CONSUMER

NEWS
Y O U R V O I C E
OCTOBER 2010 FREE
www. c o n s u me r n e ws n a mi b i a . c o m
Fastest
coffee
in town
Interviews
with Ees
and Frankie
Fredericks
Tipping
the
Scales
ISSN: 2026-710X
Best
of
Namibia
Terms and conditions apply
www.telecom.na
Apply now at your nearest Teleshop, CND outlet, Nam-mic Office or
SMS Internet Combo to 060 123
ULTIMATE INTERNET COMBO
Financed by: Equipment by:

Mobile Broadband
with 1.1 GB Download
Data every month
for only N$589
per month-24 months
(Computer, 3G modem,
& printer included)
Unlimited Internet
Access for only
N$771
per month-36 months
(Computer, modem, printer
& phone included)
15.6” MSI-Acer-Dell
10” Netbook
• Free cartridge
• Free 500 print papers
Colour Printer
• Free installation until
31 October 2010
• 30 Free minutes on-net
monthly
• Flexicall Starter pack
Fixed
Telephone
Handset
(Product may vary)
• Unlimited Internet
• Free Email address
• Free Fax2Email number
Fixed Broadband
Internet modem
OR
Free activation until
31st October 2010
10” Netbook 15.6” MSI-Acer-Dell
• Free 1.1 GB per month
• Free Email address
• Free Fax2Email number
3G EVDO USB
Modem
• Free cartridge
• Free 500 print papers
Colour Printer
OR
CASH BACK option on old PC or laptop
Contact CND @ 061 255 022
This month in Consumer News we embrace the premise of
some great Namibian exports. Louis Maruwasa brings us
a story on some of the manufactured goods exported from
Namibia. In that theme of great Namibians abroad we talk
to two famous Namibians who have made waves interna-
tionally - the Olympic star and four-time medallist Frankie
Fredericks and the musician Ees, who is always conscious
about representing the country onstage and off. Consumer
News also brings you some important articles designed to
protect the consumer. Denver Isaacs teams up with the Min-
istry of Trade and industry and takes you into the world of
weights and measures where he re-weighs retail goods and
compares the results with the listed weights on the packages
with unexpected results. We also give some tips on spotting
email and emigration fraud with Mitchell van Wyk. We test
drive the fastest coffee in town so you know where to go for
speedy quality service. Our partners in consumer protection;
Bob Ziekenoppasser and Milton Louw weigh in with their
viewpoints and experience.
Editor’s Note
CONSUMER
NEWS
You deserve more ...
The consumer, so it is said, is the king, each is a voter who uses
his money as votes to get the things done that he wants done.
Samuelson, Paul Anthony
Economics.
The Team
Publisher
Consumer News
Printed by
John Meinert Printing
Design & Layout
Shapwa Hashali
E-mail: shapwa@consumernewsnamibia.com
Cell: 081 236 2824
Journalists
Louis Maruwasa
E-mail: louis@consumernewsnamibia.com
Rob Parker
rob@consumernewsnamibia.com
Marla Chaneta
E-mail: marlachaneta@yahoo.com
Denver Isaacs
E-mail: denver@consumernewsnamibia.com
Business Development Manager
Jacques Nieman
E-mail: jnieman@consumernewsnamibia.com
Cell: 081 203 7180
Advertising Sales Executive
Tabeth Nyahasha
E-mail: tabeth@consumernewsnamibia.com
Cell: 081 409 3448
Photography
Norman Skrywer
E-mail: norman4all@gmail.com
Cell: 081 430 4003
Leitago /Narib
E-mail: leitago@yahoo.com
Cell: 081 363 2712
Consumer News
PO Box 96366
Windhoek, Namibia
Tel/Fax: +264 61 228 196
Enquiries
info@consumernewsnamibia.com
CN 01
Terms and conditions apply
www.telecom.na
Apply now at your nearest Teleshop, CND outlet, Nam-mic Office or
SMS Internet Combo to 060 123
ULTIMATE INTERNET COMBO
Financed by: Equipment by:

Mobile Broadband
with 1.1 GB Download
Data every month
for only N$589
per month-24 months
(Computer, 3G modem,
& printer included)
Unlimited Internet
Access for only
N$771
per month-36 months
(Computer, modem, printer
& phone included)
15.6” MSI-Acer-Dell
10” Netbook
• Free cartridge
• Free 500 print papers
Colour Printer
• Free installation until
31 October 2010
• 30 Free minutes on-net
monthly
• Flexicall Starter pack
Fixed
Telephone
Handset
(Product may vary)
• Unlimited Internet
• Free Email address
• Free Fax2Email number
Fixed Broadband
Internet modem
OR
Free activation until
31st October 2010
10” Netbook 15.6” MSI-Acer-Dell
• Free 1.1 GB per month
• Free Email address
• Free Fax2Email number
3G EVDO USB
Modem
• Free cartridge
• Free 500 print papers
Colour Printer
OR
CASH BACK option on old PC or laptop
Contact CND @ 061 255 022
Namibia Consumer Protection Group: Milton Louw. E-mail: miltonlouw@gmail.com
Namibia Customer Service Institute: Jon Allen. E-mail: csinstitute@iway.na
Website: www.namibiacsi.com
Namibian Consumer Lobby: Bob Ziekenoppasser. Tel: 064-461 461 or 081 284 8000
Namibian Standards Institution: Tel: 061-386 400 / Queries: query@nsi.com.na
Website: www.nsi.com.na
Contact details
You deserve more ...
Our mission is to create a platform for you the Namibian consumer, who strives to see
improvement in the value of goods and services and are savvy enough to spot misleading
advertising and poor quality products and services. You deserve more, and together we
have power in numbers, so we welcome your contributions, feedback, acknowledgements
and your voice on products and services that need our investigation.
contents
Feature
Metrology
We investigate weights and measures
Comparison Shopping
Cofee timed
Editorial
NCPG (Namibia Consumer Protection Group)
Tenants
NCL (Namibia Consumer Lobby)
Bob weighs in
The African Century
By Klaus Weichhaus
Top Namibian Exports
By Louis Maruwasa
Entertainment
Ees
African Music Awards Nominee
International
On Leaving Namibia
Internet Scams Exposed
Sports
Frankie Fredericks
We Sit With a Great
table of
04
17
30
09
20
24
32
34
36
04
17
30
09
20
24
32
34
36
f e a t u r e
By the Gram
… give or take a few
By Denver Isaacs
It is the most mundane thing at your average fresh-
produce selling store.
Tear an empty bag from the spindle next to the to-
matoes, throw in as many as you’ve budgeted for,
and watch mindfully as the assistant weighs, seals
and hands it back to you for payment.
Taken for granted perhaps, that scenario actually
illustrates the most basic ingredient for that mira-
cle we call fair trade.
Transparency.
But not all fresh-produce is weighed in front of the
customer.
What about that N$20 block of cheese you just
picked up, labeled as 300 grams or a six-pack of
kumquats? And the ready-made bag of carrots that
reads 250 grams and thus priced at N$18.49? How
do you know? Internationally, accurate weight and
measurements have always formed the basis for
fair trade and taxation through the ages. Whether
buying a loaf of bread, a carton of milk, or a bag of
building sand from the hardware store, imagine no
uniform method of weighing and pricing existed to
ensure that traders play fair in their pricing versus
amount sold.
In New Zealand for example, the ministry of Con-
sumer Affairs in that country reports that the Auck-
land District Court in 2007 fned a bread company
more than N$48,830 for selling underweight loaves.
The company was prosecuted after inspection of an
Auckland supermarket found several of the compa-
ny’s loaves marked 700g and 720g actually weighed
between 24g and 85g less than stated.
Namibia, like the rest of the world, has very clear
regulations on how to go about standardising
weights and measures, most profusely in the Trade
Metrology Act (of 1973 and last amended in 2005).
Section 30 of this act gives you the right to request
from any trader selling you pre-packed food, to re-
measure the quantity of the goods you’re buying,
using “a certifed measuring instrument suitable for
measuring the quantity of such goods”.
Furthermore, shops are supposed to measure the
net weight of the product, says George Mabakeng,
Trade Inspector with the Namibia Standards Insti-
tution (NSI) in the Ministry of Trade and Industry.
This means the amount you’re paying should not in-
clude the weight of the packaging it came in.
“There is some margin within which it may vary,
like maize, which is usually topped up a bit more
than the indicated mass to make up for climatic con-
ditions and loss of moisture,” Mabakeng says.
He says the ministry does routine checks of measur-
ing scales and pre-packed foods, and have in fact at
times needed to institute fnes of up to N$2 000 in
04 CN
> >
CN 05
06 CN
We found discrepancies almost throughout.
From unweighed pre-packed Patty Pan Squash,
to food that was obviously weighed with the
container mass included, to cases where even
with the container mass added, the product still
didn’t add up to the weight indicated.
some cases.
“There’s a number of things we look for, and that
can get traders into trouble. The measuring instru-
ments if they’re defective, if the weight and the
address where it was weighed is not displayed, or
even a loaf of bread if it weighs less than stand-
ard,” he says.
Put to the test
Consumer News decided to go out on the town
and test whether inaccurate measurements were in
fact something to consider in the Namibian con-
text. We visited six Windhoek stores and bought a
number of fresh produce items pre-packed by the
shops in question themselves. Consumer News
enlisted the help of the Ministry of Trade and In-
dustry. A technician from the ministry assisted us
in re-weighing the produce on a calibrated scale
and explaining the process. This was done to es-
tablish how accurate the supermarkets are in their
weighing processes. The shops visited were Check-
ers, Shoprite, Woermann Brock and Tre Supermar-
ket, and two smaller outlets in Ridas Take Away and
the Klein Windhoek Mini Mark.
The results?
Select Cases
We spent N$6.90 on a pack of green beans from Ri-
das Take Away marked at 215 g.
When the entire pack was placed on our calibrated
scale, it only added up to 194.5g.
Just the weight of the plastic container and the plas-
tic wrapping added to 7.9g (4.7g and 3.2g), meaning
that we in fact only got 186.6g of green beans. A
500g bag of tomatoes from Shoprite lost 5 grams
when put on our scale, although this was nothing
compared to a pack of shredded cabbage from the
same shop that was billed at 180g. Including pack-
aging, the Shoprite cabbage pack only weighed
105.4g. Packaging weight excluded, we in fact got
only 98.1 grams of food.
At Tre’, a bag of baby potatoes showed a tag of 404g,
but when weighed, package included, only added up
to 393.8g (388.1g excluding packaging).
In the case of a pack of mince meat bought from
Tre, it seemed the customer actually scored, with the
mass given as 436g before our independent meas-
urements of the entire pack added up to 441.2g.
That’s until you start subtracting the weight of the
packaging. First, there’s the now familiar plastic
container, which made up 5.2g in its own. Added to
that, came the plastic wrapping at 3.7g and fnally
the wet and relatively weighty moisture-holding
napkin resting over the meat, which bulked up the
package weight by 7.7g.
In all, the amount of meat found inside the pack was
actually only 419.4g.
That’s 16.6 grams less than was indicated.
Finally, at Klein Windhoek Mini Mark, we bought
442g of pumpkin cuts, which even in its packaging
only added up to 431.6g in independent testing.
On the other hand, at Woermann Brock, while
a 270g block of cheddar cheese only added up to
267.2g, they actually sold us a bag of carrots marked
250g that added up to 279.3 g in packaging (272.1
without).
f e a t u r e
08 CN
Big deal or not, that’s for the consumer to decide,
but judging from the responses we got from some
of these shops after our investigation, it’s clear that
a tighter eye is required in making sure fair trade
remains just that.
“I know there are regulations as to how to weigh. I
know the company name should be on there, and the
scales need to be certifed, but honestly they haven’t
yet once come to inspect my store,” says Americo
De Santos, owner of Ridas Take-Away. Confronted
about two packs of Patty Squash bought from them,
neither which showed the weight of the item, only a
price, De Santos tries to explain.
“The packaging doesn’t really weigh anything,” he
says.
Consumer News bought a similarly-sized pack of
yellow Patty Squash from Woermann Brock & Co
in Klein Windhoek, which also omitted the weight.
The Ridas pack, when we weighed it, came to 242.8
grams at N$12.50, while the Woermann Brock pack
came to 280.5g at N$7.99.
“Ministry of Trade comes through about once a
year,” reported Shoprite Independence Branch Man-
ager John Uushona.
Explaining Shoprite’s method of weighing, he says
the shop self-packs some things, but for the most
part buy goods already packed by the manufacturer.
“We do it with the packaging on. The covering
doesn’t really have any weight,” he echoes the
words of Ridas’ De Santos.
The NSI serves as the custodian of national stand-
ards that provide measurement traceability and
also calibration of measuring instruments used
in trade by industry in Namibia. The NSI is also
tasked to administer the Trade Metrology Act,
1973 (Act No.77 of 1973), as amended, in order
to ensure the effective and effcient type approval
of measuring instruments.
For further enquiries, contact the Namibian
Standards Institution on (061) 386 400
CN 09
Dear Namibian consumers, if
the heading confuses you let me
explain:
Many manufacturers have diverted from old tradi-
tions. My frst example is potatoes. Traditionally
they were packed in 10kg packages. Then some-
one decided to create a 7kg package and sell it at
the price of the 10kg package. The story does not
end there. The 5kg and 4kg pockets were born to
confuse the consumer even more, with regards to
the kilo price. Mostly a 5kg pocket per kilo costs
more than 10kg per kilo. So, as the value of our
money became less, a multitude of manufacturers
jumped on the bandwagon. One will fnd that in
the majority of examples given the consumer will
be paying much more per kilo for a smaller pack-
aging than for the regular size. I’ve noticed that
the smallest size peanut butter only cost some N$2
cheaper than the regular size, being at least half
the size bigger.
The Namibian consumer has to become more
weight conscious when purchasing goods. The
next example is a well-known brand of tomato
sauce. 375ml will cost you a whopping N$ 11.60
while it’s bigger brother of 750ml will cost you
anything between N$13-N$14.50. Have we ever
looked at the weight of a packet of soup? Knorr
soup at 81g will sell for the same price or a few
cents cheaper than Royco soup at 50g, the differ-
ence being 37g. When buying pasta, do not assume
that the packet that looks like it contains 500g has
500g packed inside. Pasta Regina, a brand sold in
supermarkets and imported from a distant coun-
try, only has 400g packed inside. Knowing this,
do you still think it is a bargain you are buying at
100g less?
Some year or so ago the cooldrink manufacturers
decided to change the can contents from 340ml to
330ml (10ml lost) but the price was not adjusted
accordingly - on the contrary, the price increased.
Also do not assume that all canned vegetables
weigh the same, they differ in weight from 410g
to 420g, and so as for many other commodities.
Tins of tuna can differ with as much as 50g for
almost the same price. Don’t be caught in the trap
of 2 for N$10 or 3 for N$20. It benefts the shop to
sell 2 or 3 once, rather than selling each seperately.
Nothing stops you from buying one only and most
cash registers are programmed to sell one only.
One will fnd that products such as sugar and four
are cheaper bought in larger packs, for the smaller
packaging per kilo cost you more.
“Get less
for more”
Watch out for items marked 100g or
200ml FREE. In life nothing is free; the
difference is calculated into the selling
price!
CONTACT
Bob Ziekenoppasser
Tel: +264 64 461 461
Cell: +264 81 284 8000
NAMIBIAN CONSUMER LOBBY
9
The OneLove campaign wants to get us thinking and talking about our sexual behaviours and the
risk of having many sexual partners. This campaign informs people about how to stay safe from HIV
by having one sexual partner at a time. The OneLove campaign uses mass media such as radio, TV
and print in 10 Southern African countries: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia,
South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Find out more about the OneLove campaign at
www.onelovesouthernafrica.org
In addition to its involvement with the regional OneLove campaign, Desert Soul HDC closely works
together with Namibian partner organizations on the national campaign, titled Break The Chain,
which also focuses on the reduction of multiple and concurrent sexual partners as an HIV prevention
measure. Desert Soul’s book, radio dramas and the regional OneLove TV series will be used
nationally by Take Control partners for social mobilization and outreach work with target audiences
in various parts of Namibia.
A joint initiative by Take Control Partners
GTZ; Intrahealth; C-Change; NASOMA
You can support Break The Chain campaign in many ways:
• Organize community meeting and talk about sticking to one partner
• Form debate clubs and talk about sexual networks
• Tell your partner and your friends about Break The Chain
• Hold discussions about reducing sexual networks
9
N
i
n
e

b
a
d

i
d
e
a
s
-
s
o
m
e

o
f

t
h
e

w
o
r
s
t

p
r
o
d
u
c
t
s

e
v
e
r
Over the years many products have been recalled. These
are products that were considered potentially hazardous to
health or the general well being of consumers and users
thereof. Such products have not been limited only to food
but I has gone as far as cars, the Toyota Prius and even cell
phones, the I-phone 4 produced by Google. All these were
products put on the shelves of stores and car dealerships
before they were removed.
1.Baby milk
The Swiss based Nestlé Corporation launched a baby milk formula
in 1977 and it spread quickly throughout the western world. The
milk was said to be better than breast milk and the company ad-
vocated that if mothers were to raise healthy children they had to
replace breast milk with the formula.
According to the website, Wikipedia Nestle launched a boycott in
the United States and most of Europe in 1977. This came about be-
cause the formula, which had to be mixed with water, had caused
illness in vulnerable children mainly in the poor countries where
water sources were not always safe. High illiteracy rates in the
same countries also contributed to the poor sanitization of feeding
bottles however even those that understood the methods of sanitiz-
ing the bottles lacked the means. In other cases many poor mothers
used less formula in order for the container to last longer. As a
result some infants received inadequate nutrients.
2.Vioxx
According to Google, 1999 saw the U.S. Food and Drug Admin-
istration (FDA) approved Vioxx , a Merck product for treating ar-
thritis. It was stronger than the existing drugs but had less negative
effects on the stomach and as a result, Vioxx became one of the
most prescribed drugs in history. However studies began to show
that an increased risk of heart attack was associated with Vioxx.
This indication had been absent in the placebo trials.
September 2004, Merck received information about results from
a clinical trial that included fndings of increased risk of heart at-
tacks among Vioxx users who had been using the medication for
over 18 months.
3.Firestone tires
Information on Wikipedia states that, Ford and Firestone was con-
tacted in 2000 by the National Highway Traffc Safety Adminis-
tration (NHTSA) about the high incidence of tire failure on Ford
Explorers, Mercury Mountaineers, and Mazda Navajos ftted with
Firestone tires. Ford investigated and found that several models
of 15” Firestone tires had very high failure rates. The failures all
involved tread separation and this was the tread peeling off often
followed by tire’s disintegration. If that happened, and the vehicle
was running at speed, there was a high likelihood of the vehicle
leaving the road and rolling over. Many rollovers cause serious
injury and even death; it has been estimated that over 250 deaths
and more than 3,000 serious injuries resulted from these failures,
with not all occurring on Ford Motor Company vehicles.
4.Tylenol
As defned by Wikipedia, Tylenol is a North American brand of
drugs advertised for relieving pain, reducing fever, and relieving
the symptoms of allergies, cold, cough, and fu. In 1982 a series
of deaths occurred after people took the Extra Strength Tylenol.
Investigation on the matter revealed that the bottles in which the
capsule came in had been tempered with. The original capsules
had been replaced by potassium cyanide, an inorganic compound
that is highly toxic. The exchange of the capsules led to a number
of deaths in September 1982.
5.Chevy
The Chevrolet Corvair was a compact automobile produced by the
Chevrolet. It was the only American-made, mass-produced passenger
car to feature a rear-mounted engine. Unfortunately its engine that had
been used in the earlier cars made the rear of the car so heavy that the
steering became light at highways speeds and it didn’t help that the
gas tank was mounted up front.
According to noted GM historian Dave Newell, Chevrolet had
planned on ceasing Corvair production after the 1966 model year.
Development and engineering changes were halted in 1966 on the
year-old, redesigned second-generation cars with mainly federally
mandated emissions and safety changes made thereafter. Information
provided on Google illustrates that a variety of factors contributed to
Corvair’s plummeting sales in 1966.
6.Dalkon Shield
The Dalkon Shield was a contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD) de-
veloped by the Dalkon Corporation and marketed by the A.H. Robins
Company. According to Wikipedia the A.H. Robins Company sold
it to an estimated 2.5 million women during a four-year period in
the early 1970’s. The intrauterine device caused severe pelvic infec-
tions and infammation. It was discovered that the longer the device
remained in the body the more the bacteria that entered the uterus.
These bacteria later attacked the placenta once a woman got pregnant.
The company however said that the shield was no more dangerous
than any other intrauterine contraceptive device and that, in fact, most
of the pelvic infammatory disease that occurred in the women had
nothing to do with the shield. The company had knowledge that the
product was defective when they put it on the market.
7.Maxwell Coffee
In 1988 the way Maxwell House launched a ready-to-drink coffee
they described as the convenient new ways to enjoy the rich taste
of Maxwell House Coffee. All the consumer had to do was put it in
the microwave while attending to other things and fve minutes later
have their coffee ready to drink. The problem however came on that
the coffee could not be microwaved in its original container; virtually
canceling out any “convenience” it may have offered. It had to be
poured out of its container into an alternative container suitable for
microwave use or heated on a stove. However if you had to pour the
ready-to-drink coffee into a mug and microwave it, you can certainly
pour yourself a mug of coffee from a coffeemaker.
8.Cocaine Energy drink
Cocaine as it was commonly known was a high-energy drink, contain-
ing three and a half times the amount of caffeine as Red Bull does.
It was pulled from U.S. shelves in 2007, after the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA), declared that its producers, Redux Beverages,
were illegally marketing their drink as an alternative to street drugs.
Google explains that the drink had the same effects that a dose of the
original cocaine powder had once consumed but Redux Beverages ar-
gued that unlike the original drug their energy drink had no addictive
properties, a statement that had no medical baking.
9.Levi Type 1 jeans
In late 2002, Levi Strauss began a massive marketing campaign to
launch what was said to be one of the company’s most signifcant
launches in history, Type 1 Jeans. The line show cased the labels as-
sociated to the Levi design such as the red tab logo, buttons, rivets,
and the two-horse back patch. To accompany the launch, Levi Strauss
spent $2 million on a commercial that misguided and confused view-
ers. Going against common practice, they priced the jeans differently
according to the stores they were being sold in. The quality of the
material they used however did not change. Levi Strauss pulled the
entire line after less than two years and Type 1 proved to be the proud
clothier’s most spectacular fop.
CN 11
The OneLove campaign wants to get us thinking and talking about our sexual behaviours and the
risk of having many sexual partners. This campaign informs people about how to stay safe from HIV
by having one sexual partner at a time. The OneLove campaign uses mass media such as radio, TV
and print in 10 Southern African countries: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia,
South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Find out more about the OneLove campaign at
www.onelovesouthernafrica.org
In addition to its involvement with the regional OneLove campaign, Desert Soul HDC closely works
together with Namibian partner organizations on the national campaign, titled Break The Chain,
which also focuses on the reduction of multiple and concurrent sexual partners as an HIV prevention
measure. Desert Soul’s book, radio dramas and the regional OneLove TV series will be used
nationally by Take Control partners for social mobilization and outreach work with target audiences
in various parts of Namibia.
A joint initiative by Take Control Partners
GTZ; Intrahealth; C-Change; NASOMA
You can support Break The Chain campaign in many ways:
• Organize community meeting and talk about sticking to one partner
• Form debate clubs and talk about sexual networks
• Tell your partner and your friends about Break The Chain
• Hold discussions about reducing sexual networks
Last month we spotted a complaint in the SMS pages of the Namib-
ian newspaper. The writer complained that power was being sold at
varying rates in different stores. Consumer News decided to further
investigate this. We visited the Electricity Control Board and asked
for some clarifcation as to whether this was happening. We were
told by Shadreck Mwilima the Public Relations Offcer of ECB that
the cost is regulated automatically and will be the same in every
outlet within a specifed region.
Mr Mwilima explained that the cost may vary from region to re-
gion because, for example, the cost may be higher in Cenored areas
because the cost of supply differs. One such reason for this is the
power line from Ruacana power station will be longer to a Cenored
area than a Nored area, for example..
ECB helping the nation get Powered
Another factor is the Local Authorities surcharge. This varies from
town to town and it depends on the rates and revenue that were
applied in the past. For Example, Grootfontein had, in the past, col-
lected most of their revenue from electricity. After the creation of
the REDs the amount on top became the local authority surcharge.
This rate varies in Cenored areas but Nored has uniform rates
across the region.
We decided to put the ECB to the test and went and did some spot
checks in Windhoek, buying power at different outlets. We found
that the ECB was, in fact, correct and the complaint was in error. In
all outlets we tested we found that power was sold at 114.85c/unit.
Motors
Old electric motors •
waste energy. Examine
all motors and replace
old units with energy
effcientmotors.
Boilers
Regular examination and •
maintenance of boiler
systems are essential to
effective energy savings.
Check the gas and air
tightness of boilers
regularly.
ENERGY SAVING TIPS: INDUSTRIAL SECTOR
Industries, no matter what line of operations they are in, are major consumers of
electricity.Promotingandimplementingenergyeffcientprogrammesandensuring
employeeparticipationisthefrstmajorsteptowardsachievingsignifcantpower
savings.
Saving electricity in industry means examining all facets of operations including:
Electricityeffciency •
Lighting •
The use of pumps, electric motors and compressed air systems •
Planteffciencyandmaintenance •
Lighting
Installeffcientlighting •
systems.
The use of electronic •
ballasts is not common
in commercial and
industrial lighting
systems, yet they can
save up to 60% of the
electricity required.

It is wise to make •
use of the services of
lighting specialists when
choosing lighting system
design.
Pumps and fans
Pumps and fans use •
signifcantamounts
of electrical energy.
Systems with fans and
pumps offer many
opportunities to save
energy on pump and fan
drives. If the pipes or
ducts are poorly placed
or designed, then the
pump or fan motors use
more energy than would
be the case with more
correctlydesignedfuid
andgasfowsystems.
www.nampower.com.na
Don't Waste a Watt!!
ENERGY SAVING TIPS: INDUSTRIAL SECTOR
Motors
Old electric motors •
waste energy. Examine
all motors and replace
old units with energy
effcientmotors.
Boilers
Regular examination and •
maintenance of boiler
systems are essential to
effective energy savings.
Check the gas and air
tightness of boilers
regularly.
ENERGY SAVING TIPS: INDUSTRIAL SECTOR
Industries, no matter what line of operations they are in, are major consumers of
electricity.Promotingandimplementingenergyeffcientprogrammesandensuring
employeeparticipationisthefrstmajorsteptowardsachievingsignifcantpower
savings.
Saving electricity in industry means examining all facets of operations including:
Electricityeffciency •
Lighting •
The use of pumps, electric motors and compressed air systems •
Planteffciencyandmaintenance •
Lighting
Installeffcientlighting •
systems.
The use of electronic •
ballasts is not common
in commercial and
industrial lighting
systems, yet they can
save up to 60% of the
electricity required.

It is wise to make •
use of the services of
lighting specialists when
choosing lighting system
design.
Pumps and fans
Pumps and fans use •
signifcantamounts
of electrical energy.
Systems with fans and
pumps offer many
opportunities to save
energy on pump and fan
drives. If the pipes or
ducts are poorly placed
or designed, then the
pump or fan motors use
more energy than would
be the case with more
correctlydesignedfuid
andgasfowsystems.
www.nampower.com.na
Don't Waste a Watt!!
ENERGY SAVING TIPS: INDUSTRIAL SECTOR
To fnd out who had the fastest coffee and best service
in town, fve coffee houses were put to the test. On
two separate occasions Consumer News visited these
5 cafes and monitored the time it took the staff to greet
us and then to deliver the coffee. Our results show that,
for the fastest coffee in town, Café Schneider is the
place to visit.
Within an average of 7 seconds of our entrance into
the coffee house, a waiter or waitress is directing you
to a table where your coffee is delivered in less than 2
minutes. Thereafter you are attended to constantly - all
for N$8.40.
Mugg and Bean may not have the speediest time but it
is the one place that coffee is bottomless. You are at-
tended to within 3 minutes and your mug of coffee is
delivered in less than 6 minutes and, if so desired, will
continue coming. This service was pegged at N$12.40.
Coffee and cookies… then Dolce is the place to vis-
it. The frst contact was in 48 seconds on both visits
and the coffee was ready and delivered in less than 4
minutes. The one-on-one service from the waiters and
waitresses is, however, not on par with the time men-
tioned above. A mug of coffee that comes with compli-
mentary shortbread will set you back N$ 11.00.
Ins Wiener and Bakery-espresso bar both serve coffee
for N$10.50. What differed however, is the time it took
for the delivery of the coffee. Ins Wiener’s frst con-
tact was 23 seconds and the coffee was on the table in
2 minutes. Raith’s Bakery-espresso bar’s frst contact
was in 2 minutes and the coffee was on the table in 5
minutes. Service in both the cafes was good but Ins
Wiener coffee comes with a smile.
So, for coffee on the go, Café Schneider is the place to
stop by, but for the day you want to just enjoy a good
cup of coffee to your heart’s content, make a turn for
Mugg and Bean where you can get free reflls. Dolce is
the place to get the little extra something to accompany
your coffee and Ins Wiener and Bakery-espresso bar
both are good places to have a sit-down coffee.
Ins Wiener
First Contact 23 seconds 23
Coffee 3:52 1:30
Cost N$10.50
Service 3 3
Café Schneider
First Contact 9 seconds 6
Coffee 1:23 2.00
Cost N$8.40
Service 3 3
Mugg and Bean M.M
First Contact 1,20 seconds 3
Coffee 5:18 2.24
Cost N$12.90
Service 2 2
Dolce
First Contact 48 seconds 49
Coffee 4.37 2.49
Cost N$11:00
Service 2 1
Bakery-espresso bar
First Contact 52seconds 18
Coffee 6.46 4.34
Cost N$10.50
Service 2 2
*service: 1 equals poor service, 3 means excellent.
Coffee
T i m e
CN 17
First visit Second visit
3
e d i t o r i a l
Africa as a whole is inextricably linked with news not
conducive to peace of mind, such as genocide and cor-
ruption, with a populace suffering under the yoke of
hunger, thirst, and desperation.
It is about time to change this perception. The so-called
“Black Continent” is on the brink of a new dawn. A
rapidly advancing economic process, the results of
which can only be estimated, is in full swing, indicat-
ing that the – mostly artifcially upheld – world domi-
nance by Europe and America will shift to Africa very
soon. This was already prophetically remarked on by
US-President J.F. Kennedy in the early Sixties when
he said that “Europe is the past, America the present,
and Africa the future.” This is a development from
which frst and foremost the population of Africa will
proft, not only the “elite”, but Africans proud of being
Africans, (allowed) to express this, and who from day
to day learn that it is of value to learn something new
without neglecting or forgetting the past.
The idea of an emergence of a new African spirit is
supported by studies of the Spanish economics profes-
sor Xavier Sala-i-Martin of the Columbia University
of New York and his colleague, Maxim Pinkovkiy.
The latter, in a very recently-released study, came to
the conclusion that “since the mid-nineties, a dramatic
change of trend has taken place in the poorest of sub-
Saharan countries. The economy of 48 countries that
have been monitored has grown continually, and per-
sistently so.” The study is founded on a development of
signifcance to every single inhabitant of this upward-
striving continent: between 1995 and 2006, the annual
per capita income rose from approximately US$ 2 000
to US$ 2 400. During the same time-span, the propor-
tion of extraordinarily destitute Africans decreased.
Those who, in the past, have always been disadvan-
taged and never profted from any economic growth,
have made disproportional profts from this positive
upswing in Africa. According to Prof. Sala-i-Martin,
“Poverty in Africa decreases at a much more rapid rate
than is generally believed”, and he adds that this is the
case for the entire continent, not only for those states
benefting from their favourable geographical position
or their mineral or other natural resources. Nigeria and
Angola, for example, fall into this category. Even land-
locked countries without any mineral resources, who,
in addition are disadvantaged agriculturally and still
suffer from the repercussions of colonialism, are prof-
iting from this new development in world politics.
Clearly, political forces are the driving factor behind
this development. The concept of “democracy” no
longer is foreign to Africa. A technical revolution has
taken hold of the continent, and its population is pre-
pared for it. Many a citizen found employment in small
The African Century:
The Republic of Namibia as Pacesetter
Article by Klaus Weichhaus
enterprises mushrooming continent-wide, not only se-
curing an income, but also providing some surplus, as
is refected in the purchases of designer clothing and
exorbitantly expensive watches and motor vehicles. In-
creasingly, recent newly- developed technologies such
as modern information and communication technolo-
gies turn out to be one of the key-industries in Africa.
From this, completely new economic branches sprout
forth, for example in the service industry.
Of course, there also are exceptions, such as Zimbabwe
and the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, just
a single glance at Mozambique will show how much
that country has opened up to the world economy and
market since the end of its civil war in 1992. Through
the privatisation of 1 200 governmental institutions, an
average annual growth rate of 8 % has been achieved.
Infant mortality in Mozambique has gone down by
an astonishing 40%. It will take some time to see the
same positive results in Zimbabwe or the Democratic
Republic of Congo.
As pointed out by Prof. Sala-i-Martin, an important
factor of the evident success of Africa lies in the urge
of its business branches to strive for independence,
inclusive of the freedom to be in charge of the dis-
tribution of its export products. In Tanzania it turned
out that not only agriculture, but tourism is a primary
source of income. The income generated by tourism
has increased by 10 % of the Gross Domestic Product
of Tanzania, for example.
In Malawi, the World Bank has forged a convincing
remedial model and developed a highly sophisticated
“Container System”. This resulted in Malawi, an in-
credibly impoverished country, previously mainly
dependent on the export of its meagre resources of
gold, cotton and meat, beside sugar, tobacco, tea and
groundnuts, to proft from an excess of mangos, with
an expansion of its annual fruit exports by an astonish-
ing 25%.
With regard to Africa’s odds of economic growth, the
Head of the International Monetary Fund, based in
Washington, Antoinette Sayeh, is of the opinion that
“this time, Africa has better withstood the crisis we are
facing now.” Prof. Sala-i-Martin, in his study on the fu-
ture of Africa’s economy, fnally comes to the conclu-
sion that “the basis for continually high growth rates
are to be expected in the future.”
“Forward, Namibia!” These are the words that on 21
March 2010, President Hifkepunye Pohamba shouted
to Namibians at the Independence Stadium, flled to
the brim on the 20th anniversary of the hard-fought for
independence of the country.
Not only since then, throughout the entire Namibia
one can discern a wave of new awakening. Namibians
want to know, and prove to the world, that at the latest
since Independence, Africans have hit the rock bottom
of reality.
They strive to dissociate themselves from hand-outs,
donations, alms – to earn their own income. They will
be successful this time as well – after all, time is on
their side, and Namibia has decided to side with the
right friends.
Klaus Weichhaus, 00264-(0)85 – 582 82 51
EMail: weichhausklaus@yahoo.de
Namibia stands ready to take over the role as leading African economic and fnancial
controller. A country with a functioning infrastructure that will attract international con-
cerns and banks, with a stable government voted in by the majority of the population, by
Namibians who have learned to fght for their ideals, to bring offers and in the long run
they will succeed.
The line at the post offce stretched outside the build-
ing and all the way along towards the scorching hot
pavement. Elderly women, men and a few playful
grandchildren waited anxiously to reach well inside
the building where there would be some shade at least.
This is the sight that greets you when approaching the
Katutura Post Offce during the days when pensioners
are receiving their much awaited social fund.
Sadly enough, these are all elderly people who were
probably unemployed for the large part of their adult-
hood and had no additional pension fund benefts
from their place of employment. These elderly are the
same people who take care of abandoned grandchil-
dren, clothe, feed and pay for their education…all on a
meager N$500.
Although people may be unprepared psychologically
to grow old and cease to be able to work, they cer-
tainly do notice the problems their elders now face;
the prospects of isolation, loneliness, lack of respect,
and above all, virtual disenfranchisement from the so-
ciety they built. The number of people reaching the
increasingly mythic retirement age of 60 has steadily
increased over the past several years.
Many people have learned to recognize and accept the
aging process and all that goes with it as a reality, a nat-
ural part of the life cycle; it happens to us all. The goal
is to change the prevailing view of aging as something
to be feared and the aged as worthless and helpless.
Being reassured of some means of income during your
aging years is a very important consideration when
taking up any new employment, medical aid, housing
and pension benefts are also deciding factors when
considering an offer for employment.
How do government employees know that their future
is secure? What incentive is there to work hard and at
the same time be secure in knowing that your future is
taken care of?
The Government Institutions Pension Fund was estab-
lished in 1989 by Government to provide retirement
and auxiliary benefts for employees in the service of
the Namibian Government as well as some institutions
established by an Act of the Namibian Parliament.
Membership to the GIPF is automatic and is a condi-
tion of employment for all civil servants and all other
member institutions. The fund provides guaranteed
pension to members regardless of how long a mem-
ber lives after retirement or whether he or she becomes
disabled and is unable to continue working. GIPF also
provides a funeral beneft to members at no additional
cost.
GIPF guarantees your
pension benefts
a d v e r t o r i a l
Saving enough money is one of the most important and
often diffcult things to do. Fortunately, access to re-
tirement benefts for GIPF members is not tied to the
employees’ ability to save because contributions to the
fund is compulsory thus compelling employees indi-
rectly to save. The Fund therefore makes saving easier
for employees who, if left to their own devices might
make inadequate retirement provision for themselves.
Benefts offered to members are some of the best with-
in the pension industry, members are guaranteed their
benefts.

Normal retirement
The normal retirement age for GIPF members is 60
years of age. Upon retirement members receive a lump
sum of 1/3 of the pension total. This payout is tax-free.
Additionally members will receive a monthly income
for the rest of their life. Pension benefts are calculated
based upon the fnal salary of the employee at time
of retirement and years of service. The frst payment
comes at the end of the members frst month of retire-
ment.
Early age retirement benefts
In order to take advantage of early age requirement,
that employee must receive approval from their em-
ployer. The option for early age retirement becomes
available when the member turns 55. The formula used
to calculate benefts is the same for normal retirement
but the pension is reduced for every year the member
retires short of the age of sixty.
Disability benefts
Employees who become disabled through disease or
accident qualify for a disability beneft. The income is
based upon the member’s previous salary and benefts
are calculated at 75% of that salary.
Death benefts
Should an employee die before the age of retirement
GIPF makes a one- time lump sum payment equal to
two times the employees monthly salary. A spouse who
qualifes will receive 40% of the member’s salary for
life. Children will also qualify for a 30% monthly in-
come based upon the salary of the member. If the mem-
ber had children but no spouse the children will receive
a maximum beneft of 60% of the members salary.
Funeral benefts
GIPF provides a funeral beneft as a lump sum to assist
members with family funeral costs. This beneft is pro-
vided to members at no additional cost. The amount
paid ranges from N$500 for children under one year to
N$5 000 on the death of the member or spouse.
There are currently a large number of individuals who
have not come forward to claim their benefts. This
results in orphans and widows suffering as a conse-
quence. Some claims have been delayed due to incom-
plete documentation or conficting details.
All GIPF members have to update their Benefciary
Nomination form where they are to maintain a current
and accurate list of benefciaries. GIPF currently has
many initiatives designed to reach the public and those
members who may be entitled to benefts but have not
come forward to claim. These outreach efforts include
promotional material, radio spots, trade fair represen-
tation, member education in remote areas and an open
door policy at all regional offces.
The GIPF has regional offces in Ondangwa, Oshaka-
ti, Swakopmund, Katima Mulilo, Keetmanshoop and
Rundu that were established to bring services nearer to
its members.
The regional offces are connected to the pension ad-
ministration system (GIMIS) that facilitates the coor-
dination and exchange of member information. The
regional offces will soon be developed into fully-
functional branches of GIPF.
24 CN
Like Canada, Namibia is held in the orbit of a more
powerful neighbour to its South, in Canada’s case the
United States and in Namibian instance; South Africa.
This power imbalance can be seen in the brands that
populate the Namibian market - we see predominantly
South African goods. Does this mean that Namibian
businesses have nothing to offer or are not manufactur-
ing and producing goods of note?
Namibia has long been renowned for the quality and
type of diamonds that it produces. Additionally, Na-
mibia is fast becoming one of the premier uranium
producing nations. Namibia further provides delicious
meat and fsh to the tables of South Africa and the EU.
Add to this list Namibia’s quality beers that are being
exported to Europe and beyond. The fact of the matter
is that Namibia has resources and ideas that are creat-
ing indigenous products which are competing against
imported brands. The beneft for the consumer is not
only choice but local brands that can create more jobs
and prosperity locally.
Namibia’s Gross domestic product and export earn-
ings have traditionally been largely resource led, from
exports of diamonds, zinc, ever larger weights of ura-
nium, beef and animal hides. Mining accounts for
8% of GDP, but provides more than 50% of foreign
exchange earnings. We have one of the world’s most
unequal income distributions, as shown by Namibia’s
GINI coeffcient. This means that a small group of Na-
mibians own a very large part of the nation’s wealth;
a legacy of Apartheid which encouraged the economy
to be structured in such a manner, to beneft a minor-
ity. GDP was estimated at U$ 9.459 Billion in 2009 at
offcial exchange rates while the unemployment rate is
projected to be 51.2 %. Namibia has traditionally add-
ed very little to these materials but this does not mean
that Namibian manufacturing has stood still. Govern-
ment has come out strongly with policies designed to
stimulate local production and value addition. This is
seen through programmes like Vision 2030 and the
NDP initiatives. It is also worth noting that after inde-
pendence Namibia’s GDP has grown rapidly.
Further with support by organisations like the Namibia
Manufacturers Association, more locals have steadily
over the years taken up the challenge of producing
goods and services within the country to add Namib-
ian products to compete with South African and other
imported goods that fll the fridges and cabinets of the
Namibian consumers. The NMA was created to facili-
tate a sustainable, competitive & prosperous manufac-
turing / processing industry for the beneft of all stake-
holders Namibia.
One of the strongest local sectors at super markets
has always been dairy products where Namibian milk
and milk derivatives have held their own against for-
eign goods. This has further moved into the vegetable
isles where Namibian agricultural produce is making a
greater appearance.
But a brand that is standing out above all others is Na-
mibia Breweries whose stable of beers are fghting for
the international market and with success. One can
now fnd Tafel Lager not only winning shelf space,
and making an appearance at braais more than some
South African brands, but also whetting throats in the
tropical heat of Angola. The star runner in Nambrew’s
stable is the Windhoek Lager sub brand. This brand has
grown by leaps and bounds in South Africa where it is
so common one might be mistaken for thinking it was
Great Namibian Exports
By Louis Maruwasa
e d i t o r i a l
www.teamnamibia.com
A LI TTLE
MORE OF THI S. . .
TEAM NAMI BI A MEMBERS AND SUPPORTERS
CREATE LOCAL WEALTH.
TEAM NAMI BI A.
BE NAMI BI AN - BUY NAMI BI AN.
CREATI NG JOBS. SUPPORTI NG LOCAL BUSI NESS.
AND A LI TTLE
LESS OF THAT?
how about
e
l
e
m
e
n
t

c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
s

/

t
n

/

h
o
w

/

2
0
1
0
brewed there. But it does not stop there. Windhoek La-
ger has made its way to London, England, Cameroon
and even Germany.
Local brands and their additions to GDP not only add
jobs to the economy but put more people to work and
money in the pockets of locals. And when it comes
to Namibia, it appears that a bright future is certainly
ahead for the Nation.
But even with all these developments, what is the
breakdown of local contributors to Namibia’s econo-
my? The statistics provided by Mr. Hennie Fourie of
the NMA reveal the following:
At Current Prices in 2009, the Manufacturing Sector
contributed N$ 10 521 Million (13.5%) to the Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) of Namibia.
(Total GDP = N$ 78169 million).
During 2009 the different manufacturing sub-sectors
contributed as follows to total manufacturing output in
the country:
CN 25
N$ million % of Manufacturing Output
Meat processing 227 2.2
Fish Processing (on-shore) 1123 10.7
Other food and beverages 4182 39.7
Other manufacturing 4989 47.4
Total Manufacturing 10521 100
The real annual growth fgures of the manufacturing industry of Na-
mibia for the past 7 years were the following (infation removed):
Year Annual Growth
2003 13.9%
2004 0.4%
2005 7.5%
2006 2.7%
2007 8.5%
2008 2.1%
2009 6.0%
This amounts to an accumulative average of 5.7% from 2003 to
2009.

The real growth fgures for the different sub-sectors of manufactur-
ing in 2008 and 2009 were as follows:
2008 2009
Meat processing -8,4% 3.8%
Fish Processing (on Shore) -3.6% 12.6%
Other food and beverages 10.0% 7.5%
Other manufacturing -2.1% 3.5%
Source: National Planning Commission, National Accounts, 2009
Exciting trends are abound in Namibian Manufacturing and over
time more and more local quality products will compete for shelf
space and export dollars to create a brighter future for all.
Sources: CIA fact-book, Namibia Manufacturers Association-Mr.
Hennie Fourie (CEO NMA).
1. Does Namibia have a Consumer Protection
Act?
No. However, the Namibian consumer is protect-
ed by various other laws, mostly industry- specifc
such as in banking, insurance, medical, etc.
2. Are there plans to table such a law in parlia-
ment?
The Ministry of Trade and Industry has been talk-
ing to various role-players such as business, statu-
tory bodies, consumer groups, etc on what form
the law should take. Their “primary considerations
were that Namibian consumers were experiencing
unscrupulous and unfair trading practices, and that
existing avenues to obtain redress are inadequate
or completely absent.” A workshop on this topic
was held in September 2009 and the Ministry of
Justice was requested to prepare a draft law. We
have not had any more feedback since March this
year.
3. What are the issues you would like to be put
into the law?
You referred in your email newsletter and on the
Internet to issues with people hiring houses and
fats?
A Namibian Consumer Protection Act should spe-
cifcally target unfair discrimination and enforce
the right of equality in the consumer market. The
Act must put the onus on the landlord to prove
that he is not discriminating in any way against
a tenant on the basis of things like race, gender,
nationality, and even income.
4. How will this affect the complaints about high
rentals in Namibia?
We believe amongst others that the new Act should
Namibia Consumer
Protection Group
allow for automatic renewal of the rental agree-
ment. This will prevent landlords from using this
as an excuse to terminate when the tenant wishes
to stay. At present, many agents and landlords are
using the end of the year contract to get rid of ten-
ants so they can increase the rent amount for the
next person. Normally the rent will only go up by
around ten percent, and the landlords are pushing
up the prices to the new tenants by a lot more.
5. What about landlords or estate agents throw-
ing out people on to the street?
We propose that the Consumer protection Act
must include the right to fair and honest dealings.
“No physical force, coercion, undue infuence,
pressure, duress or harassment may be employed
to evict a tenant or compel them to sign a lease.”
6. What can a consumer do if they feel unfairly
treated by an estate agent?
The Estate Agents Board is under the Ministry of
Trade and Industry with the mandate to regulate
and control certain activities of estate agents in
the public interest. They can be contacted about
any complaint and they have specifc procedures
to deal with complaints.
30 CN
Milton Louw
e d i t o r i a l
E-mail: miltonlouw@gmail.com
CN: What artists have inspired you in your music?
EES: There were two main artists who inspired me back
in the days to start doing music and not to care what peo-
ple say about my musical genre! It all started of with the
Fresh Prince of Bel Air series which I loved watching and
Will Smith was and still is a very big role model of mine!
He is HIMSELF and FRESH and that is what I like – since
I strive to be the same.
And the artist who actually gave me the push to record
my own music was when Eminem came out – he was so
original back then and gave the message of be who you
want to be. And I was like – if HE can do it – I can also
do it!
CN: Which International Artists would you like to collabo-
rate with?
EES: Och,…hahaha there are plenty!! But when I think
about it – I love collaboration with local NAM artist even
more! I fnd our artist so original and unique – I am proud
to say that Namibia got some hewie talent jong! Haha
Back to the question – I would love to feature with the
“Black Eyed Peas” – I think I could spice up a collabora-
tion with them even more – to bring in some NAM fava,
and kwaito beat! Think the world would love a collabo like
that!
Otherwise I think a killa combination would be a track with
AKON. We already met at the MTV Africa Music Awards
last year in Kenya, but you know how it is – one caint re-
ally talk to these guys, dey all kamma to busy ne!
CN: Who is your favourite Namibian artists to collaborate
with?
EES: Hahaha, yes-ja very ees-y question, I don’t have
a favourite Namibian artist to collaborate – I love work-
ing with all of them! I just sometimes wish the artist I col-
laborate with and put all effort into making a collaboration
possible would also one day make effort and come to me
to work together on one of their album songs – not just
always the one way thing you know! But I guess they for-
get about me – because most of the time I am not in the
country – but in the year 2010 this is not an excuse with all
the internet communication going on and making things
eesier for us!
CN: What Namibian products do you see when you are
abroad?
EES: Windhoek Lager Beer, at the people love our Beer
and our MEAT,..haha!
But unfortunately that is about it! – Namibia is not yet a
very strong exporter of products!
But I am working on it – so that soon people all over the
world will be talking about Namibian music!
CN: Tell us about your nomination for the AMA awards?
How do I vote for you?
EES: The Africa Music Awards is the biggest African
event held out side of Africa, and will this year take place
in the Wembley arena in London (UK), I am nominated as
in the Category “Best Southern African Artist” which is a
massive recognition, I gladly except and I am up for the
challenge, to bring the award back to Namibia!
One can Vote under the following link:
http://funsahara.co.uk/websites/gma_awards/ama_10/
ama_african_southern.htm
CN: Can you bring us up to date on your current tour?
EES: Well I am touring Europe with my “YES-JA” band
right now – and we had great shows already!
The last one was in Spain (Valencia) and the location
was amazing – straight at the harbour with a view on the
EES
e n t e r t a i n me n t
32 CN
p
h
o
t
o
:

e
e
s

beach! The peoples responds to the NAM Flava – kwaito
music played live with a band is getting better and better
– they are really starting to move and dance to the tunes
now this side – which is a great success for getting Na-
mibian sound recognized outside the border!
CN: What are you woking on right now?
EES: I am working on too many things at once…hahaha!
Right now I am working on my two new albums, what to
release two straight after one another – since I think its
time to give the true EES fans out there who are support-
ing me very hewie over the last year years a listening
NAM FLAVA adventure!
CN: If you could change one thing about the Namibian
music industry, what would it be?
EES: The thing of people working AGAINST each other,
instead of working together!
Namibia is so small music industry-wise compared to the
rest of the world out there – and one only sees this once
one actually has been outside of NAM – and if the local
artist would stop the beef and stress and rather focus that
energy towards working and pushing that energy together
– we would be way more successful out there by now!
Because I just know NAM music has got massive talent
– its just needs to be pointed in the right direction of all
becoming ONE – under the Namibian SUN!
CN: How was your latest album received...
a) internationally?
EES: Where ever I go an perform or present my music
here overseas the people respond so well to it! Except
for people who are in the music industry in Europe – they
always want to change it! But I think because they are not
used to this fava and are afraid of change – or afraid that
this new vibe might just break the industry – from all the
fake music that is being produced out there in the interna-
tional music market!
b) here in Nam?
The last album of mine ”Awee!” was described as the best
Collaboration album to have been released in Namibia so
far! And myself can also agree that it is the BEST repre-
sentation album of me as the artist “EES”! it is a fresh al-
bum with all sorts of genres all inspired by the NAM fava
music style and has GREAT collaborations with other Na-
mibian artist on there!
CN: You always seem to representing Namibia with your
fag onstage. Why is this?
EES: Hahahaha – yes-ja! First of ALL I am a very PROUD
Namibian – who just Loves his country – and I feel so
honored to have been born and bred in Namibia.
Secondly I think with the whole globalization going on in
the world and Namibia being a country that has always
in some sort of form been oppressed by the outside
world – it is time to get a certain recognition BACK as
the one nation Namibia!
By having a Namibian fag with me on stage – wher-
ever I perform I achieve two main goals, I represent
the country and show them our beautiful fag and at the
same time get the people in Namibia to believe in their
Country and become proud citizens who believe that
we are not just a small country but we are part of it ALL
– without feeling left out!
CN: What is your favourite track on your latest album?
Why?
EES: “NEWWA HOLD US DOWN”, it gives me the cer-
tain energy I need at times – while living overseas to go
on – and keep believing in the dream of getting the local
fava music heard outside the border!
But I feel it is a FRESH and happy outgoing party song
– which celebrates LIFE and what a great opportunity
we have to live TODAY!
CN: Whose music are you enjoying right now?
EES: Right now – at I don’t know what – but I am on a
House music type of trip! Just listening to club sound
bangas! Who don’t give you the chance to stand still
and just move your body!
Because I believe dancing is the best medicine – it
gives you that happy feeling of fulfllment in that mo-
ment in time!
CN: What do you see in the future for Namibian music?
EES: WE WILL MAKE IT! The big records companies
of the world WILL TALK about US! The rest of the world
will know WHERE NAMIBIA is thru our MUSIC and our
outgoing life spirit we present in our local music! We
in Namibia have something that all the other African
country don’t have as much as we do have it! – and
that is UNITY!! We are so strong and will become even
stronger because we ARE UNITED! When an artist
from Namibia is nominated at an international award
– people stick together in Nam and actually give their
ALL to support their artist – and this is one of the big
reasons why we will make BIG in the future!
I will always be there for my NAM people – and I expect
the same from THEM!
YES-JA!!!!
A friend of the magazine was recently applying for an
Au Pair position in the UK. Here is the letter she re-
ceived from a “family” looking to hire her.
The letter is fraudulent and is a typical letter from a
scam artist:
I am Mrs Dolly Miller from Florida USA. I am 40 years
old. ... actually i got two contacts from the new au pair
website and you are happen to be one of the two i liked.
I have long been searching for an aupair, I found your
profle on new aupair website ,i like the fact that you
are a foreigner,i have a mixed background so i accept
any race tribe religion,and so i decided to send you this
email so as to make
you know that i am interested in you working for me
as my nanny/aupair .My Daughter who is four is just a
distraction as i am very busy woman. this implies that
striking the balance between my child care,up bring
and my personal life and job is been very diffcult,to
this effect i urgently need the help of a nanny/aupair.I
am a single parent, so i need someone like you to take
good care of her..I will pay you $2200 USD monthly
When we are looking at the above letter, a few things
stand out.
Consumer News checked the online phone directory
from Hollywood, Florida and no Dolly Miller was list-
ed. Another way to check if your offer is genuine, is to
simply cut and paste a few sentences into google. When
I did this with Dolly’s letter I got several matches from
websites that warn about scam letters. The name had
been changed - Dolly was now Kathy and her daughter
was now three years old instead of four, but the text
and wording was otherwise identical, a scam for sure.
Scam artists will typically hire you very quickly, with
few questions asked. They do this because, in truth,
they do not really care whether you are qualifed or
not. They just want your money so they will entice you
with a high wage.
Someone who wants to be an Au Pair will be happy
to receive such a wage and this is what the scammer
is counting on. After they pique your interest this way
they will then ask you for a sum of money, usually they
say this is for immigration fees. In the above case the
“immigration agency” which was fake, sent a docu-
ment for the Au Pair to fll out and instructions on how
to pay the “immigration agency”. The English used
34 CN
Au Pair Beware
by Rob Parker
in these letters is often poor and not the fuency ex-
pected from someone named “Dolly Miller” who lives
in Florida U.S.A.
The document sent from the “agency” also contained
a few clues that this was a scam. Firstly, the letter was
a Microsoft Word document which was not on a com-
pany letterhead. The second and most important clue
was that the agency wanted to be paid via Western Un-
ion. Reputable companies do not depend on Western
Union, they will allow you to pay via Pay Pal or credit
card. Scam artists embrace Western Union because the
money is basically untraceable. I wrote back to the
“agency” and asked why there was no letterhead and
why they were using Western Union. In return I got a
letter all in capital letters telling me to just follow the
instructions, whereas any legitimate company would
be able, and pleased, to prove that they are genuine.
These fraudsters do not just target Au Pairs for human
traffcking or money extortion, but students are also at
risk.
There was a recent article in the Namibian Newspaper
about a young Namibian national from the north who
was the victim of a human traffcking scam. Offered
the opportunity to study medicine in Russia, the young
man ended up in Angola and money was extorted from
his family in exchange for his safe return.
According to Mitchell van Wyk of the Namibia Edu-
cation Exchange & Consultants (EDUEXCON), a stu-
dent placement service business for studies abroad,
prospective students should always be alerted to the
following:
• Is the individual or company claiming
to recruit students properly registered in
terms of the relevant authorities?
• Is this individual or company duly
authorised to act as representative of
the educational institution he/it claims to
represent?
• Does the individual or company operate
from a fxed business premises and are the
contact details consistent?
• What sort of advertising mediums do they
make use of? Again look at duration and
consistency of adverts.
• Is it possible to make cross references,
for example, are local consulates
or embassies aware of the type of services
offered by the individual or company
claiming to represent institutions from their
countries?
• Do these individuals or companies have
some sort of a working relationship with
a local travel agency? This would be a good
way to determine whether students have left
for studies.
• What methods of payment are being made
use of by individuals or companies receiving
money for their services? Do they have
legitimate banking facilities/details?
• Can the individual or company provide
references such as contact details of parents
or relatives of students who have already
made use of such services?
• Legalisation of educational documents
is a requirement for foreign universities, such
as an APOSTILLE. Are these individuals or
companies known by the authorities such as
the Ministry of Justice, who issue the
APOSTILLE?
In addition to the above, EDUEXCON also advises
that, should a prospective student not be sure about an
individual or company claiming to recruit for foreign
educational institutions, they can always consult with
the Namibia Qualifcations Authority (NQA). They
can provide the NQA with the name of the educational
institution and the courses that such institution offers.
The NQA will check this on their database to deter-
mine whether the institution is legitimate and whether
the courses offered will be recognised in Namibia.
If you receive an email offer and you want to be sure
that it is genuine, please feel free to forward it to rob@
consumernewsnamibia.com and we will be pleased to
check it out for you.
Athletics Namibia (AN) president Frank Fredericks believes
that the lack of medals among Namibian athletes is a great
concern, while the fnancial burden to improve the competi-
tive edge of the competitor also adds to the misery.
Namibian athletes who competed at the recently concluded
regional and international events failed to land any medals,
a concern that the former Namibian sprint ace (Fredericks)
considers as a huge setback for a country that has talent in
abundance.
“We need to fnd highly talented athletes to do the job for the
country at some of these elite events. It serves no purpose
to send athletes to compete at the top level with no proper
preparation,” he said.
But he also admitted that sometimes there are darker times
in the careers of the athletes and can also not bring medals
back each time, as the competition is often stiff and at times,
results are unattainable at the elite level.
With proper preparation, Fredericks, who took over the man-
tle from former athletics boss Alpha Kangueehi almost two
years ago, said that preparation for the athletes is currently
hampered by the lack of qualifed coaches in the country.
“We don’t have a lot of highly qualifed and specialist coach-
es in the country and it is diffcult to always get the best from
the athletes, especially when they perform at the highest
level. So, our next step is to fnd a structure to source good
coaches,” he said.
He said an option is to involve coaches at school level, add-
ing that the Namibia Schools Sports Union (NNSU) also has
a good coaching structure in place that can be helpful in
terms of training athletes.
“But as matters stand now, most coaches are working on a
voluntary level. There is absolutely no compensation for the
ones that are putting in so many hours to train these athletes.
It is a pity, but we will look into fnding solutions to this sce-
nario when our congress comes up in November,” he said.
Namibia has some qualifed coaches who hail from Cuba, but
Fredericks says it is diffcult to acquire their services consist-
ently as they are based in the north.
“The athletes in the central part of the country cannot make
use of the Cuban coaches as they need to train on a daily
basis and the coaches are far and cannot be in Windhoek for
longer periods,” he said.
He said that the coaching aspect, in general, is one of the is-
sues that Athletics Namibia will focus on to improve the qual-
ity of the athletes.
FUNDING
Fredericks said that AN has limited funds overall and can
only operate with what they have at their disposal.
“We, the administrators of the sport can always blame it on
the funds, but we need to look beyond that.
AN annually gets N$80 000 from the International Athletics
Federation and most of the money is used on development.
Frank (“Frankie”) Fredericks (born October 2, 1967) is a former athlete from
Namibia. Running in the 100 metres and 200 metres, he won four silver medals at
the Olympic Games (two in 1992 and two in 1996), making him Namibia’s first and
so far only Olympic medalist. He also won gold medals at the World Championships,
World Indoor Championships, All-Africa Games and Commonwealth Games. He
is the world indoor record-holder in the 200 metres, with a time of 19.92 seconds
set in 1996.
FRANK FREDERICKS-ON THE RECORD
s p o r t s
He said it was also one of the biggest aims of AN to identify
other sources of revenue that can improve the standard of
the sport.
The Namibia Sports Commission (NSC) also contributes
to athletics, but Fredericks believes that the money coming
from the body is still not suffcient to sustain them, adding
that they are competing with various other sports codes.
“We must not let our athletes down. All they need is to com-
pete. We must create the environment for them to do that,”
said Fredericks, a former 100 and 200 metre specialist.
Despite that, Fredericks lauded some of the committed spon-
sors who have contributed to the sport in recent years.
He said that Bank Windhoek was currently their lead spon-
sor, as they host the National Championships, which Fred-
ericks believes is the most important event on the athletics
calendar.
“Athletes who do not compete in events will not be selected
for the national championships. Athletes need to take part
in the various events that are organised by the federation in
order to have a stake at the national champs,” he said.
He said the athletes competing at the national champion-
ships and other sponsored events must demonstrate a cer-
tain level of superiority in what they are doing.
“We need to give the sponsors value for their money by
putting in athletes for competition who can demonstrate a
sense of quality in their performances,”he said.
Fredericks added that athletes need to sell themselves to
attract more sponsorships in the future to get decent com-
pensation and to sustain their careers by having the events
on a regular basis.
He said other partners in the hosting of the domestic events
include Old Mutual and Coca Cola, while they are also in the
process of identifying more to form partnerships with the ex-
isting ones and to make the events more lucrative.
AN, apart from the National Championships also holds the
Cross Country and will also hold a Street Mile later this year.
Overall, Fredericks reckons that in order for athletics to pros-
per, there is a need to identify talent at grassroots level. “The
future to this sport is that we must invest in the youth and the
juniors from now on,” he said
My philosophy is that athletes should not suffer
because of the lack of funds. We must fnd ways
how to get funding and send the athletes to
competitions and improve the level of the sport
overall.
CN 37
p
h
o
t
o
g
r
a
p
h

c
o
u
r
t
e
c
y

o
f
:

T
h
e

N
a
m
i
b
i
a
n
32052 Premiumistaion.indd 1 7/30/10 10:41:09 AM