FINGER FITNESS™

The Art of Finger Control

by

Lorraine C.& Greg'ory G. lrwin

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION ~ Gregory G. Irwin 3

Meg Robinson OTRlL, CHT 5

I. CHAPTER ONE ~ To Begin With 7

1. Reference to Fingers

2. Basic Positions

3. Warm-Up Exercises

II. CHAPTER TWO ~ Folds 12

1. Introduction

2. Single Folds

3. Double Folds

4. Triple Folds

5. Folded Extenders

III. CHAPTER THREE - Taps 23

1. Introduction

2. Single Taps

3. Double Taps

4. Triple Taps

IV. CHAPTER FOUR - Bends 30

1. Introduction

2. Single Bends

3. Double Bends

4. Triple Bends

V. CHAPTER FIVE - Splits 36

1. Introduction

2. Splits

VI. CHAPTER SIX - Combinations of Bends and Splits 39

1. Introduction

2. Single Bend Splits

3. Double Bend Splits

4. Triple Bend Splits

VII. CHAPTER SEVEN - Opposites .4 7

1. Introduction

2. Opposite Bends

3. Opposite Splits

4. Opposite Single Bend Splits

5. Oppostie Double Bend Splits

6. Opposite Triple Bend Splits

VIII. CHAPTER EIGHT - Shuffling 57

1. Introduction

2. Pre-Shuffling

3. Double Shuffling

4. Single Shuffling

IX. BIBLIOGRAPHY 78

1

Gregory G. Irwin, BS Music Education, Miami University 1981

What is Finger FitnesstM?

Finger Fitness is a unique excercise program that directly addresses the physical needs of the hand. It ta.kes an athletic approach to hand conditioning by isolating and exercising natural hand and finger movements. It is designed to build strength, dexterity, coordination, flexibility, and independence in the fingers and hands. The philosophy is similarto that of athletes training for peak pertormance in their sport. They condition their bodies (i.e. lifting weights, running, aerobic workouts, etc.) prior to participating in a sport

so that their bodies not only perform better but they are less likely to experience stress, _ fatigue, and injury. In turn, those involved in hand-intensive activities should approach their activity as a smallmuscle athlete and eonditiontheirhands to reach peakskill performance. This athletic approach to the hands not only can Improve performance but can be used for - prevention of injuries and rehabilitation.

. TM

How did the concept of Finger F·itness develop?

As I begin this new and revised edition of Finger Fitness: The Arl of Finger Control, I realize that Finger Fitness was not an Instant revelation, but rather, a concept that has and will continue to evolve. The capability of the human hand distinguishes us from other animals and has allowed us to develop this complex world in which we live. Humankind could not have evolved without some awareness of the necessity of increasing the agility and coordination of the hands. This awareness allowed us to develop tools necessary to enhance our abilities to survive, build, and create in our surroundings. It is this continuous refining of the hand/finger thought connection that allows us to live as we do now. Incorporating a program like Finger Fitness can only help refine our most precious tool, the hand, to its next level of development. Because our hands play such an important role in our development, would it not than make sense that the conditioning and improving of our hands would hel'p strenqhthen and develop our individual ability and possibly the ability of humankind as a whole?

My curiosity about our hands and their development, and the need for finger/hand conditioning and control first came to my attention While I was in college pursuing a degree in Music Education. Three special skills were needed in order to excel in music: auditory (ie. ability of the ear), mental (ie. ability to sense harmony, melody, and rhythm), and physical(ie. strength, dexterity, and coordination). My music education had developed the firsttwo skills by adequately breaking them down into ear training classes and music theory classes. The physical skills were neglected though, other than What each individual did while practicing his or her own instrument.

2

In addition to practicing my instrument and the piano, and to gain better control of my fingers, I began doing simple bending and splitting exercises in my spare time. As this seemed to help my hands' performance, I continued to practice these excercises for the next few years while working as a musician and a teacher. For several years I entertained students with finger tricks. Some of these students showed me new tricks and exercises which I added to my repertoire. It was at thls time I realized I had many groups of exercises which seemed to ereatea complete program. After talking to hand surgeons, physical therapists, and sports medicine professionals, I found that, altho.ugh there were programs for rehabilitation of the hand, there were none for advancing the, ordinary hand to a higher level of strength and coordination. This gave me the final motivation to publish my own exercise program directed specifically toward building the strength, coordination and dexterityofthe normal hand, and in turn for preventing hand injuries. Recently, I have found many physical therapists and people in preventive medicine have become interested in incorporating Finger Fitness into their treatment and rehabilitative programs. This is true for) when applied correctly, the exercises in this book can be helpful in hand therapy and in the prevention of the recurrence of certain hand injuries. Further research continues at this time.

TM

What are the benefits of Finger Fitness?

Advantages of exercising have been well established in the health and medical field.

The athletic approach in this program has three key physical benefits for the hands. The first is the increase of skill level by the development of strength, dexterity, coordination and finger and hand independence. Also, one will gain confidence and trust in the ability of the hands through the repeated exercises and by what I call the finger-thought connection (tuninq the brain in with the movements of the hands).

Conditioning for prevention of stress and injuries through the limbering and building of your fingers and hands is the second physical benefit The third is that these exercises have been found to be beneficial in the rehabilitation of certain injuries and ailments.of the hand. Many occupational therapists and physical therapists have been incorporating the exercises in this book into their treatment and rehabilitation programs.

Another advantage tothese exercises is that they can be done anytime, anywhere since all one needs is their hands. This convenience factor is invaluable in our time-crunched society. The Finger Fitness program ts designed to maximize time by offering the option to do most of these exercises in conjuction with some daily activities such as watching TV, riding in a car, or as an addition to an established physical workout. (See inside back cover for additional ideas.)

Allin all, the hand is a tool, and like a tool, if it is kept in top condition it will perform at its best ability. A sharpened knife wiU cut better; in a like manner, a hand with improved physical skills will also perform better.

3

How do I use the Finger Fitness™ Program?

The Finger Fitness program is laid out in a methodical way with each chapter showing the different exercise families. Like other exercise programs, it begins with warm-up exercises. These exercises are not only beneficial for warming-up before the Finger Fitness workout, but also for limbering-up before any handintensive activity such as playing an instrument, performing surgery, typing, or participating in sports.

In order to use the Finger Fitness program properly, it is important to do two thinqs. First, take time to consider the needs of your hands (i.e, increasing coordination, flexibility, strength, etc.) and what muscle groups those needs and movements involve. (See page 6 for assistance.) Second, take time to considerthe skill and flexibility status of your fingers and hands. This will help determine at what Level of Progression you will begin with. On page 5, is a chart describing the Levels of Progression used in this book. These levels are based on the number and types of muscle groups involved in certain positions of the hand. Each photo in this book has been coded with a Level of Progression number. We recommend starting with Level I exercises in all exercise fam ilies until your hand muscles become tam War with the feel of those exercises. As you become more proficient and comfortable with these exercises, move up into the higher levels.

Last, once you have found the exercises suited for reaching your goals, remember that all hands are not created equal l Some people will find these exercises easier than others will, but we believe that if you keep practicing and allow for adequate rest periods, you will progress.

Acknowledgements.' I want to thank all ot those people who have helped me develop and improve The Finger Fitness Program over the past fifteen years--my parents, teachers, students, and friends. I want to acknowledge in this special way two extraordinary people in my lite; my inspirational eighty-nine year old grandmother who was a professional pianist and teacher for over fifty years and still plays beautifully, and my dear wife, Lorraine, without whose understanding and support this program and book would have not been possible.

To Your Healthy Hands, Gregory G. Irwin

PLEASE NOTE ...

Because in this program it is important to strengthen each and every finger, we do not feel that social gestures should restrict the smooth flow of these exercises. Therefore1 none of the positions you see pictured in this book are meant to have any social meaning whatsoever.

Also, if you already have problems with pain in your hands, or experience any pain or discQmfort while doing any of-these exercises, please s top and consult a physician betore continuing.

______________________________________________________ __' 4

Comments from Certified Hand Therapist, Meg Robinson OTRIL

"The hand is not only the symbol of man's power and the instrument of his perception; it is a/so the mirror otbis emotion. n ••• R. Guy Pulvertaft

Fing.e.r Fitness enables an individual to control the intricate workings ofthe powerful tool-the Hand. The hand is composed of complex structures, each enhancing and opposing one another to achieve a delicate balance which allows fine dexterity as well as strength. Byrnasterlnq Finger Fitness techniques, one can improve not only physical dexterity but overall reflexive responses, enabling him to perform with peak skill and accuracy.

Cumulative Trauma is today's hot topic. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is taking a close second to back injuries in the work place. Cumulative Trauma commonly occurs from insuffieientconditioning or prolonged positioning. Finger Fitness will enable an individual to sufficiently warm-up and consistently alter his position if performed periodically throughout the day. Whether he is a meat cutter or a musician, Finger Fitness will enhance an tndividual's effectiveness and endurance.

As a Hand Therapist, my goal is to restore range of motion, strength, dexterity, and overall function to the injured hand. Finger Fitness allows a patient to begin light range of motion exercises at a comfortable speed when using Levels 1 and 2. As the patient progresses, Levels 3 and 4 provide challenging exercises to improve strength and coordination.

IMPORTANT: It is essential to consult your physician or therapist prior to performing Finger Fitness when recovery is your goal. Exercises may not be appropriate in the acute stages of tendon and nerve lacerations, fractures, or arthritis.

Levels of Progression

Level 1 : 1. Involves 1 muscle group at a time without isolated movements. 2. Speed is not required.

Level 2: 1. Involves 1 muscle g.roup WIth isolated movements

2. Involves 2 muscle groups with minimally isolated movements. a. Moderate speed required for lower lever tasks.

Level 3: 1. Involves 2 muscle groups with isolated movements.

2. Involves 3 or moremuscle groups with minimally Isolated movements.

3. High rate of speed required for lower level tasks.

4. Moderate speed required for higher level tasks.

Level 4: 1. Involves 30r more muscle groups with complex isolated movements.

2. High rate of speed required.

3. Able to perform all range of motion despite quadregia.

5

The.ABI ADDUCTORS work as a team to. spread the fingers and pull the thumb away from the palm.

HAND MUSCLE GROUPS

Palm View

Palm View

The Miscellaneous Intrinsic Muscles inelude OPPONENS to the thumb and small finger and the LUMBRICALS. The Opponens muscles rotate the thumb and small finger toward each othe r to allow for a secure contact during

pinching. The Lumbricats provide a secure

clamping grasp with the fingers extended.

Appropriate Exercise Group Choice:

SPLITS

Appropriate Exercise Group Choice:

Opponens--None in this edition Lumbricals--SHUFFLING

The EXTENSORS work as a team to open the hand.

Appropriate Exercise Group Choice:

ALL with a concentration oli TAPS

The FL~XORS work as a team to allow the hand to make a fist for a secure grasp. The thumb flexors are used to pinch and assist with fine dexterity.

Appropriate Exercise Group Choice:

ALL except TAPS.

6

*SJ<etches by Jason Vineyard under consultation wffh Meg Robinson OTRIL CHT

Back View

Palm View

CHAPTER 1 - To Begin With

Chapter 1 introduces the Basic Positions and Warm-up Exercises. The first section of this chapter will show the Basic Positions. They are the positions from which you will start the exercises in this book. These positions are the Upright Position, the Spread Position, and the Full Bend Position.

The second section in this chapter will introduce the Warm-up Exercises. Like any other exercise program, it is important to limber-up. With this program in particular, it is important to get in touch with the feel of each individual finger before practicing the actual exercises.

After you become comfortable with the Basic Positions and the 'Warm-up Exercises, you are ready to move on to the exercises most suited for your needs as determined by the instructions in the introduction. Good luck and remember, these exercises are not impossible; they only take time and practice to master just like any other exercise program.

Finally, we will refer to the fingers in the following manner:

NOTE: The exercises hi this chapter are beneficial for Extensor & Flexor muscle groups & involve Levels 1 and 2 (See pages 5 & 6).

7

BASIC POSn·IONS

#1 Upright Position

Hands flat. Fingers together.

Use this starting position for Warm-up, Bending, Splitting, & Combination exercises.

(Variations on this position include Upright Closed & Upright Open.)

#2 Spread Position

Hands flat. Fingers spread.

Start from Upright Position

& stretch slowly & comfortably to full open position. Good Warmup exercise as well.

#3 FullB:end Position

Start from Upright Position.

Bend all fingers down until

they rest upon the palms. Another good Warm-up exercise.

8

level1

level1

WARM-UP EXERCISE #1

I even

Start in tJpright Closed Position with palms together and fingers upright.

~evel1

- #2

Relax LEFT hand. Gently push

LEFT fingers back using HIGHT fingers, Do not bend wrist.

level1

Relax RIGHT hand. Gently push RIGHT fingers back using LEFT fingers. Do not bend wrist.

(Alternate between these two pesitions.)

9

leveJ1

WAR,M-UP EXERCISE #2

level1

#1 Fold fingers & thumbs together so that your RIGHT thumb is closest to you.

#2 Interchange all fingers & thumbs so that your LEFT thumb is closest to you.

(Alternate between these two posltlons.)

level2

WARM-UP EXE_RCISE #3

level2

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Cross SECOND finger over THIRD finger on both hands.

#2 Keep SECOND fingers crossed over THIRD fingers. Spirt FIRST & FOU RTH fingers out.

(Alternate between these two positions.)

(Assistance from opposite hand may be needed until youoan do this independently.)

10

WARM-UP EXERCISE #4

level2

level2

leve12

#1 Cross SECOND finger over FIRST finQ:er& THIRD finger over FOURTH finger On both hands.

(Assistance from opposite hand may be needed until you can do this independently.)

#2 Hold this position for a few seconds to begin with and increase time with practice.

#3 After you have become comfortable with this position, wiggle your fingers up and down for a few seconds.

With time & practice your spectrum of movement should increase.

11

CHAPTER 2 - The Folds

This book begins with Folding since it is probably the most natural position our hands can assume. Folding your hands is intersecting the fingers from both hands and bending them all the way downoverthe knuckles on the opposing hand. Folding all the fingers back and forth is a good way to start developing strength, agility and independence throughout the fingers and hands.

Please note that all the exercises in this section lead with the right finger on top (or in front) and switch to the left finger on top. It may be easier for you to lead with your left finger on top (or in front). There may be a genetic reason for this tendency to right-handedness and left-handedness. We call it Thumb Dominance. If you put your hands together and fold all your fingers and thumbs, you will find that your hands will naturally put your right or left thumb on top. The thumb on top (or in front) is your dominant thumb. (See photos in Warm-up Exercise #2, Page 1.0). After you have determined whether you are Rightthumb or Left-thumb Dominant, you are ready to start with the Single Folds.

Single Folds involve folding your fingers one pair at a time starting with the first fingers of your hands and moving down to the fourth fingers. Concentrate on moving only one pair of fingers at a time- while keeping the other fingers together arid extended. After practicing this eight-count exercise it should be done with a smooth and consistent rhythm.

The Double and Triple Folds basically follow the same idea as the Single Folds except that you will be folding different combinations of two and three fingers at a time. Again, you should concentrate on moving only the pairs of fingers you see while keeping the other fingers together and extended. Also, after you master these combinations, they too should flow in a smooth and consistent pattern.

The last section in this chapter is slightly different. The Folded Extenders start with all the fingers down and then at least one pair of fi.ngers is extended. The other difference is that the fingers are extended but do not actually touch at the tips like the Folds do in the previous pages.

In conclusion, remember to start these exercises in whichever position is most comfortable for you and work through them at your own pace.

NOTE; The exercises in thls chapter are beneficial for worKing on Extensor & Flexor muscle groups & involve primarily Level 2 exercises as well as Level 1 and Level 3 (See pages 5 &6).

12

'BASIC FOLDING POSITIONS

levelt

Upright Closed Position

Hands upright with palms together & fingers spread.

leve,l1

Right Full Fold

Start in Spread Position. Fold all fingers down leaving RIGHT FIRST finger nearest thumb. Keep thumbs together.

Left Full Fold

Start in Spread Position. Fold all fingers down leaving LEFT FIRST finger nearest thumb. Keep thumbs together.

13

level2

#1 Start in the Upright Closed Position.

Fold down FI RST fingers on both hands leaving your HIGHT finger closest to you.

level2

#5

Repeat the folding movement with your THIRD Ungers. Leave your RIGHT THIRD finger closest to you.

14

level2

SINGLE

#2

Switch both fingers simultaneously so your LEFT FIRST finger is now closest to you.

level2

#6

Switch both fingers simultaneously so that your LEFT THIRD finger is now closest to you.

le,ve.12

#3

Repeat the folding movement with your SECOND fingers. Leave your HIGHT SECOND finger closest to you.

level2

#7

Repeat the folding movement with FOU RTH fingers. Leave your RIGHT FOURTH finger closest to you.

level2

#4

Switch both fingers simultaneously so your LEFT SECOND finger is now closest to you.

#8

Switch both fingers simultaneously so your LEFT FOURTH finger is closest to you.

15

#1 Begin in Upright CI:osed Position.

Fold dawn FIRST & SEC.OND fingers on both hands. Leave your RIGHT FIRST finger nearest.

#3 Return' to Upright Closed Position.

Fold down S'ECOND & THIRD fingers on both hands. Leave your RIGHT SECOND finger nearest.

#5 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Fold down THI RD & FOU R-rH fingers on both hands. Leave your HIGHT THIRD finger nearest.

16

DOUB,LE

lever2

level2

level2

FOLDS

level2

#2' Switch fingers simultaneously so that your LEFT FIRST finger

is nearest

#4 Switch fingers simultaneously so that your LEFT SECOND finger is nearest.

#6 Switch fingers simultaneously so that your LEFT THIRD fin§er is nearest.

17

l.evel2

#1 Start in the Upright Closed Position.

Fold down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers on both hands. Leave RIGHT SECOND finger closest to you.

levelS

#5 Return to Uptight Closed Position.

Fold down FIRST, SECOND~ & FOURTH fingers on both hands. Leave RIGHT FIRST finger closest to you.

18

level2 TR1PLE

#2

Switch all folded fingers simultaneously leaving your LEFT SECOND finger closest to you.

level3

#6

Switch all folded fingers slmultaneously leaving your LEFT FIRST finger closest to you.

FOLDS

level3

#3 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Fold down FIRST, THIRD,& FOURTH fingers on both hands. Leave HIGHT FI RST closest to you.

level2

#7 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Fold down FIRSl SECOND,& THIRD fingers on both hands. Leave your RIGHT FIRST finger closest to you,

#4

Switch all folded fingers simultaneously leaving your LEFT FIRST closest to you.

level2

#8

Switch all folded fingers simultaneously leaving your LEFT FIRST finger closest to you.

19

level2

#1 Start from Full Fold Position.

Extending one finger at a time begin with your RIGHT FIRST finger.

level3

#5

Extend HIGHT THIRD finger.

20

lev~12

SINGLE

#2

Extend LEFT FIRST finger.

levelS

#6

Extend LEFT THIRD finger.

level2

l.evel2

#3 #4

Extend RIGHT SECOND finger. Extend LEFT SECOND finger.

level2. level2

#7 #8

Extend RIGHT FOUHTH finger. Extend LEFT FOURTH finger.

(Return to Photo #1. and repeat series.)

21

IeveJ2

DOUBLE EXTE,NDERS

level2

#1 Begin in the Full Fold Position.

Simultaneously extend both the RIGHT& LEFT FIRST fingers.

level3

#3 Return to the Full Fold' Position.

Simultaneously extend both the RIGHT & LEFT THIRD fingers.

22

#2 Return to tne Full Fold Position.

Simultaneously extend both the RIGHT & LEFT SECOND fingers.

#4 Return to the Full Fold Position.

Simultaneously extend both the RIGHT & LEFT FOURTH fingers.

HAND ... "so remarkably constructed in man as to give hlm maneuverability and skill in its use beyond that of any other animal. There are 27 hand bones in all ... The finqers can be straightened or curved into various positions and the thumb can meet every part of every finger on the frontal surface ... "

The Columbie Encyclopedia.

23

CHAPTER 3 - The Taps

This chapter introduces the Taps. You pull your fingers away from each other and then bring them back together in a "tappinq" motion.

All of the exercises in this chapter begin from the Upright Closed Position you see pictured on the left below. Also, like the Folds, this chapter is divided into Single, Double, and Triple Taps. With Single Taps you pull only one finger away from the corresponding one on the other hand, while all the other fingers remain together. With Double and Triple Taps you pull different double and triple combinations of corresponding fingers away from each other while keeping the remaining fingers together.

Finally, remember to work at your own pace. These exercises, like all the exercises in this book, take time and practice to master.

NOTE: The exercises in this chapter concentrate on the Extensor muscle group & involve Levels 1 and 2 (See pages 5 & 6),

UPRIGHT CLOSED POSITION

Palms touching & fingers together in a spread position. All exercises in this section start from this position.

24

UPRIGHT OPEN POSITION

Palms remain touching. Your fingers should remain in aspread po-sition but should be pulled away from those on the other hand.

levert

SINGLE TAPS

l.evel2

#'1 Start in Upriqht Closed Position.

Pull FIRST fingers on each hand away from one another. Keep all other fingers together.

level~

- #3 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull THIRD tlnqers on each hand away from one another. Keep all other fingers together.

#2 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull SECOND fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep all other fingers .together.

levelt

#4 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull FOURTH fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep all other fingers together.

25

#1 Start in the Upriqht Closed Positron.

Pull FIRST & SEGOI'J,D fingers on both hands away from each other. Keep THIRD & FOURTH fingers together.

#2 Return to Upright Closed Position,

Pull FIRST & THIRD fingers on both hands away from each other. Keep SECOND & FOURTH fingers

together.

#3 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull FIRST & FOURTH fingers on both hands away from 'each other, Keep SECOND & THIRD fingers together.

26

DOUBLE

Ievelt

level2

leven

TAPS

level2

level2

revel2

#4 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull SECOND & THIRD fingers on both hands away from each other. Keep FIRST & FOURTH fingers together.

#5 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull SECOND & FOURTH fingers on both hands away from each other. Keep FIRST & THIRD fingers together,

#6 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull THIRD & FOURTH fingers on both hands away from each other. Keep FIRST & SECOND fingers together.

27

level2

TRIPLE TAPS

,Ievel2

#1 Start in Upright Closed Position.

Pull SECOND, THIHD,& FOURTH fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep FI RST fingers together.

level2

#3 Return to Uprlqht Closed Position.

Pull FIRST, SECOND, & FOURTH fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep THIRD fingers together.

28

#2 Return to Upriqht Closed Position.

Pull FIRST, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep SECOI\JD fingers together.

level2

#4 Return to Upright Closed Position.

Pull FIRST, SECOND! & THIRD fingers on each hand away from each other. Keep FOURTH fingers together.

"Let him value his hands and feet, he has but one pair. II

Ralph Waldo Emerson

29

CHAPTER 4 - The Bends

This chapter introduces the Sends. These exercises are perhaps the best for developing finger independence and strength. In Chapter 6, you will use these exercises in combination with the Split exercises in Chapter 5 to gain an even higher level of finger independence and strength.

As with Folds, this chapter is divided into Single, Double, and Triple B.end sections. With Single Bends, you bend down onlyone fingeron each hand while keeping the otherfingers upright With the Double and Triple Bends, you bend down different combinations of two and three fingers at a time. Again, it is important to bend down each of the combinations simultaneously while keeping the other fingers upright.

Last, but not least, remember to work on the exercises at your own pace. With time and practice, you should be able to move fluidly from one position to another. Also, certain people will be able to progress at a quicker pace than others, so remember-don't get discouraged, and keep practicing.

NOTE: The exercises in this chapter are beneficial for working on Extensor & Flexor muscle groups & involve predominantly Levels 2 and 4 (See pages 5 & 6).

30

JeveJ2

SINGLE B.ENDS

leve.12

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST fingers on both hands.

level2

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down THIRD fingers on both hands.

#2 Return to Uprlqht Posifion.

Bend down SECOND fingers on both hands.

level4

#4 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FOU RTH fingers on both hands.

31

DOUBLE

level2

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST & SECOND flngers on both hands.

level2

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fingers on both hands.

level,3

32

#5 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FI RST & TH IRD fingers on both hands.

BENDS

level2

level4

levei4

-#2 SWItch fingers so that THIRD & FOURTH fingers are now bent down & FIRST & SECOND fing.ers are up.

#4 Switch fingers so that FI RST & FOURTH fingers are now bent down & SECOND & THIRD fingers are up.

#6 Switch fingers so that SECOND & FOURTH are now bent down

& FIRST & THIRD fingers are up.

33

leve.I2

TRIPLE BENDS

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers on both hands.

level4

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & FOU RTHfingers on both hands.

34

#2 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers on both hands.

#4 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers on both hands.

IINo man can feel himself alone

The while he bravely stands Between the best friends ever known His two good, honest hands."

Nixon Waterman

35

CHAPTER 5 - Splits

This brief chapter deals with the Split family. These exercises are good for developing finger independence, strength and flexibility.

As you can see, there are only four positions in this section. Perhaps they are the most difficult to master, but they are not impossible, As with the other exercises in this program, you should work on the Splits at your own pace, and with time and practice you should be able to move smoothly from one position to another.

Once you feel comfortable with the Splitting and Bending Exercises from this chapter - and the previous chapter, you will be ready to move on to the following chapters. In these chapters, you will be challenged to combine the two exercises into some very interesting positions.

NOTE: The exercises in this chapter are beneficial for Extensor & Flexor muscle groups with a concentration on AS/Adductor muscle group, and involve mainly Levels 2 & 3 (See pages 5 & 6).

36

l:evel2

SPLITS

level2

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Split FIRST fingers out on both hands.

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Split FIRST & SECOND fingers from THIRD & FOURTH fingers on both hands.

#2 Return to Upright Position.

Split FOURTH fingers out on both hands.

level3

#4 Retum to Upright Position.

Split FIRST fingers from SECOND fingers & FOURTH fingers from THIRD fingers simultaneously.

37

38

"The gods hear men's hands before their lips",

Algernon Charles Swineburne

"There's no better sign of a brave rnind than a hard hand."

William Shakespeare

CHAPTER 6 -Combinations of Bends and Splits

This chapter combines the individual skills of bending and splitting which you have mastered from the previous two chapters. These combination exercises are excellent for bringing finger independence, strength and flexiblity to an even higher level of skill.

In this chapter, you will be introduced to Single Bend Splits, Double Bend Splits and Triple Bend Splits. The Single Bend Splits involve bending only one finger down at a time while simultaneously splitting another finger. Next, the Double Bend Splits involve bending - two fingers down at a time while simultaneously splitting another finger. Last, the Triple Bend Spills involve bending three fingers down at a time while simultaneously splitting - another finger.

The important thIngs to remember throughout this chapter are as follows: first, both hands should be in the same position, (that is, whichever fingers you have bent and split on the right hand should be the same fingers you have bent and split on the left hand); second, the splitting and bending movements on both hands should be done simultaneously:

- - and third, those fingers not involved in the exercise should stay straight and upright.

NOTE: These exercises concentrate on working AS/Adductor, Flexor & Extensor muscle groups, and involve Levels 3 and 4 (See pages 5 & 6).

39

levela

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FOURTH fingers out.

level4

#5 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down THIRD fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FOURTH fingers out.

40

level3

SINGLE

#2 Retu rn to Upright Position.

Bend down FI RST fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split THIRD & FOURTH fingers out from FIRST & SECOND fi'ngers.

level4

#6 Return to Uprlqnt Position.

Bend down THIRD fingers on both hands. Sirnultaneously split FIRST fingers out.

BEND SPLITS

ievel3

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND fingers on both hands, Simultaneously split FOURTH fingers out.

level4

#7 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FOURTH fingers

on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST fingers out.

levef3

#4 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST fingers out

level4

#8 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FOURTH fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST & SECOND lingers out from THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

41

level3

SINGLE BEND SPLITS

level3

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down SECON D fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST & FOURTH fingers out. (Your SECOI\JD & THIRD fingers should stay together.)

42

#2 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down THiRD fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST & FOURTH fingers out. (Your SECOND & THIRD fingers should stay together.)

level3

DOUBLE BEND SPLITS

:level3

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST & SECOr'\ID fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FOURTH fingers out.

level3

#3 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST fingers out

#2 Return Upright Position.

Bend down THIRD & FOURTH fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST fingers out.

#4 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fin.g.ers on both hands. Simultaneously split FOU RTH fingers out.

43

leve!4

DOUBLE BEND SPLITS

leve13

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST & FOURTH fing.ers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST & SECOND fingers from THIRD & FOU RTH fingers.

level4

#3 'Return to Upright Positron.

Bend down SECOND & FOURTH fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST finger out.

44

#2 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down SECON D & TH I RD fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST & FOURTH fingers out.

#4 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST & THIRD fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FOURTH fingerout.

l'evel3

TRIPLE BEND SPUTS

level3

#1 start in the Upright Position.

Bend down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers on both hands. Simultaneously split FIRST finger out.

#2 Return to Upright Position.

Bend down FIRST, SECOND,

& THIRD fingers on both hands, Simultaneously split FOURTH finger out.

45

"Hands of invisible spirits touch the strings Of that mysterious instrument, the soul, And play the prelude of our tate."

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"The hand is one of the most beautifully complex and powerful machines not invented by man."

Walt Whitman

46

CHAPTER 7 - Opposites

This chapter, like Chapter 6, again challenges the skills of bending and splitting, but with a new twist. In this chapter the left hand will be doing the exact opposite of what the right hand is doing in terms of bending and extending. If a particular finger is bent on the right hand, it will be extended on the left hand. In order to make the e-xplanation of the exercises in this chapter a bit easier, there is a separate description for each of the hands. These exercises are perhaps the best for developing left and right hand independence, finger independence and flexibility.

The first two sections of this chapter deal with Opposite Bends and Opposite Splits.

With the Opposite Bends, you bend your fingers down just like in Chapter 4, but the left hand bends down the exact opposite finger as compared to the right hand. Similarly, with the Opposite Splits you split your ffngers just like in Chapter 5, but again the left hand splits the exact opposite fingers as the right hand.

The last three sections of this chapter deal with the Opposite Single Bend Splits, Opposite Double Bend Splits and Opposite Triple Bend Splits. These are the exercises shown in Chapter 6, but instead of having both hands assume the same position, they will assume the direct opposite position from each other.

The important things to remember throughout this chapter are similar to those in Chapter 6 . That is, the splitting and bending movements on both hands should be done simultaneously, and those fingers not involved in the exercise should remain straight and upright. The noted exception between Chapter 6 and this chapter is that whatever position the fingers assume on the right hand, they should assume the exact opposite on the left hand.

NOTE: These exercises concentrate on working AB/Adductor, Flexor & Extensor muscle groups} and involve Levels 3 and 4 (See pages 5 & 6).

47

Jevel3

#1 Start In the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down FI RST finger. Extend SECONDj THIRD, & FOURTH fingers.

level4

Bend down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers. Extend FIRST finger.

#5 Return to the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down THIRD finger. Extend FIRST, SECOND, & FOURTH fingers.

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & FOURTH fingers. Extend THI RD finger.

48

level3

OPPOSITE

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers. Extend FIRST finger.

RIGHT

Bend down FIRST finger. Extend SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH fingers.

leVel4

#6 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & FOURTH fingers. Extend THI RD finger.

RIGHT

Bend down THIRD finger. Extend FIRST, SECOND, & FOU RTHfingers.

BENDS

leve.14

#3 Return to Upright Position.

LEFT RI.GHT

Bend down SECOND finger. Extend FI RST, - THIRD., & FOURTH fingers.

Bend down FIRST, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers. Extend SECOND finger.

Jevel4

#7 Return to UprIght Position.

LEFT

Bend down FOURTH finger. Extend FtRST, - SECOND, THIRD.

RIGHT

Bend doWn FIRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers. Extend FOURTH finger.

level4

#4 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down FIRST, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers. Extend SECON D finger.

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND finger. Extend FIRST, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers.

level4

#8 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers. Extend

FOURTH finger.

RIGHT

Bend down FOURTH finger. Extend FI RST, SECOND·, & THIRD fingers.

49

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

LEFT

Bend down FI RST & SECOND fingers. Extend THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

RIGHT

Bend down THIRD & FOURTH fingers. Extend FI RST & SECOND fingers.

#3 Return to Upright Position.

LEFT Bend down FIRST &

FOU RTH fing.ers. Extend SECOND & TH.IRD fingers.

RI'GHT

Bend down SEC" OND & THIRD fingers. Ex-

tend FIRST & FOURTH fingers.

#5 Return to Upright Position.

LEFT

Bend down FI RST & THIRD fingers. Extend SECON D & FOURTH fingers.

50

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND & FOURTH fingers. Extend FIRST & THIRD fingers.

OPPOSITE

l~vel4

level4

Il.evel'4

BENDS

Ilevel4

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down TH I R D & FOURTH fingers. Extend FIRST & SECOND fingers.

RIGHT

Bend down FI RST & SECOND fingers. Extend THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

#4 Switch fingers.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down SEC- Bend down FI RST

OND & THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

fingers. Extend Extend SECOND &

FIRST & FOURTH THIRD fingers. fingers.

#6 Switch fingers.

LEFT Bend down SECOND & FOURTH flnqere, ~xtend FIRST& THIRD fingers.

RIGHT

Bend down FIRST & THIRD fingers. Extend SECOND

& FOURTH fingers.

51

OPPOSITE SPLITS

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Split FIRST finger out.

Split FOURTH finger out.

level3

#3 Return to Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Split FI RST & SECOND fingers from THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

Split FI RST finger from SECOND finqer & THIRD finger from FOURTH f,inger simultaneously.

52

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Split FOURTH finger out.

RIGH'T

Split FI RST finger out.

leveJ3

#4 Switch fingers.

LEFT

RIGHT

Split FI RST from SECOND finger & THIRD finger from FOURTH finger simultaneously.

Split FIRST & SECOND fingers from THIRD & FOURTH fingers.

leveJ4

OPPOSITE SIN'GLE BEN,D SPLITS

level4

#1 Start In the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down FIRST finger & split FOURTH - finger out simulta-

neously.

Split FIHST finger out& bend down FOURTH finger simultaneously.

level4

#3 Return to Upright Position.

LEFT

Bend down SECOND finger & split FOURTH finger out simultaneously.

RIGHT

Split FI RST finger out & bend down THIRD finger simultaneously.

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Split FIRST finger out & bene down FOU RTH finger simultaneously.

RIGHT

Bend down FIRST finger & split FOURTH finger out simultaneously.

level4

#4 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Split FIRST finger out& bend down THIRD finger simultaneously.

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND finger & split FOURTH finger out simultaneously.

53

level4

OPPOSITE DOUBLE BEND SPUTS

leVel4

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down FI RST & SECOND fingers. Simultaneously split FOURTH finger out.

level4

Bend down THIRD & FOURTH fingers. Simultaneously split FI RST finger out.

#1 Return to the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down SECOND Bend down SECOND

& THIRD fingers. & THIRD fingers.

Split FOURTH finger Split FIRST-finger out.

out.

54

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

RIGHT

Bend down Fl RST & SECOND .fingers. Split THIRD &

FOU RTH fingers out.

Bend down THIRD, & FOU RTH fingers. Split FI RST & SECOND fingers out.

leveI4

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down SECOND & THIRD ,fingers. Split FI RST fing,er out.

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fingers, Split FOURTH finger out.

leve14

OPPOSITE DOUBLE BEND SPLITS

level4

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fingers while splitting I=IRST & FOURTH fingers out.

level4

Bend down FIRST & FOURTH fingers while splitting, SECOND & 1HIHD fingers.

#1 Return to the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down FI RST & THIRD fingers while splitting

_0· FOURTH finger owt.

B~nd down SECOND & FOURTH fingers while splitting FIRST finger out.

#2 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down FIRST

&. FOURTH fingers while splitting SECOND & THIRD fingers.

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND & THIRD fingers while splitting FI RST & FOURTH fingers.

level4

#2 Switch fing.ers.

LEFT

Bend down SECOND & FOURTH fingers while splitting FI RST finger out.

RIGHT

Bend down FI RST & THIRD fingers

while splitting FOURTH finger

out.

55

leve.13

OPPOSITE TRIPLE BEN,'D SPLITS

#1 Start in the Upright Position.

LEFT RIGHT

Bend down SEGOt\ID, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers while splitting FIRST finger out.

Bend down FIRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers while splitting FOURTH finger out.

56

level3

#2 SWitch fingers.

LEFT

Bend down FIRSTr SECOND, & THIHD fingers while splitting FOURTH finger out.

RIGHT

Bend down SECOND, THIRD, & FOURTH fingers while splitting

FI RST finger out.

CHAPTER 8 - ShuffJing

This final chapter introduces Finger Shuffling. Shuffling is another way to develop finger independence. This chapter can be divided into two sections: the Pre-shuffling exercises and the actual Shuffling exercises. All these exercises begin from the Full Bend Position.

The Pre-shuffling exercises are divided into Singles, Doubles, Triples, Opposite Doubles, and Opposite Triples. In Single, Double, and Triple Pre-shuffling exercises, you learn to isolate either one" two, orthree fingers and raise them from the Full Bend Position. In these exercises, both hands do the same thing. In the Opposite Doubles, (the last part af the Pre-shuffling exercises), you again learn to isolate two fingers and raise them from the Full Bend Position. However, the raised fingers on the right and left hands will be exactly opposite.

The last two sections of this chapter guide you through the actual Shuffling exercises.

The first of the Shuffling exercises is Double Shuffling. In these exercises, different combinations of opposite fingers are raised on each hand, the hands are turned and brought together and then separated, finger positions are then switched and hands are brought back together aqain. These patterns can be repeated again and again until the exercise flows in a smooth rhythm.

Single Shuffling is a slight variation on the Double Shuffling exercise described above.

With Single Shuffling, you begin with the first finger raised on the right hand while the first fingBr on the left hand is bent. You continue raising and bending the second, third and fourth fingers on each hand ln the same pattern. Your hands are turned and broughttogether and then separated again in the manner described above. You then repeat the entire pattern but begin with the fingers on the left hand raised while the fingers on the right hand are bent. Again, this pattern can be repeated over and over until it flows in a smooth rhythm.

Finally, the basic idea behind shuffling is interchanging the extended top fingers with the folded bottom fingers. Remember that those fingers not involved in the exchange should stay flat if they are on the top hand, and folded if they are on the bottom hand.

NOTE: In this chapter, excerCises includeAB/Adductor, Flexor & Extensor muscle groups with a concentration on the Lumbrical muscle group. Levels 3 & 4 are involved.

57

FULL BEND POSITION

All fingers touch the palms .. AI.I exercises in this section start from this position.

58

level2

PRE-SHUFFLING EXERCISES - Singles

level3

#1 Start In the Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST fingers on both hands to upright position. Other finqers should remain touching palm.

Jevel4

#3 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise THIRD fingers on both hands to upright position. Other fingers should remain touching palm.

#2 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise SECON D fingers on both hands to upright position. Other fingers should remain touching palm.

level2

#4 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise FOURTH fingers on both hands to upright position. Other fingers should remain touching palm.

59

PRE-SHUFFLING EXERCISES - Doubles

level1

Start from the Full Bend Position with all fingers touching palms.

level2

#1 Start in the Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST & SECOND fingers on both hands to upright position. THIHD & FOURTH fingers should remain touching palms.

60

level3

#2 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise THIRD & FOURTH fingers on both hands to upright position. FIRST & SECOND fingers should remain touching palms.

revel4

PRE-SHUFFLING EXERCISES - Doubtas

tevel2

#3 Start in Full Bend Position.

Raise SECOND & THiRD fingers on both hands to upright position. FIRST & FOURTH fingers should remain touching palm.

leve.13

#5 Return to Full Bend Position.

RaiSe SECOND & FOU RTH fingers on both hands to upright position. FI.RST & THIRD fingers should remain touching palm.

#4 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise FI RST & FOURTH fing.ers on both hands to upright position. SECOND & THIRD fingers should remain touching palm.

level4

#6 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST & THIRD fingers on both hands to upriqht position. SECOND & FOURTH fingers should remain touching palm.

61

SHUFFLING WARM-U-PS - Opposlte Doubles

Start from the Full Bend Position with all fingers touching the palms.

level3

#1

LEFT

RIGHT Raise THIRD & FOURTH fIngers. Keep FI RST s SECOND fingers touching palm.

Raise FI,HST & SECOND fingers. Keep THIRD & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

62

level1

level3

#2

LEFT

Raise THIRD & FOURTH fingers. Keep FIRST & SECOND fingers touching palm.

RIGHT Raise FIRST & SECOND fingers. Keep THIRD & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

I eve 14 SHUFFLING WARM-UPS -Opposite Doubles

#3 LEFT RIG_HT #4 LEFT RIGHT
Raise SECOND Raise FIRST & Raise FIRST & Raise SECOND
& THI RD fingers. FOURTH fingers. FOURTH fingers. & THIRD fingers.
Keep FIRST & Keep SECOND Keep SECOND Keep FIRST &
FOURTH fingers & THIRD fingers & THIRD fingers FOURTH fingers
touching palm. touching palm. touching palm. touching palm. #5 LEFT RIGHT #6 LEFT RIGHT
Baise FIRST & Raise SECOND Raise SECOND Raise FIRST &
THIRD fingers. & FOURTH fin- & FOURTH fin- THlRD fingers.
Keep SECOND gers. Keep gers. Keep Keep SECOND
& FOURTH fin- FIRST & THIRD FIRST & THIRD & FOURTH fin-
gers touching fingers touching fingers touching gars touching
palm. palm. palm. palm. 63 l.evel4

SHUFFLING WARM-UPS - Triples

#1 Start in the Full Bend Position.

Raise SECOND, THIRD & FOURTH fingers on both hands to upright position, Keep FIRST fingers touching palms.

leve.14

#3 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST, SECOND & FOURTH fingers on both hands to upright position. Keep THIRD fingers touching palms.

-64

#2 Heturn to Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST, THIHD & FOURTH Hngers on both hands to upright position. Keep SECOND fingers touching palms.

level4

#4 Return to Full Bend Position.

Raise FIRST, SECOND & THIRD fingers on both hands to upright position. Keep FOURTH fingers touching palms.

"Enough is something 'from our hands have power To live, and act and serve the future hour,"

Willia.m Wordsworth

65

#1 Start in Full Bend Position.

LEFT

Raise THIRD & FOURTH fingers to upriqht positron. Keep FIRST & SECOND fingers touching palm.

RIGHT Raise FIRST & SECOND fingers to upright position. Keep THIRD & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

#2 Turn hands so that palms face each other.

#3 Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

66

DOUBLE

leverS

SHUFFLING

level3

level3

leve13

#4 Separate hands.

#5 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Raise FIRST & SECOND fingers to upright position. Keep THIRD & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

RIGHT

Baise TH I RD & FOURTH fingers to upright position. Keep FIRST & SECOND fingers touching palm.

#6 Bring hands toqether with palms touching. Thumbs remain toqsther & upright.

(NOTE: As you become more proficient with this exercise you should be able to switch back & forth between photos #3, 4,5, & 6.)

67

#1 Start in the Full Bend Position.

LEFT

Raise SECOND

& THIRD fingers to, upright position. Keep FIRST & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

RIGHT

Raise FIRST & FOURTH fingers to upright position. Keep SECOND & THIRD fingers touching palm.

#2 Turn hands so that palms face each other.

#3 Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

68

DOUBLE

level4

level4

level4

SHUFFLING

leve\,4

J'evel4

level4

,#4 Separate hands.

#5 Switch fingers.

LEFT

Raise FI RST & FOURTH fingers to upright posit.on. Keep SECOND & THIRD fingers touching palm.

RIGHT Raise SECOND

& THIRD fingers to upright position. Keep FIRST & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

#6 Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

(NOTE: As you become more proficient with this exercise you should be able to switch back & forth between photos #3, 4,5, & 6.)

69

#1 Start 'in FuU Bend Position.

LEFT Raise FI RST& THIRD fingers to upright position. Keap SECOND & FOURTH fingers touching palm.

RIGHT Raise SECOND & FOURTH fingers to upright position. Keep FIRST & THIRD tinqers touching palm.

#2 Turn hands so that palms face each other.

#3 Bring hands toqether with pal ms touching. Thumbs remain together &upright.

70

DOUBLE

leveJ4

lev,eJ4

ite:v~14

SHUFFLING

level4

#4 Separate hands.

#5 Switch fingers.

LEFT Raise SECOND & FOURTH fingers to upright position. Keep FIRST & THIRD fingers touching palm.

RIGHT Raise FIRST & TH I RD fingers

to upright position. Keep SECOND & FOU RTH fingers touching palm.

#6 Bring hands together with palms tou.ching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

(NOTE: As you become more proficient with this exercise you should be able to switch back & forth between photos #3, 4,5, & 6.)

71

level2

level2

SINGLE

#1 Start in the Full Bend Position. #2

LEFT RIGHT

Turn hand in towards RIGHT hand.

Extend all fingers & turn towards LEFT hand.

level3

#5

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

72

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright

level3

#6

Separate hands.

S.HUFFLING

level2.

#3

Separate hands.

level3

#7

LEFT Extend FI RST & SECOI\JD fingers only.

RIGHT

Bend FIRST & SECOND finqers only.

level3

#4

LEFT Extend FI RST finger only.

RIGHT Bend FIRST finger only.

level3

#8

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

73

levei3

#9

Separate hands.

level2

#13

LEFT

Extend ali fingers.

RIGHT

Bend all fingers.

74

level4

SINGLE

#10

LEFT Extend FI RST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers only.

RIGHT Bend FrRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers only.

leve12

#14

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upriqnt.

SHUFFLING

level4

level4

#11 #12

Bring hands together with Separate hands.

palms touching. Thumbs

remain together & upright.

I eve 12 level3

#15 #16

Separate hands.

LEFT Bend FfRST finger only.

RIGHT Extend FIRST finger only.

75

leveJ3

#17

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

#21

Separate hands.

76

fevel3

SINGLE

#18

Separate hands.

level4

#22

LEFT Bend FIRST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers only.

RIGHT

Extend FI RST, SECOND, & THIRD fingers only.

level3

#19

LEFT

Bend FIRST & SECOND fingers

only.

RIGHT Extend FI RST & SECON D fingers only,

l.eve:l4

#23

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

level3

#20

Bring hands together with palms touching. Thumbs remain together & upright.

level4

#24

Separate hands.

(Return to Photo #1 to begin series again.)

77

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bartlett, John. Familiar Quotations. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, Tnlrteentn Edition. 1955. pg. 127a, 411b.

Bridgwater, WIlliam and Seymour Kurtz, editors. The Columbia Encyclopedia.

New York, NY: Columbia University Press, Third Edition. 1963. pg. 904.

Chase, Hobert A. Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Hand. Rehabilitation of the Hand.

St. Louis, MO: The C.v. Mosby Company. 1990.

Pulvertaft, R. Guy. Psychological Aspects of Hand Injury. Rehabilitation of the Hand.

St. Louis, MO: The C.V. Mosby Company. 1990.

Sie-9, Kay W. and Sandra P. Adams. Illustrated Essentials of Musculoskeletal Anatomy. Gainesville, FL: Megabooks, Inc., 2nd. Edition. 1985.

Stevenson, Burton. The Home Book of Quotations. New York, NY: Dodd, Mead & Company, Ninth Edition. 1964. pg. 849 - 851.

78

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Gregory G. Irwin ...

Entrepreneur, educator, and entertainer, .. best describes this multi-talented man who has dedicated himself to teaching the value of his Finger Fitness program.

Greg, a percussionist, is a 1981 graduate of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, with a B.A. in Music Education. While in school, Greg was required to pass a piano exam. This was when he began training his fingers to do simple bending and splitting movements as a way of making them more responsive. After graduating, Greg worked as a substitute school teacher and with the help of his students, continued to develop his finger repertoire.

As an entertainer, Greg has been a special guest on many live shows, The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson, You Bet Your Lite with Bill Cosby, To Tell The Truth, and The Chevy Chase Show, where he has amazed millions with his exercises and his original Finger Ballet. These exercises and this new art form has also led to performances on 14 International shows in Canada) England, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, and Spain.

Lately, Greg and his Finger Fitness program have expanded into the hand therapy field. He has given seminars for physical therapists, massage therapists, and occupational therapists. Greg was recently recognized as the person with the most dexterious hands by The Museum of History and Science in Louisville, Kentucky where he will be a permanent part of the exhibit A ShOWDf Hands.

Lorraine C. Irwin ...

Lorraine is a 1982 graduat~ of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, with a B.A in Anthropology and a minor in Womenls Studies. After graduating, Lorraine was responsible for setting up the Finger Fitness business. Currently she is the Operations Mana.ger of their ever expanding company and has been responsible for the organization, research, and layout of this book.

When not involved with Finger Fitness, Lorraine continues to work on her Fine Arts degree in Graphic Arts and Painting at Miami University.

Greg and Lorraine .live in the Greater Cincinnati area with their three stress-buster kitties; Jessica, Ruby, and Emerson.

Meg Robinson OTAIL CHT ...

Meg is a 1985 graduate of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio with a degree in Occupational Therapy. In 1992 she became a Certified Hand Therapist. She has been practicing for eight years at a hospital Hand Rehabilitation Center in Ohio. Meg has evaluated and analyzed the Finger Fitness program in this edition, and has brought it in accordance with medical and theraputic standards.

Leslie Kay French

79

"Now join your hands, and with your hands your hearts. II William Shakespeare

80

Good Times For Finger Fitness

While Watching TV (Especially Commercials) Listening to Music

Waiting in Lines

Riding in Cars

In a Traffic Jam

When You're Studying

While Talking on the Phone During a Boring Concert or Play On a Boat, Train, Bus or Airplane

Waiting in Offices (Doctor's, Dentist's, etc.) When You're Trying to Fall Asleep

In a Hospital Bed

While Getting Your Hair Cut In an Elevator or an Escalator On a Coffee Break

As Part of Your Physical Work Out

As a Warm-up Exercise Before a Physical Performance When You're Snowed in·

Instead of Cracking Your Knuckles Instead of Biting Your Nails

At a Bus Stop

At the Laundromat

When You Have Nothing Else to do

...

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