Theory of Radiation”, we saw many applications of laser in
our modern life. In 1960, the first laser was built by Theodore Maiman and he used a
method known as optical pumping to achieve population inversion. Gas lasers, such
as the Helium-Neon laser, which made use of electrical pumping soon followed.

(a) LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation,


explain how amplification of light may be achieved by stimulated emission of
radiation. [3]

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Lasers that cannot sustain population inversion for long periods of time may be
deployed in pulsed mode. In pulsed mode, lasing occurs for short period of time
hence the laser output is in pulses. Alternatively, the pulsed pumping can be used to
achieve a pulse laser. The graph in Fig 6.1 shows the output power of a certain pulse
laser with time.

Fig 6.1

(b) (i) State the period of the pulse laser. [1]

Period = _______________ ns

(ii) State the peak power of the laser. [1]

Peak Power = _______________ W

(iii) Estimate the total energy emitted by a single pulse. [1]

Total energy by a single pulse = _______________ J

(iv) Calculate the mean power of such a pulse laser. [2]

Mean power = _______________ W


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(c) Lasers may be focused onto an even smaller circular area with the use optical
lens in a microscope as illustrated in Fig 6.2.
 
 
Focused circle
 
 
  1000 μm  93 μm 
 
 
  Not to scale Image of the 
  focused laser 
Fig 6.2

The diameter of the laser spot and magnification of the optical lens used in
experimentation are tabulated below. The wavelength of the laser is 553 nm.

Magnification, M Laser Spot Diameter, D / μm


1× 1000
10 × 93
20 × 46
50 × 18

The relationship between magnification and laser spot diameter can be estimated
with
M× D = K
where K is a constant.

(i) Without drawing a graph, determine the value for K [3]

K = ____________________

(ii) Calculate the diameter of the laser spot at 200× magnification. [1]

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15 
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Diameter = _______________ μm

(iii) Suggest if your answer in (ii) is an underestimate or overestimate. Explain


your answer clearly. [2]

(d) The laser spot is not uniform in its brightness. The graph in Fig 6.3 shows the
approximate beam profile of the same laser in (c) about its centre when focused
using an unknown lens.

Fig 6.3

The diameter of a laser spot is determined by its full width of the spot at half
maximum intensity. Estimate the magnification of the lens used. [2]

Magnification = _______________ X

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(e) Besides the laser beam profile, the wavelength of the photons emitted by the
laser may be studied. The wavelength of photons emitted by the laser is found to
vary by 1% or even less as shown in Fig 6.4.

Fig 6.4

(i) Suggest how the figure above provide evidence that there are energy level
splitting about each discrete energy levels of electrons [2]

(ii) For ultra-short pulse laser of 10−15 s, the variation in laser wavelength is even
greater than what is shown in the figure above. With appropriate calculations,
explain why this is so. [2]

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7. The attenuation of a γ-ray beam is the reduction in its intensity due to its passage
through a material. One way of investigating the attenuation of a γ-ray beam is to
measure the half-value thickness. The half value thickness of a material is the
thickness that reduces the intensity of the γ-ray beam to half its original value.

Design a laboratory experiment to measure the half value thickness of steel. You may
assume that you have access to steel plates of varying thickness as well as a
radioactive source emitting both α and γ radiation and other standard Physics
laboratory equipments. [12]

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End of Paper
Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/02/Prelim/2010  
   
   
 
   
  YEAR 6 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS 2010 
 
CANDIDATE
NAME

EXAM INDEX
CLASS
NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/03
Higher 2 24 September 2010
Paper 3 Longer Structured Questions 2 hours

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST For Examiner’s Use


¾ DO NOT TURN THIS PAGE OVER UNTIL YOU ARE Section A
TOLD TO DO SO.
1 / 8
¾ Write your name and exam index number at the top of
this page. 2 / 10

3 / 7
¾ There are 2 sections to this paper,
4 / 9
Section A: Structured Questions
Answer ALL questions 5 / 6

Section B: Longer Structured Questions Section B


Answer ANY 2 questions
6 / 20

¾ For numerical answers, all working should be shown. 7 / 20

8 / 20
¾ The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end
of each question or part question. S.F. Units

Total / 80
 

This question paper consists of 25 printed pages (including this cover page).

 

DATA
speed of light in free space c = 3.00 × 108 m s-1
permeability of free space μo = 4π × 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space εo = 8.85 × 10-12 F m-1
(1/(36π)) × 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge e = 1.60 × 10-19 C
the Planck constant h = 6.63 × 10-34 Js
unified atomic mass constant u = 1.66 × 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron me = 9.11 × 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton mp = 1.67 × 10-27 kg
molar gas constant R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1
the Avogadro constant NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol–1
the Boltzmann constant k = 1.38 x 10–23 J K–1
gravitational constant G = 6.67 × 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall g = 9.81 m s−2
 
 
 

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   

 
 

FORMULAE
uniformly accelerated motion s = ut + ½at2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas W = pΔV

hydrostatic pressure p = ρgh

gravitational potential Φ =

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xosinωt


velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vocosωt
=
mean kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas E =
resistors in series R = R1 + R2 + ……..

resistors in parallel 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ……..

electric potential V =

alternating current/voltage x = xosinωt


transmission coefficient T exp(-2kd)

where k =

radioactive decay x = xoexp(-λt)

decay constant λ =

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010 


   
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4  Examiner’s
 
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Section A
Answer ALL questions in this section.

1 A satellite is a body that revolves around a planet. A satellite in a geostationary orbit


around the Earth does not appear to move relative to any fixed observer on Earth.

Mass of the Earth ME = 6.0 × 1024 kg


Radius of Earth RE = 6.4 × 106 m

(a) (i) One condition for a satellite to be in geostationary orbit is that the orbit of the
satellite must lie in the plane containing the equator. Explain why this is
necessary. [2]

(ii) Using Newton’s law of gravitation, explain why all geostationary satellites
have the same orbital radius around the earth which is independent of the
mass of the satellite. [2]

(iii) Determine the orbital radius of a geostationary satellite. [1]

Orbital radius = _______________ m

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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Examiner’s
 
Use 
(b) (i) Show that the kinetic energy of a satellite of mass ms in an orbital radius R
around the earth is given by the expression

[1]

(ii) Using your answer to (a)(iii) and the expression in (b)(i), determine the
minimum amount of energy required to put a satellite of mass 1500 kg into a
geostationary orbit. You may ignore the effects due to the rotation of the
Earth about its own axis. [2]

Energy required = _______________ J

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2 Fig 2.1 below shows a simple vertical mass-spring system with the load oscillating in
a vertical plane. The spring has a spring constant k and the load a mass m. The load
may be considered to be in simple harmonic oscillation if the extension of the spring
does not exceed the limit of proportionality.

Vertical 
LOAD  Oscillation

Fig 2.1

By considering the forces acting on the platform and applying Newton’s second law, it
can be shown that when the spring obeys Hooke’s law and the extension of the
spring does not exceed the limit of proportionality, the acceleration of the load in the
vertical direction is given by

where x is the vertical displacement of the load measured from its equilibrium position.

(a) (i) Explain why the load may be considered to be in simple harmonic motion if
the spring obeys Hooke’s law and the extension of the spring does not
exceed the limit of proportionality. [1]

(ii) Show that the expression for the frequency of oscillation f of the vertical
mass-spring system is given by

[1]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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Examiner’s
 
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(b) For a system with a spring of spring constant 100 Nm-1, a load of mass 1.0 kg
and a vertical amplitude of oscillation of 0.20 m, calculate the magnitude of the
velocity of the platform as it passes the equilibrium position. [2]

Magnitude of velocity = _______________ m s-1

(c) The suspension system of a car, as shown in Fig 2.2, may be modeled as
vertical mass-spring system combined with a shock absorber that damps the
vertical oscillations of the car.

shock absorber 

spring 

Fig 2.2

When a driver of mass 90 kg steps into a car of mass 1410 kg, the vertical height
of the car above the road decreases by 2.0 cm. If the car is driven over a series
of equally spaced bumps, the amplitude of vibration becomes much larger at a
particular speed.
Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010 
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(i) Explain why the amplitude of vibration of the car becomes much larger at a
particular speed. [2]

(ii) Calculate the effective spring constant of the suspension system. [1]

Effective spring constant = _______________ N m-1

(iii) Using the expression given in (a)(ii) and your answer to (c)(ii), determine the
separation between the bumps if large amplitude vibrations occurs at a
speed of 18 m s-1. [3]

Separation of bumps = _______________ m

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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Examiner’s
 
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3. Ice of 50g at temperature −15 oC is added to water at 30oC in an insulated container.

Specific heat capacity of ice = 2100 J kg−1 K−1


Specific heat capacity of water = 4200 J kg−1 K−1
Specific latent heat of fusion of water = 3.3 × 105 J kg−1

(a) Calculate the quantity of energy needed to change the ice at −15oC to water at
0oC [3]

Energy needed = _______________ J

(b) Calculate the mass of the water in the container if the lowest temperature
reached by the water is 7.5oC, assuming no heat is lost to the surroundings. [3]

Mass of water = _______________ kg

(c) State one other assumption that you have made in your calculations in (b). [1]

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4. Jingwen wants to determine the internal resistance r of a cell of e.m.f. E using a


potentiometer as shown in Fig 4.
Eo

lo
P Q

E r G 

Fig 4

When switch S is open, the balance length is lo. When switch S is closed, the balance
length is l.

(a) (i) When switch S is closed, obtain an expression for V, the potential difference
across the variable resistor R in terms of the e.m.f. E and internal resistance
r of the cell [1]

(ii) Hence or otherwise, show that the internal resistance r of the cell is

[2]

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(iii) She found that when R = 12 Ω, lo = 82.3 cm and l = 78.9 cm. Determine r. [1]

r = _______________ Ω

(b) She repeated the experiment with R set to (i) 4.0 Ω and (ii) 30 Ω. Explain which
value of R used would result in a more reliable determination of r. [2]

(c) The value of r can also be found by drawing a suitable straight line graph.
Explain how this can be done. [3]

 
 

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010 


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5. A stationary radon (Rn) nucleus may decay spontaneously into a polonium (Po)
nucleus and an α-particle as shown below. It may be assumed that no γ-ray is
emitted in the process.

The rest masses of the polonium nuclei and constituents nucleons are
218
Po : 218.0090u
Proton : 1.007276u
Neutron : 1.008664u

(a) Explain what is meant by spontaneous? [1]

(b) Show that the binding energy per nucleon of Polonium is about 1.207 × 10−12 J
[3]

(c) Calculate the total kinetic energy of the decay if the binding energy per nucleon
of 222Rn is 1.201 × 10−12 J and that of 4He is 1.092 × 10−12 J. [2]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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Kinetic Energy = _______________ J

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010 


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Section B
Answer ANY 2 questions in this section.
6. Ink-jet printing is a non-impact, dot matrix technology in which ink droplets are
projected through an array of tiny nozzles onto paper.

In a continuous flow print head, ink-jet droplets are approximately 80 μm in diameter


and can be charged negatively as they pass through a charging ring electrode
immediately after they break away from the nozzle of the print head. Whether or not
a droplet is charged is controlled by a signal sent to the printer by a computer. An ink
droplet that becomes charged would be deflected into a gutter when it passes
through a region with a uniform electric field strength while uncharged droplets pass
through undeflected to reach the paper.

4.0 × 10‐4 m 
20 m s‐1

+ − 
5.0 × 10‐4 m 

35o
5.0 × 10‐4 m 

Gutter to collect  x
deflected ink droplets
5.0 × 10‐4 m 
Paper 

Fig 6

(a) Fig 6 shows the parallel deflecting plates with some dimensions of the ink-jet
cartridge. The ink drops falls straight through the centerline between the
deflecting plates with a constant vertical velocity of 20 m s-1. In order to land in
the center of the gutter, a charged ink droplet must leave the deflecting plates at
an angle of 350.

(i) Calculate the horizontal component of velocity as a charged ink droplet


leaves the deflecting plates. [1]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
For 
15 
Examiner’s
 
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Horizontal component of velocity = _______________ m s-1

(ii) Determine the horizontal acceleration of the charged ink droplet for which it
is between the deflecting plates. [3]

Horizontal acceleration = _______________ m s-2

(iii) Determine the horizontal distance x between the centre of the gutter and the
centerline of between the deflecting plates. [3]

x = _______________ m

(b) (i) Explain the term uniform electric field strength. [2]

(ii) Sketch on Fig 6 the electric lines representing electric field in the region
between the pair of parallel deflecting plates. [2]

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(iii) Each ink droplet has a mass of mass 2.9 × 10-10 kg. Using your answer to
(a)(ii), determine the electric force FE acting on the charged ink droplet while
it is between the deflecting plates. [2]

FE = _______________ N

(iv) If the charge gained by the ink droplet is -2 × 10-10 C, determine the electric
field strength E between the deflecting plates. [2]

E = _______________ N C-1

(v) Hence, calculate the potential difference V between the deflecting plates. [2]

V = _______________ V

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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17 
Examiner’s
 
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(c) The uncharged, undeflected ink droplets travel beyond the deflecting plates
towards the paper. When a droplet hits the page, it forms a dot sticking to it.
Assuming that the printer giving print of 20 dots per mm would take 0.08 s to print
a line on a page 20.0 cm wide, calculate the average force exerted on the page
when the ink droplets strike. The ink has a density of 1100 kg m-3. [3]

Average Force = _______________ N

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7. Fig 7.1 shows a ring falling from rest through a coil A carrying a constant current.

Fig 7.1

(a) (i) List two factors which will affect the magnitude of e.m.f. induced in the ring.
[2]
1.

2.

(ii) Using the appropriate laws of electromagnetism, state and explain how the
magnitude and direction (as viewed from the top) of the current in the ring
changes throughout the motion in which the ring approaches, falls through
and away from coil A. [6]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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19 
Examiner’s
 
Use 

(iii) On the separate axis below, sketch graphs to show the variation of
1. The magnetic flux through the ring with position of the ring
2. The induced current in the ring with time [4]

Magnetic flux

Position

Induced current

Time

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(iv) If air resistance is ignored, state and explain whether the ring falls through
the coil A with a constant acceleration. [2]

(b) The constant current source connected to coil is now replaced by a varying e.m.f.
which produces a current in the coil A as shown in Fig 7.2.

Fig 7.2

In addition, coil A is wound on one side of an iron core with coil B on the other
side as shown in Fig 7.3.

Fig 7.3

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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21 
Examiner’s
 
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(i) Sketch a graph to show the variation of magnetic flux produced by the
current in coil A with respect to time. [1]

Magnetic flux

Time

(ii) Sketch a graph to show the variation of e.m.f. induced across coil B with
respect to time. [1]

Induced e.m.f.

Time

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(iii) State and explain how the e.m.f. induced across coil B be affected by
1. the number of turns in coil A [2]

2. the number of turns in coil B [2]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
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23 
Examiner’s
 
Use 

8. Fig 8.1 below shows a simple model of a hydrogen atom in which a single ground
state electron stationary wave fits the radius of an atom. This model suggests that the
electron cannot exist outside this atomic sphere. The atomic radius is 3.0 × 10−10 m.

Electron stationary wave 

3.0 × 10−10

Edge of atom 

Fig 8.1

(a) (i) Explain what the electron stationary wave represents. [1] 

(ii) State what you can infer about the location of the electron in ground
state. [1]

(iii) With reference to stationary waves, explain why you can’t find the
electron within the nucleus even if the electron is in excited state. [2]

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(b) (i) Show that the kinetic energy of this electron at ground state can be
written as

where h is the Planck constant and λ is the wavelength of the electron


stationary wave. [2]

(ii) Hence calculate the kinetic energy of the electron at ground state shown
in Fig 8.1. [3]

Kinetic energy = _______________ eV

(iii) Given that the potential energy of the atom is −9.55 eV at 1.5×10−10m
away from the nucleus, explain if this model leads to a stable atom. [3]

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010  


   
For 
25 
Examiner’s
 
Use 
(c) Another model of the hydrogen atom is to consider the electron to be a free
particle inside an ‘atomic box’ as shown in Fig 8.2 below.

Infinite potential at 
the nucleus 
Energy 

Finite potential at 
the edge 

9.55 eV 

3.0 × 10−10 m
−10
0.3 × 10 m
Fig 8.2

(i) Sketch the electron stationary wave for ground state on the figure above. [2]

(ii) Using your sketch above, explain why it is possible for this model of the
hydrogen atom to experience spontaneous ionization. [2]

(iii) Using your answer in (b)(ii) as an approximate, explain if this model of an


atom leads to a stable atom. [3]

(iv) Suggest what could be wrong with this model. [1]

End of Paper

Dunman High School (Senior High) 9646/03/Prelim/2010 


   
Name of Student : Class :

College Section

H2 Physics 9646

C2 Preliminary Examination

Paper 1 Multiple Choice Questions

22 September 2010

Duration of Paper : 1 h 15 min

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do Not Open This Booklet Until You Are Told To Do So.

1. Write your name and class at the top of the question paper.

2. Shade your NRIC/FIN number using a 2B pencil on the optical mark sheet (OMS).

3. Check that you have 24 printed pages (including this cover page) for this question
booklet.

4. There are 40 multiple-choice questions in this paper. For each multiple-choice question,
there are four possible answers. Choose the one you consider correct and shade your
answer using a 2B pencil in the boxes provided in the OMS.

5. Answer ALL questions.

6. A data and formula list is provided on page 2.

7. The total marks for this paper is 40 marks.

8. Hand in only your OMS at the end of the test.

This booklet consists of 24 printed pages, inclusive of this page.


2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Data Formulae

1 2
speed of light in a vacuum, uniformly accelerated motion, s  ut  at
8 -1 2
c = 3.00  10 m s
v 2  u 2  2as
permeability of free space,
-7 -1
o = 4  10 H m work done on/by a gas, W  pV

permittivity of free space, hydrostatic pressure, p  gh


-12 -1
o = 8.85  10 Fm
-9 -1 GM
= (1/(36))  10 F m gravitational potential, 
r
elementary charge,
-19 displacement of particle in s.h.m., x  xo sint
e = 1.60  10 C
velocity of particle in s.h.m., v  v o cost
the Planck constant,
- 34
h = 6.63  10 Js v   x o  x 2
2

unified atomic mass constant,


-27 resistors in series, R  R1  R2  ...
u = 1.66  10 kg
resistors in parallel, 1/ R  1/ R1  1/ R2  ...
rest mass of electron,
-31
me = 9.11  10 kg Q
electric potential, V
4 o r
rest mass of proton,
-27
mp = 1.67  10 kg alternating current / voltage, x  x o sint

molar gas constant, transmission coefficient, T  exp(2kd )


-1 -1
R = 8.31 J K mol
8 2 m(U  E )
where k 
the Avogrado constant, h2
23 -1
NA = 6.02  10 mol
radioactive decay, x  x o exp(t )
the Boltzmann constant,
-23 -1 0.693
k = 1.38  10 JK decay constant, 
t1
2
gravitational constant,
-11 2 -2
G = 6.67  10 N m kg

acceleration of free fall,


-2
g = 9.81 m s

Page 2 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

1 Which of the following ratios is wrong?

A The ratio of the size of an atom’s diameter to the diameter of a nucleus is of


the order of 105: 1.
B The ratio of the mass of an electron to the mass of a proton is 1: 1836.
C The ratio of the period of a 100 kg satellite orbiting the Earth at distance R
(from the centre of the earth) to the period of a 200 kg satellite orbiting Earth
at a distance 2R is 1: 2.8.
D The ratio of the size of the energy band gap in an insulator to the band gap in
a semiconductor is of the order of 103: 1.

2 Ball 1 is launched up an inclined plane from point A with an initial speed that is the
minimum speed for it to just reach point B at the top of the plane. At the same moment
that ball 1 is launched up the plane, ball 2 is released from rest from point B. The two
balls make their first contact at a point C somewhere on the inclined plane between A
and B. What is the ratio of the distance AC to the distance BC?

Ball 2

Ball 1 B

A 1
B 2
C 3
D 4

Page 3 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

3 A particle of mass m is launched with an initial velocity v from a point P.

o
30
P Figure 3 Q

Neglecting air resistance, what is the magnitude of the change in momentum between
leaving P and arriving at Q?

A zero
1
B mv
2
C mv
D 2mv

Page 4 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

4 A ladder is placed between a vertical wall and horizontal ground. The wall and ground
can be either smooth or rough.

Wall

Ladder

Ground

The table below shows you the various combinations of roughness and smoothness
for the two surfaces.

Wall Ground

(i) Smooth Smooth

(ii) Rough Smooth

(iii) Smooth Rough

(iv) Rough Rough

For which of the options below would the ladder be in static equilibrium?

A (iv) only
B (ii) and (iv) only
C (iii) and (iv) only
D (ii), (iii) and (iv) only

Page 5 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

5 A fast moving neutron with an initial velocity u has a head-on elastic collision with a
stationary proton. After the collision, the velocity of the neutron is v and that of the
proton is w. Taking the masses of the neutron and proton to be equal, which one of
the following statements is false?

A Since collision is elastic, it shows that u + v = w.

B By considering kinetic energies of the particles, it can be shown that


u2 = v2 + w2.

C The speed of the proton after the collision is the same as that of the neutron
before the collision.

D The proton and the neutron move off in opposite directions with equal speeds.

6 A block and a sphere of equal mass m are placed on an inclined plane. If the
maximum frictional force that can exist between the block and the plane is equal to the
weight of the block, and there is no frictional force between the sphere and the plane,
what is the maximum angle θ at which the plane can be inclined before the block starts
to slip?

A 30o
B 45o
C 60 o
D 90o

Page 6 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

7 Mass X slides down a frictionless slope while mass Y falls freely downwards from the
same height. Both blocks are initially at rest and the gradient of the slope is vertical at
the starting position of X.

X Y

Which object takes longer time to fall through the same height H?

A X
B Y
C X or Y, depending on which mass is lighter
D X and Y take the same time

8 Two objects P and Q having the same volume are hung at either ends of a light
uniform rod and subsequently submerged in two different liquids X and Y respectively.
The density of X is less than that of Y. The system is balanced when a string is hung
right at the centre of the rod as shown in figure.

P Q
Liquid X Liquid Y

Which object has a smaller mass?

A P
B Q
C P and Q have the same mass
D Not enough information given

Page 7 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

9 Using a rope, delivery man Sam drags a crate of mass 10.0 kg across a rough
horizontal surface at a constant speed of 0.800 m s-1. The rope makes an angle of
30.0  with the horizontal. The average frictional force between the crate and the rough
surface is 200 N.

rope

crate
30.0
10.0 kg

rough horizontal surface

However, Sam realizes that he has to increase his speed if he is to deliver the goods
in the crate on time. Hence, he begins to accelerate uniformly at 1.00 m s-2. The angle
which the rope makes with the crate remains unchanged.
What is the instantaneous power input by Sam on the crate 2.00 seconds after he
starts to accelerate?

A 0W
B 194 W
C 588 W
D 679 W

10 A 50.0 kg man weighs himself using a bathroom scale at the equator as well as on the
pole of planet Earth. What is the difference in the two readings due to the rotation of
the earth? Assume the earth is a sphere with a radius 6400 km.

A 2.64 x 10-7 N
B 0.0338 N
C 1.69 N
D 465 N

Page 8 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

11 A simple pendulum is released from rest at A. What is the tension in the string when
the pendulum is at position B (where the string is vertical), given that the mass of the
bob is m and the length of the pendulum is L?
L

A 0.87 mg o
60
B mg A
C 1.27 mg
B
D 2 mg

12 A and B are two spheres with the same mass. They are both placed at a height R
above the surface of Earth. Sphere A is released from rest while sphere B is projected
with a very small tangential velocity v perpendicular to the radial direction of Earth.

B
A
v
R
R

Which of the following best describes the gain in kinetic energy of the two spheres in
their descent to surface of Earth? Neglect frictional forces.

A Identical
B A is larger
C B is larger
D Cannot be deduced

13 A particle performs simple harmonic motion with a maximum acceleration of 5.0 m s -2


and a maximum speed of 3.0 m s-1. What is the frequency of the particle’s oscillation?

A 0.095 Hz
B 0.27 Hz
C 0.60 Hz
D 1.7 Hz

Page 9 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

14 A hollow metal cylinder floats upright in a body of water with the bottom of the cylinder
at a depth of D below the water surface as shown in the figure below.

The cylinder is pressed further down into the water and upon release, performs simple
harmonic motion. Which of the following graphs (all drawn to scale) shows how the
upthrust U and net force F acting on the cylinder vary with d, the depth the bottom of
the cylinder below the water surface?

A B
U, F U, F

d d
0 D F 0 D F
U
U

C D U, F
U, F
D F
d d
0 D F 0
U

Page 10 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

1
15 n moles of an ideal gas has pressure p and volume V. The graph shows how
p
varies with V at a constant temperature.

1
/105 Pa1
p
0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.0 V / 103 m3
0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

If the number of moles of the gas is increased to 2n and the thermodynamic


temperature is reduced to one quarter of the initial temperature, which graph will be
obtained?

1
/105 Pa1
p
A B
0.4

0.3

0.2 C

0.1 D

0.0 V / 103 m3
0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0

Page 11 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

16 Container X contains neon gas and container Y contains argon gas. Container X has
twice the volume of container Y. The temperatures of the gases in both containers are
the same. What is the ratio of the mean kinetic energy of a neon molecule to the mean
kinetic energy of an argon molecule? [The relative atomic masses of neon and argon
are 20 and 40 respectively.]

A 0.5
B 1
C 2
D 4

17 A progressive wave travelling to the right hits a hard surface and gets reflected after
suffering a phase change of 180°. The diagram below shows the incident wave at a
particular instant of time.

Which of the following shows the corresponding reflected wave?

Page 12 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

18 A point source of sound emits energy equally in all directions at a constant rate. A
detector placed at a distance 8.0 m away registers an amplitude A. After a while, the
intensity of the source is halved. How far from the source must the detector be placed
now so that it can register the same amplitude?

A 2.0 m
B 2.8 m
C 4.0 m
D 5.7 m

19 A guitar string of length L is stretched between two fixed points P and Q and made to
vibrate transversely as shown in the figure.

A
P Q
s B
L

Two particles A and B on the string are separated by a distance s. The maximum
kinetic energies of A and B are KA and KB respectively. Which of the following gives
the correct phase difference and maximum kinetic energies of the particles?

Phase difference Maximum kinetic energy


 3s 
 2L   360
0
A KA < KB
 

 3s 
 2L   360
0
B same
 

C 180o KA < KB

D 180o same

Page 13 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

20 A beam of red light of wavelength 710 nm is incident normally on a diffraction grating.


The angular separation between the two second order maxima is 60o. What is the
resolution of the grating?

A 3.5 x 105 lines per millimetre


B 3.5 x 105 lines per metre
C 6.1 x 105 lines per millimetre
D 6.1 x 105 lines per metre

21 A tuning fork of pitch 2.4 kHz is placed near the mouth of a long cylindrical container
which is fully filled with water. Water is slowly drained from the bottom of the container.
Resonance is first heard when the water level had dropped 3.4 cm below the mouth of
the container. At which position of water below the mouth of the container will the next
resonance be heard? Assume the speed of sound in air = 3.4 x 102 m s-1.

A 7.1 cm
B 8.0 cm
C 10.2 cm
D 10.5 cm

22 Two fixed point charges, each of magnitude Q1 = -7.83 nC and Q2 = +4.63 nC, are
located at O and P respectively as shown in the figure. The distance OP is 48.2 cm.
The value of the electric potential at point A is

50.0 cm
33.0 cm

Q1 Q2
48.2 cm
O P

A -14.7 V
B +29.7 V
C +101 V
D -267 V

Page 14 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

23 The diagram shows the electric equipotential lines in a non-uniform electric field. At
which position is the electric field greatest in magnitude?

24 An electron is located midway inside the space between horizontal metal plates H and
K. A potential difference of 1000 V is applied across
H and K. + 1000 V
H
H is positively charged while K is earthed. Which one electron x
of the following graphs best represents how the
K
electric force F acting on the electron varies with the
distance x measured from plate H?

A F B F

0 x

0 x
F F
C D

0 x 0 x

Page 15 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

25 A potentiometer consists of a 1.000 m long resistance wire XY in series with a battery


of e.m.f. E1 = 9.00 V and internal resistance r = 1.42 Ω. The resistance of XY is 8.30 Ω.
Find the emf of cell E2 if the balance length l is found to be 0.745 m.

E1

X Y

E2 G

R2 = 2.00 Ω

A 0.636 V
B 2.72 V
C 5.73 V
D 9.00 V

Page 16 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

26 A thermistor R1 is connected to a battery of constant e.m.f. with negligible internal


resistance as shown in the figure.

R1

M R3
V
P Q

R2 S

Which of the following actions will cause an increase in the potential difference V
measured by the voltmeter? Assume that the voltmeter has infinite resistance.

A Increase the temperature of the thermistor with S open


B Remove the earth connection at M with S open
C Close switch S
D Decrease resistance R3 with S open.

27 A battery with internal resistance r is connected to a resistor R as shown in the figure


below. A constant current passes through R. When a charge of 30.0 C passes through
the circuit, the heat dissipated in r is 45.2 J and the heat dissipated in R is 88.3 J. Find
the e.m.f. of the battery.

A 0.148 V
r
B 1.51 V
C 2.94 V
D 4.45 V

Page 17 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

28 A coil PQRS in the shape of a rhombus, has its plane parallel to the magnetic field
lines of a uniform magnetic field, as shown in the figure.

Q
P
Uniform
I I magnetic
field
R
S

Which of the following statements is true when a current I flows in the coil?
A There are no forces on sides SP and QR.
B There are no forces on sides PQ and RS.
C The direction of force on PQ is acting out of the paper.
D The magnitude of force on PQ is smaller than the magnitude of the force on
QR.

29 A uniform metallic rod PQ of density , area of cross-section A and length x, is


suspended horizontally by two identical strings as shown below.

string
string B

P Q

A uniform magnetic field B acts throughout this region in the direction outwards from
the plane of this page and perpendicular to the length of the rod. When a certain
magnitude of current I is passed along the rod, the tensions of the supporting strings
reduce to zero. What is the magnitude and direction of the current in PQ?
Magnitude Direction

A B Q to P
 Ag

B B P to Q
 Ag

C  Ag Q to P
B

D  Ag P to Q
B

Page 18 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

30 An e.m.f. is induced in a coil placed in a changing magnetic field. The flux density B of
this field varies with time t as shown below.

At which value of t is the magnitude of the e.m.f. induced in the wire a maximum?

A 1 ms
B 2 ms
C 3 ms
D 4 ms

31 A copper bar of length L is moving to the right with a uniform speed v in a region of
uniform magnetic field of flux density B, directed perpendicularly downwards into the
paper in the figure below.

v
B

The ends of the rods are rigidly connected to a voltmeter which moves with the rod.
What is the reading on the voltmeter?

A Zero
B Non-zero reading less than BLv
C BLv
D More than BLv

Page 19 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

32 A 100% efficient transformer is connected as shown to a sinusoidal a.c. supply. What


is the reading on the ammeter?

Primary coil, Secondary coil,


100 turns 20 turns

Output:
A.C. supply 140 Ω
30 V a.c.
A

A 0.0429 A
B 0.214 A
C 1.07 A
D 2.14 A

Page 20 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

33 In a photoelectric effect experiment, a metallic surface A in an evacuated tube is


illuminated with light of wavelength 275 nm causing the emission of photo-electrons
which are collected at an adjacent electrode. The variation of photocurrent I with the
potential difference V between the metallic surface and the adjacent electrode is
shown in the diagram below.

A
B
V

The experiment is repeated by replacing metallic surface A by another metallic surface


B.

The table below lists the work functions of some elements.

Element Work Function (eV)

Sodium 2.7

Aluminum 4.3

Copper 4.7

What materials are the metallic surfaces A and B made of?

Metallic Surface A Metallic Surface B


A Copper Copper
B Copper Aluminum
C Sodium Aluminum
D Sodium Copper

Page 21 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

34 The x-ray spectrum of a metal target is shown in figure below.

Intensity

 / 10-12 m
36 60 70

Which of the following statements is correct?

A The graph shows that electrons with a range of kinetic energies are used to
bombard the target.
B The position of the peaks allow us to calculate the energy of the electrons
used to bombard the target
C The smallest wavelength detected, 36 x 10-12 m, is dependent on the target
material.
D The locations of the peaks can be used to identify the element that the target
material is made of.

35 An atom X is excited to an energy level E2 from its ground state E0 by collision with
another atom Y. Atom X is initially at rest. Which of the following gives possible energy
values of X and Y?

Kinetic energy of atom Y Kinetic energy of atom X


before collision after the collision
A less than (E2 - Eo) zero
B (E2 - Eo) non-zero
C (E2 - Eo) zero

D greater than (E2 - Eo) non-zero

Page 22 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

36 The figure below shows how the atomic energy levels for a material vary with the inter-
atomic separation.

energy

P Q R S
Inter-atomic separation

At which separation does the graph show the material possibly behaving like a
conductor and an ideal gas respectively?

conductor ideal gas


A P R
B P S
C Q R
D Q S

37 A p-n junction is formed when p-type semiconductor is joined to an n-type


semiconductor. Which of the following statements about the p-n junction is false?

A Each of the semiconductor is electrically neutral before joining.


B The p-type semiconductor becomes positively charged after joining.
C In reverse bias condition, the p-n junction can be used to rectify an alternating
current.
D In forward bias condition, the width of the depletion region decreases.

38 It is possible for an electron to annihilate a positron to produce two identical photons.


Given that the mass m of the positron is equal to the mass of the electron, what is the
minimum wavelength  of the photons produced?

h h h 2h
A B C D
mc mc 2 2mc mc 2

Page 23 of 24
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

39 A sample of a radioactive material contains 1018 atoms. The half life of the material is
2.00 days. Calculate the activity of the sample after 5.00 days.

A 1.77 x 105 disintegrations s-1


B 7.09 x 1011 disintegrations s-1
C 2.05 x 1012 disintegrations s-1
D 6.13 x 1016 disintegrations s-1

40 A radioactive source contains two materials. One has a half life of 4 days and decays
by the emission of alpha particles whilst the other has a half life of 3 days and emits
beta particles. The initial count rate is 160 Bq but when a sheet of paper is placed in
between the source and the detector, the reading drops to 96 Bq. What will be the
count rate after 12 days, without the paper present?

A 10 Bq
B 14 Bq
C 16 Bq
D 20 Bq

----- END OF PAPER -----

Page 24 of 24
College Section

H2 Physics 9646
Preliminary Examination
Paper 2 Structured Questions
3 Sept 2010

Duration of Paper : 1 h 45 min

Name of Student :
INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do Not Open This Booklet Until You Are Told Class:


To Do So.

1. Write your name, class, tutor’s name and Name of Tutor :


calculator model clearly on this cover page.

2. Check that you have the correct number of Calculator model:


pages for this question booklet.

3. Answer ALL questions.


For Examiner's Use :
4. For numerical answers, all working should be 1 /9
shown.
2 /8
5. You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams,
graphs or rough working. 3 /8
6. Do not use paperclips, highlighters, glue or 4 /7
correction fluid.
5 /8
7. A data and formula list is provided on page 2.

8. You are reminded of the need for clear 6 /8


presentation and good English.
7 / 12

INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES 8 /12

The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the Deductions


end of each question or part question.

Paper 2 /72

This booklet consists of 17 printed pages, inclusive of this page.


2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Data Formulae

speed of light in free space, uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + 1 at2


8 -1
c = 3.00  10 m s 2 2
2
v = u + 2as
permeability of free space,
-7 -1
o = 4  10 H m work done on/ by a gas, W = p V

permittivity of free space, hydrostatic pressure p = gh


-12 -1
o = 8.85  10 F m
-9
 (1/(36))  10 F m
-1 gravitational potential,  = -Gm/r

elementary charge, displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin t


-19
e = 1.60  10 C
velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos t
the Planck constant, =  ( xo2  x 2 )
- 34
h = 6.63  10 J s
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + . . .
unified atomic mass constant,
-27
u = 1.66  10 kg resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + . . .

rest mass of electron, electric potential, V = Q/4or


-31
me = 9.11  10 kg
alternating current / voltage, x = xo sin t
rest mass of proton,
-27 transmission coefficient, T  exp(-2kd)
mp = 1.67  10 kg
2
molar gas constant, 8 m(U  E )
-1 -1 where k  2
R = 8.31 J K mol h

the Avogadro constant,


23 -1
NA = 6.02  10 mol radioactive decay, x = xo exp ( -t )

the Boltzmann constant, 0.693


k
-23
= 1.38  10 J K
-1
decay constant, 
t1
2
gravitational constant,
-11 2 -2
G = 6.67  10 N m kg

acceleration of free fall,


-2
g = 9.81 m s

Page 2 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

1. The figure below shows a juggler performing a trick called “the shower” in which three balls are
kept moving around between the two hands and through the air in the trajectory shown in
Figure 1.

Trajectory
of balls.
1.75 m

Ball 1

Ball 3

Right Left
(Throw) (Catch)
Ball 2
Figure 1

(a) Ball 1 leaves the right hand at an angle of 80.0o to the horizontal and reaches a maximum
height of 1.75 m above the level of the juggler’s hands. Show that ball 1’s initial speed of
projection must be 5.95 m s-1.

[2]

(b) Calculate how far the juggler must position his hands apart so that the ball lands on his
left hand.

distance =_______________ m [2]

Page 3 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(c) For a fixed speed of projection, suggest two advantages for the juggler to throw the balls
at such a large angle to the horizontal

Advantage 1:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________[1]

Advantage 2:

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________[1]

(d) When Ball 1 is just at its maximum height, the juggler throws Ball 2 up with the same
speed and in the same direction as he did Ball 1. How much time does the juggler have to
transfer Ball 3 from his left to right hand so that his left hand is available to catch Ball 1?

time = ______________ s [1]

(e) Suggest a minimum value for the horizontal distance between the two hands and explain
your answer clearly.

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________[2]

Page 4 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

2. Daniel decides to have his first attempt at bungee jumping. He falls from rest from the top of a
tall cliff with an elastic rope tied to his feet. The force constant of the rope is 100 N m-1, and the
rope's unstretched length is 20.0 m. Daniel's mass is 80.0 kg. Assume that the average drag
force by the air on Daniel during his jump is 300 N, and that g = 10 m s-2.

cliff H

(a) Determine the lowest height H Daniel reaches in his jump.

H = ____________ m [3]

Page 5 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(b) Calculate the tension in the rope at the instant when Daniel is at his lowest height.

tension = ____________ N [1]

(c) Hence, determine Daniel's acceleration at this instant.

Magnitude of acceleration = ____________ m s-2

Direction of acceleration = _________________ [3]

(d) Sketch a graph of the tension in the rope against the height which Daniel falls through,
from the time when he jumps to the instant when he is at the lowest height
[1]

Tension in
rope

0
Height Daniel falls through

Page 6 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

3. A small cube of mass m slides down along a spiraled path round a cone as shown in
Figure 3a. The path is always inclined at an angle  to the horizontal at any point.
There is a smooth wall along the outer edge of the spiraled path to prevent the cube
from falling out of the path (see Figure 3b). This wall is inclined such that it always
exerts a horizontal contact force on the cube as it spirals down. All frictional forces are
negligible.

Inner Wall

Cube
Cone

Spiraled Outer
Path Wall

Figure 3a

Spiral Path
taken by cube

cube

Figure 3b

(a) Label all the forces acting on the cube in Figure 3b. [3]

(b) Based on the answer in (a), describe the motion of the cube.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[2]

Page 7 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(c) (i) State the work done by the horizontal contact force on the cube as it spirals
down the plane.

________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________[1]

(ii) Derive an expression for the rate of change of kinetic energy of this cube in
terms of m,  and its instantaneous speed v.

[2]

Page 8 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

4(a) Define gravitational potential at a point in a gravitational field.

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________[2]

(b) (i) State the expression of the gravitational potential due to a point mass m at a distance r
from it.

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[1]

(ii) 4 identical masses, each of mass m, are arranged symmetrically about a light circular
ring of radius R.
m

O P Central axis
h
R Figure 4

Find the gravitational potential V at point P (at distance h from the centre O of the ring
along the central axis of the ring) as shown in Figure 4.

potential = _______________[2]

(iii) Another mass of mass M is placed at P. It is moved along the central axis of the ring
towards the centre O of the ring by an external force F. Assume that the kinetic energy
of the mass remains a constant. Discuss how the work done by F changes with
distance as the mass M approaches O from P.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[2]

Page 9 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

5(a) A student attempts to measure the resistivity of soil using two parallel copper plates driven into
the ground as shown in Figure 5.

E
A
K

d = 0.800 m 1.040 m

0.210 m
x = 0.900 m
0.050 m 0.050 m

Figure 5

Each copper plate has a height of 1.040 m, a width of 0.210 m and a thickness of 0.050 m.
Assume the ammeter has zero resistance and the voltmeter has infinite resistance.

The copper plates are driven to a depth of d = 0.800 m and separated by a distance x = 0.900
m. If the soil is acidic, it reacts with copper and this produces an e.m.f. When switch K is open,
the student obtained a steady voltmeter reading of +0.281 V. When switch K is closed, the
student obtained a voltmeter reading of +1.398 V and an ammeter reading of 0.31 mA.

(i) Show that the resistance of the soil between the copper electrodes is 3.6 k. [2]

Page 10 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(ii) Hence, find the resistivity of the soil.

resistivity = ………………………. Ω m [1]

(iii) Suggest how the value in a(ii) could be measured more accurately.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[1]

(b) A light bulb, marked 60 W, 120 V, is connected to an alternating power supply whose voltage V
in volts is given by V = 170 sin (100  t) where t is time in seconds.

(i) Calculate the value of the root-mean-square current in the bulb.

root-mean-square current =……………… A [2]

(ii) Sketch the graph showing the variation with time t of the power P dissipated by the light
bulb. Indicate the mean power clearly on the graph. [2]

P/W

t/s
0

Page 11 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
6. The Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) is a stylus-type instrument in which a sharp probe
is scanned across a sample to detect changes in the surface structure on the atomic scale.

(a) Explain using the concept of quantum tunneling, how the STM detects changes in the
topography of the surface.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[3]

(b) When the tip of a STM probe is set at a distance d of 1.0 x 10-10 m from the sample, its
transmission coefficient T is 0.0001. The sample has a work function energy of 4.0 eV.
8 2 m(U  E )
The transmission coefficient is given by T  e 2 kd , k  .
h2

(i) Compute k.

k = __________________ m-1 [2]

Page 12 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(ii) Hence, find the value of d when T is 0.0002.

d = ________________ m [2]

(c) When STM is used in biological applications, it is often required to coat DNA complexes
with a conducting film. Suggest why this coating is necessary.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[1]

Page 13 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

7. Solids can be classified as crystalline, polymeric or amorphous. All these materials are widely
used in engineering and industry. In the question, we will look at how materials deform when
subjected to loads of varying amounts.

When a load F is applied to the end of a wire of unstretched length l and cross sectional A, it
extends by a length e. Some technical terms used in the subject of elasticity of wires include:

F
 Tensile stress = force per unit area =
A
e
 Tensile strain = extension per unit length =
l
stress Fl
 Young Modulus E = 
strain Ae

(a) Determine the base units of E.

Base units of E = ____________[2]

Page 14 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

A specimen fibre of glass has the same dimensions as a specimen of copper wire. The length
of each specimen is 1.60 m and the radius of each is 0.18 mm. Both specimens are loaded
until they break. The force-extension graphs of both specimens are shown in Figure 7.1.

18

16

14
A

12

10
force/N

8
B
6

0
0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32
extension/mm

Figure 7.1

(b) (i) State Hooke’s law.

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[1]

(ii) Label the limit of proportionality for material A with X. [1]

(iii) Suggest, with a reason, which material is likely to be glass.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________[2]

Page 15 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(c) Using the graphs and data given, determine


(i) the Young modulus of B

Young modulus E = ________________[2]

(ii) the approximate value of work done to stretch material A to its breaking point

Work = _____________ J [2]

Page 16 of 17
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(d) In a separate experiment, three rods were set up as shown in Figure 7.2 for the loading test. All
rods are of the same dimensions as in the previous experiment. Rods X and Y are made of
material B and Rod Z is made of material A. Rod Z is at the midpoint of the support rod.

X Y

Support rod

Applied load

Figure 7.2

State, with a reason, which rod(s) will break first as the load increases.

___________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________[2]

Page 17 of 17
College Section

H2 Physics 9646
Preliminary Examination
Paper 2 Structured Questions
Planning Question
3 Sept 2010

Duration of Paper : 1 h 45 min

Name of student Class

Name of tutor Score 12

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES

Do Not Open This Booklet Until You Are Told To Do So.

1. Write your name, class and tutor’s name clearly on this cover page.

2. Check that you have the 4 printed pages inclusive of the cover page for this question
booklet.

3. You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.

4. Do not use paperclips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.

5. You are reminded of the need for clear presentation and good English.

6. It is recommended that you spend about 25 minutes on this question.

Page 1 of 4
8. A bar magnet is attached to the end of a given spring which is connected to a corkboard. The
arrangement is as shown in Figure 8.1.

Corkboard taped onto brick


Current
carrying coil

brick
x
Coil is taped onto Bar
table surface magnet Screw
Figure 8.1

A current carrying coil is placed near the bar magnet. There is an attractive force on the
magnet which depends on the distance x between the end of the magnet and that of the coil.

Design a laboratory experiment to investigate how this attractive force varies with the distance
x.

You may use any standard equipment which may be found in a school or college science
laboratory together with some or all of the apparatus from the following list.

Ammeter,
Bar magnet,
Coil,
Connecting wires,
Mass holder,
Metre rule,
Oscilloscope,
Power supply units (variable output 0 – 6 V d.c.),
Pulleys,
Resistor,
Rheostat,
Set of masses,
Signal generator,
String,
Voltmeter

Your answer should contain details of

(a) the procedure to be followed including which measurements would be taken

(b) how the attractive force between the magnet and the coil would be measured

(c) how the current in the coil would be monitored

(d) any modifications you would make to the setup shown in Figure 8.1 in order to obtain a
measurable change in x. Diagrams should be clearly labelled.

Page 2 of 4
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Page 4 of 4
College Section
H2 Physics 9646
Preliminary Examinations
Paper 3
Section A
Longer Structured Questions

C2 14 September 2010 Duration: 2 h

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Name of Student :

Do Not Open This Booklet Until You Are Told To Class:


Do So.

1. Write your name, class, tutor’s name and calculator Name of Tutor :
model clearly on this cover page.

2. Check that you have the correct number of pages for Calculator model:
this question booklet.

3. Answer ALL question in Section A (40 Marks). For Examiner's Use :


Section A
4. The total marks for Section A is 40.
1 /10
5. For numerical answers, all working should be shown.
2 /10
6. You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or
rough working 3 /10
7. Do not use paperclips, highlighters, glue or correction
4 /10
fluid.
Section B
8. A data and formula list is provided on page 2. Question No.

9. You are reminded of the need for clear presentation /20


and good English.
/20

INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES Deductions

The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of


each question or part question. Paper 3 /80

This booklet consists of 10 printed pages, inclusive of this page.


2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Data Formulae

speed of light in free space, s = ut + 1 at


2
8 -1 uniformly accelerated motion,
c = 3.00  10 m s 2
2 2
v = u + 2as
permeability of free space,
-7 -1
o = 4  10 H m work done on/ by a gas, W = p V

permittivity of free space, hydrostatic pressure p = gh


-12 -1
o = 8.85  10 Fm
-9 -1 gravitational potential,  = -Gm/r
 (1/(36))  10 F m
displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin t
elementary charge,
-19
e = 1.60  10 C velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos t
=  ( xo 2  x 2 )
the Planck constant,
- 34
h = 6.63  10 J s resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + . . .

unified atomic mass constant, resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + . . .


-27
u = 1.66  10 kg
electric potential, V = Q/4or
rest mass of electron,
-31 alternating current / voltage, x = xo sin t
me = 9.11  10 kg
transmission coefficient, T ∞ exp(-2kd)
rest mass of proton,
-27
mp = 1.67  10 kg 2
8π m(U - E)
where k=
molar gas constant, 2
-1 -1 h
R = 8.31 J K mol

the Avogadro constant, radioactive decay, x = xo exp ( -t )


23 -1
NA = 6.02  10 mol
0.693
the Boltzmann constant, decay constant, λ=
-23 -1 t1
k = 1.38  10 J K
2

gravitational constant,
-11 2 -2
G = 6.67  10 N m kg

acceleration of free fall,


-2
g = 9.81 m s

Page 2 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
SECTION A (40 Marks)

Answer all questions

1 Tom was driving his car on the expressway one evening when he spotted a van
travelling towards him at a high speed from a short distance away. The driver in the van
was apparently drunk and not aware that he was driving on the wrong lane.
Unfortunately, Tom was unable to stop his car on time and the two vehicles collided
eventually.

The variation of the velocity of both vehicles from the time Tom saw the oncoming van to
the time after the accident occurred is shown in the graph below.

velocity /km h-1

A B
80

Tom's car

60

40
C

20

E
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 time /s

–20
D

–40

–60 Van

Page 3 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(a) Using information from the graph, briefly describe and explain what happened to [4]
Tom's car during the following periods of time:

AB: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

BC: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

CD: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

DE: __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

(b) The mass of Tom's car is 1200 kg. Determine the average force experienced by
Tom's car during the collision.

Average force = ____________ N [2]

(c) Hence or otherwise, calculate the mass of the van.

Mass of van = ____________ kg [2]

(d) Is the collision between the two vehicles elastic or inelastic? Explain your answer. [2]

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

Page 4 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
2 (a) State
(i) the first law of thermodynamics, [2]

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

(ii) the meaning of the term internal energy. [2]

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

(b) The diesel cycle is the thermodynamic cycle which approximates the pressure and
volume of the combustion chamber of the diesel engine, invented by Rudolph
Diesel in 1897.

An ideal gas undergoes the diesel cycle which comprises 4 processes:


Process A - adiabatic compression
Process B - isobaric heating
Process C - adiabatic expansion
Process D - isovolumetric cooling

P / 105 Pa

11
B

A
D

0.020 0.070 V / m3

(i) Calculate the work done by the gas during process B.

work = ___________ J [2]

Page 5 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(ii) Table 2.1 is a table of energy changes during one cycle. Complete the table [4]
with appropriate values.

increase in
work done on heat supplied to
Process internal energy,
gas, W / kJ gas, Q / kJ
ΔU / kJ
A + 201
B + 74

C - 185

D - 35 - 35

Table 2.1

3 A researcher is investigating a cubic crystal with x-rays. The x-rays are incident at an
angle  with the crystal surface and the crystal has a lattice spacing a. He is looking at
reflection from parallel planes of atoms in a thin film deposit of the material, as shown in
Figure 3.1.

Constructive interference occurs when the path difference between radiation reflected
off adjacent layers is an integer product of the wavelength of the radiation.

Incident Reflected
parallel radiation
beams of
radiation

Top-most
layer of atoms
 a
Second layer
of atoms Fig. 3.1

(a) Derive an expression of the path difference, x, between the radiation reflected from
two adjacent layers of atoms, in terms of  and a.

x = ________________ [1]

Page 6 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(b) (i) When the x-rays of wavelength 0.165 nm are used, a strong first order
maximum occurs as the beam makes an angle of  = 23.5° with the top-most
plane. Calculate the lattice spacing a.

a = ______________ m [3]

(ii) The beams indicated in Fig 3.1 depict the conditions for first order maxima. [1]
Sketch, in the same figure, the beams of incident and reflected radiations
corresponding to the second order maxima.

(c) It is suggested that electron beam can be used in place of x-rays to carry out this
diffraction experiment.

(i) Calculate the maximum wavelength of x-rays which can be used to probe the
crystal lattice.

maximum wavelength = ______________ m [2]

(ii) Hence, find the minimum speed which the electrons must possess to be
used for electron diffraction.

mininum speed = _____________ m s-1 [3]

Page 7 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

4 In 1932, Cockcroft and Walton produced nuclear disintegrations by bombarding lithium with
the high speed protons. The protons were accelerated through a potential difference of
4.00 x 105 V using a specially built high-voltage machine. Photographs of the reaction taken
in a cloud chamber show that two alpha particles were produced. The tracks were straight
and as their range was equal, the alpha particles have the same initial energy. Using the
length of the tracks, the initial energy of the alpha particles was calculated. The experimental
value of the energy agreed closely to the theoretical value, providing the earliest verification
of Einstein’s mass-energy relation.

The nuclear reaction is given by:


7
3 Li  11 H  2 4
2 He

(a) (i) Explain what is meant by 37 Li .

____________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________
[1]

(ii) By considering the Coulomb repulsion between the lithium nucleus and the
proton, calculate the distance of closest approach between the lithium
nucleus and the accelerated proton.

Distance = _____________ m [2]

(iii) Suggest why it is possible for the proton to penetrate the Coulomb potential
barrier and interact with the lithium nucleus, producing the alpha particles.

____________________________________________________________
[1]
____________________________________________________________

Page 8 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(b) The masses of the nuclei involved are listed below:

7
3 Li 7.0138 u

4
2 He 4.0015 u

1
1 H 1.0073 u

(i) Ignoring the kinetic energy of the proton, calculate the energy of each alpha particle.



Energy of an alpha particle = ____________ J [3]

(ii) On average, an alpha particle creates 5.0 x 103 ion pairs per mm of track in the
cloud chamber and the energy needed to produce an ion pair is 5.2 x 10-18 J.

1. Calculate the length of the track made by the alpha particle.

Length = __________ mm [1]

2. Sketch the tracks produced by the two alpha particles in figure below.

path of incident
proton
1 7
1 H 3 Li

[1]

Page 9 of 10
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(c) In 1934, Fermi began using neutrons instead of protons to produce nuclear
disintegrations. Neutrons are generally more effective than protons or alpha particles for
this purpose. Suggest a reason why this may be so.

[1]
__________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________

- End of Section A -

Page 10 of 10
College Section
H2 Physics 9646
Preliminary Examinations
Paper 3
Section B
Longer Structured Questions

C2 14 September 2010 Duration: 2 h

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Name of Student :

Do Not Open This Booklet Until You Are Told To Class:


Do So.

1. Write your name, class, tutor’s name and calculator Name of Tutor :
model clearly on this cover page.

2. Check that you have the correct number of pages for Calculator model:
this question booklet.

3. Answer ANY TWO questions from Section B and For Examiner's Use :
CIRCLE the questions attempted on this cover Section B
page.
CIRCLE Question No. attempted
4. The total marks for Section B is 40.

5. For numerical answers, all working should be shown. 5 /20

6. You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or 6 /20
rough working.
7 /20
7. Do not use paperclips, highlighters, glue or correction
fluid.
Deductions
8. A data and formula list is provided on page 2.

9. You are reminded of the need for clear presentation


and good English.
Section B
INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES Total
/40

The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of


each question or part question.

This booklet consists of 13 printed pages, inclusive of this page.


2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS

Data Formulae

speed of light in free space, s = ut + 1 at


2
8 -1 uniformly accelerated motion,
c = 3.00  10 m s 2
2 2
v = u + 2as
permeability of free space,
-7 -1
o = 4  10 H m work done on/ by a gas, W = p V

permittivity of free space, hydrostatic pressure p = gh


-12 -1
o = 8.85  10 Fm
-9 -1 gravitational potential,  = -Gm/r
 (1/(36))  10 F m
displacement of particle in s.h.m., x = xo sin t
elementary charge,
-19
e = 1.60  10 C velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cos t
=  ( xo 2  x 2 )
the Planck constant,
- 34
h = 6.63  10 J s resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + . . .

unified atomic mass constant, resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + . . .


-27
u = 1.66  10 kg
electric potential, V = Q/4or
rest mass of electron,
-31 alternating current / voltage, x = xo sin t
me = 9.11  10 kg
transmission coefficient, T ∞ exp(-2kd)
rest mass of proton,
-27
mp = 1.67  10 kg 2
8π m(U - E)
where k=
molar gas constant, 2
-1 -1 h
R = 8.31 J K mol

the Avogadro constant, radioactive decay, x = xo exp ( -t )


23 -1
NA = 6.02  10 mol
0.693
the Boltzmann constant, decay constant, λ=
-23 -1 t1
k = 1.38  10 J K
2

gravitational constant,
-11 2 -2
G = 6.67  10 N m kg

acceleration of free fall,


-2
g = 9.81 m s

Page 2 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
SECTION B (40 Marks)

Answer ANY TWO questions.


CIRCLE the question you have chosen on the cover sheet.

5 (a) Speed guns are frequently employed by traffic police to measure the speed of
vehicles for the purpose of speed limit enforcement. A radar speed gun sends a
broad, cone-shaped radiowave and gauge the speed of the target from the change in
frequency of the reflected wave from the moving target. A laser speed gun shoots a
very short pulse of infrared laser light and waits for the reflected laser light to
calculate the distance to the target. By taking many samples per second, the laser
speed gun can find the change in distance between samples and calculate the speed
of the target.

(i) Give one advantage and disadvantage of using the laser speed gun over the [2]
radar speed gun.

Advantage : ___________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

Disadvantage : _________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

(ii) A simple laser speed gun is used to investigate the motion of a small object
performing simple harmonic motion (Fig. 5.1). At its equilibrium position, the
object is 5.000 m away from the laser speed gun.

5.000 m

Fig. 5.1

One section of the data recorded by the laser speed gun is shown in the table
below.

time / ms distance / m speed / m s-1


1000 5.031 31.0
1001 5.059 28.0
1002 5.081 22.0
1003 5.095 14.0
1004 5.100 5.0
1005 5.095 -5.0
1006 5.081 -14.0
1007 5.059 -22.0
1008 5.031 -28.0
1009 Z -

Page 3 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS

1. Define simple harmonic motion. [2]

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

2. Hence, verify that x = Acos(Bt) is a possible solution for an object in SHM, [2]
where A and B are constants.

3. Calculate the amplitude and the period of the simple harmonic motion. [4]

amplitude = ____________ m
period = ____________ s

4. Hence, or otherwise, find the value of Z. [2]

Z = _______________ m

Page 4 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
5. Calculate the number of samples taken per second by the laser speed gun. [3]
Hence explain why a high number of samples taken per unit time is
necessary for the laser speed gun to measure the speed of a moving object.

sampling rate = _____________ s-1

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

(b) Consider a laser medium whose atoms only have two energy levels. Lasing can
occur when population inversion is achieved between the two energy levels through
optical pumping.

(i) Explain what is optical pumping. [2]

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

(ii) Explain why it is very difficult to achieve population inversion using optical [3]
pumping in the 2 levels laser medium.

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

Page 5 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
6 (a) Define magnetic flux density. [2]

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________

(b) (i) The magnetic flux density B a distance d from a long, straight wire carrying a [2]
current I is given by
o I
B
2d

Using this relationship with a clearly labeled diagram, show that the force per
unit length between two long, straight, parallel wires carrying currents I1 and I2
respectively in the same direction, separated by a distance d is given by

 o I1 I 2
F
2d

(ii) A light metal spring with its axis vertical is clamped at the top and is hanging
freely unextended. The turns of the spring have a radius r and the longitudinal
distance between adjacent turns is d when the spring is unstretched, as shown
in figure 6.1. The spring obeys Hooke’s Law and has a spring constant k.

r
c
d

Figure 6.1 Figure 6.2


10.0 g

Page 6 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
An e.m.f. source is then connected across points A and B, and a current I
passed through exactly two turns of the spring.

1. On Figure 6.2, complete the circuit connections made at A and B so that the [2]
current passing through the spring can be measured.

2. A student noted that the current causes a change in the length of the spring. [3]
State and explain whether the change in the length of the spring is an
extension or compression.
(Assume the connections themselves are light, and do not disturb the
equilibrium of the spring and the force between any two circular turns of the
spring is the same as that between two straight wires.)

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

3. Using your answer in (b)(i), derive an expression for the change in the length [2]
of the spring, x, caused by a current I passing through points A and B on the
spring, in terms of I, d, k and r.

x = _____________________

4. The connections made across A and B are now reversed. State whether the [1]
change in the length of the spring is an extension or a compression.

______________________________________________________________

Page 7 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
(c) A physicist designs an electromagnetic braking system for a truck in his model
railway. The top view of the set up is shown in the figure below.

Fig 6.3 Top View

The truck has mass M = 0.15 kg. X and Y are wheel axles with an axle spacing of
l = 0.10 m. The truck is projected at velocity v to the right, along a level metal track
with rail spacing w = 0.050 m. Mechanical friction is negligible.
The truck runs into a limited region of vertical magnetic field B = 0.70 T over the
length L = 0.15 m between points P and Q. The field is negligible outside this region.
The truck has metal wheels and axles. Axles X and Y, together with the section of rail
length l between the axles, form a closed loop. The closed loop has a circuit
resistance R of 0.020 .
When the initial velocity v = 30 mm s-1, the braking system works well with the truck
coming to rest before axle X enters the magnetic field at point P.

(i) Explain how the braking occurs. [3]

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________

Page 8 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS

(ii) Hence, by considering the net horizontal force, show that the acceleration, a, [3]
experienced by the truck when it enters the magnetic field is proportional to its
velocity v.

(iii) Suggest and explain briefly one improvement to this braking system to [2]
effectively stop trucks projected at high velocities.

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

Page 9 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS

7 (a) List two similarities and two differences between electric field and magnetic field. [2]

Similarities:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

Differences: [2]

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

Page 10 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
(b) Fig. 7.1 shows a cyclotron, which is used for accelerating charged particles to very
high kinetic energies. It consists of two hollow semi-circular metal chambers, called
‘dees’ of radius 1.30 m, within which there is a uniform magnetic field, B. A high
frequency square wave alternating voltage V and frequency 3.05 MHz is connected
across the narrow gap between the chambers.

Fig 7.1

Fig. 7.2 shows an enlarged view of the narrow gap at the centre of the cyclotron. Positive
charges called deuterons enter the narrow gap near dee Y with negligible kinetic energy
(point 1). They accelerate towards dee X, which has lower potential (point 2).

There is no electric field within the dees and the deuterons move in semi-circular path
inside the dee X. As soon as they complete a semi-circular path (point 3), dee X reverses
its polarity such that dee Y now has a lower potential. The deuterons then accelerate
towards dee Y (point 4).

This process is repeated until the deuterons have gained sufficient energy, eventually
emerging at a very high speed.

High frequency
alternating voltage
3 Particles released here +V
with negligible K.E.
2 X
X Narrow gap of
negligible width -V

1 Y 0V
Y
4

Fig. 7.2

Page 11 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
(i) Explain why the deuterons move in a semicircular path when they are inside [2]
the dees.

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________

(ii) Show that the radius of the circular path of the deuteron motion inside a dee [2]
is given by
mv
r
Bq
where m is the mass of the deuteron, v is its speed and q is its charge and B is
the magnetic flux density inside the chambers.

(iii) Show that the period of the motion is independent of v and r. [2]

(iv) Sketch the graph showing the variation of the kinetic energy of the deuteron [2]
with distance travelled as it moves from Point 2 to Point 4.

K.E.

Distance
Point Point Point
2 3 4

Page 12 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS
(v) There is a uniform magnetic field of 0.400 T directed normally out of the plane
of the dees and the high frequency alternating voltage V of amplitude 100 V
and frequency 3.05 MHz is connected between the dees.

The mass of deuteron is 3.34 X 10-27 kg and its charge is +1.60 X 10-19 C.

1. Calculate the gain in kinetic energy of the deuterons in each complete


revolution.

gain in kinetic energy = ____________ J [2]

2. Show why a frequency of 3.05 MHz for the square wave alternating voltage [3]
is appropriate (Fig 7.1).

3. Hence calculate the time taken for a deuteron to attain a kinetic energy of
1.00 MeV.

time = ___________ s [3]

Page 13 of 14
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION)
C2
H2 PHYSICS

- End of Paper -

Page 14 of 14
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

Solution for 2010 H2 Physics Paper 1:

1 D 11 D 21 D 31 A 2. C. Method 1: If the time t = 0 corresponds


2 C 12 A 22 A 32 A to the moment Ball 1 is launched, the
distance travelled by Ball 1,
3 C 13 B 23 B 33 C
4 C 14 A 24 B 34 D ,
where u is the initial speed it was
5 D 15 B 25 C 35 D
launched, and the distance travelled by
6 A 16 B 26 D 36 B
Ball 2 is .
7 A 17 C 27 D 37 B
Therefore, the sum of the distances
8 A 18 D 28 D 38 A travelled, .
9 C 19 C 29 C 39 B The two balls will meet when the sum
10 C 20 B 30 D 40 B equals the distance s that Ball 1
would travel from A to B.

Worked Solutions
1. D. Option A is correct because the ratio of
diameter of atom to nucleus
= 10-10: 10-15

Option B is correct because ratio of


mass of electron to proton
= 9.11x10-31:1.67x10-27

Option C is correct because the period


of orbit depends on the radius of
circular orbit r according to the
4 2 3
equation, T 2  r where M = mass
GM
of planet. It is independent of the mass ,
of the satellite. When r is doubled, T is
3 and .
increased by a factor of 2 2 = 2.8
The ratio is 1.5:0.5 = 3:1.
Option D is wrong because ratio of
band gap for semiconductor to insulator Method 2: Graphical
is 1eV: 10 eV. The band gap for
insulator is at most tens of eV, but not 3. C
1000 eV.

since this is an
60o
equilateral triangle. So the
change in momentum is mv.

1
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

4. C . Regardless of the nature of the wall, it


will exert a normal contact force 8. A. The freebody diagram for each mass is
(horizontally) on to the ladder. To as shown:
balance it, a horizontal force acting to
the left must be provided by the
Mass P Mass Q
ground. That is only possible if the T1 T2
ground is rough so as to provide a
frictional force on the ladder. UP UQ

5. D. The neutron has the same mass of the


proton to 3 significant figures (1.67 x
WP WQ
10-27 kg). The result of this elastic
collision (same mass of particles, with
one particle initially stationary) is that T = tension in the string suspending the masses
the proton will leave with the speed of U = upthrust acting on each mass
W= weight
the incident neutron, while the neutron
will come to rest.
For rod to be horizontal:
6. A. If the frictional force is , then
T1  T2  T
when the block just starts to
slip: WP  U P  WQ  U Q
WP   X gV  WQ  Y gV
sin
Since  X  Y , then the weight of fluid
sin
displaced by P is less than the weight of
fluid displaced by Y if both masses had
sin = 0.5
the same volume.

 X gV  Y gV
7. A. The magnitude of acceleration of X
along its path decreases as it is Hence,
released. It decreases from g = 9.81 m
s-2 to 0 at the bottom of the slope. On W P  WQ
the other hand the vertical acceleration m P  mQ
of Y is constantly at g = 9.81 m s-2. The
average speed of descent of Y will be 9. C. Along the horizontal direction:
higher than the average speed of
descent of X. Thus X will take a longer cos 30o - 200
time to fall down the same height as Y. 242.49 N

0.800 + (1.00)(2.00)

2.80 m s-2
cos
(210)(2.8)
= 588 W

2
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

10. C
At pole: Normal contact force,
13. B. Using and

,
= (50)(9.81)

= 490.50 N then .
At equator:
Hz.

14. A. The upthrust U is equal to the weight


of fluid displaced. When d = D, U =
weight of the cylinder. Since the
cylinder has a uniform cross-sectional
= 488.81 N area, U must vary linearly with d. Given
that the motion is simple harmonic, the
Difference is = 1.69 N
net force .

15. B.
11. D

Gain in
= lost in GPE
KE

Gradient of the graph = . Given


that n is doubled and T is ¼ the original
F temperature, then the gradient will
increase by a factor 2.

TB  mg
16. B. The mean kinetic energy of a molecule
is proportional to the temperature of the gas.

12. A. Change in gravitational potential


energy is the same since the change in
distance to the centre of the earth is the
same. Lost in GPE is the same and
hence the gain in KE will be the same
too.

3
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

17. C. When electromagnetic waves enter a 19. C. The adjacent segments of a stationary
region of different refractive index, the speed wave on a string are in antiphase. Point
and wavelength change. The direction also B has a larger amplitude of vibration
changes (refraction) if the incident angle is than point A. Thus the maximum kinetic
oblique. The frequency remains unchanged, energy that point B can have during the
however. vibration is greater than A.

20. B.

180° phase change

21. D. Wavelength  = v / f
= (3.4 x 102) /(2.4 x 103)
= 0.142 m = 14.2 cm
reflection
Distance between consecutive
resonances = /2
18. D. Intensity of the source is the power
Therefore the next position of
emitted per unit area over which the
resonance = /2 + 3.4
wave energy is distributed. Assuming a
= 7.1 + 3.4
point source emitting in all directions, = 10.5 cm
the area is the spherical surface
22. A. Vnet = V1 + V2
enclosing the source.
(Po = the power of the source). The
intensity is halved at the same position
only if the power of the source is = -14.7 V
halved. Next, the power of the wave is
proportional to the the square of the 23. B. Electric field is numerically equal to the
amplitude of the wave. In order to potential gradient. The closer the
register the same amplitude, the spacing of the equipotential lines, the
intensity measured by the detector stronger the E field.
must still be the original intensity I.
24. B. Electric between parallel plates is
uniform. Hence force F on the electron
is constant.

4
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

25. C. Total resistance in series with E1 29. C. Using Fleming’s Left hand rule to
= 8.30 + 1.42 = 9.72 Ω. obtain an upward magnetic force so
Pd across XY that the tensions of the strings
= 8.30/9.72 x 9.00 = 7.69 V. become zero, the current has to flow
leftwards i.e. Q to P.
Pd across l
= 0.745/1.000 x 7.69 Since F = BIL,
= 5.73 V. I = F/BL
This is equal to the emf E2.
= mg/BL
26. D. By potential divider principle, voltmeter
reading increase when effective = ALg/BL = Ag/B.
resistance across thermistor is
increased or resistance R3 is reduced. 30. D. Maximum induced e.m.f. occurs at the
greatest rate of change of magnetic
27. D. Energy supplied by emf flux linkage. Since the coil area
= Sum of energy dissipated by R and r remains the same, then this occurs
when the magnetic field B is changing
Emf = W/Q = (88.3+45.2)/30.0 = 4.45
at greatest rate i.e. at the steepest
V
gradient of the graph.
28. D. Current in PS and QR are
31. A. The same p.d. will be induced across
perpendicular to the magnetic field,
the voltmeter, resulting in no net
thus a magnetic force acts on them.
induced emf.
Current in PQ and SR do experience
a component of the magnetic field that 32. A. RMS current in secondary coil
is perpendicular the current, thus will = V/R = 30/140 = 0.214 A
still experience a magnetic force. IS/IP= NP/NS = VP/VS = 100/20 = 5
Component of B IP = 0.214/5 = 0.0429 A
parallel to PQ 33. C. Sodium having the smallest work
B (given) function will release photoelectrons
with greatest kinetic energy. Sodium
Component of B
will require the largest stopping
perpendicular to PQ
voltage. The stopping voltage is the
value of V such that the photocurrent I
The direction of the magnetic force on = 0 (x-intercept).
PQ is directed into the plane of the
paper.

The magnitude of the magnetic force on


PQ will be less than that on QR since
the magnetic field perpendicular to PQ
is a small component of the magnetic
field perpendicular to QR.

5
2010 Hwa Chong Institution C2 Preliminary
H2 Physics Worked Solutions

38. A. The mass m of the electron is equal to


34. D. Option A is not correct because since the mass of the positron. By the law of
the X-ray spectra will always contain conservation of energy, the total energy
bremsstrahlung radiation whether the of the 2 photons is
electrons bombarding the metal target
has a single energy or have a range of 2hc
 2mc 2
energies. Option B is not correct 
because the the position (wavelength) h
corresponding to the characteristic  
mc
peaks is dependent only on the kind of
target and not on the energy of the ln 2
incoming electrons. Option C is not 39. B.    0.3466 day-1
2
correct because minimum wavelength
(cutoff wavelength) depends on the A  A0 e  t
maximum energy of the incident
electrons.   N 0 e  t
 (0.3466)(1018 )e ( 0.3466)( 5)
35. D. In addition to the law of conservation
energy, the law of conservation of
A  6.1263  1016 day-1
momentum must also be fulfilled. The
atom Y cannot have exactly the = 7.09 x 1011 disintegrations s-1
energy required to excite atom X
because this imply that both atoms Y 40. B Initial activity of alpha emitter:
and X will come to rest after the 160-96= 64 Bq
collision and the total momentum
would be zero, inconsistent with the After 12 days (3 half lives) :
non-zero total momentum before Activity = 64 / 8 = 8 Bq
collision. The total momentum would Initial activity of beta emitter : 96 Bq
not be conserved. Therefore atom Y
has to have a kinetic energy greater After 12 days (4 half lives) :
than the excitation energy of X. After Activity = 96/ 16 = 6 Bq
the collision, atom X must move in the
direction that Y was incident on X in Hence, total activity = 8 + 6 = 14 Bq.
order to conserve momentum.

36. B. P has overlapping energy bands which


would make it a conductor. The atoms
in an ideal gas are isolated from one
another and would have discrete
energy levels of R.

37. B. Choice B is false as the p-type


semiconductor becomes negatively
charged due to the diffusion of mobile
electrons from n-type to p-type at the
pn junction.

6
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

2010 HCI H2 Physics Preliminary Examinations


Suggested solution for Paper 2

Q1
(a) vy2 = uy2 + 2aysy
+
0 = (usin80.0) 2 + 2 (- 9.81) (1.75) [M1]
u = 5.95 m s-1 [C1]

(b) vy = uu + ayt
0 = 5.95 sin80.0o – 9.81(T/2),
where T is time of flight and is twice the time to reach maximum height,
T = 1.1946 s [C1]
Range Sx= 5.95 cos80.0 (1.1946) = 1.23 m. [A1]

(c)
1. Large angle gives a longer time of flight for a given projection speed and hence
juggler has more time to manipulate balls. [B1]
2. Large angle keeps (horizontal) range small and of the order of the natural distance
between the juggler’s hands. [B1]

(d) The left hand has 1.19/2 = 0.597 seconds before ball 1 arrives. [A1]

(e) The minimum distance between the two hands must be at least greater than the diameter
of the balls. [B1]
Otherwise, an upward moving ball will collide with a downward moving ball. [B1]

Q2
(a) Decrease in GPE = Increase in EPE + Work done against drag force [M1]
m g H= ½ k e2 + F H
80.0(10)H = ½ (100)(H – 20.0)2 + 300 (H) [C1]
800 H = 50( H2 – 40H +400) + 300 H
16 H = H2 – 40H + 400 + 6 H
0 = H2 – 50H +400
0 = (H – 40) (H – 10)
H = 40 m , 10 m (rejected) [A1]

(b) T = ke, where e is the extension of the rope


= 100 (40.0 – 20.0)
= 2000 N [A1]

(c) T – mg = ma [M1]
2260 – 80.0(10) = 80.0a
a = 15 m s-2 [A1]
Direction: Vertically upwards [B1]

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2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(d) Tension in
rope

0 [B1]
20.0 H Height Daniel falls through
3(a)
Normal contact
force from ground
The direction of the
Horizontal Normal normal contact force from
Contact force from the wall should be drawn
wall into the paper properly into the page
using the right symbol. In
X the event where it is really
hard to draw, a clearly
written statement to
explain the direction is
required.

Weight of cube

Figure 3b

[B1] mark each for each clearly labeled force X 3

(b) Normal horizontal contact force of wall on cube provides the centripetal force for cube
to spiral. [B1]
Component of the weight down the slope causes the acceleration of cube down slope.
[B1]

(ci) Since the horizontal normal contact force is always perpendicular to the direction of
motion, work done is zero. [B1]

(ci) Rate of increase of kinetic energy = rate of decrease of gravitational


potential energy. [M1]
= m g v sin. [A1]

4(a) Gravitational potential at a point in a gravitational field is the work done by external
force to bring a unit mass from infinite to that point [B1]
without a change in kinetic energy. [B1]

Gm
4(bi) V   [A1]
r

4(bii) Distance of any point on the ring to P = R2  h2 [M1]


4Gm
Potential at P, Vp =  [A1]
R2  h2

2
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

4(biii) Work done W by external force at constant kinetic energy = the change in
gravitational potential energy of the system. [A1]

W required from h to h1
   
= 4G mM    
1 1
= (Vp)M
  R2  h 2   R2  h2 
 1   

As h1 gets smaller, W gets more negative (or W is negative but increase in


magnitude). [A1]

5 (a) (i) V = 1.398 – 0.281 = 1.117 V [M1]


I = 0.31x10-3 A
R = V/I = 3600 Ω [A1]

(ii) R = ρl/A, thus [M1]


ρ = RA/l = 3600 x 0.800 x 0.210 / 0.900
= 670 Ω (2 s.f.) [A1]
(iii) Any one of these: [B1]
 Among all the readings given, the least significant or most
imprecise is the current reading (only 2 s.f.). The current reading
will be subject to significant random errors.

EITHER: Increase the area of the copper plates in the soil. This
will decrease the resistance of the sample of soil to be measured
and increase the current readings for the same voltage applied.

OR use a higher voltage supply so that current will be greater.

 Use a variable voltage supply in place of the battery. Plot the


graph of the voltmeter reading V against the current I. The gradient
equals the resistance R of the soil and the y-intercept the emf due
to the copper plate interacting with the soil. Calculate the resistivity
using the value of resistance R obtained from the gradient of the
graph.

 Vary the area of the copper plates in the soil (use different depths),
find the corresponding R of the soil between the plates using V
and I, and plot the graph of the R against A-1. The gradient is ρl
where l = x. Calculate resistivity ρ as gradient divided by x.

(b) (i) The labels 60 W and 120 V indicate that the normal operating conditions
for the bulb. If a DC voltage of 120 V is applied across the bulb, then the
power dissipated is 60 W. If an alternating voltage is applied, then the
RMS value of the voltage should be 120 V so that the mean power
dissipated is 60 W.

Vrms = 170/√2 = 120 V [M1]


Mean P = IrmsVrms
Irms = Mean P/V rms = 60/ 120 = 0.500 A [A1]

3
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(ii)
Compare the given equation with V=V0 sin (2f t).
Therefore 100 = 2f, and f = 50 Hz.
P/W P=V2/R = (V02/R)sin2(2πf t)
[1] – Correct sine-squared [B2]
curve (note P=0 when t=0)
Peak power 120 [1] – All three values
labelled (120W, 60W, T =
0.020 s)
Mean power 60

0
t/s
T = 1/f
= 1/50
= 0.020 s

6 (a) The gap between the STM probe tip and the sample surface acts like [B1]
a potential barrier to the electrons.

When a pd is applied between the probe and the sample, there is a finite [B1]
probability that electrons can tunnel through this potential barrier
due to the wave nature of the electrons even though the electron does
not have sufficient kinetic energy.
The probability of tunneling is T  e 2 kd where d is the width of the [B1]
potential barrier. Thus tunneling current varies exponentially with the
distance of gap d between the probe and the sample surface. As
probe scans across the surface, the distance d changes and the variation
in tunneling current can be detected and used to plot the topography of
the sample surface.

1st mark: identifying potential barrier


2nd mark: identifying electrons as the particles tunneling the barrier
3rd mark: the tunneling current varies exponentially with the width of the
potential barrier which is identified as the distance of the gap.

(b) (i) Work function energy refers to how much additional energy needs to be
provided to the electron for it to cross the potential barrier classically.
This equals to U-E in the equation for k.

Substituting the values,

k
8 2m(U  E )

 
8 2 9.11 1031 (4.0  1.6  1019 )
[M1]
h2
 
2
6.63  1034
[A1]
 1.02  1010

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2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(ii) T  e 2kd
T e 2kd
 2kd [C1]
T0 e 0
T
 e 2k ( d do )
T0

0.0002 21.021010 ( d 11010 )


e
0.0001

d = 6.60 x 10-11 m [A1]

(c) DNA complexes are poor electrical conductors. As a result, electrons [A1]
that have tunneled through to the molecule accumulates. This results in a
strong electrostatic field that will disrupt the tunneling process. The
conducting film helps to channel the tunneling current away.

7 (a) Fl F
Units of E = Units of = Units of [M1]
Ae A
-2 -2
= kg m s m
[A1]
= kg m-1 s-2
(b)(i) The extension of the material is proportional to the applied load if the limit [B1]
of proportionality is not exceeded.
(ii) Mark X on (2.0, 12.4) [B1]
(iii) Material B. [A1]
Glass is brittle and is unlikely to undergo extended stretching/plastic
deformation after it reaches its limit of proportionality before its breaking [B1]
point.
(c)(i) Fl (6.0)(1.60) [C1]
E 
Ae (1.01  10 7 )(1.6  10 3 )
[A1]
= 5.89 x 1010 kg m-1 s-2

(ii) Work = Area under the force-extension graph


1 1
= (12)(0.002)  (12  14.4)(0.0036)  14.8(0.0148) [C1]
2 2
[A1]
= 0.278 J

Working must be clearly shown to be given full credit.


Accepted range (0.264, 0.291)
(d) Rod Z will break first. [A1]
Each rod X and Y only experiences half of the force on Z. The maximum
force that rods X and Y can take is more than half of Z, hence Z will reach [B1]
breaking point first.

5
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Question 8

Mark Aim
B1 The aim of this experiment is to investigate how the attractive force varies
with the distance x.
(Some students used another quantity instead of force, eg. Extension of
spring. In such cases, students need to elaborate on how this quantity is
related to the attractive force and justify in order to score this mark.)
Preliminary work
The attractive force can be measured by the formula
D1 F = ke where e is the extension of the spring, which is given by e = L – L0,
where L0 is the initial length of the spring when it is not stretched and L is the
length of the spring when it is stretched. The spring constant k can be
measured by
D2 i) suspending the spring vertically from a retort stand. Its length is measured
using a meter rule Lo.
ii) attach a mass of 50g to the bottom of the spring and measure its new
length L.
iii) calculate the spring constant k from k = F/e = (0.050 )(9.81)/(L-L0)
(Calibration curves are acceptable but elaborations on how to get the data
for this curve and how to use it are necessary. Spring balance is also
acceptable as a means to measure the force directly, however, as with scale
instruments, need elaboration on zero error).
Control Variable
B2 The current in the coil is to be kept constant. This can be done by connecting
an ammeter to the coil as shown in the following diagram.
(Good answers include how a rheostat is necessary to allow for adjustments
to the resistance in the circuit as a means of ensuring constant current.
Some students forgot to include a cell in the circuit diagram)
A4
A

A5 The rheostat is first used to vary the resistance in the circuit and hence the
current. The current should be fixed at a value such that when x = 6.0 cm,
the extension in the spring is more than 1.0 cm. This is to ensure that values
of e recorded in the experiment are large enough such that it can be
measured with acceptable percentage error with a meter rule.
(students should elaborate that an acceptable range is one whereby
variations in data are not just realistic, but also measurable, according to the
resolution of the measuring instruments)
B3 More batteries can be connected in series to increase the current until the
resulting change in e is large enough.
A4
A

6
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Hypothesis
D3 Suppose the relationship between the attractive force F and the distance x is
expressed in power law,
F = cxn where c and n are constants to be determined.
lg F = n lg x + lg c
If we plot lgF against lgx, then a straight line will indicate that the relationship
is valid and the gradient is n and the y-intercept is lg c.
(some students neglect the interpretation of the gradient and vertical
intercept of the graph)
Procedure
A1 a) Setup the apparatus as shown in Fig 1.1.
b) Use a meter rule to measure the length of the spring when it is
unstretched. Record this as L0.
D4 c) Switch on the circuit to allow current to flow through the coil. Monitor
the ammeter to ensure that current is constant. Ensure that an
attractive force is exerted on the bar magnet by the coil (this occurs
when the spring is stretched). If there is a repulsive force instead,
switch the polarity of the battery in the circuit to reverse the direction
of current flow.
(Its important to include this step in verifying that an attractive force is
present and if not,elaborate on how one can rectify the problem)
A2 d) Measure the distance between the magnet and the coil x. Also
measure the length of the stretched spring and record it as L.
A3 e) Shift the magnet, together with the spring, corkboard and brick, for at
least 5 different values of x. For each x, record the new stretched
length of the spring L. Tabulate the data in the table below,

x /m L /m F =k(L-Lo)/N lg (x/m) lg (F/N)

f) Plot a graph of lgF against lgx

A1-3 Basic Procedure


A4 Labeled Diagrams
A5 Actions taken to set range readings
B1 Correct Dependent and Independent Variables
B2 Valid choice of control variable
B3 Action to improve accuracy of readings
D1 Theory on how to calculate the attractive force
D2 Pre experiment work necessary to measure spring constant
D3 Linearization
D4 Action to ensure correct current flow
(12 marks in total)

7
2010 HCI H2 Physics Preliminary Examinations
Suggested solution for Paper 3

SECTION A
Q1
(a)
AB: Car travels at constant speed. Tom's reaction time.
BC: Car decelerates uniformly. Tom applies car's brakes.
CD: Car's velocity changes from one direction to the opposite direction. Actual collision of the two
vehicles.
DE: Both vehicles stuck together after the collision and slow down to a rest. Friction of road on
the vehicles causes them to stop eventually. [B4]

(b)
dp d (mv)
F 
dt dt
[M1]
 [30  (20)]  1000 
F  1200 
 0.1  3600 
F  1.67 105 N [A1]

(c) N3L: FVC  FCV


mC ( vC 2  vC 1 ) mV ( vV 2  vV 1 )
 [M1]
t t
mV vC 2  vC 1 50
 
mC vV 2  vV 1 30
5
mV  ( 1200 )  2000kg [A1]
3

(d) Inelastic. [B1]


(EITHER)
The 2 vehicles stuck together and move as one after the collision, as observed from the
velocity-time graph.
(OR)
The total KE of the 2 vehicles after the collision is less than the total KE of the 2 vehicles
before the collision. [B1]

Q2

(a)(i) The increase in the internal energy of the system, U, is the sum of the heat supplied to the
system, Q, and the work done on the system, W. [B2]

(a)(ii) Internal energy U of a system is the sum of all microscopic kinetic energies of the
particles and their potential energies. [B2]

(b)(i) Work done by gas


= (0.070 – 0.020) x (11 x 105) [M1]
= 55 kJ [A1]

This booklet consists of 7 printed pages, inclusive of this page.


2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(b)(ii)
Process W / kJ Q / kJ ΔU / kJ
AQ + CQ correct [1]
A 201 0 201 DW correct [1]
B -55 74 19 BW correct [1] (for –ve)
C -185 0 -185 ABC ∆U correct [1]
D 0 -35 -35

Q3
(a) x = 2 a sin           [B1]

(b)(i) x = n           [M1]


2 a sin  = n 
 a = (1)(0.165 x 10-9)/ 2 sin(23.5o) [M1]
a = 2.07 x 10-10 m [A1]

(b)(ii)
nd
2 order
st
1 order

[M1]

(c)(i) 2 a sin n 


< 2a sinn
 is maximum when  = 90o and n = 1 [M1]
< 4.14 x 10-10 m [A1]

(c)(ii) < 4.14 x 10-10


h/p < 4.14 x 10-10 [M1]
h / (me vmin ) < 4.14 x 10-10
vmin > h / (me)(4.14 x 10-10) [M1]
vmin > 1.76 x 106 m s-1 [A1]

4(a)(i) A nuclide with 3 protons and 4 neutrons. [B1]

(a) (ii) Applying conservation of energy:


Gain in electric potential energy = loss in kinetic energy
Qq
 qV [M1]
4 0 x
3  1.6  10 19
 400000
4 0 x
[A1]
Solving, x = 1.08 x 10-14 m

Page 2 of 7
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

(a)(ii) With quantum tunneling, the proton can still penetrate the barrier despite [B1]
having an energy that is less than the potential barrier.

(b)(i) Energy released = (7.0138 + 1.0073 – 4.0015 x 2)(1.66 x 10-27)(3 x 108)2 [M1]
= 2.70414 x 10-12 J [A1]

Energy of each alpha = ½ (2.70414 x 10-12) = 1.3521 x 10-12 J [A1]

(b)(ii)1. 1.35211012
Length =  52 mm [A1]
(5.0 103 )(5.2 1018 )

(b)(ii)2. [A1]



(c) Neutrons have no charge and are therefore able to penetrate more deeply B1
into the positively charged nucleus, resulting in higher probability of nuclear
reactions.

SECTION B

Q5
(a)(i) Advantage: precise (can accurately target 1 specific vehicle) or longer range because laser
is unidirectional/small divergence [B1]

Disadvantage: need to aim properly, need to ensure beam is reflected back to the gun [B1]

(a)(ii) 1. Acceleration always directed towards a fixed point [B1]


and proportional to displacement from that point [B1]

(a)(ii) 2. SHM defining equation x  Cx


Let x  A cos(Bt ) , x   AB sin(Bt ) [M1]
x   B A cos( Bt )   B x , where C  B
2 2 2
[A1]

(a)(ii) 3. From table, maximum distance is 5.100 m, hence amplitude = 0.100 m. [B1]
2
Let t = 0 s when time = 1004 ms (laser speed gun time), hence x  0.100 cos( t)
T
[M1
]
When time = 1005 ms, t = 0.001 s, x = 0.095 m, [M1]
2
 0.095  0.100 cos( 0.001)  T  0.0198  0.020 s [A1]
T
2 2
(a)(ii) 4. Using x  0.100 cos( t ) and t = 0.005 s, x  0.100 cos( 0.005)  0.0016 m [M1]
T 0.0198
Hence Z = x + 5.000 = 4.998 m. [A1]

Page 3 of 7
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
(a)(ii) 5. t  0.001 s  f  1/ t  1000 samples per second [B1]
Laser gun computes the average speed = Δx / Δt [M1]
Δt should as small as possible so that it approximates instantaneous speed. [A1]

(b)(i) Excitation of electrons/atoms from lower to higher energy levels [B1]


with light of correct frequency f, such that the energy difference between the 2 levels is equal
to hf. [B1]

(b)(ii) When using optical pumping for a 2 levels laser, any incoming photon can cause simulated
adsorption as well as stimulated emission [C1]
Initially most of the atoms are in the ground state, the incoming photons will cause more
simulated adsorption than stimulated emission. [M1]
As more atoms become excited, the rate of simulated emission will eventually increase until
it at most equals that of simulated adsorption, when the number of excited atoms is equal to
the number of ground state atoms. Thus it is very difficult to achieve population inversion.
[A1]

6a) The magnetic flux density is defined as the force per unit length per unit current [B1]
acting on an infinitely long current carrying conductor placed perpendicularly to the magnetic
field. [B1]

 o I1 o I 2
6b) (i) B1  B2  [C1]
2d 2d
F21  B1 I 2 L F12  B2 I1 L
F  II F
F  21  B1 I 2  o 1 2  B2 I 1  12 [A1]
L 2d L
d
6b)(ii) 1.

b)(ii) 2. The current in each turn of the coil of the spring produces a magnetic field that is
perpendicular to the current in the adjacent coil. [B1]
Since the current in the adjacent spring coils is flowing in the same direction, by
Fleming’s left hand rule, an attractive force will be exerted on the coils towards each
other. [B1]
The spring coils will move towards each other and the length (vertical) will shorten.
The change in the length of the spring is therefore a compression. [B1]

F o I 2  I2
b)(ii) 3. Force per unit length    F  o (2r ) where r is the radius of the
L 2d 2d
spring coil. [B1]

Since the spring obeys Hooke’s law, F = kx where k is spring constant.

Page 4 of 7
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS
o I 2 o I 2 r
kx  (2r )  x  [B1]
2d dk

b)(ii) 4. Compression. [A1}

6c)(i) According to the Faraday’s law of Electromagnetic Induction, when the metal axle Y of the
truck first enters the magnetic field entry point P with an initial velocity, there will be an
induced electromotive force (emf) across the two metal wheels of Y whose magnitude is
directly proportional to the rate of change of magnetic flux linkage. The wheel on the left (at
the top according to figure) will be at a higher potential. [B1]
Since the axle Y, the two wheels and the railing form a complete loop, induced current will
hence flow. [B1]
Using Fleming’s left hand rule, a magnetic force opposite to the direction of motion would be
produced due to this current flow. This opposing force on the wheels will cause braking to
occur. [B1]

c)(ii) At any instant when axle Y enters magnetic field,


Induced emf E = IR = Bwv
Bwv
Induced current I  [B1]
R
Since FB = - BIw (using the direction of motion as +ve direction)
Bwv
M a  B ( )w [B1]
R
B 2 w2
a  ( )v   v a  v ----------------(1) [B1]
RM

c)(iii) (If the truck’s initial speed is high, the magnetic braking force experienced upon entering and
leaving the magnetic field may not be able to bring the truck to rest completely.)

To improve, we can either have several regions of PQ placed close to each other for
consecutive braking effects [B2]
OR
Have a stronger vertical magnetic field B. [B1]
Any reasonable explanation that leads to a larger acceleration hence braking force eg. with
reference to (1), would be awarded the second mark. [B1]

7(a)
Similarities:
1. Both fields exert forces on moving charged particles. [B1]
2. They are non-contact forces/action-at-a-distance force [B1]

Alternative answers
3. The forces they exert long range forces.
4. They are conservative fields

Differences
1. Electric field will change the magnitude of the speed of charged particles whereas magnetic
field can be used to change the direction of motion of charged particles. [B1]
2. If the paths of charged particles are not straight line path, it will be parabolic and circular
paths in electric and magnetic field respectively. [B1]

Page 5 of 7
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

Alternative answers
3. The electric force is either parallel or anti-parallel to the Electric field whereas the magnetic
force is always mutually perpendicular to the magnetic field and the motion of charged
particle.
4. There will not be any magnetic force on stationary charged particle whilst there will be
electric force on charged particle regardless of its state of motion.

b(i) Using Fleming’s Left Hand Rule, the magnetic force will be mutually perpendicular to the
velocity and the magnetic field. [B1]
It provides the necessary centripetal force for uniform circular motion. [B1]

(ii)
m v2
FB  C1 [1]
r
m v2
 Bqv C1 [1]
r
mv
 r
Bq

2
(iii) T

mv v Bq
Since r     C1 [1]
Bq r m
2 m
 T C1 [1]
Bq

In the above derivation for the period, period is found to be dependent on mass and
charge of deuteron and B only

(iv)
K.E B1 B1
[2]
.
distance
Point 2 Point 3 Point 4

(v)

1. Gain in KE crossing each gap = e V [C1]


Hence gain in KE per revolution = 2 e V = 2 (100) ( 1.6 x 10-19) = 3.2 x 10-17 J [C1]

2 m Bq
2.  T  f  C1 [1]
Bq 2 m

0.400 (1.6 1019 )


 C1 [1]
2 (3.34 10 27 )

Page 6 of 7
2010 HWA CHONG INSTITUTION (COLLEGE SECTION) C2
H2 PHYSICS

= 3.05  106 Hz [A1]

1.00  106  1.6  1019


3. Number of revolutions to gain 1.00 MeV =
3.2  1017
= 5000 [C1]
2π (3.34  10 27 )
Time taken = 5000 x [C1]
(0.400)(1.60  10 19 )
= 1.63 x 10-3 s [A1]

(Relativistic effects negligible at these speeds)

Page 7 of 7
INNOVA JUNIOR COLLEGE
JC 2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2
in preparation for General Certificate of Education Advanced Level
Higher 2

CANDIDATE
NAME

CLASS INDEX NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/01, 9745/01


Paper 1 Multiple Choice 17 September 2010
1 hour 15 minutes
Additional Materials: Multiple Choice Answer Sheet

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write in soft pencil.


Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
Write your name, class and index number on the Answer Sheet in the spaces provided
unless this has been done for you.

There are forty questions on this paper. Answer all questions. For each question, there are
four possible answers A, B, C and D.

Choose the one you consider correct and record your choice in soft pencil on the separate
Answer Sheet.

Read the instructions on the Answer Sheet very carefully.

Each correct answer will score one mark. A mark will not be deducted for a wrong answer.
Any rough working should be done in this booklet.

This document consists of 18 printed pages.

Innova Junior College [Turn over


2

Data
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 x 10 F m
-12 -1

≈ (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1


elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10-23 J K-1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s-2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + ½at2
v2 = u2+ 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
3
average kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas U = kT
2
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
GM
gravitational potential, Φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xosin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vocos ωt

= ±ω (x o
2
− x2 )
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sinωt
transmission coefficient T = exp (-2kd)
8π 2m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(-λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ =

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


3

1 Which pair contains one vector and one scalar quantity?

A displacement and acceleration


B force and kinetic energy
C momentum and velocity
D power and speed

2 A student makes measurements from which she calculates the speed of sound as
327.66 m s-1. She estimates that her result is accurate to ± 3 %.

Which of the following gives her result expressed to the appropriate number of
significant figures?

A 327.7 m s-1 B 328 m s-1 C 330 m s-1 D 300 m s-1

3 An object has an initial velocity u. It is subjected to a constant force F for t seconds,


causing a constant acceleration a. The force is not in the same direction as the initial
velocity.

A vector diagram is drawn to find the final velocity v.

What does vector X in the diagram represent?

A F B Ft C at D u + at

4 A boy throws a ball vertically upwards. It rises to a maximum height, where it is


momentarily at rest, and falls back to his hands.

Which of the following gives the acceleration of the ball at various stages in its motion?
Take vertically upwards as positive. Neglect air resistance.

rising at maximum height falling


-2
A + 9.81 m s 0 - 9.81 m s-2
B - 9.81 m s-2 0 + 9.81 m s-2
C - 9.81 m s-2 0 - 9.81 m s-2
D - 9.81 m s-2 - 9.81 m s-2 - 9.81 m s-2

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


4

5 Which statement about Newton’s laws of motion is correct?

A The first law follows from the second law.


B The third law follows from the second law.
C Conservation of energy is a consequence of the third law.
D Conservation of energy is a consequence of the first law.

6 A tennis ball of mass 100 g is struck by a tennis racket. The velocity of the ball is
changed as shown.

What is the magnitude of the change in momentum of the ball?

A 1.0 kg m s-1 B 5.0 kg m s-1 C 1000 kg m s-1 D 5000 kg m s-1

7 A stationary body explodes into two components of masses m and 2m.

The components gain kinetic energy X and Y respectively.

What is the value of the ratio X ?


Y

A 0.25
B 0.50
C 2.0
D 4.0

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


5

8 A car with front-wheel drive accelerates in the direction shown.

Which diagram best shows the direction of the total force exerted by the road on the
front wheels?

9 A hinged door is held closed in the horizontal position by a cable.

Three forces act on the door. The forces are the weight W of the door, the tension T in
the cable and the force H at the hinge. The diagram is not drawn to scale.

Which list gives the three forces in increasing order of magnitude?

A W, H, T B W, T, H C H, T, W D T, H, W

10 Two springs P and Q both obey Hooke’s Law. They have spring constants 2k and k
respectively.

The springs are stretched, separately by the same force. The elastic potential energies
stored in spring P and Q are WP and WQ respectively.

How is WP related to WQ?

A WP = ¼ WQ B WP = ½ WQ C WP = 2 WQ D WP = 4 WQ

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


6

11 A ball of mass 0.10 kg is attached to a string and swung in a vertical circle of radius
0.50 m. Its speed at the top of the circle is 6.0 m s-1.

6.0 m s-1

0.50 m

What is the tension in the string at this moment?

A 0.22 N B 6.2 N C 7.2 N D 8.2 N

12 Which diagram shows the variation of gravitational force F on a point mass, and the
gravitational potential energy U of the mass, with its distance r from another point mass?

A B

C D

13 The escape speed of an oxygen molecule at the Earth’s surface is 1.1 × 104 m s-1. What
is the escape speed at a height 0.2 RE above the Earth’s surface, where RE is the radius
of the Earth?

A 0.5 × 104 m s-1


B 1.0 × 104 m s-1
C 1.2 × 104 m s-1
D 2.5 × 104 m s-1

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


7

14 A trolley of mass 2.0 kg with free-running wheels is attached to two fixed points P and Q
by two springs under tension as shown.

The trolley is displaced a small distance of 5.0 cm towards Q by a resultant force of


10 N and is then released. The equation of the subsequent motion is a = -ω 2 x, where x
is the displacement from the equilibrium position.

What is the constant ω2?

A - 10 rad2 s-2 B - 100 rad2 s-2 C 10 rad2 s-2 D 100 rad2 s-2

15 A particle of mass 4.0 kg moves with a simple harmonic motion and its potential energy
U varies with position x as shown.

What is the period of oscillation of the mass?

π 2 8π 4π 2π 2
A s B s C s D s
5 25 5 5

16 The temperature of a body at 100 °C is increased by Δθ as measured on the Celsius


scale.

How is this temperature change expressed on the Kelvin scale?

A Δθ
B Δθ + 273
C Δθ + 273.15
D Δθ + 273.16

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


8

17 A gas undergoes the cycle of pressure and volume changes W → X → Y → Z → W as


shown in the diagram.

What is the net work done on the gas?

A - 600 J B - 200 J C 0J D 200 J

18 A displacement-time graph for a transverse wave is shown in the diagram.

The phase difference between X and Y can be expressed as nπ.

What is the value of n?

A 1.0 B 1.5 C 2.0 D 3.0

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


9

19 A light meter measures the intensity I of the light falling on it. Theory suggests that this
varies with the inverse of the square of the distance d.

Which graph of the results support this theory?

20 A stationary wave has a series of nodes. The distance between the first and the sixth
node is 30.0 cm.

What is the wavelength of the sound wave?

A 5.0 cm B 6.0 cm C 10.0 cm D 12.0 cm

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


10

21 In an interference experiment, two slits are illuminated with white light.

What is seen on the screen?

A The central fringe is black with black and white fringes on each side.
B The central fringe is black with coloured continuous spectrum on each side.
C The central fringe is white with black and white fringes on each side.
D The central fringe is white with coloured continuous spectrum on each side.

22 A narrow beam of monochromatic light is incident normally on a diffraction grating.


Third-order diffracted beams are formed at angles of 40° to the original direction.

What is the highest order of diffracted beam produced by this grating?

A 3rd B 4th C 5th D 6th

23 Which diagram represents the electric field of a negative point charge?

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


11

24 An electric field exists in the space between two parallel charged metal plates.

Which of the following graphs shows the variation of electric field strength E with
distance d from X along the line XY?

25 The current in the circuit is 4.8 A.

What is the rate of flow and the direction of flow of electrons through the resistor R?

rate of flow direction of flow


A 3.0 × 1019 s-1 X to Y
B 6.0 × 10 s
18 -1 X to Y
C 3.0 × 1019 s-1 Y to X
D 6.0 × 1018 s-1 Y to X

26 The resistivity of aluminum is 2.0 times that of silver. An aluminium wire of length L and
diameter d has a resistance R.

What is the diameter of the silver wire, also of length L and resistance R?

A 0.05 d B 0.71 d C 1.4 d D 2.0 d

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


12

27 When four identical lamps P, Q, R and S are connected as shown in diagram 1, they
have normal brightness.

The four lamps and the battery are then connected as shown in diagram 2.

Which statement is correct?

A The lamps do not light up.


B The lamps are less bright than normal.
C The lamps have normal brightness.
D The lamps are brighter than normal.

28 In the circuit, the battery has an e.m.f. of 12 V and an internal resistance of 3.0 Ω. The
ammeter has negligible resistance.

The switch is closed.

What is the reading on the ammeter?

A 0.50 A B 1.0 A C 1.3 A D 2.0 A

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


13

29 A long straight wire XY lies in the same plane as a square loop of wire PQRS which is
free to move. The sides PS and QR are initially parallel to XY. The wire and loop carry
steady currents as shown in the diagram.

What will be the effect of the loop?

A It will move towards the long wire.


B It will move away from the long wire.
C It will rotate about an axis parallel to XY.
D It will be unaffected.

30 A coil has area A and n turns.

A uniform magnetic field of flux density B acts at an angle θ to the plane of the coil, as
shown.

What is the decrease in magnetic flux linkage when the coil rotates so that angle θ is
reduced to zero?

A BAn cosθ B BAn sinθ C 2BAn cosθ D 2BAn sinθ

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


14

31 An alumimium rod moves at right angles to a uniform magnetic field as shown in


diagram 1. Diagram 2 shows the variation with time t of the distance s from point O.

Which graph best shows the variation with t of the e.m.f E induced in the rod?

A B

C D

32 A sinusoidal potential difference V1 shown in graph 1 produces heat at a mean rate W


when applied across a resistor R

graph 1 graph 2

What is the mean rate of production of heat when the square-wave potential difference
V2 shown in graph 2 is applied across the resistor?

W W
A B C 2W D 2W
2 2

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


15

33 A transformer has NP turns in its primary coil and Ns turns in the secondary coil. The
alternating voltage and current in the primary coil are VP and IP respectively. The
alternating voltage and current in the secondary coil are VS and IS respectively.

Which one of the following relations must be correct?

NS VS I S
A = =
NP VP I P
NS VS I P
B = =
NP VP I S
NS VS
C =
NP VP
NS I P
D =
NP I S

34 In a photoelectric emission experiment on a certain metal surface, two quantities, when


plotted as a graph of y against x, give a straight line passing through the origin.

Which of the following correctly identifies x and y with the photoelectric quantities?

x y
A photocurrent threshold frequency
B frequency of incident light maximum kinetic energy of photoelectrons
C light intensity photocurrent
D light intensity maximum kinetic energy of photoelectrons

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


16

35 The diagram shows the energy levels for an atom, drawn to scale. The electron
transitions give rise to the emission of a spectrum of lines of λ1, λ2, λ3, λ4 and λ5.

What can be deduced from this diagram?

A λ1 > λ2
B λ3 = λ4 + λ5
C λ4 is the shortest of the five wavelengths.
D The transition corresponding to wavelength λ3 represents the ionisation of the atom.

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


17

36 The sketch graph shows how the wave function ψ of an electron varies with position.

Which graph, drawn on the same horizontal scale, gives the probability of finding an
electron at each position?

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


18

37 A proton has a kinetic energy of 1.00 MeV. If its momentum is measured with an
uncertainty of 1.00 %, what is the minimum uncertainty in its position?

A 9.08 × 10-13 m
B 2.28 × 10-13 m
C 9.08 × 10-14 m
D 5.64 × 10-14 m

38 The diagram shows the energy band structure of a typical semiconductor.

Conduction band
Energy gap

Filled valence band


Energy E

What is a typical value for the energy gap?

A 0.10 eV B 1.0 eV C 10 eV D 100 eV

10
39 When an isotope of boron, 5 B captures a slow neutron, it splits into a lithium 73 Li and an
alpha particle. An emission of γ-ray occurs during this reaction. The nuclear binding
energies are
10
5B
: 64.94 MeV
7
3 Li : 39.25 MeV
4
2 He : 28.48 MeV

4
If the total kinetic energy of the products produced, 73 Li and 2 He is 2.31 MeV, the
energy of the γ-ray emitted is

A 0.48 MeV B 2.79 MeV C 10.77 MeV D 25.69 MeV

40 The half-life of a certain radioactive material is 3.0 s. How long does it take for its activity
to reduce by 90%?

A 0.46 s B 5.4 s C 10 s D 11 s

END OF PAPER

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


INNOVA JUNIOR COLLEGE
JC 2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2
in preparation for General Certificate of Education Advanced Level
Higher 2

CANDIDATE
NAME

CLASS INDEX NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/02
Paper 2 Structured Questions 17 September 2010
1 hour 45 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your name, class and index number on all the work you For Examiner’s Use
hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen on both sides of the paper. 1
6
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough
working. 2
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction 7
fluid.
3
8
For Section A
Answer all questions. 4
6
It is recommended that you spend about 1 hour and 15
minutes on this section. 5
7
For Section B 6
Answer Question 8. 8
It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this
section. 7
18

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely 8


12
together.
The number of marks is given in the brackets [ ] at the end of
each question or part question. Total
72

This document consists of 21 printed pages.

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


Innova Junior College [Turn over
2
For
Data Examiner’s
Use
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 x 10 F m
-12 -1

≈ (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1


elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10-23 J K-1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s-2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + ½at2
v2 = u2+ 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
3
average kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas U = kT
2
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
GM
gravitational potential, Φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xosin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vocos ωt

= ±ω (x o
2
− x2 )
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sinωt
transmission coefficient T = exp (-2kd)
8π 2m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(-λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ =

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


3
Section A For
Examiner’s
Use
Answer all the questions in this section.

1 (a) Complete Fig. 1.1 to show each quantity and its base units. [2]

quantity base units


speed m s-1
density kg m-3
…………………… kg m s-1
electric field strength ……………………

Fig. 1.1

(b) In the classroom, a student wishes to determine the mass of a plastic semi-circular
protractor.

Fig. 1.2

(i) Give a reasoned estimate of the mass of the semi-circular protractor and express
your answer in an SI unit.

mass = ………………………… unit ……………. [2]

(ii) State an instrument which is most appropriate for the measurement of the
thickness of the protractor x, as indicated in Fig. 1.2.

……………………………………………………………………………..…..…….….. [1]

(iii) For the measurement of x, suggest a way to reduce random errors.

…..…………………………………………………………………………..……………….

……………………………………………………………………………..…..…….….. [1]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


4
2 ‘Clay pigeon shooting’ is a sport whereby the shooter aims and hits the clay disc For
Examiner’s
projected by a launcher. A certain clay disc is launched from the horizontal ground with a Use
o
velocity of 20 m s-1 at an angle of 30 to the horizontal.

(a) Assuming that air resistance can be neglected, calculate

(i) the maximum height of the disc,

maximum height = ………………………… m [2]

(ii) the horizontal distance between the point from which the disc is launched and
where it lands on the ground.

horizontal distance = ………………………… m [2]

(b) The path N for the above disc is as given in Fig. 2.1 where air resistance is neglected.

20 m s-1
o
30

Fig. 2.1

(i) Draw the path of the clay disc on Fig. 2.1, assuming that air resistance cannot be
neglected. Label this path A. [1]

(ii) Suggest an explanation for any differences between the two paths N and A.

.………………………………………………………………………………………………

.………………………………………………………………………………………………

.………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


5
3 Fig. 3.1 shows a binary star system where two identical stars each of mass 4.0×1030 kg For
Examiner’s
are moving with a constant speed v in a circular orbit of radius 1.0×1011 m about their Use
common centre of mass.

star

star 1.0×1011 m

Fig. 3.1

You may assume that each star to be a uniform sphere with its mass concentrated at
the centre of the sphere.

(a) (i) On Fig. 3.1, label with the letter ‘X’ a point where the gravitational field strength is
zero. [1]

(ii) Explain why you have chosen the point in (i).

………………………………………………………………………………………………

..………………………………..………………………………………………………. [1]

(iii) Calculate the gravitational potential at point X.

gravitational potential = ………………………… J kg-1 [2]

(b) For each star in the system, calculate

(i) the net force,

net force = ………………………… N [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


6
(ii) the linear speed v. For
Examiner’s
Use

linear speed = ………………………… m s-1 [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


7
4 (a) Define For
Examiner’s
Use
(i) magnetic flux density,

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

...………………………………..………………………………………………………. [1]

(ii) the tesla

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

...………………………………..………………………………………………………. [1]

(b) Fig. 4.1 shows an electric motor which is made up of a rectangular coil of wire of 150
turns. The coil is 0.20 m long and 0.12 m wide. The coil has a current of 0.32 A
flowing through it and its plane is parallel to a field of magnetic flux density 0.36 T.

magnetic field
0.12 m
Y

0.20 m

0.32A

Fig. 4.1

(i) Draw arrows on Fig. 4.1 to represent the directions of the magnetic forces acting
on the coil. Label them F. [1]

(ii) Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic force acting on one side of the coil.

force = ………………………… N [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


8
(iii) Calculate the torque which is exerted on the coil. For
Examiner’s
Use

torque = ………………………… N m [1]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


9
5 A student sets up the apparatus shown in Fig. 5.1 to demonstrate a two slit interference For
Examiner’s
pattern on the screen. The set-up is modelled after Young’s double slit experiment. The Use
slits S1 and S2 are of the same width.

single double screen


slit slit

S1
laser So d
beam S2

Fig. 5.1

(a) Explain why the single slit So is not necessary in this particular set-up.

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

..……………………………….……………………………………………………………. [1]

(b) The laser beam has a wavelength of 630 nm. The separation d is 1.0 mm and the
distance D is 2.5 m. Determine the separation of the fringes on the screen.

separation = ………………………… m [2]

(c) Describe and explain what would be observed on the screen if the slit S1 is made
narrower by half compared to slit S2 while maintaining the same separation d.

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

..……………………………….……………………………………………………………. [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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(d) Explain how the result of this experiment provided evidence that light must have For
Examiner’s
wave properties. Use

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………….……………………………………………………………. [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


11
6 (a) (i) Electromagnetic radiation has a wave nature as well as a particulate nature. This For
Examiner’s
is known as wave-particle duality. Describe a situation in which particles can be Use
shown to have a wave nature.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………..………………………………………………………. [3]

(ii) Calculate the wavelength of a particle of mass 1.82 x 10-28 kg when travelling with
a speed which equals to 10% of the speed of light.

wavelength = ………………………… m [2]

(iii) Electromagnetic radiation can also be considered as a transverse wave and


hence it also exhibits wave-like behaviour such as polarisation. Explain why
polarisation is a phenomenon of transverse waves but not longitudinal waves.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

..………………………………..………………………………………………………. [1]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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(b) Fig 6.1 illustrates a phenomenon known as the Compton effect, whereby an incident For
Examiner’s
X-ray photon is scattered by an electron at rest. The wavelength of the scattered Use
photon λ’ is found to be longer than the wavelength λ of the incident photon.

electron after
collision
incident
photon (λ)
θ

electron at φ
rest
Scattered
photon (λ’)

Fig. 6.1

Using de-Broglie’s relation, suggest how this phenomenon demonstrates the


particulate nature of electromagnetic radiation.

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………….……………………………………………………………. [2]

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7 Multi-bladed low-speed wind turbines (windmills) similar to the one shown in Fig. 7.1 For
Examiner’s
have been used since 1870, particularly for pumping water on farms. Use

Fig. 7.1

The turbine blades cover almost the whole surface of the wheel and a tail vane behind
the windmill keeps the wheel facing the wind. The diameters of the wheel of windmills of
this type vary from 2 m to a practical maximum of about 12 m. Because of this size
limitation, they are not suited to large power outputs. They will start freely with wind
speeds as low as 2 m s-1 and, at these low speeds, can produce large torques.

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


14
Fig. 7.2 shows how P, the output power of these windmills, varies with the overall For
Examiner’s
diameter of the wheel for different wind speeds, v. Use

v = 10 m s-1 v = 9.0 m s-1

v = 8.0 m s-1
Power P / W

v = 7.0 m s-1 v = 6.0 m s-1

v = 5.0 m s-1

v = 4.0 m s-1

v = 3.0 m s-1

v = 2.0 m s-1

2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0


diameter / m
Fig. 7.2

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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(a) It is thought that, for a given diameter, the output power is related to the wind speed For
Examiner’s
by the equation Use
P = k v n,
where n and k are constants.

Explain how the relation may be tested by plotting a suitable graph.

………………………………….…………………………….…………………………………

…....……………………………….……………………………………………………………

………………………………….…………………………….…………………………………

.…….……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………….……………………………………………………………. [3]

(b) (i) Use Fig. 7.2 to determine lg (P / W) for a particular multi-bladed low-speed
windmill with a wheel of diameter 6.0 m and wind speed 3.0 m s-1.

lg (P / W) = ………………………… [1]

(ii) On Fig. 7.3,


1. plot the point corresponding to a wheel diameter of 6.0 m and a wind speed of
3.0 m s-1, [1]

2. draw the line of best fit for the points. [1]


lg (P / W)

x
3.5
x

x
3.0

x
2.5

2.0

1.5

1.0
0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00
-1
Fig. 7.3 lg (v / m s )

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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(iii) Use the line drawn in (b)(ii) to determine the magnitudes of the constants n and k For
Examiner’s
in the expression in (a). Use

n = …………………………

k = ………………………… [3]

(c) (i) When the wind speed is 8.0 m s-1, calculate the volume of air that reaches the
6.0 m diameter wheel of the windmill in one second.

volume = ………………………… m3 [1]

(ii) The density of air is 1.3 kg m-3. Calculate the kinetic energy of the volume of
moving air in (c)(i).

kinetic energy = ………………………… J [2]

(d) Use your answer in (c)(ii), together with data from Fig. 7.2 to find the fraction of this
power converted into useful output power.

fraction of useful output power = ………………………… [1]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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(e) State three factors, other than wind speed and diameter of wheel, that are likely to For
Examiner’s
influence the output power. In each case, indicate how the power output is likely to Use
be affected.

1. ……………………………….………………………………………………………….……

….……………………………….……………………………………………………………

2. ………………….……………….……………………………………………………………

…….…………………………….……………………………………………………………

3. …….…….……………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………….……………………………………………………………. [3]

(f) In practice, it has been found difficult to scale up a windmill such as this to a wheel of
30 m diameter, to achieve power outputs of the order of megawatts. Suggest two
reasons for this.

1. ………………….……………….……………………………………………………………

…….…………………………….……………………………………………………………

2. …….…….……………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………….……………………………………………………………. [2]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


18
Section B For
Examiner’s
Use
It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this section.

8 Cantilever is widely found in construction, notably in cantilever bridges and balconies.


The cantilever is a beam that is supported on only one end and it can be represented by
a loaded wooden rule, as shown in Fig 8.1. As a result of support only at one end, a
cantilever will oscillate when it is subjected to external forces such as wind.

Fig 8.1

Design a laboratory experiment to investigate how the period of the oscillation of the
loaded wooden rule depends on the overhanging length l of the rule.

You may assume that the following apparatus is available, together with any other
standard equipment that may be found in a school or college science laboratory.

wooden rule
slotted mass
stopwatch
G-clamp

You should draw diagram to show the arrangement of your apparatus. In your account
you should pay particular attention to

(a) the equipment you would use for the investigation,

(b) the procedure to be followed,

(c) the control of variables,

(d) any safety precautions,

(e) any precautions that you would take to improve the accuracy of the experiment. [12]

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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Diagram For
Examiner’s
Use

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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For
Examiner’s
…....…………………………………………………………………………………………………….... Use

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


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For
Examiner’s
…....…………………………………………………………………………………………………….... Use

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

…....……………………………………………………………………………………………………....

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END OF PAPER

© IJC 2010 9646/Prelim2 [Turn over


INNOVA JUNIOR COLLEGE
JC 2 PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION 2
in preparation for General Certificate of Education Advanced Level
Higher 2

CANDIDATE
NAME

CLASS INDEX NUMBER

PHYSICS 9646/03, 9745/03


Paper 3 Longer Structured Questions 21 September 2010
2 hours
Candidates answer on the Question Paper
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST


For Examiner’s Use
Write your name, class and index number on all the work you
hand in. Section A
Write in dark blue or black pen on both sides of the paper.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough
1
working. 10
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction
fluid. 2
10
Section A 3
Answer all questions. 10

4
Section B 10
Answer any two questions.
Section B
You are advised to spend about one hour on each section.
5
The number of marks is given in the brackets [ ] at the end of 20
each question or part question. 6
20

7
20

Total
80

Penalty

This document consists of 20 printed pages.

© IJC 2010Innova Junior College 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turnover


[Turn over
2
Data
speed of light in free space, c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1
permeability of free space, μo = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space, εo = 8.85 x 10 F m
-12 -1

≈ (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1


elementary charge, e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant, h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron, me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38 x 10-23 J K-1
gravitational constant, G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s-2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + ½at2
v2 = u2+ 2as
work done on/by a gas, W = p ΔV
3
Average kinetic energy of a molecule of an ideal gas U = kT
2
hydrostatic pressure, p = ρgh
GM
gravitational potential, Φ = −
r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vo cos ωt

= ±ω (x o
2
− x2 )
resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel, 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage, x = xo sinωt
transmission coefficient T = exp (-2kd)
8π 2m (U − E )
where k =
h2
radioactive decay, x = xo exp(-λt)
0.693
decay constant, λ =

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


3
Section A For
Examiner’s
Use
Answer all the questions in this section.

1 (a) (i) Define simple harmonic motion.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(ii) On the axes of Fig 1.1, sketch the variation with displacement x of the
acceleration a of a particle undergoing simple harmonic motion.
[1]

Fig 1.1

(b) A strip of metal is clamped to the edge of a bench and a mass is hung from its free
end as shown in Fig. 1.2.

Fig 1.2

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


4
The end of the strip is pulled downwards and then released. Fig. 1.3 shows the For
Examiner’s
variation with time t of the displacement y of the end of the strip. Use

Fig 1.3

(i) State two times, apart from t = 0, at which the end of the strip is stationary.

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [1]

(ii) State two times at which the end of the strip is moving vertically upwards with
maximum speed.

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [1]

(iii) State two times at which the end of the strip is moving with maximum downward
acceleration.

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [1]

(c) On Fig. 1.4, sketch the corresponding variation with time t of the potential energy Ep
of the vibrating system. [2]

Fig 1.4

(d) The string supporting the mass breaks when the end of the strip is at its lowest point
in an oscillation. Suggest what change, if any, will occur in the period and amplitude
of the subsequent motion of the end of the strip.

Period : ..……………………………………………………………………………..……

Amplitude : ..……………………………………………………………………………….. [2]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


5
2 (a) (i) What is meant by the term internal energy of a system? For
Examiner’s
Use
………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(ii) Write down an equation representing first law of thermodynamics. Define the
symbols that you use.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(b) Some water in a saucepan is boiling.

(i) Explain why there is a change in internal energy as water changes to steam.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(ii) Explain why external work is done by the boiling water.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(iii) With reference to your answers in (b)(i) and (b)(ii), show that thermal energy
must be supplied to the water during the boiling process.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


6
3 (a) A charged particle may experience a force in an electric field and in a magnetic field. For
Examiner’s
Use
State two differences between the forces experienced in the two types of field.

1. ……………………………………………………………………………………………...

……………………………………………………………………………………………...

2. ……………………………………………………………………………………………..

...………………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

(b) A proton, travelling in a vacuum at a speed of 4.5 × 106 m s–1, enters a region of
uniform magnetic field of flux density 0.12 T. The path of the proton in the field is a
circular arc, as illustrated in Fig. 3.1.

Fig 3.1

(i) State the direction of the magnetic field.

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [1]

(ii) Calculate the radius of the path of the proton, in terms of cm, in the magnetic field.

radius = ………………………… cm [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


7
(c) A uniform electric field is now created in the same region as the magnetic field in For
Examiner’s
Fig. 3.1, so that the proton passes undeviated through the region of the two fields. Use

(i) On Fig. 3.1, mark with an arrow labelled E, the direction of the electric field. [1]

(ii) Calculate the magnitude of the electric field strength.

electric field strength = ………………………… N C-1 [2]

(d) Suggest why gravitational force on the proton has not been considered in the
calculations in (b) and (c).

.…………………………………..……………………………………………..…………… [1]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


8
4 (a) (i) Explain what is meant by metastable state and population inversion. For
Examiner’s
Use
………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(ii) Explain why it is important in the production of laser to excite atoms to the
metastable state.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

(iii) Explain how stimulated emission enables a laser to deliver a monochromatic light
beam.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [2]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


9
(b) The most common function of a diode is to allow an electric current to pass in one For
Examiner’s
direction while blocking current in the opposite direction. This rectifying behaviour Use
can be achieved by using p-n junctions made of semiconductors. A p-n junction is
formed when a p-type and n-type extrinsic semiconductors are joined as shown in
Fig 4.1.

n-type p-type
material material

Fig 4.1

Explain, with a diagram, how the p-n junction acts as an open switch during the
rectification of an alternating current.

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

…...……………………………………………………………………………………………...

………………………………………..……………………………………………………… [4]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


10
Section B For
Examiner’s
Use
Answer two of the questions in this section.

5 (a) (i) State Newton’s first law of motion and show it leads to the concept of force.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

.………………………………..……..…………………………………………………. [2]

(ii) Using diagrams, with labelled arrows showing the velocity v and acceleration a,
describe situations in which an object

1. has an acceleration in the opposite direction to its velocity,


2. has an acceleration at right angles to its velocity.

In each case, include in your diagram, a labelled arrow to illustrate the direction of
the resultant force F acting on the object.

1.

…....……………………………………………………………………………………….

……....………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

2.

…....……………………………………………………………………………………….

……....………………………………………………………………………………… [2]

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11
(b) A ship of mass 1.2 × 107 kg is moving backwards with a velocity of 0.50 m s-1 towards For
Examiner’s
a dockside. In order to stop the ship, the engines are ordered full ahead. Use

(i) Calculate the initial kinetic energy of the ship.

kinetic energy = ………………………… J [1]

(ii) Assuming that viscous effects are negligible, calculate the magnitude of the
constant retarding force which must be exerted on the ship if it is to stop in a
distance of 15 m.

retarding force = ………………………… N [3]

(iii) Calculate the time taken by the ship to stop under these conditions.

time = ………………………… s [2]

(iv) Explain qualitatively how your answer in (iii) would be affected by viscous forces.

…......……..…………………………………………………………………………………

…......……..…………………………………………………………………………………

…......……..…………………………………………………………………………………

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

…......……..…………………………………………………………………………………

...……..………………………………………………………………………………..... [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


12
(v) Calculate the change in momentum of the ship as it comes to a complete halt at For
Examiner’s
the dock. Use

change in momentum = ………………………… N s [2]

(vi) Using your answer in (v) and with the aid of a diagram, explain how the law of
conservation of momentum is applied in this example.

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

……..……..…………………………………………………………………………………

...……..……………..…………………………………………………………………... [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


13
6 (a) (i) Draw a labelled diagram of the type of apparatus used by Rutherford, Geiger and For
Examiner’s
Marsden to investigate the nuclear model of the atom. Use
[2]

(ii) With the aid of diagrams, discuss qualitatively two important outcomes of the
experiment that provided the evidence for the nuclear model of the atom.

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………..……………………………………………………… [6]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


14
For
(b) A stationary radium ( 226
88 Ra ) nucleus decays into a radon (Rn) nucleus and an Examiner’s
α-particle. Use

(i) Write an equation for the radioactive decay.

….…………………………………..…………………………………………………… [1]
v
(ii) Show that the ratio of speeds α after the decay is approximately 56.
v Rn
[2]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


15
(iii) After the decay which takes place at a large distance from the gold nucleus, the For
Examiner’s
α-particle moves head-on towards a gold ( 197 79 Au ) nucleus with a speed of Use

1.66 ×107 m s-1.

Sketch 2 curves on Fig. 6.1 to illustrate how the electrical potential energy
between the two particles, and the kinetic energy of the α-particle varies with
position between the α-particle and the gold ( 197
79 Au ) nucleus.

You may assume that the gold ( 197


79 Au ) nucleus remains stationary during the

interaction.
[2]
Point of closest
approach of α-particle B
A
α
vA
E/J

0
Position of α-particle relative to
the point of closest approach
Fig. 6.1

(iv) Calculate the distance of closest approach of the α-particle relative to the gold
( 197
79 Au ) nucleus.

distance = ………………………… m [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


16
(v) With reference to your answer to (b) (iv), comment on the radius of the gold For
Examiner’s
nucleus. Use

..………………………………………………………………………………………..……

……………………………..……..………………………………………………..……. [1]

(vi) Estimate the ratio of

1. the diameter of gold atom to the diameter of its nucleus and

ratio = ………………………… [1]

2. the mass of a gold nucleus to the mass of a gold atom ( 197


79 Au ).

ratio = ………………………… [2]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


17
7 (a) X-rays are emitted when a metal target is bombarded by high-energy electrons. For
Examiner’s
Fig. 7.1 shows a X-ray spectrum which consists of a broad continuous spectrum and Use
a series of sharp lines known as characteristic X-ray spectrum.

intensity

characteristic spectrum

continuous spectrum

wavelength
λo

Fig. 7.1

(i) Explain how the continuous spectrum in Fig. 7.1 is formed.

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

..…………………………..……..………………………………………………..……. [3]

(ii) Explain why there is a minimum wavelength λo for the continuous spectrum in
Fig. 7.1.

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

..…………………………..……..………………………………………………..……. [1]

(iii) Suggest a reason why the lines are called the characteristic X-ray spectrum.

…..……………………………………………………………………………………..……

..…………………………..……..………………………………………………..……. [1]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


18
(b) Fig. 7.2 shows an experimental setup to investigate the photoelectric effect. For
Examiner’s
Ultraviolet (UV) light of wavelength 237 nm is incident on an emitter of area 2.0 cm2 Use
and a current reading of 2.00 nA is registered.

I
A

collector +
UV light Variable
V d.c supply
_
emitter

Fig. 7.2

(i) Given that every 1 in 5 photons causes a photoelectron to be emitted from the
emitter, show that the rate of photons incident on the emitter is 6.25 × 1010 s-1.
[2]

(ii) Calculate the energy of each photon incident on the emitter.

photon energy = ………………………… J [1]

(iii) Calculate the intensity of the incident radiation.

intensity = ………………………… W m-2 [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


19
(iv) The battery connections in Fig. 7.2 are reversed so that the emitter is made For
Examiner’s
positive with respect to the collector. Use

1. Given that the work function of emitter is 4.7 eV, calculate the stopping
potential.

stopping potential = ………………………… V [2]

2. Explain why the stopping potential in (b)(iv)1. remains the same when the
intensity of the UV light is increased.

……………………………………………………………..……………………………

……………………………………………………………..……………………………

..….……………………………………………..………………………………………

……………………………………………………………..……………………………

..….……………………………………………..………………………………………

.………..……….…………………………..……………………….………………. [3]

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


20
(c) Fig. 7.3 represents the energy levels for an atom. The atom at ground state is For
Examiner’s
bombarded with an electron of energy 17 eV. Use

n=4 -2eV
n=3 -5 eV

n=2 -7 eV

n=1 -20 eV

Fig. 7.3

(i) State all possible photon energies when the atom returns to its ground state.

…..………………..……….……………………………………………………………. [2]

(ii) On Fig.7.4, sketch the appearance of the spectrum which corresponds to the
frequencies of the emitted photons.
[1]

Increasing frequency

Fig. 7.4

(iii) Explain the difference between an emission line spectrum and an absorption line
spectrum.

…..…………………………………………………………………………………………..

……………………………..……..………………………………………………..……. [1]

END OF PAPER

© IJC 2010 9646,9745/Prelim2 [Turn over


Innova Junior College
2010 Prelim 2 H2 Physics
Paper I Solutions

Qn Ans Qn Ans Qn Ans Qn Ans


1 B 11 B 21 D 31 D
2 C 12 C 22 B 32 D
3 C 13 B 23 D 33 C
4 D 14 D 24 C 34 C
5 A 15 D 25 C 35 A
6 B 16 A 26 B 36 B
7 C 17 B 27 C 37 B
8 B 18 D 28 B 38 B
9 A 19 D 29 A 39 A
10 B 20 D 30 B 40 C

1. A displacement (vector) and acceleration (vector)


B force (vector) and kinetic energy (scalar)
C momentum (vector) and velocity (vector)
D power (scalar) and speed (scalar)

2.
ΔV = 0.03×327.66
ΔV = 9.8298
ΔV = 10m s-1 (to 1 s.f.)

∴V = 330 ± 10m s-1

3.

-u
The vector on side X is the sum of vector : v + (-u)
From v = u + at,
v – u = at

4. Since air resistance is neglected, the ball undergoes free fall after it leaves the hand and
before it falls back on the hand. Under free-falling, the acceleration is due to gravity and
acting downwards (negative by convention) all the time, even when the ball is
momentarily at rest at the maximum height.

5. From Newton’s second law, net force is proportional to the rate of change of momentum.
For a case where there is no net force acting on an object, the object will maintain its
momentum (i.e. either stay at rest or continue its motion with a constant speed along a
straight line) , which is Newton’s first law.

1
6. Δ p = pf – pi

Sign convention: Take rightwards as positive.


Δ p = m vf – m vi
Δ p = [0.100 (–30)] – [0.100 (20)]
Δ p = – 5.0 kg m s-1 (to the left)

⏐Δ p⏐ = 5.0 kg m s-1

7.
From Conservation of Momentum,
Initial momentum of system = Final momentum of system
0 = px + p y
py = – p x

p2
Use KE = to establish the ratio,
2m
2
px 2 px
X 2(m ) 2(m )
= 2
= 2
= 2.0
Y py px
2(2m ) 2(2m )

8. Total force is the sum of the normal force and friction.


Normal force by road

Friction by road

2
9.

Ty

Tx

Hx
Hy

Considering the forces in the x-direction,


Tx = Hx

Considering the forces in the y-direction,


Ty = Hy + Wy

Since Tx = Hx and Ty > Hy,


hence T > H (Only Option A and C)

Since Ty > W, and W has no x-component,


Hence T > W
(Leaving option A as the answer)

10. By Hooke’s Law, F = k x

For spring P,
F = (2k) xP
F
xP =
2k

For spring Q,
F = (k) xQ
F
XQ =
k
Work done on spring:
W=½Fx
Since F is constant,
W∝ x

WP xP
=
WQ xQ
F
WP 2k 1
= =
WQ F 2
k
WP = ½ WQ

3
11.

T
At the top position, tension and weight are both acting vertically downwards on the ball.

T and W provides the centripetal force,

mv 2
= T +W
r
mv 2
= T + mg
r
(0.10)(6.0)2
T= - (0.10)(9.81)
(0.50)
T = 6.2 N

-GMm
12. From U = , U has negative values.
r
- dU
From F = , F is the negative gradient of U–r graph.
dr

13. For molecule to escape, it must be given enough KE to overcome the GPE.
-GMm
½ m v2 = 0 – ( )
r
2GM
v=
r
1
v∝
r
v1.2RE RE
=
v RE 1.2 RE

v1.2RE = 1.0 × 104 m s-1

14. At the amplitude position,


ao = - ω 2 x o
Fmax
= ω 2 xo
m
10
= ω 2 (0.05)
2.0
ω 2 =100

4
15.
From graph, PEmax at amplitude position = 1.0 J
By conservation of energy, KEmax at equilibrium position is also 1.0 J.

KEmax = ½ m vo2 = ½ (4.0) vo2 = 1.0


1
vo = m s-1
2

For SHM, vo = xo ω
1 2π
=(0.2)
2 T
1 2π
=
2 5T

2π 2
T= s
5

16. In degree Celsius,


θf - θI = Δθ
Converting to Kelvins,
(θf + 273.15) – (θI + 273.15) = Δθ

17.
For W → X,
work done on gas = area under the p-V curve = 400 J

For Y → Z,
work done on gas = area under the p-V curve = - 600 J

For X → Y and Z → W,
work done on gas = 0 J

For cycle W → X → Y → Z → W
Net work done on gas = 400 + 0 + (-600) + 0 = -200 J

18.
Δφ Δt
=
2π T
Δφ 1.5T
=
2π T
Δφ = 3 π
∴n = 3

1
19. Since I ∝ ,
d2
1
I=k ,
d2
1
For a graph of I against , a straight line passing through the origin is obtained.
d2

5
20. 2.5 λ = 30.0 cm
λ = 12.0 cm

21. The zeroth order fringes of the various wavelengths overlap to give a central bright fringe.
Other than this, the various wavelengths of light are diffracted by different diffraction
angles (red, having the largest wavelength, will be diffracted the most), to form coloured
fringes on each side.

22.
d sin θ = n λ
d sin 40° = 3 λ --- Eqn (1)

d sin 90° = nmax λ


nmax = 4.67
nmax = 4 (round down)

23. The electric field of a negatively point charge is directed radially inwards.

24. The electric field between 2 parallel charged plates is uniform. Hence E is constant when
plotted against d.

25. Q = I t
Ne e = I t
Ne I
=
t e

Ne
= 3.0 × 1019 s-1
t
The electrons flow from the negative to the positive terminal of the battery. Hence Y to X.

26.
ρL
R=
R
ρL
R= 2
⎛d ⎞
π⎜ ⎟
⎝2⎠

Since the wires have the same resistance and length,


ρ alumimium ρ silver
2
= 2
⎛ d alumimium ⎞ ⎛ d silver ⎞
π⎜ ⎟ π⎜ ⎟
⎝ 2 ⎠ ⎝ 2 ⎠

ρ silver d silver 2
=
ρ alumimium d alu min ium 2
1 d silver 2
=
2 d2
d silver = 0.71 d

6
27. The potential difference across each lamp in diagram 2 is the same as that in diagram 1.
Hence power dissipated in each lamp is the same. Each lamp will light up with normal
brightness.

28. The circuit can be redrawn in the following way.

Let the total external resistance be R.


1 1 1
= +
R 6 6
R = 3.0 Ω

E = I (R+r)
12 = I (3.0 + 3.0)
I = 2.0 A

Since I1 + I2 = 2.0 A
And I1 = I2

I1 = 1.0 A

29.
XY carrying a current upwards, produces a magnetic field (into the page) in the region
where PQRS is. Segment PS, carrying a current upwards experiences a magnetic force
directed towards XY while segment QR, carrying a current downwards will experience a
magnetic force away from XY. However, the strength of the magnetic field decreases
with distance from XY, hence PS being nearer to XY will experience a larger force
compared to QR. Hence, the coil experiences a net force towards XY and it will move in
that direction.

The magnetic force acting on PQ upwards and the magnetic force acting on SR is
downwards. These 2 forces are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, hence they
cancel.

30. Initially,
Φ = nBA cos α , where α is the angle between the magnetic field and normal to the
plane.

Φ = nBA cos (90° - θ)


Φ = nBA sin θ

As θ becomes zero, Φ = 0. Hence the decrease is nBA sin θ.

7
31.

Zero gradient implies


Constant gradient velocity is zero
implies velocity is E = Blv is zero.
constant.
E = Blv is a constant.

32. For a sinusoidal p.d,


Vo 2
P R =W
<P> = o =
2 2
For the square-wave,
Vo 2
<P> = =2W
R

NS VS I P
33. If the transformer is 100% efficient, = = will be true.
NP VP I S
N V
If the transformer is NOT 100% efficient, only S = S can be applied.
NP VP
N V
Hence, S = S must be true.
NP VP

34. As light intensity increases, the number of photons arriving at the metal surface per unit
time increases. An increase in the number of photons per unit time by a certain
proportion will lead to an increase in the number of photoelectrons per unit time (hence
photocurrent) in the same proportion.

35. From E = hc , energy of photon 1 is smaller than energy of photon 2, hence λ1 > λ2.
λ
36. The square of the wavefunction ψ gives the probability of finding the electron at each
2

position.

8
37.
p2
KE =
2m
p2
1.0 × 106 × 1.6 × 10-19 =
2 (1.67 × 10-27 )
p = 2.312 × 10-20 kg m s-1

Δp = 0.01 (2.312 × 10-20) = 2.312 × 10-22 kg m s-1

Using the Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Pricnciple,


h
Δx Δp ≥

h
Δx (2.312 × 10-22 ) ≥

Δx ≥ 2.28 × 10-13
Hence, minimum Δx is 2.28 × 10-13 m.

38. B

39. 10
5 B + 01n → 73 Li + 42 He + net energy release

net energy release = energy release when 73 Li is formed from its constituent nucleons
+ energy release when 42 He is formed from its constituent nucleons
- energy required for 10
5 B to separate into its constituent nucleons

net energy release = 39.25 + 28.48 - 64.94


net energy release = 2.79 MeV
KE of 73 Li and 42 He + energy of γ photon = 2.79 MeV
Thus, energy of γ photon = 0.48 MeV

40. A = Ao e - λt
A
= e − λt
Ao
A
When Ao reduces by 90%, it means = 10%
Ao
⎛ ln2 ⎞
−⎜ ⎟t
0.10 = e ⎝ 3.0 ⎠

t = 9.97 s
t =10 s

9
Innova Junior College
2010 Prelim 2 H2 Physics
Paper 2 Solutions

Section A

1 (a)
kg m s-1 = [mass] × [velocity] = [momentum] or [impulse] [B1]

electric force
electric field strength =
charge
electric force
electric field strength =
charge
electric field strength = [E] = [mass] × [acceleration]
[current] × [time]
kg m s-2
[E] =
As
[E] = kg m A -1 s-3 [B1]

(b) (i) Estimate the density of plastic to be 2 times that of water = 2 g cm-3

Mass of protractor = (Volume) (Density)


Mass of protractor = ½ π r 2 x ρ
Mass of protractor = ½ π (5.0)2 (0.1) (2)
Mass of protractor = 7.9 g

[M1] for logical reasons


[A1] for acceptable range of 5 to 50 g

(ii) Micrometer Screw Gauge [B1]

(iii) Repeat the measurement of x at different parts of the protractor and taking
average. [B1]

2 (a) (i) Taking into consideration, the vertical component of the motion

Vertical component of initial velocity


u y = u sin θ = (20) sin 30 o = 10.0 m s-1

v 2y = u 2y + 2 gh
0 = (10.0) 2 + 2(−9.81)h [M1]
h = 5.10 m [A1]

(ii) The time taken to reach maximum height


v y = u y + gt
0 = 10.0 + (−9.81)t
t = 1.02 s [C1]

1
vx = u x = u cos θ = (20) cos 30o = 17.3 m s-1

The horizontal distance (or the range)


= (u x )(time of flight )
= (17.3)(1.02×2)
= 35.3 m [A1]

(b)

20 m s-1 A
o
30

Fig. 2.1

(i) The maximum height and the horizontal distance will both be reduced. [B1]

Note: The path should be shorter in height and in range slightly. No mark for
excessive reduction in height and range as the effect of air resistance is
slight. The path should be asymmetrical as the net force on the clay disc is
varied.

(ii) Suggest an explanation for any differences between the two paths N and A.

The maximum vertical height is smaller because the net force acting against the
object moving up is larger (weight plus air resistance). The deceleration on the
object is greater, thus the maximum vertical displacement is reduced. [B1]

The shorter time of flight due to the reduced maximum height causes the horizontal
distance covered to be reduced. Or the additional horizontal force due to air
resistance causes the object to be displaced less horizontally. [B1]

3
v

star

star 1.0×1011 m
Fig. 3.1
v

(a)(i) Correct labelling of point X at the centre of rotation. [B1]

2
The stars are directly opposite each other. When an object of any mass is placed at
the centre, it will have two forces of equal magnitude acting in opposite directions
thereby causing the net gravitational force on the object to be zero. Hence, the net
gravitational field strength here will be zero.
[B1]

(ii) Gravitational potential at point X


⎛ GM ⎞
= ⎜− ⎟×2
⎝ r ⎠
⎛ (6.67 × 10 −11 )(4.0 × 10 30 ) ⎞
= ⎜⎜ − ⎟×2
⎟ [M1]
⎝ 1.0 × 1011 ⎠
= -5.34 × 109 J kg-1 [A1]

(Deduct 1 mark if negative sign is not included)

It is also the work done to transfer an object of unit mass from infinity to this point.

GM 2
(b)(i) Net force = Gravitational force =
(2r ) 2
(6.67 × 10 −11 )(4.0 × 10 30 ) 2
= [M1]
(2 × 1.0 × 1011 ) 2
= 2.67×1028 N [A1]

(ii) Gravitational force provides the centripetal force.


Mv 2
= Net force
r
(4.0 × 10 30 )v 2
= 2.67×1028 [M1]
1.0 × 10 11

v = 2.58×104 m s-1 [A1]

4
(a) (i) Magnetic flux density is the magnetic force acting on a straight wire per unit length
per unit current flowing through it, when the wire is placed perpendicular to the
magnetic field. [B1]

(ii) It is the amount of magnetic flux density of a uniform magnetic field when a magnetic
force per unit length per unit current of 1 newton per metre per ampere acts on a
straight wire placed perpendicular to the magnetic field. [B1]

(b) (i)

3
Magnetic field
F 0.12 m
Y

0.20 m

0.32A F

Correct direction for forces acting on each side of the coil showing a couple [B1]

(ii) Magnitude of magnetic force on one side of the coil


F = NBIL sinθ
= (150)(0.36)(0.32)(0.20) sin 90o [M1]
= 3.46 N [A1]

(iii) Torque of a couple


= (Magnitude of one force)×(perpendicular distance between forces)
= (3.46)(0.12)
= 0.415 N m [A1]

5 (a) The single slit So is not necessary because the light source used is a laser and it is
already coherent by nature. [B1]

λD (630 ×10−9 )(2.5)


(b) Separation of fringes x = = [M1]
d (1.0 ×10−3 )
= 1.58×10-3 m
= 1.58 mm [A1]

(c) Since the separation of the slits is maintained, the separation of the fringes is
unchanged. Because one slit is made narrower, the fringes are not so distinct or
clearly observable. [B1]
The amplitude of the light emerging from it will be less than that from the other slit.
The amplitudes are not the same and hence, when the waves combine at the
locations of destructive interference, there are no total cancellations of waves.
[B1]

(d)The observation that there are bright and dark fringes on the screen is an indication
that interference has taken place. [B1]

Bright fringes are where constructive interference takes place while dark fringes are
where destructive interference takes place. The summation of the two combined light
rays is a direct consequence of the principle of superposition which applies to waves.
Thus, light has wave properties. [B1]

4
6
(a) (i) A beam of electrons passes through the graphite ‘diffraction grating’ [B1].
An interference pattern of circular concentric rings is seen on the screen [B1].
The de-Broglie wavelength of the electron is of the same order as the lattice spacing
of the graphite atoms [B1].

(ii)
h
λ=
mv
6.63 × 10−34
= [M1]
(1.82 × 10−28 ) × (0.10 × 3.0 × 108 )
=1.21× 10-13 m [A1]

(iii) For a transverse wave, there are many possible vibration of particles as long as it is
perpendicular to the direction of the wave, but the axis of vibration of particles in a
longitudinal wave is always parallel to the direction of the wave [B1].

(b) As a result of collision, the momentum of the electron increases and the momentum of
h
the photon decreases as the momentum of the scattered photon is less than the
λ'
h
momentum of the incident photon (since λ’ is longer than λ) [B1].
λ
From the principle of conservation of linear momentum [B1], the decrease in the
momentum of the incident photon displays the particulate nature of electromagnetic
radiation.

5
7.
(a) Linearise the equation P = k vn by taking lg on both sides,
lg P = lg (k v n)
lg P = lg k + n lg v [B1]

Plotting lg P against lg v. [B1]

If the points lie close to a straight-line trend, the relationship P = k v n is true. [B1]

(b)
lg (P / W)

3.5
0.91, 3.45

3.0

2.5

2.0 0.38, 1.90

1.5

1.0
0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00
-1
lg (v / m s )
(a) (i) For diameter = 6.0 m and v = 3.0 m s-1,
P = 150 W
lg P = 2.18 [A1]

(ii) 1. [B1] for correct point plotted.

(iii) 2. [B1] for suitable best-fit-line drawn.

(iii)
3.45 -1.90
Gradient = [B1]
0.91- 0.38
n = 2.93 (to 3 s.f) [A1] for n = 2.95 ± 0.05

6
Sub (0.38, 1.90) and gradient = 2.93,
1.90 = (2.93) (0.38) + y-intercept
y-intercept = 0.7866
lg k = 0.7866
k = 6.12 [A1]

(c) (i) Consider the air is of a cylindrical volume,


volume πr 2 x
=
time t
volume
= πr 2v
time
2
volume ⎛ 6.0 ⎞
=π ⎜ ⎟ 8.0
time ⎝ 2 ⎠
volume
= 226.2 = 230 m3 s-1
time
In 1 sec,
Volume of air = 230 m3 [A1]

1
(c) (ii) kinetic energy = mv 2
2
1
kinetic energy = ( ρV)v 2
2
1
kinetic energy = (1.3)(226.2)(8)2 [M1]
2

kinetic energy = 9409.92 = 9400 J [A1]

useful power output 2750


(d) = = 0.292 (to 3 s.f) [A1]
total power 9409.92

(e) 3 × [B1] marks for any of the points:


- Height of the windmill. The wind is stronger at higher heights, hence the
output power will be higher.
- Location of the windmill. For example, the wind is stronger near the coast and
the power output will be higher.
- Type of material used for the blades. A lighter material has smaller inertia in
rotating and hence the power output will be higher.
- Shape of the blades. An aerodynamic shape will cause the power output to
be higher.
- Surface area of the blade. A larger surface area implies that more wind is in
contact with the blade and the power output will be higher.
- Friction between the wheel and the axle. A higher friction would mean that
more energy is lost through heat, causing the power output to be less.

(f) 2 × [B1] marks for any of the points:


- The wheel of diameter 30 m may be too heavy to mount during construction.
- The wheel produces a very large torque, hence may be unstable.
- To provide a strong frame to support it, it may be costly.
- There may be space constraints to construct long blades as they extend 30m
high up.

7
Section B
Suggested Solution

Diagram
B
fixed ends load
G-clamp

Diagram marks (D1)


1. Diagram is to show that the cantilever is fixed using g-clamp & bench or retort stand and clamp
or any other appropriate means.

Procedure
1. Set up the apparatus as shown above.

Control Mark (C1)


Variable(s) to be controlled

2. Ensure that the mass of the load at the end of the strip remains unchanged by using the same
slotted mass.
3. Ensure that the position of the mass remains unchanged by taping or gluing it at the end of
the rule.
4. Ensure that the Young modulus of the rule remains unchanged by using the same wooden
rule. (not type or material as not quantifiable)
5. Ensure that the width and/or thickness of the rule remain unchanged by using the same
wooden rule.
(Maximum 1 out of these 4 controls)

Procedure and Measurement Mark (P1 and M1)


setup
Initial

6. Measure the overhanging length l of the rule using the scale on the rule [M1].

7. Slightly displace the end of the rule vertically downwards so that the end of the rule starts
Measurement
of dependent

oscillating in a vertical plane. [P1]


variable

8. Measure the time taken t for many oscillations such that the time is more than 20 seconds
using a stopwatch. [M1] An oscillation is considered when the end of the rule moves from A to
B, then back to B to A.
Repeat

9. Repeat steps 6 to 8 to obtain another 7 set of values of t with different overhanging length l of
the rule by shifting the rule [P1].

Analysis Mark (A1)


t
Plotting
Graph

10. The period of an oscillation T is calculated using T = .


n
11. Plot a graph of lg T against lg l to determine the relationship [A1].

8
Additional Detail Mark (AD1)
Reliability measures
1. The same mass should be used (to keep the mass of the loaded wooden rule constant)
2. The load should be secured to the rule using tape and/or glue (to keep the position of the
mass constant).
3. The same rule should be used (to keep Young Modulus and the dimensions of the rule
constant).
4. Start timing after the oscillations become stable (as the first few oscillations are usually jerky
Reliability

and will constitute to the random errors in measuring the time taken).
5. Take repeated readings of time taken t to reduce the random errors incurred due to the
inconsistent starting and stopping of stopwatch
6. The mass of the load should be large enough to make period T large.
7. A fiducial marker should be used to help in the measurement of the time taken t.
8. Discussion of how motion sensor or light gates can be used to ensure accurate measurement
of time taken t.
9. The amplitude/angle of oscillations should be small (to ensure that the oscillations follow
S.H.M.).

Safety Precautions
1. There should have sand placed below the load just in case the load falls off or the load
Safety

should be secured to prevent the load falling off.


2. No person or fragile object should be placed near the possible landing area of the load if it
falls off.
(Maximum 5 out of all the reliability and safety measures)

END OF PAPER

9
Innova Junior College
2010 Prelim 2 H2 Physics
Paper 3 Solutions

Section A
1
(a) (i) Simple harmonic motion is defined as the periodic motion in which acceleration is
directly proportional to displacement [B1] but opposite in direction to the
displacement [B1].
(ii)

The graph should be a downwards sloping straight line through the origin [B1]

(b)
(i) 0.05 s, 0.10 s, 0.15 s, 0.20 s [B1] for any 2 correct answers
(ii) 0.025 s, 0.125 s [B1] for both correct answers
(iii) 0.05 s, 0.15 s [B1] for both correct answers

(c)

Correct shape (sinusoidal curve with all above t-axis and maximum Ep at t = 0) [B1]
Correct period (2 maximum Ep for every 0.10 s) [B1]

(d)
When the mass breaks at the lowest point, the resultant force increases with the
reduction in the weight (net force is mainly due to the tension in the stretched metal
strip).
With an increased in restoring force and a decrease in mass, acceleration will
increase and hence period will decrease.
The equilibrium position shift higher, hence the amplitude of subsequent motion of
the end of the strip increases.
Note: the total available energy for energy transformation increases with the shift in
equilibrium upwards, hence the amplitude of subsequent motion increases according
to ET = ½ kx02.

1
2
(a) (i) Internal energy of a system is the sum of all the microscopic kinetic and potential
energies of the atoms/molecules within the system. [B1] The kinetic energy is
associated with the random motion of the atoms/molecules while the potential
energy is associated with the intermolecular forces between molecules. [B1]

(ii) ΔU = Q + W [B1]
ΔU : increase in internal energy of the system
Q : thermal energy (heat) supplied to the system
W : work done on system [B1]

(b)
(i) Since there is no change in temperature during boiling, the kinetic energy of the
water molecules remains constant [B1]. However, when the volume of the water
expands during boiling, the separation between water molecules increases, the
potential energy of the atoms increases [B1]. Since internal energy of water is the
sum of potential and kinetic energy of the water molecules, there is a change
(increase) in internal energy.

(ii) The volume occupied by the water molecules increases [B1] on vaporisation.
Hence the water molecules has to do work, pushing back the atmosphere [B1].

(iii) During boiling, the internal energy of the water molecules increases [M1] (ΔU:
+ve). According to first law of thermodynamics, the thermal energy supplied must
be positive since work done on the boiling water is negative [A1],

2
3 (a)
1. The magnitude of the electric force is independent of the speed of the charged
particle while the magnitude of the magnetic force is directly proportional to the
speed of the charged particle. [B1]
2. The direction of electric force is along the direction of the electric field while the
direction of the magnetic force is perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic
field. [B1]

(b)
(i) Since the proton deflects downwards, the magnetic force acting on the proton is
downwards. With velocity towards right, the direction of the magnetic field is out
of the plane of paper [B1] (not upwards) according to Fleming’s Left Hand rule.

(ii) Fc = mac
mv 2
Bqv =
r
1.67 × 10 −27 × 4.5 × 10 6
0.12 × 1.6 × 10 −19 = [M1]
r
r = 0.391 m [C1]
r = 39.1 cm [A1]

(c)

(i)

With magnetic force acting downwards, the electric force acting on the proton
must be upwards. Thus the electric field should be acting upwards.
Arrow pointing vertically upwards [B1].

(ii) When the proton passes undeviated, Fn = 0


FE = FB
Eq = Bqv
E = 0.12 × 4.5 × 106 [M1]
= 5.40 × 105 V m-1 [A1]

(d) The magnitude of gravitational force is negligible as compared to the magnitude of


the electric or magnetic forces [B1].
(‘mass of proton is small’ is an insufficient answer)

3
4 (a)
(i) A metastable state is an excited state of an atom in which the atom can remain
for a relatively longer time interval (~10-3 s) than most other normal excited
states (~10-8 s). [B1]

Population inversion is a situation in which there are more atoms or molecules in


excited states than in lower energy states (or ground state). [B1]

(ii) With atoms in the metastable state, the atoms can stay there longer, so that
population inversion can be achieved [B1].
As such, a photon with appropriate energy equivalent to the energy difference
between the two energy levels can cause stimulated emission to take place [B1],
than absorption.

(iii) When an atom in its excited state encounter an incoming photon with energy
equivalent to the energy difference between the excited state and its lower
energy level [B1], stimulated emission will occur. The incoming photon can
stimulate the de-excitation of the atom such that the subsequent emitted photon
has the same energy (same wavelength) as the incoming photon [B1], hence the
light beam has same wavelength (monochromatic).

(b)

[B1] for correct diagram

When the potential at the p-type material is negative with respect to the n-type
material (reverse bias) [B1], holes and electrons are pulled away from the junction
[B1], creating a larger negative potential difference. The depletion region widens [B1]
i.e. no current.

4
Section B
5.
(a) (i) Newton’s First Law of Motion states that every body continues in its state of rest or
uniform motion in a straight line unless a net external force acts on it to change that
state. [B1]

Hence, if we observe an object initially in a state at rest but which suddenly moves,
or an object moving at uniform speed in a straight line, but which suddenly reduces
or increases in speed or changes in direction, we say that there must be a net
external force acting on it. [B1]

(ii)
1. v

a
F

[B1] for diagram showing 3 arrows.

Description: An object that is projected vertically upwards in the earth’s gravitational


field. [B1]
v
2.
a
F

B1] for diagram showing 3 arrows.

Description: An object that is undergoing circular motion. [B1]

(b)(i)
1 2 1
Initial KE = mu = (1.2 × 107 )(0.50)2
2 2
= 1.5 × 106 J [A1]

(ii)
Using v 2 = u 2 + 2as
0=(0.5)2 + 2a(15)
-(0.5)2
a= [M1]
2(15)
-(0.5)2
net force = ma = (1.2 × 107 )[ ] [M1]
2(15)
= -1.0 × 105 N

magnitude of retarding force is 1.0 × 105 N [A1]

5
(iii)
Using v = u + at ,
−(0.50)2
0 = 0.50 + [ ]t [M1]
2 × 15
t = 60 s [A1]
(iv)
Viscous force FD ∝ v where v is the instantaneous velocity [B1]
Viscous force will be greatest initially as the initial speed is greatest, and it will
reduce to zero when the final speed is zero.
The viscous force will provide a greater retardation force [B1], and the time
taken to stop the ship will be shorter [B1].

(v)
Δp =m(v - u ) = 1.2 × 107 (0 − 0.50) [M1]
Δp = - 6.0 × 10 N s
6
[A1]

Fws
Fsw
Fws = force exerted by water on the ship
Fsw = force exerted by ship on the water
(Diagram - B1)

By considering the ship and the water as an isolated system and with no external
forces acting on the ship and the water [B1], the momentum lost by the ship is equal
to the momentum gained by the water [B1].

6
Beam of alpha particles Gold foil target
(a)(i)

Radium source

Details: Radium source emitting beam of alpha particles, gold foil target &
detector
(Deduct up to 2 × B1 for each missing detail)

(a)(ii)

Nucleus
of gold
atom

Diagram with details-B1

Most of the α-particles passed straight through the foil with little or no deflection [B1].
This concluded that the atom consist of mostly empty space.[B1]

Some α-particles were deflected from their original direction of travel [B1]. This
suggested that there was an electrostatic force of repulsion between the nucleus and
the positively charged alpha particles. This concluded that the nucleus of the atom is
positively charged[B1].

A very small number of alpha particles were deflected with an angle greater than 90
degree from their original path [B1]. This suggested that the positive charge is
concentrated in the nucleus of the atom. This concluded that the nucleus is massive
[B1].

[Any 2 of the above 3 observations with deductions made to be provided by


candidates for marks to be awarded]

7
(b)(i) 226
88 Ra → 222
86 Rn+ 24α [B1]

(ii) From the Principle of conservation of momentum,

0 = mα vα + mRn ( −v Rn ) [C1]
vα m 222u
= Rn = [M1]
v Rn mα 4u
≈ 56 (shown) [A0]

Point of closest
(iii) B
A approach of α-particle

α
vA
E/J

KE

EPE

One curve showing KE –B1


One curve showing EPE –B1
Deduct B1 if the total energy (KE & EPE) is not constant.

8
(iv) From the Principle of Conservation of energy,

1 q q
mα vα 2 = α Au [C1]
2 4πε o r
(2e )(79e )
r=
2πε o (mα )(vα )2
(2)(79)(1.6 × 10−19 )2
= [M1]
2πε o (4 × 1.66 × 10−27 )(1.66 × 107 )2
= 3.97 × 10−14 m [A1]

(v) The radius of the gold nucleus is in the order of 10-14 m [B1].

(vi) 1.
datom = 10–10 m & dnucleus = 10–14 m
datom / dnucleus = 104 [A1]

2.
Mnucleus 79mprotons + 118mneutrons
=
Matom 79mprotons + 118mneutrons + 79melectrons
197(1.67 × 10−27 )
= [M1]
197(1.67 × 10 −27 ) + 79(9.11× 10 −31 )
=1.00 [A1]

7
(a)(i) When an electron collides with one of the target atoms, it loses an amount of kinetic
energy that corresponds to the energy of an X-ray photon[B1].

The electron may continue to lose kinetic energy in a series of collisions with other
atoms, thereby giving off X-ray photons of different energies [B1].

Since different X-ray photons correspond to different wavelengths, the continuous


spectrum is thus formed [B1].

(ii) An electron may lose all its kinetic energy in a single collision with a target atom [B1],
thereby emitting a photon of maximum energy E max . that corresponds to a minimum
wavelength λo .

(iii) The wavelengths of the characterlistic lines are unique for each element [B1].

2.00 × 10−9
(b) (i) Rate of electrons produced = −19
= 1.25 × 1010 [M1]
1.6 × 10
Rate of incident photons = 1.25 × 1010 × 5 [M1]
=6.25 × 1010 s−1 [A0]

(ii)
hc 6.63 × 10−34 × 3.0 × 108
E= =
λ 237 × 10−9
= 8.39 × 10−19 J [A1]

9
(iii) power = 8.39 × 10−19 × 6.25 × 1010 = 5.24 × 10−8 W [M1]
power 5.24 × 10−8
= [M1]
Intensity = area 2.0 × 10−4
= 2.62 × 10−4 W m−2 [A1]

(iv)1.
hf = φ + eVs

Vs =
−19
(
hf − φ 8.39 × 10 − 4.7 1.6 × 10
=
−19
) [M1]
e 1.6 × 10 −19
= 0.544 V [A1]

(iv)2.
Increasing intensity does not affect the photon energy and the photon energy remains
the same as the frequency of UV light is constant. [B1].
The radiation is incident on the same emitter surface (work function is also constant)
[B1].
The maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectron does not change [B1].
Hence the stopping potential does not change.

(c) (i) 2 eV, 13 eV & 15 eV [Deduct B1 for each incorrect answer]

(ii)

Increasing frequency

3 distinct lines drawn with 2 lines closely spaced on the right of the spectrum [B1]

(iii) An emission line spectrum consists of bright lines against a dark background but an
absorption line spectrum consists of dark lines against a continuous spectrum. [B1]

10
Class Adm No

Candidate Name:

Preliminary Examination II 2010


Pre-university 3

H2 Physics 9646
Paper 1: Multiple-Choice Questions
9646/01
Friday 24 September 1h 15m

Additional materials:
OMR

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your name, class and admission number in the spaces at the top of this page and on all the
work you hand in.
Write in soft pencil.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, and glue or correction fluid.

There are forty questions on this paper. Answer all questions. For each question there are four
possible answers A, B, C, and D.
Choose the one you consider correct and record your answer in soft pencil on the separate
OMR.

Read the instructions on the OMR very carefully.

Each correct answer will score one mark. A mark will not be deducted for a wrong answer.
Any rough working should be done in this booklet

This question paper consists of 21 printed pages.


2

Data

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00  108 m s–1

permeability of free space, 0 = 4  10–7 H m–1

permittivity of free space, 0 = 8.85  10–12 F m–1

= (1/(36))  10–9 F m–1

elementary charge, e = 1.60  10–19 C

the Planck constant, h = 6.63  10–34 J s

unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66  10–27 kg

rest mass of electron, me = 9.11  10–31 kg

rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67  10–27 kg

molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1

the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02  1023 mol–1

the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38  10–23 J K–1

gravitational constant, G = 6.67  10–11 N m2 kg–2

acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s–2


3

Formulae

1 2
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + at
2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas, W = pV

hydrostatic pressure, p = gh

gravitational potential, Gm
 = 
r

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin t

velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cost

v =   xo2  x 2

mean kinetic energy of a molecule of


an ideal gas E =

resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …

resistors in parallel, 1 1 1
=   ...
R R1 R 2

electric potential, Q
V =
4 0 r

alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin t

transmission coefficient T = exp(2kd)

8 2 m(U  E )
where k =
h2

radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(–t)

0.693
decay constant,  = t1
2

[Turn Over
4

1. In the equation, P = Q – RS, P, Q, R and S are physical quantities. For the


equation to be homogeneous, which of the following must be true.

A. P, Q, R and S all have the same units.


B. P, Q, R and S are all scalar quantities.
C. The product RS have the same units as P and Q.
D. The product RS is numerically equal to (Q – P)

2. A student wishes to determine the density  of a cylinder of mass M, height


d 2
h and diameter of cross section d, using the formula M  h . If the
4
percentage uncertainties of his measurements of M, d and h are 3%, 1%
and 2% respectively, what will be the percentage uncertainty of  ?

A. 3% B. 5%

C. 6% D. 7%

3. A train travelling at 2.0 m s-1 passes through a station. The graph below
shows the variation with time, t of the speed, v of the train after leaving the
station.

What is the speed of the train when it is 150 m from the station?

A. 6.0 m s-1 B. 8.0 m s-1

C. 10 m s-1 D. 12 m s-1
5

4. Which of the following is a false statement regarding how two forces give
rise to a couple?

A. They act in opposite directions.


B. They both act at the same point.
C. They both act on the same body.
D. They both have the same magnitude.

5. A string of negligible mass with a weight of 50 N at one end is attached at


the other end to a fixed point P. The sphere is acted upon by a horizontal
force of 80 N such that the string makes an angle to the vertical. What is
the value of ?

A. B.

C. D.

6. Five blocks of equal masses V, W, X, Y and Z are connected by four


identical strings as shown in the diagram below. They are pulled by a
steadily increasing force F. Which of the strings A, B, C or D is most likely
to break first?

[Turn Over
6

7. A 60 kg archer stands at rest on frictionless ice and fires a 0.50 kg arrow


horizontally at 50 m s-1. What is the final velocity of the archer as he moves
across the ice after firing the arrow?

A. 0.42 m s-1 B. 0.48 m s-1

C. 0.60 m s-1 D. 0.72 m s-1

8. A stone of weight 80 N is thrown vertically upwards from the ground with an


initial kinetic energy of 150 J. Ignoring air resistance, the kinetic energy, the
gain in potential energy, and the work done against gravity when the stone
is at 1.00 m above the ground will be

Kinetic Energy Gain in Potential Work Done


Energy
A. 70 J 70 J 70 J
B. 70 J 80 J 70 J
C. 70 J 80 J 80 J
D. 80 J 150 J 80 J

9. A block of iron is suspended in water


7

The block experiences an upthrust from the water.

Which is the explanation for this upthrust?

A. Iron is more dense than water.


B. The area of face R is greater than the area of face S.
C. The density of water increases with depth.
D. The pressure of water increases with depth.
10. A helicopter which has blades of diameter 5.0 m is hovering above the
ground at a particular instance. Its blades are rotating in such a way that
they are pushing air downwards at a speed of 18 m s-1.

The density of the surrounding air can be taken as 1.02 kg m-3.

The upward force acting on the blades is

A. 360 N B. 1400 N

C. 6500 N D. 26000 N

11. To travel at constant speed, a car engine provided 25 kW of useful power.


The driving force on the car is 600 N. At what speed is the car travelling at?

A. 2.5 m s-1 B. 4.0 m s-1

C. 25 m s-1 D. 42 m s-1

[Turn Over
8

12. A satellite is in circular orbit 144 km above the Earth. Assuming that the
radius of the Earth is 5760 km, the gravitational force on the satellite
compared with that when it is at the Earth’s surface is approximately

A. greater by 10%
B. greater by 5%
C. the same
D. less by 5%

13. Why does the Moon stay in its orbit at a constant distance from the Earth?

A. The gravitational pull of the Earth on the Moon is just sufficient to cause
the centripetal acceleration of the Moon.
B. The gravitational pull of the Earth on the Moon balances the
gravitational pull of the Moon on the Earth.
C. The gravitational pull of the Moon on the Earth is negligible at this
distance.
D. The centripetal force the Earth exerts on the Moon balances the
centripetal force the Moon exerts on the Earth.

14. P is a planet with centre O, as shown in the figure below. X and M are two
points of equal gravitational potential, A . Y and N are two other points of
equal gravitational potential, B .
9

Which of the following statements is correct?

A. The work done by an external agent to move a mass from Y to X is


negative.
B. The work done by the gravitational field to move a mass from X to N is
different from that needed to move the same mass from M to Y.
C. The work done by the gravitational field to move a mass from N to M is
negative.
D.  A OX

B OY

15. For one complete oscillation in simple harmonic motion with amplitude, a,
how does velocity, v vary with displacement, x?

A. B.

C. D.

16. An object undergoes simple harmonic motion with an amplitude A, and its

[Turn Over
10

total energy is E. What is the displacement of the object from the equilibrium
3E
position when its kinetic energy is ?
4

A. 3 B. A
A
2 4

C. 3A D. A
4 2

17. Which of the following statement is true?

A. The internal energy of a system can be increased by transfer of energy


by heating.
B. The internal energy of a system is dependent only on its temperature.
C. When the internal energy of a system is increased, its temperature
always rises.
D. When two systems have the same internal energy, they must be at the
same temperature.
18. A heater of power of 300 W is immersed in a filter funnel of crushed ice.
Before the heater is switched on, 10 g of water is collected from the melting
ice in 1 minute. When the heater is switched on, the mass of water collected
from the melting ice in 1 minute is 85 g. The specific latent heat of fusion of
ice, in J g-1 is

A. 5 B. 240

C. 300 D. 1200

19. A star emits electromagnetic waves of wavelengths 50 m, 5 m, 0.5 m and
0.05 m. In which regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are they?

Wavelength

50 m 5 m 0.5 m 0.05 m
A. infra-red infra-red visible ultraviolet
B. infra-red visible ultraviolet x-ray
11

C. microwave visible visible ultraviolet


D. radio infra-red visible ultraviolet

20. A stationary sound wave has a series of nodes. The distance between the
first and the sixth antinode is 30.0 cm.

What is the wavelength of the sound wave?

A. 5.0 cm B. 6.0 cm

C. 10.0 cm D. 12.0 cm

21. Monochromatic light with a wavelength of  is incident normally on a


diffraction grating. The angle between the directions of the two second-order
diffracted beams is  .

What is the spacing of the lines on the grating?

A. 2 B. 
sin  sin 

C. 2 D. 
 2
sin  sin  2

[Turn Over
12

22. A sphere is released from rest, in vacuum, between two parallel, vertical
metal plates with a separation of 0.10 m. The sphere has a weight of
1.6  103 N and an electric charge of +2.0 C. The potential difference
between the two plates is 80 V.

Which of the following depicts the path of the sphere after release?

23. A positive charge is placed at P and a negative charge is placed at Q. The


electric potential at different points between these two charges is shown in
the figure below.

Which of the following graphs correctly shows the variation with distance, x
along line PQ of the electric field strength, E?
13

A. B.

C. D.

24. Two charges, P and Q are 100 mm apart.

X is a point on the line between P and Q. If the potential at X is 0 V, what is


the distance from P to X?

A. 40 mm B. 45 mm

C. 50 mm D. 60 mm

25. What is the definition of resistance?

A. Resistance is the potential difference per unit current.


B. Resistance is the gradient of the graph of potential difference against
current.
C. Resistance is the voltage required for a current of 1 A.
D. l
Resistance is defined by the equation R  , where  is the resistivity
A
of the material, l is the length of the wire, and A is its cross-sectional
area.

[Turn Over
14

26. A main circuit has six identical bulb connected in series. One of the bulbs
has a broken filament. Voltmeters X and Y of infinite resistance are placed in
the circuit as shown.

What are the voltmeter readings?

X reading Y reading
A. 0V 0V
B. 0V 240 V
C. 40 V 40 V
D. 240 V 0V

27. A diode is connected to a battery as shown below.

Which of the following statements about the diode is not true?

A. No current flows through the diode.


B. The resistance is very large.
C. The voltage across the diode is zero.
15

D. The voltage across the diode is the same as the e.m.f. of the source.

28. In the circuit shown below, the light bulb will become brighter when

A. light is incident on the LDR and P is moved to X.


B. light is incident on the LDR and P is moved to Y.
C. the LDR is covered and P is moved to X.
D. the LDR is covered and P is moved to Y.

29. A straight wire PQ carrying a constant current I is placed perpendicularly to a


uniform magnetic field, as represented by the dotted line in the diagram
below.

[Turn Over
16

The current-carrying wire is then rotated through an angle,  about an axis


perpendicular to the plane of the diagram.

Which of the following graph shows how the magnitude of the magnetic force
F on the wire varies with  in the range 0° to 90°?

A. B.

C. D.

30. Two long straight wires, X and Y are placed perpendicular to each other at a
17

small distance, d apart, with wire X vertically above the point R. The current
in wire X is out of the page and the current in wire Y is to the right as shown
in the figure below.

What is the direction of the force acting on wire Y at point P due to the
magnetic field produced by wire X?

A. Out of the page


B. Into the page
C. Upwards
D. Downwards

31. An e.m.f. is induced in a wire that is subjected to a varying magnetic field.


The following graphs show how magnetic flux density, B of this field varies
with time, t.

At what time is the magnitude of the e.m.f induced in the wire at its
maximum?

A. 1 ms B. 2 ms

C. 3 ms D. 4 ms

[Turn Over
18

32. Two flat horizontal coils are mounted as shown

Which of the following actions will cause the galvanometer to register a


current?

1. With switch S closed, Coil 2 is stationary while Coil 1 is moved


upwards.
2. Both coils are stationary and S is switched on and off.
3. With switch S closed, the variable resistor R is increased and
decreased rapidly.

A. 2 only
B. 1 and 3 only
C. 2 and 3 only
D. 1, 2 and 3

33. A sinusoidal alternating current flows through a resistor.

What is the mean power dissipated in the resistor?

A. 1
maximum current 
2

2
B. 1
maximum power 
2
C. 1
 
2
maximum current
2
D. 1
2

maximum power 
19

34. The half-wave rectification of an alternating current sinusoidal voltage of


amplitude 100 V gives the waveform as shown in the figure below. The r.m.s.
value of the rectified voltage is

A. 25 V B. 50 V

C. 71 V D. 100 V

35. A laser beam of power, P has wavelength,  . What is the rate of photons
produced?

A. hc B. Ph
P c

C. Phc D. P
hc

36. Which of the following observations regarding the photoelectric effect is not predicted
by the classical theory of electromagnetic radiation?

A. The rate of photoelectric emission is proportional to the intensity of the incident


radiation.
B. Irrespective of the intensity of radiation, photoelectric emission is instantaneous.
C. Photoelectric emission is observable using any part of the electromagnetic
spectrum.
D. The maximum kinetic energy of the photoelectrons is dependent on the intensity
of the radiation.

[Turn Over
20

37. At room temperature, the charge carriers inside a p-type semi-conductor are

A. holes only
B. electrons only
C. positive ions
D. both holes and electrons

38. The following diagram illustrates the upper energy bands in two different classes of
solids at absolute zero. The shaded areas represent occupied electron energy levels.

What are bands P and Q, and classes X and Y of solids?

Band P Band Q Class X Class Y


A. conduction valence intrinsic semi-conductor metal
B. conduction valence metal intrinsic semi-conductor
C. valence conduction intrinsic semi-conductor metal
D. valence conduction metal intrinsic semi-conductor

39. Which of the following equations correctly shows an -particle causing a nuclear
reaction?

A. 14
7
N  42 He  178 O  11n

B. 17
8
O  42 He  20
9
F  11p

C. 17
8
O  10e  135 B  42 He

D. 14
7
N  11p  116 C  42 He
21

40. Initially, a source comprises No nuclei of a radioactive nuclide. What is the number of nuclei
decayed after a time interval of three half-lives?

A. No B. No
16 8

C. 7No D. 15No
8 16

END OF PAPER

[Turn Over
Class Adm No

Candidate Name:

Preliminary Examination II 2010


Pre-university 3

H2 Physics 9646
Paper 2 Structured Questions
9646/02
Friday 17 September 1h 45m

Candidates answer on the Question Paper.


No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your name, class and admission number in the spaces at the
top of this page.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough
working. For Examiner’s Use
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, and glue or correction
fluid. 1
2
Section A
Answer all questions. 3
It is recommended that you spend about 1 hour 15 minutes on this 4
section.
5
Section B 6
Answer Question 8
It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this section 7
8
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each Total
question or part question.

This question paper consists of 23 printed pages and a blank page.

[Turn over
2

Data

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00  108 m s–1

permeability of free space, 0 = 4  10–7 H m–1

permittivity of free space, 0 = 8.85  10–12 F m–1

= (1/(36))  10–9 F m–1

elementary charge, e = 1.60  10–19 C

the Planck constant, h = 6.63  10–34 J s

unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66  10–27 kg

rest mass of electron, me = 9.11  10–31 kg

rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67  10–27 kg

molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1

the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02  1023 mol–1

the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38  10–23 J K–1

gravitational constant, G = 6.67  10–11 N m2 kg–2

acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s–2


3

Formulae

1 2
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + at
2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas, W = pV

hydrostatic pressure, p = gh

gravitational potential, Gm
 = 
r

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin t

velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cost

v =   ( x o2  x 2 )

mean kinetic energy of a molecule of 3


an ideal gas E = kT
2

resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …

resistors in parallel, 1 1 1
=   ...
R R1 R 2

electric potential, Q
V =
4 0 r

alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin t

transmission coefficient T = exp(2kd)

8 2 m(U  E )
where k =
h2

radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(–t)

0.693
decay constant,  = t1
2

[Turn Over
4 For
Examiner’s
Use

Section A

Answer all questions


It is recommended that you spend about 1 hour 15 minutes on this section.

1. (a) Distinguish between a scalar quantity and a vector quantity, providing an example for
each.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………....[2]

(b) A ship is initially cruising in the direction bearing of 045 at a speed of 10 m s-1
changes direction to head in a new direction bearing of 145 at a speed of 5 m s-1, as
seen in Fig. 1.1. The manoeuvre was completed in 30 s.

Fig. 1.1

Using a vector diagram or otherwise, calculate the acceleration of the ship during the
change in direction.

acceleration of the ship =…………………..m s-2 at bearing of ………… [3]


For
5 Examiner’s
Use

2. (a) A body accelerates at 10 m s-2 over a period of time.

Explain what is meant by the phrase in italics.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………....[1]

(b) A Singapore Army soldier is undergoing marksmanship training by firing at the target,
as seen in Fig. 2.1 below. He uses the SAR 21 Rifle, which has a muzzle velocity
(velocity at which the bullet exits the rifle) of 900 m s-1.

Fig. 2.1

He ensures his rifle is perfectly horizontal while aiming for the head of the target. He
then fires a bullet at the target, which is 300 m away from his current position.

(i) Calculate the time taken for the bullet to reach the target after it is fired.

time taken =……….…..s [1]

(ii) What is the assumption made in this calculation?

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

[Turn Over
6 For
Examiner’s
Use

(iii) Assuming that it is a perfect shot (i.e. the rifle was perfectly horizontal and was
aimed properly at the head of the target), calculate the vertical distance
between his aiming point and where the bullet actually hits the target.

vertical distance =………………m [2]

(iv) After passing through the target, the bullet is entrenched 4.0 m deep into a
sandbag that is directly behind the target board.

Calculate the average deceleration of the bullet as it moves within the sandbag

average deceleration =…………….m s-2 [2]

(v) If the assumption was not made in (b) (ii), state whether the bullet would hit the
target at a lower or higher point than what was calculated in (b) (iii).

……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

3. (a) Using the simple Kinetic Model of Matter, explain the following:

(i) the melting of ice takes place without a change in temperature.

……………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) the specific latent heat of vaporisation of water is higher than its specific latent
heat of fusion.

……………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]
For
7 Examiner’s
Use

(b) An ideal gas at constant pressure has its volume directly proportional to its absolute
temperature.

Calculate the absolute temperature T when an ideal gas has volume 0.00825 m3,
assuming that the same mass of the ideal gas at the same pressure has volume
0.00424 m3 at a temperature of 273 K.

absolute temperature T =…………….K [2]

(c) (i) State the conversion formula from the Celsius scale (°C) to the thermodynamic
absolute scale (K)
[1]

(ii) Hence or otherwise, comment on whether the following statement is true:

“Today the temperature is 30 °C and yesterday it was 15 °C. Hence it is twice


as hot today as it was yesterday.”

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

[Turn Over
8 For
Examiner’s
Use

4. (a) A 1 kg solid block of iron, when placed on water, will sink. The same block of iron is
shaped into a model of a boat, and this model would float on water.

Explain why the boat model would float, and not sink.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………….………......[2]

(b) A string supports a solid iron object of mass 200 g. The solid iron object is hence
suspended in mid-air

(i) Calculate the tension in the string when the solid iron object is suspended by
the string in mid-air

tension in the string =…………. N [1]

(ii) Given that the density of iron is 8000 kg m-3, calculate the volume of the solid
iron object

Volume of solid iron object =………….. m3 [1]

(iii) Calculate the new tension in the string when the solid iron object is completely
immersed in a liquid of density 800 kg m-3.

New tension in string =…………… N [2]


For
9 Examiner’s
Use

(c) A solid cube with sides of length, x is placed on the surface of a fluid. The cube is
then slowly pushed downwards into the fluid, as seen in Fig.. The distance from the
base of the cube to the surface of liquid is given by h. The cube is pushed
downwards until h >> x.

Fig. 4.1

Fig. 4.2

Sketch in, Fig. 4.2 above, the graph showing the variation of the upthrust acting on
cube due to the fluid against the distance from the base of the cube to the fluid
surface, h. Your graph should show the variation of upthrust for values of h that are
greater than x.
[2]

[Turn Over
10 For
Examiner’s
Use

5. (a) Define magnetic flux density.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………....[2]

(b) Fig. 5.2 below shows a loosely-coiled metal spring hanging from a fixed point.

Fig. 5.1

The ends of the spring are connected to a circuit as shown in Fig. 5.1. When a
current is switched on, the spring becomes compressed (i.e. the coils move closer to
one another and the vertical length of the spring becomes slightly shorter than
before).

(i) Explain why the spring shortens in length when the current is switched on.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]
For
11 Examiner’s
Use

(ii) State and explain if the spring is lengthened or compressed if the direction of
current is reverse?

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

(c) Fig. 5.2 below shows a beam of -particles of speed v entering a region in space
where there is a uniform magnetic field of flux density B.

Fig. 5.2

In the magnetic field, they are deflected from their original pathway and move along
the arc of a circle of radius r.

(i) Indicate on the figure the direction of the magnetic field.


[1]

(ii) Sketch the path of -particles that has a speed greater than v.
[1]

(d) A beam of electrons that is travelling with velocity 3.4  107 m s-1 enters
perpendicularly into a region with magnetic flux density of 8.4 mT.

(i) Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic force on an electron.

magnetic force = …………. N [2]

[Turn Over
12 For
Examiner’s
Use

(ii) State and explain the changes (if any) in the kinetic energy of electron due to
the magnetic force acting on it.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

6. (a) State and explain briefly the conditions necessary for the production of a laser beam.

…………………….…………………….…………………….…………………….…………

…………………….…………………….…………………….…………………….…………

…………………….…………………….…………………….…………………….…………

…………………….…………………….…………………….…………………….…………

…………………….…………………….…………………….…………………….…………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

……...…………………….…………………….…………………….……………………..[3]
For
13 Examiner’s
Use

(b) Complete the table below to show the three differences between light from a filament
lamp and laser light.

Light from a filament lamp Laser light

[3]

[Turn Over
14 For
Examiner’s
Use

7. X-rays are emitted when a metal target is bombarded by high-energy electrons. The X-ray
spectrum consists of a broad continuous spectrum and a series of sharp lines known as
the line or characteristic X-ray spectrum.

The K-series line spectrum arises when an incoming electron removed an atomic electron
from the innermost shell, K-shell (n = 1). An electron from the L-shell (n = 2) may fill the
vacancy, and in the process emits a photon. The photon emitted has an energy that
corresponds to the wavelength of the K  -line shown in Fig. 7.1.

Fig. 7.1

(a) (i) Explain how the continuous spectrum is formed.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) Explain why there is a minimum wavelength 0 for the continuous spectrum.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]
For
15 Examiner’s
Use

(iii) Explain how the K  -line arises.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

(b) In 1913, a British physicist H. G. J. Moseley measured the wavelength of the


characteristics X-rays from a number of elements. He noted that when the square-
root of the frequency f is plotted against the position Z (atomic number) of the
element in the periodic table, a straight line results.

The energy for a multi-electron atom is given by the expression

k Z  1
2
En  
n2

where k is a constant

(i) Show that the frequency f of the K  -line is given by the expression

f  C Z  1

where C is a constant.
[2]

[Turn Over
16 For
Examiner’s
Use

(ii) The experimental data for the variation with Z of f are shown in Fig. 7.2.

On Fig. 7.2, draw the best-fit line for the points.


[1]

Fig. 7.2
For
17 Examiner’s
Use

(iii) Determine the constant C, with its unit.

C =…………………

unit =………………[2]

(iv) Hence, or otherwise, determine the wavelength of the K  -line for copper
whose atomic number Z is 29.

wavelength =……………….. m [2]

(c) The X-ray spectrum can be studied using the X-ray diffraction. A particular set of
crystal planes that have a known spacing d is chosen, as seen in Fig. 7.3 These
planes effectively reflect different wavelengths at different angles.

Fig. 7.3

[Turn Over
18 For
Examiner’s
Use

(i) Fig. 7.4 shows a graph of intensity against angular position  (measured in
degrees) for the diffraction of an X-ray beam by a crystal. The beam consists of
two wavelengths, and the spacing d between the reflecting planes is 0.94 nm.

Fig. 7.4

The condition for constructive interference is given by the expression


2d sin  m , which is known as Bragg’s law.

Using Bragg’s law, calculate the values of these two wavelengths of the X-ray
beam.

1 [1]
1 =………………… pm [1]

2 =………………… pm [1]
For
19 Examiner’s
Use

(ii) A standard optical diffraction grating where the grating spacing is 3000 nm
cannot be used to discriminate between different wavelengths in the X-ray
region of approximately 0.1 nm.

Using the formula for the calculation of the diffraction angle, given the
wavelength and grating spacing, explain quantitatively why this is so.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

[Turn Over
20 For
Examiner’s
Use

Section B

Answer Question 8
It is recommended that you spend about 30 minutes on this section.

8. A manufacturer of filament lamps for use as a night-light in children's bedrooms is concerned


about the surface temperature of the glass envelope after the lamp has been left on for some
time, The surface temperature must not be too high, otherwise there is a danger of burns or fire
resulting from accidental contact with the surface of the lamp. However, it is important that the
power output from the lamp should not be too small, otherwise the lamp will be too dim to be
useful.

Power supply Voltmeter


Connecting wires Ammeter
Light bulbs of different diameters Oscilloscope
3 V battery Bucket of water
Crocodile clips Thermometer
Signal generator Rheostat
Microphone Thermistor
Bunsen burner Thermocouple
Loudspeaker

Your answer should contain a diagram showing how the chosen equipment would be
arranged, together with details of

(a) the procedure to be followed,

(b) your choice of the type of thermometer used to measure the surface temperature of the
lamp,

(c) how the electrical power would be measured,

(d) any relevant safety precautions you may take when carrying out the experiment,

(e) any particular features of your design that may improve the accuracy of your experiment.

[12]
For
21 Examiner’s
Use

DIAGRAM

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

[Turn Over
22 For
Examiner’s
Use

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
For
23 Examiner’s
Use

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

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………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

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………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

END OF PAPER
Class Adm No

Candidate Name:

Preliminary Examination II 2010


Pre-university 3

H2 Physics 9646
Paper 3 Longer Structured Questions
9646/03
Monday 20 September 2h

Candidates answer on the Question Paper.


No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your name, class and admission number in the spaces at the
top of this page.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough
working. For Examiner’s Use
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, and glue or correction
fluid. 1

Section A 2
Answer all questions. 3
Section B 4
Answer any two questions.
5
You are advised to spend about one hour on each section. 6
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each 7
question or part question.
Total

This question paper consists of 33 printed pages and a blank page

[Turn over
2

Data

speed of light in free space, c = 3.00  108 m s–1

permeability of free space, 0 = 4  10–7 H m–1

permittivity of free space, 0 = 8.85  10–12 F m–1

= (1/(36))  10–9 F m–1

elementary charge, e = 1.60  10–19 C

the Planck constant, h = 6.63  10–34 J s

unified atomic mass constant, u = 1.66  10–27 kg

rest mass of electron, me = 9.11  10–31 kg

rest mass of proton, mp = 1.67  10–27 kg

molar gas constant, R = 8.31 J K–1 mol–1

the Avogadro constant, NA = 6.02  1023 mol–1

the Boltzmann constant, k = 1.38  10–23 J K–1

gravitational constant, G = 6.67  10–11 N m2 kg–2

acceleration of free fall, g = 9.81 m s–2


For
3 Examiner’s
Use
Formulae

1 2
uniformly accelerated motion, s = ut + at
2

v2 = u2 + 2as

work done on/by a gas, W = pV

hydrostatic pressure, p = gh

gravitational potential, Gm
 = 
r

displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin t

velocity of particle in s.h.m., v = vo cost

v =   ( x o2  x 2 )

mean kinetic energy of a molecule of 3


an ideal gas E = kT
2

resistors in series, R = R1 + R2 + …

resistors in parallel, 1 1 1
=   ...
R R1 R 2

electric potential, Q
V =
4 0 r

alternating current/voltage, x = xo sin t

transmission coefficient T = exp(2kd)

8 2 m(U  E )
where k =
h2

radioactive decay, x = x0 exp(–t)

0.693
decay constant,  = t1
2

[Turn Over
For
Examiner’s
4 Use

Section A

Answer all the questions in this section.

1. An intelligent elevator as seen in Fig. 1.1, can take passengers to the top of a skyscraper.
The elevator has a built-in weight sensor below its floor that can be used to measure the
combined weight of the elevator’s occupants.

Fig. 1.1

An emergency braking mechanism can be activated within a few seconds if the steel cable
holding onto the elevator snaps.

A man decides to take the elevator to reach the upper floors. He has a mass of 80 kg, and
the elevator has a mass of 1.0  103 kg.
For
5 Examiner’s
Use

(a) Calculate the initial reading of the weight sensor when the elevator is stationary.

initial reading of weight sensor =……………..N [1]

(b) The lift accelerates upwards with an acceleration of 2.5 m s-2.

(i) Draw a free-body diagram of the man, indicating and labelling the forces acting
on him.

There is no need to show the magnitude of the forces involved.


[1]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
6 Use

(ii) Hence or otherwise, calculate the reading of the weight sensor when the
elevator is accelerating upwards at 2.5 m s-2.

Reading of weight sensor =…………….N [2]

(iii) If the maximum G-force that can be experienced safely by a human is 1.5G
(i.e. 1.5 times of the human’s weight), calculate the maximum upward
acceleration of the elevator that is still considered safe.

Maximum safe upward acceleration =……………. m s-2 [1]

(c) A computer simulation is designed to test the response of the emergency braking
mechanism and the weight sensor should the elevator’s cable snap when there are
passengers onboard. The simulation takes place in the following sequence:

Time / s Incident
0 Elevator is stationary at a height of 250 m.
t1 Steel cable snaps and elevator starts to
freefall.
t2 Emergency braking system kicks in and
elevator undergoes deceleration.
t3 Elevator comes to a complete stop.
For
7 Examiner’s
Use

Sketch a graph using the axes provided in Fig. 1.2 below to show the variation of the
weight sensor’s reading with time during the simulation. The original reading, W, is
indicated.
[2]

Fig. 1.2

(d) The owner of the skyscraper decided to replace the motor powering the elevator as it
was not efficient enough. He decided to use a motor that is 75% efficient, replacing
the original model which is 60% efficient.

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
8 Use

(i) If the elevator is designed to hold up to 8000 N of passenger weight, and is


required to rise up to a height of 250 m in 60 s, calculate the power required to
achieve the task.

power required =…………… W [2]

(ii) Hence, calculate the input power that is required to operate the new motor.

input power =…………….W [1]


For
9 Examiner’s
Use

2. (a) State the formula to calculate the centripetal force required to keep a body of mass
m, moving in a circle of radius r with speed v.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………....[1]

(b) A smooth toy car track is set up in the following manner as seen in Fig. 2.1 below.

Fig. 2.1

Cars 1 and 2 are identical in construction and have a mass of 500 g each. Car 1 is
released from rest at point A, which is at a height of 0.60 m. Car 1 is designed to
move down the slope and complete the circular loop (during which it would be upside
down at the top of the loop), before colliding with Car 2.

(i) Calculate the speed of Car 1 at point B after it has moved down the slope.

speed of Car 1 at point B =………………….. m s-1 [2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
10 Use

(ii) If Car 1 was to just reach point C, i.e., it comes to a complete stop at point C,
state the height of the circular loop.

height of circular loop =……………… m [1]

(iii) Explain why if the circular loop has the height that is calculated in (b) (ii), Car 1
would be unable to complete the entire loop safely.

………………………………………………..…………………………………………

………………………………………………..…………………………………………

…..…………………………………….…………………………………………….. [2]

(iv) Hence or otherwise, calculate the maximum radius of the circular loop.

maximum radius of circular loop =………………m [2]


For
11 Examiner’s
Use

(c) After completing the loop, Car 1 collides elastically with Car 2. Car 1 comes to a
complete stop, and Car 2 moves forward and compresses the spring until it comes to
a complete stop

Given that the spring constant of the spring is 150 N m-1, calculate the compression
of the spring when Car 2 comes to a complete stop.

compression of spring =……………… m [2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
12 Use

3. (a) In Fig. 3.1 below, the battery has an internal resistance r and the ammeter has
negligible resistance.

Fig. 3.1

The graph in Fig. 3.2 below shows how current I in the circuit varies as the potential
difference V across the variable resistor R changes.

Fig. 3.2
For
13 Examiner’s
Use

(i) Define the term potential difference.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) 1. Show that the e.m.f E of the battery is 6 V.


[2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
14 Use

2. What is the power dissipated in the variable resistor R when the current
in the circuit is 1.2 A?

power dissipated =……………..W [2]

3. What is the internal resistance r of the cell?

internal resistance r =……………… [2]


For
15 Examiner’s
Use

(b) Four resistors are connected as shown in Fig. 3.3 below. Point a is at a higher
potential than point b.

Fig. 3.3

If a wire is connected from c to d, state and explain the direction of the current that
will flow through the wire.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………[2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
16 Use

4. Fig. 4.1 below shows an arrangement used to determine the wavelength  of


monochromatic light emitted by a laser.

Fig. 4.1

S1 and S2 are slits that are at right angles to the plane of this page. When illuminated by
light from the laser, they form coherent sources of light. An interference pattern is formed
on the screen, from which measurements can be taken to determine .

(a) Explain what is meant by interference of two coherent sources.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………………[2]
For
17 Examiner’s
Use

(b) (i) Describe briefly the interference pattern produced using the arrangement
shown in Fig. 4.1 above.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) Describe the roles played by diffraction and interference in the production of
the interference pattern.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(iii) Calculate the wavelength  of light emitted by the laser, given the following
values:

D = 2.0 m
a = 0.5 mm
Fringe spacing = 2.5 mm.

wavelength  =……………… nm [2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
18 Use

(c) The interference pattern is easier to observe when the amplitudes of the waves from
the two coherent sources are similar.

Explain why this is so.

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………………………………………………………………………………….

………………………….………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………….....[2]

Section B

Answer two questions in this section

5. (a) Explain what is meant by simple harmonic motion, and give an example of it that
occurs in nature.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………….[2]
For
19 Examiner’s
Use

(b) A vertical peg is fixed to the rim of a horizontal turntable of radius r = 15.0 cm,
rotating with a constant angular speed  = 4.0 rad s-1, as shown in Fig. 5.1 below.

Fig. 5.1

Parallel light is incident on the turntable so that the shadow of the peg is observed on
a screen, which is normal to the incident light. At time t = 0,  = 0 and the shadow of
the peg is seen at S.

At some later time t, the shadow is seen at T.

(i) Write down an expression for the angular displacement  in terms of  and t.
[1]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
20 Use

(ii) Derive and expression for the distance ST in terms of r,  and t.


[2]

(iii) By reference to your answer in (b) (ii), explain how the motion executed by the
shadow is simple harmonic in nature.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………..………………………………………………………………………….[2]

(iv) Calculate the period of the motion of the shadow on the screen.

period of shadow’s motion =…………… s [1]


For
21 Examiner’s
Use

(v) Hence or otherwise, calculate


1. the speed of the shadow as it passed through S,

speed of shadow =……………… m s-1 [2]

2. the magnitude of the acceleration of the shadow when it is


instantaneously at rest

magnitude of acceleration =………………. m s-2 [2]

(c) A light spring hangs vertically from a fixed support and a metal sphere of mass
m is attached to its free end. The mass is displaced vertically and then
released. The variation of the kinetic energy of the mass Ek, with time t of the
mass is shown in Fig. 5.2 below.

Fig. 5.2

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
22 Use

(i) Determine the period T of the oscillation.

period =…………….. s [1]

(ii) Using the data from the kinetic energy-time graph in Fig. 5.2, sketch the
displacement-time graph of the oscillating mass for two complete oscillations
using the axes in Fig. 5.3 below.

On the axes, indicate and label clearly the amplitude and the period of the
oscillation.
[2]

Fig. 5.3
For
23 Examiner’s
Use

(d) To investigate the effects of damping on the oscillations of the metal sphere in (c), an
electromagnet is placed near it, and light damping is observed.

(i) Explain what is meant by damping.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……..………………………………………………………………………………….[1]

(ii) Sketch on Fig. 5.2, the kinetic energy-time graph of the lightly damped
oscillating system.
[2]

(iii) Suggest how critical damping of the metal sphere’s oscillations may be
achieved using the electromagnet.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……..………………………………………………………………………………….[2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
24 Use

6. (a) Fig. 6.1 below shows 2 coils X and Y wound on a soft iron core.

Fig. 6.1

(i) Magnetic flux links coils X and Y when there is a current in coil X.

1. What happens in coil Y when the magnetic flux in the soft iron core
changes?

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

2. State a law that justifies your answer in (i) (1).

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

(ii) The output of coil Y is connected to a 12 V, 3 A light bulb. The input of coil X is
now connected to a 240 Vr.m.s 100 Hz mains supply.
(Assume that the efficiency of energy transfer between the two coils is 100%
and the bulb lights with full intensity.)

Calculate the current in coil X.

current in coil X =…………….A [2]


For
25 Examiner’s
Use

(iii) Sketch a graph to show how the power dissipated in the light bulb connected to
coil Y varies with time over one cycle of the alternating output voltage.
[2]

(b) Fig. 6.2 below shows the path of an -particle as it passes near the nucleus of a gold
atom.

Fig. 6.2

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
26 Use

(i) Explain why the -particle was deflected as shown in Fig. 6.2.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) Indicate on the diagram the direction of the electric force acting on the
-particle.
[1]

(c) Xenon-139 has a half-life of 41 s and is generated at a constant rate during the
fission of a specific sample of Uranium-235. The number of Xenon-139 nuclei in the
sample increases initially and finally becomes constant.

(i) Explain the meaning of the following terms:

1. half-life,

……………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

2. fission.

……………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

(ii) Suggest a reason why the number of Xenon-139 nuclei in the sample becomes
constant.

……………………………………………………………………………………………
……………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]
For
27 Examiner’s
Use

(iii) The activity of Xenon-139 is 3.4  108 Bq when the number of Xenon-139
nuclei has reached a constant.

Calculate
1. the number of Xenon-139 nuclei present in the sample.

number of Xenon-139 nuclei present =……………..[2]

2. the mass of Xenon-139 in the sample.

mass of Xenon-139 =………………kg [2]

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
28 Use

(d) The energy released in the fission reaction of Uranium-235 occurs partly as kinetic
energy of the fission products (167 MeV) and of the neutrons (5 MeV).

In a nuclear power station, 25% of the energy of the fission products is converted
into electrical energy. The number of uranium nuclei in 1.0 kg of Uranium-235 is
2.56  1024 .

(i) Calculate the electrical energy generated from the fission of 1.0 kg of
Uranium-235.

electrical energy generated =…………….. J [2]

(ii) Calculate the average power output of the power station if the duration of the
fission reaction of Uranium-235 is 24 hours.

average power output =………………. MW [2]


For
29 Examiner’s
Use

[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
30 Use

7. (a) Explain clearly each of the following observations:

(i) Light waves seem to travel only in straight lines while sound waves and water
waves can go around corners.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

(ii) Sound waves cannot be polarized but radio waves can.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[1]

(b) Fig. 7.1 below shows some of the possible energy levels of an electron orbiting
inside a mercury atom.

The lowest possible energy level is Level 1. The diagram below is not drawn to
scale.

Fig. 7.1
For
31 Examiner’s
Use

(i) Explain how Fig. 7.1 can be used to account for the emission line spectrum.

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………......

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[3]

(ii) Cool mercury vapour is bombarded with a stream of electrons that have been
accelerated from rest through a potential difference of 7.3 V.

1. Determine the kinetic energy of an electron inside the stream.

kinetic energy of electron =………………J [2]

2. Calculate the frequency of an emitted photon when an electron falls


from Level 2 to Level 1.

frequency of emitted photon =………………. Hz [2]


[Turn over
For
Examiner’s
32 Use

3. State and explain whether photons with frequency in (b) (ii) (2) would
be emitted if electrons with energy of 4.15 eV collide with the mercury
atoms.

………………………………………………………………………………………......

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

4. Draw on Fig. 7.1 the number of possible transitions when the mercury
atoms are bombarded by electrons with energy of 7.6 eV.
[2]

(c) A particle of mass m and kinetic energy E has a de Broglie wavelength .

Show that the expression for de Broglie wavelength  in terms of m and E is given by
h

2mE
[2]

(d) An electron travels at 0.5 times the speed of light.


For
33 Examiner’s
Use

(i) Calculate its de Broglie wavelength.

de Broglie wavelength =…………………. m [2]

(ii) Comment and explain what is observed if such an electron beam is passed
through a thin film of crystalline material.

………………………………………………………………………………………......

……………………………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………...[2]

END OF PAPER

[Turn over
Millennia Institute
PU3 H2 Physics
Preliminary Examination II
Mark Scheme

Paper 1

1 C 11 D 21 C 31 D
2 D 12 D 22 C 32 B
3 B 13 A 23 A 33 D
4 B 14 A 24 A 34 B
5 A 15 C 25 A 35 D
6 A 16 D 26 D 36 B
7 A 17 A 27 C 37 D
8 C 18 B 28 A 38 A
9 D 19 A 29 D 39 B
10 C 20 D 30 A 40 C

QN ANS SOLUTION
1 C -
2 D d 2
M h
4
4M

 d 2h
 m d h


m
2
d

h
 3  2 1  2  7%
3 B v u 62
a   0.2
t 20
  
v  u 2  2as  22  2 0.2 150  8 m s-1

4 B In order to cause turning effect, forces cannot act on same


point
5 A Tx  T sin  80
80
T
sin
Ty  T cos   50
50
T
cos 
80 50

sin cos 
8
  tan1
5
6 A Common a

TA  mW  mx  mY  mz a 

1
7 A m1v1  m2v 2  0
60v1  0.50(50)  0
v1  0.42 m s-1
8 C 
W  GPE  80 1.00  80 
KEf  KEi  GPE  150  80  70 J

9 D B not correct as even if faces R and S have same area, face R


will still experience a larger force due to the higher pressure at a
greater depth.

10 C 2
m V  5.0 
t

t
 1.02 
 2 
18  360.5  
p m
F
t

t
 
v  360.5 18  6500 N

11 D P  Fv
25000
v  42 m s-1
600

12 D Let F be gravitational force on surface and F’ is force 144 km


above the surface.

GMm GMm
F 
r2 5760 2
GMm GMm
F'  
r2 5904 2
F
F'  2
 0.95F
 5904 
 5760 

13 A Centripetal force of Moon is provided by gravitational force on


Moon due to Earth.

14 A Move from Y to X, object loses GPE, and hence positive work is


done by the G field  negative work done by external agent.

15 C
v  w a2  x2
Hence circular.

2
16 D 1
KEmax  mv002  E
2
2
3E 1 1 3v
 mv 2  m 0
4 2 2 4
2
3v
v2  0
4
x2
v   x02  x 2   x0 1
x02
3v 02  x2 
 v 02  1 2 
4  x0 
3 x2
 1 2
4 x0
x0 A
x 
2 2

17 A Internal energy = kinetic energy + potential energy


Temp increase = KE increase

18 B m  85  10  75
W  ml f
 
300 60  75l f
l f  240 J g-1

19 A Visible: 0.4 - 0.7 m  0.5 m is visible


Hence: 0.05 m is UV
5 m and m is IR.

20 D 1st to 6th node is 2.5 wavelengths


Hence wavelength is 12.0 cm

21 C d sin  n
n 2
d 
sin 
sin
2

22 C Electrical force same magnitude as gravitational force.


Hence C and not B. B assumes that there is horizontal velocity,
hence incorrect.

23 A Electric field strength is proportional to the rate of change of


electric potential with respect to distance. Close to P and Q,
lines become closer, hence increased E.

3
24 A VP  VQ  0
k 4   k 6  0
x 100  x
4 6
 
x 100  x
400  4x  6x
x  40 mm

25 A V
R
I

26 D Once filament is broken, circuit is open, and all the potential is


dropped across X. Hence Y is zero.

27 C Diode is in reverse bias, hence infinite resistance. Hence it


behaves like an open circuit, and therefore potential across it is
equal to the cell’s emf.

28 A Potential divider
Light incident on LDR, its resistance would drop.
Hence more potential dropped across XY

Shifting P towards X increases pd across bulb. Hence brighter.

29 D F  BILcos

30 A Flemming’s LHR. B-field at R is upwards. Hence force is out of


page

31 D Max induced e.m.f. when rate of change of B and hence flux


linkage wrt time is highest. Hence 4 ms.

32 B 1. Flux density increases, hence increase in flux linkage


2. No change in flux density, hence no change in flux
linkage
3. Current in coil 2 increases, increasing flux density and
hence changing flux linkage.

33 D P0
P by definition.
2

34 B T T

Vrms 
0
V 2 dt


0
Vo2 sin2  t dt

Vo
T T 2
After rectification,
1 T 2 2
V sin  t dt 
Vrms  2  0 o 

1 Vo Vo 100
   50 V
T 2 2 2 2

4
35 D hc
E  hf 

hc
E n  n hc
P  
t t t 
n p

t hc

36 B Classical theory suggests that there is a time lag. If intensity is


lower, time lag would be longer.

37 D In p-type, holes are majority carriers but electrons are present


as well.

38 A Conduction band above valence band (last fully occupied band).


Y is metal as it has an occupied conduction band.

39 B A is wrong as neutron is represented by


1
n , and not 11n .
0

40 C 3
N  N 7N0
N  1  0   1 0 
 2 8 8

5
Paper 2

1a Scalar: Magnitude and no direction (mass) B1

Vector: Magnitude and direction (weight) B1

 
v v v v
1b V  B  A  B   A
x : Ax  Bx  10 sin 45  5 sin35  4.2
y : Ay  By  10 cos 45  5 cos35  11.2 M1

V  4.22  11.22  11.9


11.9
a  0.40
30
4.2
  tan1  20.6 M1
11.2

Hence 0.40 m s-2 at bearing of 201 A1

2a Velocity changes by 10 m s-1 per second. B1


[Do not accept definition of acceleration.]

2bi sx 300 C1
t   0.333 s
ux 900
2bii No air resistance. B1

2biii 1 2
s y  uy t  gt
2
sy  0 
1
2
 
9.81 0.333 2 M1

sy  0.544 m A1

2biv v x2  ux2  2as


M1
0  9002  2a 4 
a  101000 m s-2 A1

2b Lower B1

3ai During melting, molecules move further apart from lattice B1


structure to clusters of molecules

Energy input is used to gain PE and not change KE, hence T B1


constant

3aii During boiling, molecules escape from liquid and escape into B1
surrounding atmosphere.

Energy input required to gain PE and also to overcome B1


atmospheric pressure

6
3b V T
V1 T1
 M1
V2 T2
0.00825 T
 1 A1
0.00424 273
T1  531 K
3ci T    273.15 (Do not accept other values) B1

3cii False. Need to measure on absolute scale, ie. thermodynamic B1


scale. In that case, difference is not 2 times.

4a Boat has greater volume compared to solid block (more empty M1


space within)

Hence displaces more water and therefore achieves sufficient A1


upthrust to support its weight.

4bi  
T  W  mg  0.200 9.81  1.96 N C1

4bii m 0.200
V   2.5  105 m3 C1
 8000
4biii T U W
T W U M1

   
T  1.96  2.5  105 800 9.81  1.76 N A1

4c B1:
Constant
gradient
up till h =
x

B1: no
increase
thereafter

5a The magnetic flux density at a point is the force per unit length B1
of conductor per unit current carried

placed at that point at right angles to the field. B1

5bi Current is moving in each coil of the spring creates a magnetic B1


field.

The magnetic field of one coil interacts with the magnetic field B1
of adjacent coil resulting in magnetic forces between coils.

7
5bii Current in each coil flows in the same direction. The spring is B1
compressed due to attractive magnetic forces.

5ci Into the paper B1

5cii Larger radius of curvature – above the given path. B1

5di FB =Bev M1

FB = (8.4 x 10-3 )(1.60 x 10-19 ) (3.4 x 107) = 4.57 X 10-14 N A1

5dii Work done on electron = 0 since magnetic is perpendicular to B1


displacement.
No change in KE of electron

6a 1. Atoms must be in the metastable state to bring about B1


stimulated emission of
coherent monochromatic laser.

2. Atoms must attain population inversion in order to cause B1


multiplication of
stimulated emission.

3. The emitted photons must be confined in the system long B1


enough to allow them
to stimulate further emission from other excited atoms.

6b

B1 each
(max 3)
Total 3
marks

7ai When an electron collides with one of the target atoms, it may B1
lose an amount of energy that corresponds to the energy of an
X-ray photon.

The electron may continue to lose energy in a series of B1


collisions with other atoms, thereby giving off X-ray photons of
different energies. Since different X-ray photons correspond to
different wavelengths, the continuous spectrum is thus formed.

7aii Min wavelength corresponds to max frequency, hence max loss B1


of energy due to most energetic electron losing all its KE.

7aiii Electron from ground state is excited and moves up to next B1


immediate state before dropping back down and releasing a
photon of wavelength corresponding to K

7bi For the energy of the photon for the K  -line,

8
E  E 2  E1
M1
k Z  1  k Z  12 
2
E     
22  12 
3k Z  1
2
hf 
4
3k Z  1
2
f 
4h
f  C Z  1 A1

3k
where C  and is a constant.
4h

7bii Best fit line B1

7biii From the graph,


gradient  5.0  10 7 (  0.2  10 7 ) M1

1
Therefore, the constant C is 5.0  10 Hz . 7 2 A1

7biv Since f  C Z  1 ,
f  5.0  10 7 29  1
f  1.4  10 9
C1
c
Since   ,
f
3.0  10 8


1.4  10 9
2

10
  1.5  10 m C1

7ci The first two peaks are the 1st order maxima and the next two
peaks are the 2nd order maxima for the two wavelengths of the
X-ray beam.

Using 2d sin  m ,

2  0.94  10 9  sin 0.8  1 1 C1


1  26 pm

2  0.94  10 9  sin 2.4  2  2 C1


2  39 pm

7cii Using the diffraction grating expression d sin  n , and


considering the 1st order maxima,

3000  10 9  sin  1 0.1 10 9 M1

9
  0.0019

The 1st order maxima is too close to the central bright fringe and A1
so is unable to discriminate between different wavelengths in
the X-ray region.

Purpose
Experiment is to investigate how the surface temperature of the glass envelope of a
filament lamp varies with the electrical power delivered to the lamp.

1. Basic Procedure
BP1
Switch on a.c. supply, measure current and voltage, measure temperature of lamp
surface.

2. Diagram

Lamp, a.c. power supply, voltmeter, ammeter, variable resistor, thermocouple on D1


surface of
lamp. D2
Correct setup

3. Procedure

1. Switch on the power supply


2. Measure the current and voltage across the lamp with the ammeter and voltmeter. M1
3. Power supplied to lamp P = V/I M2
4. Measure the surface temperature with a thermocouple. M3
5. Repeat steps 1-4 for different values of V by varying the variable resistor M4
6. Thermocouple is placed at the same part of the lamp. (any one 5 / 6) CV1
OR The room temperature is kept constant.

Safety
1. Do not touch the surface of the bulb FS1
2. Switch off bulb before adjusting the thermocouple FS2
3. Use glove to protect burns from lamp surface.

Improvement
1. Temperature reading take at various points on the surface. FI1

10
2. Tape junction of thermocouple on to the surface to ensure proper thermal contact. FI2

11
Paper 3
1a W = 80 (9.81) = 780 N C1

1bi Weight acting downwards from centre of object Both


presen
Normal force acting upwards from base of object t: B1

1bii F N W
a  M1
m m
N  780
2.5 
80
N  980 N A1

1biii F N W
a 
m m
1.5W  W
a C1
m
a  0.5g  4.9 m s-2

1c Correc
tF
values:
B1

Correc
t
timing:
B1

1di W Fs
P  M1
t t

P
 
8000  1 103 250
60
P  37.5 kW A1

1dii Eo
 0.75
Ei
37.5
 0.75
Ei
C1
E i  50.0 kW

2a mv 2 B1
F
r

12
2bi GPE  KE M1
1
mgh  mv 2
2
 
v  2gh  2 9.81 0.60 
A1
v  3.4 m s-1

2bii 0.60 m B1

2biii mv 2
At top, v  0  F  0
r
M1
F  N W  0  N  0

If contact force, N is less than zero, car breaks contact from track A1
and drops

2biv Min N = 0
mv 2
N  0& F  N W 
r
mv 2
W 
r
Wr 1
 mv 2 M1
2 2

GPE  GPE top  KE top

 
mg 0.6  mg 2r   Wr
2
5r
 0.6
2
r  0.24 m A1

2c GPE  EPE M1
1
mgh  kx 2
2

 
0.5 9.81 0.60   21 150x 2

x  0.20 m A1

3ai The potential difference between two points is the amount of B1


electrical energy converted into other forms of energy

per unit charge moved across the points. B1

3aii E = V + Ir  V = - Ir + E  y = mx + c M1
1
The y-intercept of the graph gives the e.m.f. E of the battery = 6 V A1

3aii From graph when I = 1.2 A, V = 4.2 V M1

13
2
P = I V  P 1.2 x 4.2 = 5.04 W A1

3aii E = V + Ir M1
3
 6 = 4.2 + 1.2 r

 r = (6 - 4.2)/1.2 = 1.5 Ω A1

3b Current in both branches the same. Pd across c and b is higher (I x M1


2Ω) compared to across d and b (I x 1Ω).

Potential at c higher than potential at d. The current will flow from c A1


to d.

4a The superposition of two waves meeting at a point in space to give a B1


resultant wave where

amplitude is given by the Principle of Superposition. B1

4bi Alternating bright and dark fringes B1

Bright fringes decrease in intensity as order increases B1

4bii Diffraction occurs at the slits where the beams spread out and B1
overlap.

Interference occurs when the 2 waves meet at different positions on B1


the screen. Constructive interference occurs if both waves are in
phase, and destructive if out of phase.

4biii

ax

 
0.5  103 2.5  103  M1

D 2.0
  625 nm A1

4c Constructive interference results in twice of original amplitude and B1


destructive results in zero amplitude.

Hence better contrast for observation B1

5a Oscillatory motion in which the acceleration is proportional to the B1


displacement from the equilibrium position and opposite direction to
the displacement.

Sea waves/ Tides B1

5bi   t B1

5bii ST  r sin M1

ST  r sin  t A1
5biii The shadow moves up and down about S. B1

14
ST  y
y  r sin  t
v  r  cos  t
a  r  2 sin  t   2 y M1
Hence SHM

5biv 2

T
2 2
T   1.57 s C1
 4

5bv v  v 0  wr M1

 
1
v  4 15.0  102  0.60 m s-1 A1

5bv a   2 x0 M1
2

a  4.0 0.15 
a  2.4 m s-2 A1

5ci T = 0.200 s B1

5cii Cosine curve starts from positive amplitude B1

T = 0.200 s B1

5di Damping is where the amplitude of oscillations gradually decreases B1


due to resistive forces and energy is lost.

5dii Same period as before. B1

Decreasing amplitude in each loop B1

5diii Increase the magnitude of the current B1

Until the mass does not oscillate but quickly returns to its equilibrium B1
position when displaced.

6ai1 An e.m.f. is induced in coil Y. B1

6ai2 Faraday's law states that the induced e.m.f. is equal to the rate of B1
change of flux linking the coil.

6aii Fission is a process in which a heavy nucleus split into 2 lighter


nuclei roughly equal mass
M1

A1

15
6aiii
2 power cycles for a cycle of voltage B1

Positive sinusoidal variation with zero to max power B1

6bi Both the -particle and nucleus contains protons which are positively B1
charged.

The deflection is due to repulsion between like charges B1

6bii Force vector from centre of gold nucleus to path. B1

6ci1 The half-life of a radioactive isotope is the time taken for half of the B1
unstable nuclei in the sample to decay.

6ci2 Fission is a process in which a heavy nucleus split into 2 lighter B1


nuclei roughly equal mass

6cii When the rate of production Xenon - 39 nuclei in the sample from B1
the Uranium-235 fission process is equal to its rate of decay of
Uranium-235 nuclei in the sample.

6ciii A 3.4 x 108


1 A  N  N =  M1
 ln 2
t1/2
3.4 x 108 x 41
  2.01x1010 A1
ln 2
6ciii N N M1
2 m x molar mass  m = x 0.139 kg mol1
NA NA
2.01 x 1010
 x 0.139  4.6 x 1015 kg
6.02 x 1023 A1

16
6di

M1

A1

6dii M1

A1

7ai Sound waves and water waves have wavelengths comparable to the B1
size of the obstacles in their path. Sound and water waves and
undergo diffraction around corners easily.

Light waves have wavelengths that are too small compared to the
dimensions of the obstacles, and will not undergo diffraction. Thus B1
light waves will appear to travel only in straight lines.

7aii Sound waves are longitudinal whereas radio waves are transverse. B1
Only transverse waves can be polarized.

7bi When the electron in a particular excited state falls to a lower energy
state, it loses energy by emitting a photon of energy. B1

Only photons of specific energies that are equal to the difference


between two energy levels of the will be emitted. B1

Differences in energy levels E  hf , the frequencies corresponding


to these photon energies give rise to an emission line spectrum.
B1

7bii W  qV  E=1.6 x 1019 x 7.6 =1.22 x 1018 J M1


1 A1

7bii E  E2  E1  5.72  (10.38)  4.66 eV M1


2
E 4.66 x 1.6 x 1019
E=hf  f=  34
 1.12 x 1015 Hz
h 6.63 x 10 A1

7bii Energy of electrons 4.15 eV is not sufficient to cause electron in the M1


3 lowest level to move to next higher Energy Level 2 (E = 4.66 eV)

Not possible for photons of this frequency to be emitted.


A1
7bii Working Not required 3

17
4 Energy of electrons = 7.3 eV correct
Possible transitions are: : B2
E3 – E1 > - 3.71 eV to - 10.38 eV E = 6.67 eV
E2 – E1 > - 5.72 eV to -10.38 eV E = 4.66 eV 1 or 2
E3 – E2 > - 3.71 eV to - 5.72 eV E = 2.01 eV correct
: B1
Therefore, the number of possible transitions (or frequencies) is 3.

7c 1 2
Energy of particle E  mv
2
p
momentum of particle p  mv (Sub. v  )
m
1 p p2
E  m( ) 2  E  p= 2mE M1
2 m 2m
h h
de Broglie wavelength  =  = A1
p 2mE

7di 1 M1
KE of electron E= x (9.11 x 1031 ) x (0.5 x 3 x 108 ) 2  1.02 x 1014 J
2
h 6.63 x 1034
   4.86 x A1
1012 m
31 14
2mE 2 x (9.11 x 10 ) x 1.02 x 10

7dii The de Broglie wavelength of the electron is similar in size as the B1


atomic spacing between atoms inside the crystal.

The spacing between atoms acts as a diffraction grating and B1


diffraction effect of electrons will be observed.

18
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September
2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

MERIDIAN JUNIOR COLLEGE


Preliminary Examination
Higher 2

___________________________________________________________________

H2 Physics 9646/1
Paper 1 24 September 2010

1 hour 15 mins
___________________________________________________________________
READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Class Reg Number

Candidate Name _____________________________

Do not open this booklet until you are told to do so.

There are forty questions in this section. Answer all questions. For each question, there
are four possible answers A, B, C and D. Choose the one you consider correct and
record your choice in soft pencil on the Optical Mark Sheet (OMS).

Read very carefully the instructions on the OMS.

Write your name and class in the spaces provided on the OMS.

Shade your Index Number column using the following format:

1) first 2 digits is your index number in class (e.g. 5th student is shaded as “05”);
2) ignore the last row of alphabets.

This document consists of 17 printed pages


Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

DATA AND FORMULAE

Data
speed of light in free space c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1
permeability of free space μo = 4π x 10-7 H m-1
permittivity of free space ε0 = 8.85 x 10-12 F m-1
= (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton mp = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant k = 1.38 x 10-23 J K-1
gravitational constant G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall g = 9.81 m s-2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion 1
s = ut + at2
2
v2 = u2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure p = ρgh
gravitational potential φ = -Gm/r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vo cos ωt

± ω xo - x
2 2
=
resistors in series R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage x = xo sin ωt
transmission coefficient T = exp(-2kd)

8π m(U − E )
2

where k = 2
h
radioactive decay x = xo exp(-λt )
decay constant 0.693
λ =
t1
2

2
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

Answer all 40 questions in this paper and shade your answers on the answer sheet provided.

1 The length of a rectangle is given as L ± l and its width as W ± w. What is the uncertainty
in its area?

A l+w
B Lw + W l
C Ll + W w
l w
D +
L W

2 For which quantity is the magnitude a reasonable estimate?

A mass of an atom 500 pg


B wavelength of green light 500 nm
C frequency of a radio wave 500 μHz
D the acceleration due to free fall 981 mm s-2

3 A housewife released a bag of rubbish weighing 54 N from rest into a refuse chute from
her unit in a HDB flat. The rubbish passes through two speed detectors at different
locations and the readings shown in the detectors are 14.7 m s-1 and 49.1 m s-1
respectively.

Neglecting the effect of air resistance, the distance between the two speed detectors is

A 20.3 m
B 31.9 m
C 71.7 m
D 112 m

4 When a ball is thrown upwards at an angle to the horizontal with an initial speed.
Assuming that air resistance is not negligible, which of the following statement is
incorrect?

A The path of the ball is asymmetrical about the highest point.


B Horizontal range of the ball is shorter than the case with negligible air resistance.
C The maximum height reached by the ball is smaller than the case with negligible air
resistance.
D The time taken for the flight up to the highest point is longer than the time taken for the
flight down.

3
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

5 A car of weight Wc is driven across a uniform bridge of length l and weight Wb. The bridge is
supported by two ropes having tensions T1 and T2 when the car is a distance x from the rope
on the left as shown in the figure below.

T1 T2

x
Wc Wb

Which of the following expressions for the tensions T1 and T2 is correct?

Tension T1 Tension T2
Wb Wc x Wb x
A + + Wc (1 − )
2 l 2 l
Wb Wc l Wb l
B + + Wc (1 − )
2 x 2 x
Wb Wc Wb Wc
C + +
2 2 2 2
Wb x Wb Wc x
D + Wc (1 − ) +
2 l 2 l

6 Three identical stationary discs P, Q and R are placed in a line on a horizontal, flat,
frictionless surface. Disc P is projected straight towards disc Q.

P Q R

If all consequent collisions are perfectly elastic, predict the final motion of the three discs.

P Q R
A moving left moving left moving right
B moving left stationary moving right
C stationary stationary moving right
D moving right moving right moving right

4
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

7 In the Pixar movie, Up, an old man lifted his house using about 20000 helium balloons.
Assuming that the average volume of each balloon used is 0.17 m3, determine the weight
of the old man’s house.
(density of air = 1.2 kg m-3, density of helium = 0.18 kg m-3)

A 6000 N B 34000 N C 40000 N D 46000 N

8 A sphere of mass 3.00 kg rests on a frictionless slope inclined at 300 above the horizontal
as shown below.

The spring constant is 500 N m-1. Determine the compression of the spring.

Wall
300

A 7.67 mm B 29.4 mm C 34.3 mm D 51.0 mm

9 A small metal sphere of mass m is moving through a viscous liquid of height h. When it
reaches a constant downward velocity v, which of the following describes the changes
with time in the kinetic energy and gravitational potential energy of the sphere?

Kinetic Energy Gravitational Potential Energy


A constant and equal to ½mv2 decreases at a rate mgv
B constant and equal to ½mv2 decreases at a rate mgh
C increases at a rate ½mv2 decreases at a rate (½mv2 – mgv)
D increases at a rate mgv decreases at a rate (mgv – ½mv2)

10 Singapore is on the Equator. Seoul is at a latitude of 37.50 N as depicted in the diagram


below.
Seoul

37.50
Singapore

The centripetal acceleration at Singapore due to the Earth’s rotation about its axis is
asingapore . The centripetal acceleration at Seoul due to the Earth’s rotation about its axis is
asingapore
aseoul . What is the ratio ?
aseoul

A 0.79 B 1.00 C 1.26 D 9.81

5
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

11 Tarzan, whose mass is 80.0 kg, needs to swing across a river filled with crocodiles in
order to save Jane of mass 45.0 kg, at the middle of the river as shown in the diagram
below. He has to swing from a branch, which is assumed to be fixed in position, on a vine
of length 30.0 m, and initially making angle of 50o with the vertical.

50o 30.0 m

Tarzan swings towards Jane and grabs hold of her. Assuming that this is a completely
inelastic collision, determine their common speed just after the collision.

A 9.28 m s-1 B 12.4 m s-1 C 15.6 m s-1 D 19.5 m s-1

12 A particle of mass m performs vertical circular motion as show in the diagram below.
C

The following two graphs show the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity of
the particle along path ABC.

Calculate the centripetal acceleration at point C.

A zero B 4.91 m s-2 C 9.81 m s-2 D 22.1 m s-2

6
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

13 Mercury is 5.79 × 1010 m away from the Sun and it takes 0.241 earth years for Mercury to
make one revolution around the Sun. Neptune is 450 × 1010 m away from the Sun,
calculate the period of its orbit around the Sun.

A 2.12 years
B 18.7 years
C 165 years
D 330 years

14 The figure below shows the gravitational potential near the surface of the asteroid 951
Gaspra. Determine the mass of the asteroid.

A 1.00 × 1016 kg
B 2.00 × 1016 kg
C 3.00 × 1016 kg
D 4.00 × 1016 kg

15 A 0.10 kg mass hanging from a light helical spring produces an equilibrium extension of
0.10 m. The mass is pulled vertically downwards by a distance of 0.020 m and then
released.

Taking g as 10 m s-2, the equation relating the displacement x of the mass from its
equilibrium position and the time t after release is

A x = 0.12 sin (10t )


B x = 0.10 cos(0.20π t )
C x = 0.020 cos ( 0.10t )
D x = 0.020 cos (10t )

7
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

16 Which graph correctly shows the variation with time t of kinetic energy Ek of an object
undergoing simple harmonic motion of period T?

17 A microwave source S is placed in front of a detector D, and a metal reflecting screen R is


placed beyond D such that its plane is perpendicular to the line joining S to D. As the
detector is moved slowly away from the source, it registers a series of maxima and
minima.

S D R

It is observed that the detector moved through a distance of 5.6 cm between the first and
fifth minimum. What is the frequency of the microwaves in GHz?

A 5.4
B 10.7
C 13.4
D 27.5

8
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

18 In a two-slit interference experiment, one slit transmits twice the amplitude of the other slit.
If the maximum intensity of the interference pattern is Io, the minimum intensity in the
pattern would be

A zero
B Io/9
C Io/4
D Io/2

19 Two sources of waves are said to be coherent if

A they are in phase.


B they have a constant phase difference.
C they have the same frequency and amplitude.
D they can interfere constructively.

20 A single traveling light wave in vacuum is able to

A carry momentum.
B create a standing wave.
C propagate at any velocity.
D create interference patterns.

21 Which statement about internal energy is correct?

A The internal energy of a system can be increased without transfer of energy by


heating.
B The internal energy of a system is the sum of the kinetic energies of the molecules.
C When the internal energy of a system is increased, its temperature always rises.
D When two systems have the same internal energy, they must be at the same
temperature.

22 An ideal gas is contained in a cylinder with a movable piston. At pressure p, volume V and
temperature T, it has Nv molecules per unit volume. If the pressure of the gas is changed
to 0.50p, and the temperature to 2.0T, the number of molecules per unit volume becomes

A 0.25 Nv
B 0.50 Nv
C 1.0 Nv
D 4.0 Nv

9
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

23 A negatively-charged oil drop is held stationary between two horizontal, charged metal
plates, the upper plate being positive.

+
Oil drop

The oil-drop then acquires an additional negative charge. In order to keep the oil-drop
stationary, what change should be made?

A Move the plate closer together.


B Reverse the charges on the plates.
C Increase the electric field strength between the plates.
D Decrease the potential difference between the plates.

24 Two point charges of -5 μC and +5 μC, are situated at points P and Q respectively as
shown below. X lies midway between P and Q while Y is at the same vertical position as X
but displaced to the right.

X Y

At point X At point Y
Electric Electric
Electric field Electric field
potential potential
A towards Q zero downwards zero
B towards Q negative downwards negative
C towards P zero upwards zero
D towards P negative upwards negative

10
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

25 In the circuit diagram below, D is an ideal diode. The voltage supply has negligible
internal resistance and the voltmeter reads 12 V.
2.0 Ω

V
Voltage
supply 2.0 Ω
2.0 Ω

If the connections to the terminals of the voltage supply are reversed, the voltmeter
reading would be

A 6.0 V B 8.0 V C 9.0 V D 18 V

26 The circuit shown in Fig. 1 may be used to determine the internal resistance of a battery.
An oscilloscope is connected across the battery as shown. Fig. 2 represents the screen of
the oscilloscope.


Fig. 1 Fig. 2

The time base of the oscilloscope is switched off throughout the experiment.
Initially the switches S1 and S2 are both open. Under these conditions, the spot on the
oscilloscope screen is at A.

Switch S1 is now closed, with S2 remaining open. The spot moves to B.


Switch S1 is kept closed and S2 is also closed. The spot moves to C.
The vertical sensitivity of the oscilloscope is 0.50 V per division.

Calculate the internal resistance of the battery.

A 0.24 Ω B 2.3 Ω C 14.0 Ω D 16.4 Ω

11
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

27 A row of 30 decorative lights, connected in series, is connected to a mains transformer.


When the supply is switched on, the lights do not work. The owner uses a voltmeter to test
the circuit. When the voltmeter is connected across the fifth bulb in the row, a reading of
zero is obtained.

Which of the following scenarios described is not possible?

A Only the filament of the fifth bulb has broken.


B The fuse in the mains transformer has blown.
C The filament of at least one of the other bulbs has broken.
D There is a break in the wire from the supply to the transformer.

28 The diagram shows a network of three resistors. Two of these marked R, are identical.
The other one has a resistance of 5.0 Ω.
●Y


R
5.0
X● ●

R ●

●Z
The resistance between Y and Z is found to be 2.5 Ω.
Determine the resistance between X and Y.

A 1.00 Ω B 1.9 Ω C 2.5 Ω D 4.2 Ω

12
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

29 In the diagram below, P is a horizontal circular coil of wire carrying a steady current I1 . A
conducting rod, which is free to move, is supported by 2 fixed horizontal parallel rails TQ
and SR which are perpendicular to the length of the conducting rod and carry a constant
current I 2 as shown in the diagram below.

P
Q R
I2
I2

I2

T S

I1
The conducting rod will

A move towards TS with increasing speed.


B move towards QR with increasing speed.
C move towards QR with decreasing speed.
D be lifted off the horizontal parallel rails momentarily.

30 The wire AC is free to move vertically while the wire BD is fixed. Suppose that both wires
carry equal currents of 100 A in opposite directions and that the mass per unit length for
each wire is 20.0 g m-1. Calculate the height which the wire AC is above wire BD. (You
may assume that the magnetic field, B at a distance r from a wire carrying current I to be
μo I
B= )
2π r

A C

I = 100 A

B D

I = 100 A

A zero, wires AC and BD are attracted to each other.


B 0.102 cm
C 1.02 cm
D 10.2 cm

13
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

31 A short bar magnet passes at a steady speed through a long solenoid. A galvanometer is
connected across the solenoid.

S N

Which graph best represents the variation of the current I of the galvanometer with time t?

I A II C
B
A

00 tt 00 tt

II C II
B D

00 tt 00 tt

32 A copper ring is suspended by a long, light rod pivoted at X so that it may swing as a
pendulum, as shown in the diagram below. An electromagnet is mounted so that the ring
passes over it as it swings.

K
The ring is set into oscillation with switch K open. What happens to the motion after switch
K has been closed?

A The periodic time will decrease.


B The oscillations will be heavily damped.
C The amplitude will increase because the ring is accelerated towards the magnet.
D The oscillations will continue at constant amplitude while the battery can supply
energy.

14
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

33 A sinusoidal potential difference V1 as shown in Fig. A, is applied across a resistor R and


produces heat at a mean rate W. What is the mean rate of heat produced when another
potential difference V2 as shown in Fig. B is applied across the same resistor?

V1 V2

Vo 2Vo

0
T time

-Vo 0
T time

Fig. A Fig. B

A ½W B 2W C 4W D 8W

34 An electric kettle has the following label:

Power : 2000 to 2400 W


Voltage : 220 to 240V
Frequency : 50 to 60 Hz

Which of the following is a probable expression of the current that passes through the
kettle when used in Singapore?

A I = 8.33 sin (315t)


B I = 10.9 sin (315t)
C I = 14.1 sin (375t)
D I = 16.0 sin (375t)

35 A potential barrier has a width W and potential height 6.0 MeV. The probability of a
3.0 MeV electron tunneling through it is 0.025.

Suppose that the potential height of the barrier is now doubled, what must the width of the
barrier be in order for a 3.0 MeV electron to have the same probability of transmission?

A 0.577 W B 0.707 W C 1.41 W D 1.73 W

36 The decay energy of a short-nuclear excited state is measured to be 150 keV ± 1%. What
is the shortest lifetime it can have?

A 3.5 × 10-40 s B 3.5 × 10-37 s C 5.3 × 10-35 s D 2.2 × 10-19 s

15
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

37 Which of the following statements about electron transitions between energy levels is
true?

A Stimulated emission describes a scenario when an atom get ‘excited’ from a lower
energy state E1 to a higher energy state E2 when one of its electron absorbs a photon
of energy E2 – E1.
B Spontaneous emission occurs more rapidly when the lifetime of the excited state is
long.
C Stimulated emission occurs more rapidly when the stimulating photon beam is of high
intensity.
D Spontaneous emission competes more strongly with stimulated emission in transitions
that emit red or infrared radiation.

38 A semiconductor device is connected in a series circuit with battery and resistance. A


current is found to pass through the circuit. When polarities of the battery are reversed the
current drops to zero. The device may be:

A pn junction
B intrinsic semiconductor
C p-type semiconductor
D n-type semiconductor

39 The radioactive isotope of iodine, 123I, is often used to test for overall thyroid function in
patients. The thyroid of an individual with hypothyroid condition will accumulate less
iodine than that of a normal individual.

An initial dose of 123I with an activity of 30 μCi was administered intravenously to a


patient. Twenty-four hours after injecting the radiopharmaceutical, the activity emanating
from the thyroid region is monitored and found to be 4 μCi.
123
What percentage of the injected I was concentrated in the thyroid
(Half-life of 123I = 13 hrs).

A 13% B 24% C 26% D 48%

16
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 24 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

40 The figure below shows the apparatus used to repeat the alpha-particle scattering
experiment. The detector measures the intensity of the alpha-radiation I at various
angular positions θ.
+90o

alpha gold
particles +170o foil
0o
θ
–170o

detector
–90o

Which of the graphs best represents the variation of I with θ?

Ι Ι

A B

θ θ
ο ο ο ο ο ο
−170 −90 0 +90 +170 −170 −90 0 +90 +170
ο ο ο ο

Ι Ι

C D

θ θ
ο ο ο ο ο ο
−170 −90 0 +90 +170 −170 −90 0 +90 +170
ο ο ο ο

End of Paper

17
MERIDIAN JUNIOR COLLEGE
Preliminary Examination
Higher 2

___________________________________________________________________

H2 Physics 9646/2
Paper 2 21 September 2010

1 hour 45 mins
___________________________________________________________________
READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Class Reg Number

Candidate Name _____________________________

This booklet contains 7 questions.

Do not open this booklet until you are told to do so.

Answer all questions.

Write your answers on this question booklet in the blanks provided.

Examiner’s Use

Section A
INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES
Q1 /15
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end
of each question or part question. Marks will be Q2 /8
deducted if units are not stated where necessary or if
answers are not quoted to the appropriate number of Q3 /8
significant figures.
Q4 /6
All working for numerical answers must be shown. You
are reminded of the need for good English and clear Q5 /8
presentation of your answers.
Q6 /15

Section B

Q7 /12

Deductions

Total /72

This document consists of 21 printed pages


2
[Turn Over
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

DATA AND FORMULAE

Data
speed of light in free space c = 3.00 x 108 m s-1

permeability of free space μo = 4π x 10-7 H m-1


permittivity of free space ε0 = 8.85 x 10-12 F m-1
= (1/(36π)) x 10-9 F m-1
elementary charge e = 1.60 x 10-19 C
the Planck constant h = 6.63 x 10-34 J s
unified atomic mass constant u = 1.66 x 10-27 kg
rest mass of electron me = 9.11 x 10-31 kg
rest mass of proton mp = 1.67 x 10-27 kg
molar gas constant R = 8.31 J K-1 mol-1
the Avogadro constant NA = 6.02 x 1023 mol-1
the Boltzmann constant k = 1.38 x 10-23 J K-1
gravitational constant G = 6.67 x 10-11 N m2 kg-2
acceleration of free fall g = 9.81 m s-2

Formulae
uniformly accelerated motion 1
s = ut + at2
2
v2 = u2 + 2as
work done on/by a gas W = p ΔV
hydrostatic pressure p = ρgh
gravitational potential φ = -Gm/r
displacement of particle in s.h.m. x = xo sin ωt
velocity of particle in s.h.m. v = vo cos ωt

± ω xo - x
2 2
=
resistors in series R = R1 + R2 + …
resistors in parallel 1/R = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + …
electric potential V = Q/4πεor
alternating current/voltage x = xo sin ωt
transmission coefficient T = exp(-2kd)

8π m(U − E )
2

where k = 2
h
radioactive decay x = xo exp(-λt )
decay constant 0.693
λ = t1
2

3
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

Answer all the questions in the spaces provided.

1 (a) State the Principle of Superposition.

.............................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Two sinusoidal transverse waves W1 and W2, of the same type, are incident
simultaneously on a point P. The amplitude of W2 is the same as the amplitude of W1.
The frequency of W2 is half the frequency of W1.

At a certain instant (time t = 0) at P, both waves have zero displacement and then both
displacements increase in the same direction.

Fig. 1.1 is a graph of displacement at P against time for wave W1.

displacement
(wave W1)

time Fig. 1.1

displacement
(wave W2)

time Fig. 1.2

displacement
(resultant
wave)

time Fig. 1.3

(i) On Fig. 1.2, sketch a graph of displacement against time for wave W2. [3]

(ii) On Fig. 1.3, sketch a graph to show the resultant wave produced by the
superposition at P of waves W1 and W2. [3]

4
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(iii) The frequency of wave W1 is 4.2 x 1015 Hz. Determine the frequency of the
resultant wave produced by the superposition of waves W1 and W2.

frequency = ………………. Hz [2]

(iv) Explain why it is incorrect to say that waves W1 and W2 are coherent.

...................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Blue light of wavelength 485.6 nm from a star is incident normally on a diffraction
grating. The light is diffracted into a number of beams as shown in Fig. 1.4.

second order

first order

zero order

first order

second order
grating
Fig. 1.4

The angular separation of the two second order beams is 45.7o. Calculate the
number of lines per millimeter on the grating.

Lines per millimetre = ………………. [4]

5
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

2 (a) Air near the Earth conducts electricity to a small extent. Because there is an electric field
directed towards the Earth’s surface, a small electric current exists in the atmosphere.
Measurements of the electric field near the Earth’s surface give an average of about
1.0 x 102 V m-1.

(i) Estimate the potential difference between the head and feet of an average adult.

potential difference = ………………. V [1]

(ii) The electric field near the Earth’s surface is as large as 1.0 x 102 V m-1, explain
why you do not experience an electric shock when you stand upright.

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………..............… [2]

(b) A photomultiplier tube is a device which has a common electrode (the photocathode) and
a number of other electrodes (the dynodes), which must be maintained at definite
potentials relative to the common electrode. A potential divider circuit may be used to
supply these potentials.

Fig. 2.1 illustrates a photomultiplier tube with a photocathode and six dynodes,
numbered 1 to 6. A potential divider of six resistors, each of resistance R, using a supply
voltage of 1050 V, is connected to the electrodes in the tube.

photomultiplier tube

1 2 3 4 5 6
photocathode dynodes

R R R R R R

potential divider

1050 V

Fig. 2.1

6
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(i) For the situation where there is no electron current inside the photomultiplier tube,
determine the potential difference between dynode 4 and the photocathode.

p.d. between dynode 4 and the photocathode = …………………V [2]

(ii) A fault develops inside the photomultiplier tube causing a short circuit between
dynodes 3 and 5. Determine the new potential difference between dynode 4 and
the photocathode. Explain your reasoning.

new p.d. between dynode 4 and the photocathode = …………….. V

Explanation: …………..……………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………………................

……………………………………………………………………………………....... [3]

7
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

3 From the power station, the voltage is stepped up to about 230 kV along the high voltage
cables before a series of step down transformers near homes are used to reduce the voltage
to 240 V at our homes. Fig. 3.1 shows the last iron-cored step down transformer before our
homes with the actual turns ratio indicated. The home 240 V output has a frequency of 50 Hz
is connected to a 58 Ω resistor of a home appliance.

iron-core

58 Ω
home

primary coil secondary coil

Fig. 3.1

(a) Determine the number of similar turns-ratio transformers required to step down from the
high voltage (230 kV) cables to the 240 V output used at homes. State one assumption
made.

Number of transformers = ..................

Assumption: ........................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [4]

(b) Explain the purpose of the iron core in the transformer.

.............................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

8
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(c) Determine the average power dissipated in the 58 Ω resistor of a home appliance.

Average power = …………….. W [2]

(d) Suggest a typical household appliance with such power rating.

Appliance is ……………..…………….. [1]

4 A p-n junction is formed between slices of p-type and n-type semiconductor material as shown
in Fig. 4.1

p-type n-type

Fig. 4.1

(a) On Fig. 4.1, draw an arrow indicating the direction of movement of holes when the two
slices are brought into contact. [1]

(b) Boron is used as a dopant in one of the semiconductor slices. State and explain whether
the addition of Boron creates a p-type or a n-type semiconductor.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

……………………………………………………………………………………................. [3]

9
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(c) State and explain what will happen to the depletion region when a battery is connected in
as shown in Fig. 4.2.

Fig. 4.2

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

……………………………………………………………………………………................. [2]

5 (a) Explain what is meant by binding energy.

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

…………………………………………………………………………………………...................

……………………………………………………………………………………................. [1]

(b) Calculate the binding energy of a thorium nucleus 226


90 Th.
Given that
rest mass of 226
90 Th = 226.0249 u
rest mass of proton = 1.0073 u
rest mass of neutron = 1.0087 u

Binding energy = ……………… MeV [2]

10
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(c) A thorium nucleus 226


90 Th originally at rest decays and forms a radium nucleus 222
88 Ra* and
an alpha particle as shown below. The radium nucleus 222
88 Ra* is in an excited state.

226
90 Th Æ 222
88 Ra* + 42 He
Given that
rest mass of 226
90 Th = 226.0249 u
rest mass of 222
88 Ra = 222.0154 u
rest mass of 4
2 He = 4.0026 u

(i) Calculate the kinetic energy of the radium nucleus if the alpha particle is emitted
with a kinetic energy of 2.38 MeV.

Kinetic energy of Ra = …………… MeV [3]

(ii) The excited radium nucleus, 222


Ra* further undergoes a gamma decay as shown below:
88

88 Ra + γ
Ra* Æ 222
222
88

Calculate the energy of the gamma ray.

Energy of the gamma ray = ……………… MeV [2]

11
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

6 Most Singapore buildings are built using a framework of concrete beams, slabs and columns.
The concrete columns need to carry both the ultimate vertical load, N and the ultimate bending
moment, M induced from the attached beam/s as shown in the 3-D pictorial diagram of
Fig. 6.1. In practice, the concrete columns are reinforced with steel bars.
N

Beam

Column

Fig. 6.1

To design for the steel bars in such columns, design charts are available from the British
Standard Structural Use of Concrete, BS8110.

12
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

In order to choose the correct design chart, the values of the following must match the design
details:

fcu = Ultimate crushing pressure limit of concrete


fy = Ultimate characteristic strength of steel bar
d
where d is the distance from the edge of the column to the centre of the steel bar that is
h
furthest from that edge and h is the larger dimension of the column

The cross section of a column is shown in Fig. 6.2: b = 200mm

h = 450 mm

d
h = 450 mm

Height of
column
32 mm cover= 40 mm
diameter steel
bar

b = 200 mm

Fig. 6.2 Fig. 6.3

Dimensions of the column are:


h = 450 mm (larger dimension of the column)
b = 200 mm
d = distance from the edge of the column to the centre of the steel bar that is furthest from that
edge.

(a) The chosen design details for the column above are:

fcu = 50 N mm-2
fy = 460 N mm-2
cover = 40 mm (from edge of column to edge of steel bar)

Assuming that 4 numbers of 32 mm diameter steel bars are to be used. Determine the
d
value of and hence explain why Chart No. 49 is appropriate to be used.
h

d
= ………………
h [1]
Explanation:

..............................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]
13
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

N M
(b) The coordinates of the chart derived from the values of and can be used to
bh bh2
100 ASC
establish the corresponding value of such that ASC (the total required
bh
cross-sectional area of steel bars) can be calculated. It is necessary to provide enough
steel bars, with a total area more than ASC.

100 ASC
An example of reading off the value is:
bh

N
Value of = 32.5 N mm-2
bh
M
Value of 2
= 3.20 N mm-2
bh

From Chart No. 49, the corresponding coordinate is marked with a cross and labelled
100 ASC
‘A’. This coordinate corresponds to a value of 4 < < 5 . More specifically, the
bh
100 ASC
value of is 4.5. Using this value, ASC can then be calculated.
bh

Based on the same design details in (a), the loads carried by the column in Fig 6.2 are:
M = Ultimate bending moment = 91.2 kN m
N = Ultimate vertical load = 2460 kN

N M
(i) Determine the values of and for the column in Fig 6.2.
bh bh2

N
= ……………… N mm-2
bh
M
2
= ……………… N mm-2 [2]
bh

14
Preliminary Examination Meridian Junior College 21 September 2010
JC2 H2 Physics 2010

(ii) Using Chart No. 49, determine whether 4 steel bars of diameter 32 mm with a
total area of 3220 mm2 is sufficient. [4]

(c) A young engineer designed the same column except that he used a different concrete
with an ultimate crushing pressure limit, fcu of 25 N mm-2. Compare your calculated value
N
of in (b)(i) with this value of fcu = 25 N mm-2. Comment what would happen to the
bh
concrete.

.......................................................................................