Foreword by MOSS HART Illustrations by Robert J. Lee Arrangements by Dr.

Albert Sirmay

The

COLE PORTER SongBook

THE COl\IPLETE WORDS AND MUSIC OF FORTY OF COLE PORTER'S BEST-LOVED SONGS

SIMON AND SCHUSTER· NEW YORK

MISSISSAUGA liBRARY SYSTEM

276486

\.

ILLUSTRATIONS, FOREWORD, AND SUMMARY OF FACTS COPYRIGHT e 1959 BY SIMON AND SCHUSTER, INC.

THIS BOOK IS AUTHORIZED FOR SALE IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA ONLY.

PERMISSION FOR USE OF THE SONGS CONTAINED IN THIS BOOK HAS BEEN GRANTED BY THE RESPECTIVE COPYRIGHT OWNERS,

COLE PORTER, CHAPPELL & CO. INC., BUXTON HILL MUSIC CORPORATION, AND HARMS, INC.

THE SONGS IN THIS BOOK HAVE ALL BEEN PROTECTED BY INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT WITH ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDING THE RIGHT OF PUBLIC PERFORMANCE FOR PROFIT.

ANY ARRANGEMENT OR ADAPTATION OF ANY OF THESE COMPOSITIONS WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE OWNERS IS AN INFRINGEMENT OF COPYRIGHT.

PUBLISHED BY SIMON AND SCHUSTER, INC., ROCKEFELLER CENTER, 630 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 20, N.Y.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CATALOG CARD NUMBER: M59-1019 TYPOGRAPHY BY THE COMPOSING ROOM, INC., NEW YORK

TEXT PRINTED BY POLYGRAPHIC COMPANY OF AMERICA, N. BENNINGTON, VERMONT BINDING BY TAUBER'S BOOKBINDERY, INC., NEW YORK

CONTENTS

Foreword by MOSS HART 1
Let's Do It 12
from PARIS [1928]
You Do Something to Me 17
from FIFTY l\IILLIO~ FRENCHMEN [1929]
lVhat Is This Thing Called Love? 21
from WAKE UP AND DREAM [1929]
Love for Sale 25
from THE NEW YORKERS [1930]
.,,;;::._ Night and Day 30
from GAY DIVORCE [1932]
I Get a Kick Out of You 34
All Through the Night 38
You're the Top 43
A nything Goes 49
Blow, Gabriel, Blow 54
from ANYTHI~G GOES [1934] v

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~[iss Otis Regrets

[1934]

lVhy Shouldn't I? Begin the Beguine

Just One of Those Things from JUBILEE [1935]

60

64 68 76

It's De-lovely Ridin' High

from RED, HOT A~D BLUE [1936]

80 86

Easy to Love

I've Got You under ]fy Skin from BORN TO DANC}<~ [1936]

92 95

I n the Still of the Night

100

Rosalie

from ROSALIE [1937]

105

At Long Last Love

from YOn ~EVER K~OW [1938]

109

._,.._ Get Out of Town

My Heart Belongs to Daddy from LEAVE IT TO ~IE [1938]

113 117

Friendship

from DUBARRY WAS A LADY [1939]

123

I Concentrate on You

from BROADWAY MELODY OF 1940 [1939]

128

Ev'rything I Love

from LET'S FACE IT [1941]

133

You'd Be So Nice to C01ne Home To

from SOMETHING TO SHOUT ABOUT [1942]

137

V'l-

Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye 141
from SEVEN I~IVELY ARTS [1944]
I Love You 145
from MEXICAN HAYRIDE [1944]
wi» Can't You Behave? 152
lVunderbar 155
So in Love 160
lVere Thine That Special Face 164
Where Is the Life That Late I Led? 170
I Always True to You in My Fashion
t 177
f from KISS )~E, KATE [1948]
From This Moment On 184
from OUT OF TIllS WORljD [1950]
It's All Right with jle 190
I I Love Paris 196
from CAN-CAN [1953]
r
F-
~ All of You 200
t from SILK STOCKINGS [1955]
~
True Love 204
(
r from HIGH SOCIETY [1956]
l Index of Song Titles, Shows and Movies 207
l Summary of Facts about Cole Porter Shows 209
~
~ Paul Hesse

I '~

\

L

FOREWORD

by Moss Hart

TIME FLIES. It is just twenty-seven years ago that I watched Cole Porter swing through the doors of the Ritz Bar in Paris and survey the room, his eyes searching the tables for the young man who had a letter of introduction to him. Though I had never seen him before, I knew that the man standing in the doorway was unmistakably Cole Porter; he looks, I thought quickly, exactly like one of his songs. The small, lithe figure beautifully turned out, the intensely alive face, the immense dark eyes wonderfully set off by the brilliant red carnation in the lapel of his suit-it could not possibly be anyone else. I waved toward him, and as he caught the gesture he smiled back and made his way to my table.

That dazzling smile was quite the best thing I had seen of Paris to date. I am aware that it is heresy not to be enamored of this jewel of cities at first glance and to remain forever afterward her willingly indentured slave, but I seemed to be impervious to the beauty and charm of Paris on this, my first trip, and I have remained so ever since. Indeed, Paris-the Paris that had escaped me-now seemed suddenly to blossom and come alive for the first time as Cole Porter talked, though I knew well enough that Cole Porter was as American as Peru, Indiana, where he was born. He had the gift, I was to learn later, of making any city singularly his own. Wherever he happens to be-London, New York, Venice, Hollywood-there the essence of the city seems to be caught, the secret of the city captured. Paris was his monarchy at the moment, and just before we parted he made a gesture so regal and at the same time so Parisian that to my Brooklyn-bred eyes it had the effect of making me feel that I was seeing the Paris of my imagination at last.

Along with the letter of introduction from Irving Berlin, I had brought with me a small package as well, which I had been asked as a favor to deliver to Cole Porter, since I would be in Paris the week before Christmas and the transatlantic mails at that time of year were somewhat uncertain. "George Hale asked me to bring this to you," I said, handing the package over.

"Doesn't say a word about not opening it until Christmas, does it ~" he said, and tore at the wrapping eagerly.

Inside the paper, a small, red leather box with the jeweler's name-Cartier-stamped on it lay exposed. He opened the box, glanced at the contents and smilingly turned the box

1

around for me to have a look. Two long, thin slabs of gold with the initials "C. P." engraved on each lay somewhat nakedly on the white satin inside the box.

I stared at them, puzzled for a moment, and then asked, "What are they ~" "Garters," he replied, and lifted them out. I watched, astonished, as he lifted each of his trouser legs, revealing a gold garter on the sock above each leg, removed the old ones from each and put the new ones on, and in further astonishment I heard him call, "Hey, Jimmy!" to the barman and toss the old gold garters across the bar.

Before this moment I had not known such a thing as gold garters existed. Now I had seen an old pair of gold garters blithely tossed across a bar and new ones installed. My face must have mirrored the amazement and wonder I felt, for Cole Porter, turning back to me, looked at me and burst into laughter. "It's the way Christmas always ought to start, isn't it f " he said. I could only nod dumbly in reply. "vVill you dine with us one night while you're here ~" he asked. "I know Linda would like to meet you. I'll have my secretary call you at the hotel." He glanced at his watch and sighed. "Late. Late again," he said, quite like the White Rabbit in Alice in Wonderland, and then held out his hand to me and smiled, the same dazzling smile that seemed to light up the entire Ritz Bar. I shook his hand and watched him swing through the doors once more and out into a Paris that seemed peculiarly his.

I have set down my first meeting with Cole Porter because it seems to me to contain some of the gaiety, the impishness, the audacity and the wonderful insouciance of some of his songs. It is hard now to remember the original impact of Cole Porter on the musical theater of the middle and late nineteen twenties. He burst upon that moribund world with the velocity of a meteor streaking across the sky. His words and his music had anabandon, a stunning freshness, a dash and a lyrical agility that were completely new to our ears. The verve of "Let's Do It," the brisk ardor of "Yon Do Something to Me," the sultry boldness of "Love for Sale," the mordant glow of "What Is This Thing Called Love ~" seemed to blow the winds of a graceful and polished world across the musty musical theater of those days and make the majority of the songs we had been singing sound downright provincial. The great ballads-" Night and Day," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "Easy to Love"-and all the others that were to run riot down the years were to come later, but in the late twenties we were suddenly aware that a new musical voice of immense vigor and freshness was making itself heard-a forcible talent that was racy and slashing and bold, but a talent that had great elegance and a curious kind of purity. One thing was certain even then: no one could write a Cole Porter song but Cole Porter. Each song had a matchless design and a special felicity of its own that stamped it as immediately and uniquely his. -,

I dined twice with the Porters during my ten-day stay in Paris and fell in love, as everyone did, with Linda Porter. To fall in love with Linda Porter was as much a part of a young man's first trip to Paris as eating snails at Fouqnet's or climbing the Eiffel

2

LINDA PORrrER

Tower. They were a wonderful pair, the Cole Porters. They were rich, they were gifted, and they moved about with infinite ease and lightheartedness in two worlds-the world of fashion and glitter and the pantaloon world of the theater. Their house in Paris was exquisite, one of the most beautiful houses I have ever seen, and Linda Porter, a legendary beauty herself, lent something of her own radiance and splendor to their life together so that everything and everyone in their house seemed to shine and sparkle with a little of her own special grace. She was a woman of immense delicacy, with an enchanting turn of mind, as easily beguiled by a chorus girl as by a duchess and equally at home with both. Together, the Porters bloomed in a scintillating world that seemed uncommonly festive, and I thought to myself on my last evening with them, What fun it would be to do a musical with Cole Porter. I dismissed this conceit from my mind quickly enough. I 'was a mere neophyte-barely out of Brooklyn and my first play-and Cole Porter was already one of the most sought-after of all composers. Yet less than two years later, that is exactly what happened. We did do a musical together. Moreover, we sailed around the world to write that musical, and I learned to my chagrin that the jaunty and debonair world of Cole Porter disappeared completely when he was at work, and that Linda Porter, who accompanied us, was as stern and jealous a guardian of that work as Cole Porter himself.

The enterprise-an enterprise that was ultimately to emerge as the musical called Jubilee

3

-began innocently enough. This time, I was lunching with Cole Porter some eighteen months or so after my Paris trip, in New York-a New York that was, in spite of the depression and the New Deal, almost convulsively singing "You're the Top," "I Get a Kick Out of You" and "Blow, Gabriel, Blow" from Anything Goes, which had opened at the Alvin Theatre three nights before. The clientele of the restaurant where we were lunching seemed to be composed almost exclusively of people who had been part of that opening-night audience, and they streamed over to our table making congratulatory sounds and cooing admiration in two or three different languages and a variety of accents. It made any kind of conversation between us difficult if not impossible, but somewhere or other in the middle of lunch I tossed out an idea for a musical I had recently had and then brushed it aside with something else that was very much on my mind that day.

"I think I came to a decision this morning," I said. "I'm going to drop work completely for a while. There are always ideas-there are always plays to be written-but always at the expense of something else. I don't want to settle for that quick trip to Europe wedged in between work and rehearsals. I want to see the whole damn world and I want to see it now. I'm going to take a year off and racket around the world."

Cole Porter looked at me soberly for a full moment before he spoke. "Why not do both f " he said. "I like that idea of yours for a musical. Why don't we do it and go around the world at the same time f "

Again I looked at him with the same mixture of astonishment and wonder that had made him burst into laughter as I watched him put the new gold garters into place.

"Why not ~" he persisted. "I could leave next week. Couldn't you f" He was already up from the table and making his way toward the door. "Let's stop by Cook's and find the first round-the-world sailing," he said, "and then go back to the hotel and tell Linda." It was all very matter-of-fact and somehow absurdly fait accompli.

The day of our luncheon was a Wednesday, and the first boat that sailed around the world happened to be for the following Tuesday. We were on it. Another thing I was·to learn about Cole Porter was that when he wanted something, mountains moved and the earth shook. Very few people ever said "no" to him. Abject surrender was the general rule. That dazzling smile could disappear with frightening rapidity and a glacial mask could take its place.

The first ten days of the trip were given over to a detailed discussion of the general architecture of the show-lazy, pleasant, sunny days marred only by the ship's orchestra, which promptly broke into" You're the Top" or "I Get a Kick Out of You" each time our party entered the dining room or the ship's lounge. The first strains of music were always accompanied by loud, wild moans from Monty Woolley and more civilized ones from Howard Sturges, two old friends of the Porters' who had come along for the trip and who found the constant playing of Cole Porter songs almost as unbearable as did Cole Porter himself. He quite literally hated to hear his music played or sung under any

4

I l

other conditions but his own precise and exacting ones. It was his fate and ours, however, to be plagued by hotel orchestras hidden behind potted palms manfully blaring out "You're the Top" in Bombay, in Zanzibar, in Rio, and even-by what miracle of communication no one of us could fathom-in Tahiti and Bali. It was, as Monty Woolley phrased it, "the white man's burden," and there was little to do but sigh and bear it.

Within two weeks I had developed enough of a rough outline for Cole to begin to think of songs, and almost immediately a great change took place. Cole Porter "worker" and Cole Porter "playboy" were two different beings. The change in him was as remarkable as it was revealing. The secret of those marvelously gay and seemingly effortless songs was a prodigious and unending industry. He worked around the clock. I had, and have always had, a fixed schedule of work. A writer of plays or prose is usually good for two or three hours of consecrated work a day and no more. He must choose the hours of the day that suit him best and use those hours to the full. Then it is over. Some writers work best at dawn, some choose even the small hours of the night, but my best hours have always been the late-morning ones. As a consequence, I would emerge from my cabin shortly before lunch ready, eager and waiting for the wonderful world of the Porters to begin, but the wonderful world of the Porters had completely disappeared.

From the time I handed him the outline with the first two or three songs indicated, Cole Porter seemed to withdraw not only from our party but from the human race as well. Indeed, I sometimes suspected that he used work as a weapon to shield himself from a boredom whose threshold was extremely low; he could withdraw and disappear before one's eyes with an almost sinister facility. His withdrawals were not confined to the moment when he entered his cabin to sit at the small upright piano; they spilled over the luncheon table, the dinner table, and even onto some of the sightseeing tours when the boat docked.

The boat stopped first at Kingston, Jamaica, and another side of his nature I had not bargained for was immediately and exhaustingly revealed. He was an indefatigable sightseer, a tourist to end all tourists. Everything held an interest for him. No ruin was too small not to be seen, particularly if it meant a long climb up a steep hill; no ride into the interior was too much or too far, if it was a broiling hot day and there was a piddling waterfall at the end of it. Even the flora and fauna fascinated him, and he would drive miles to gape at a native shrub or an animal that flourished only in a particularly disagreeable part of whatever country we were in. Yet even his insatiable tourism, it turned out, was also grist to the mill of work, which went on whether he was sightseeing, eating or, for all I knew, while he was sleeping at night. I made this discovery a few days later when I went to his cabin to hear the first song written for Jubilee. It was called, astonishingly enough, "The Kling-Kling Bird on the Divi-Divi Tree," a bird and a tree I had heard him asking innumerable questions about during our stopover in Jamaica. It did not surprise me too greatly, therefore, when, sometime after we had sailed away from

5

Samoa, he informed me that one of the chief ballads for the show was to be entitled "Begin the Beguine." The beguine was a native dance we had driven endless hot miles to witness, and my reservations about the length of the song (I am somewhat ashamed to record that I thought the song had ended when he was only halfway through playing it) were overridden by my relief that one of the chief love songs of the show was not to be about a koala bear or a duck-billed platypus, one or the other of which he had found completely entrancing.

As I grew used to his method of working, however-the long, baffling silences, the sudden withdrawals-I became increasingly fascinated and admiring of the profound sense of dedication he brought to his work. I do not know if it is generally known that Cole Porter is a first-rate musician, thoroughly schooled in musical theory and harmony, with a large and cultivated knowledge of classical music at his command. It was, I know, a surprise to me. Those songs which seemed almost to cascade from the piano with infinite ease and grace, those words which were so captivatingly set to music that in combination they sounded almost as if they had written themselves, had been arrived at with immense labor and out of a solid musical background. Without that background, and in spite of his great musical gift, I do not think he could have written" Begin the Beguine," a song that was as far ahead of its time musically in 1935 as "What Is This Thing Called Love I' was ahead of its time in 1929. Likewise, his steeplechase agility with words-words that seem to quicken the music or fill it with languor and very often with passion-spring from a real devotion to the English language. Here again his erudition is surprising, his knowledge encyclopedic and his taste impeccable. The trite, the hackneyed, the commonplace word was never settled for. The search for the right word-the unerring word that would fit the musical note with exactitude and express precisely what he wanted the song to say-was like the quest for the Holy Grail. There was something almost mystical about his constant pursuit for the explicit, tangible word that would highlight the rhyme scheme or illuminate the middle of a song and make it soar to the end. Wit and elegance he had at his fingertips, and he could write clever, smart and even brilliant lyrics by the yard, but he was scrupulous about what each particular song was to say in relationship to the score as a whole, and he polished and worried over so simple a song as "Why Shouldn't I ~" until it gleamed like the perfect little song it is.

I learned a lasting lesson from watching Cole Porter at work. It was, simply, that no artist, however gifted, can ever rely solely on his gift without a steady and relentless industry in its application. The ability to use his gift with vigor and constancy is almost as necessary a requisite as talent itself. Cole Porter is a prime example of this depressing truism. Though the most self-indulgent and the most pleasure-loving man I have ever known, indulgence and pleasure both stopped dead the moment song-writing began. Perversely enough, and to point up the exception to every rule, I suppose; he could fashion a song overnight when necessity demanded it. I was given a startling example of this shortly before rehearsals began.

6

Marcus Blechman

MOSS HART

Both score and book had been completed by the time we returned to New York. The weekend before rehearsals were scheduled to begin, I accompanied him to Leonard Hanna's farm in Ohio for a last respite before the frenzy that lay just ahead. On Saturday afternoon as we walked through the quiet September countryside, inevitably discussing the only topic that held any interest for either of us, I brought out into the open a nagging thought I had long held-that the score still lacked a major song in the second act. He was surprised, but quickly agreed with me. Thereafter silence fell and the withdrawal began. I might just as well have been strolling through the woods by myself. Early on, I might have mistaken this for annoyance, but I knew by now that he was already at work. Mentally I made a note that, with luck, we might have the song for the third week of rehearsal. It is unwise to count on predictability in people, more particularly in anyone as unpredictable as Cole Porter. The next morning he called me into the living room and closed the doors. He placed a scribbled sheet of note paper on the music rack of the piano and then played and sang the verse and chorus of "Just One of Those Things." No word of either verse or chorus was ever altered. It has been played and sung through the years exactly as I heard it on that Sunday morning in Ohio, a song written overnight, thereby defying all the nice little rules I had conceived about work. The fact remains, however, that with this one exception a Cole Porter song is usually the end product of

I

7

hours and days of work such as no self-respecting longshoreman would ever accept without complaining to his union.

Jubilee was a pleasant enough success, and it is interesting to note that two of its songs that I have mentioned-"Begin the Beguine" and "Just One of Those Things"-were dismal failures both in the show and with the public as well. The critics were dismissive and the public uninterested in them. Not until three or four years later did either song begin to assume the characteristics of a popular "hit" or begin to achieve the acclaim that has made them two of the standard songs of the American musical theater.

Jubilee was also the end of our collaboration. We have never done another musical show together. I do not know quite why. Through the years we have talked of doing another one, but somehow it has never come to pass. Shows either happen or they don't

'happen. That is as reasonable an explanation as I can give. Meanwhile, that unending and, to me, unrivaled flow of words and music has continued to pour forth. These recollections are being written during a holiday in Jamaica, and quite accidentally two days ago some vivid memories of our collaboration and of Cole Porter were sent spinning across my mind. A river picnic was arranged for one of the final nights of our stay. Food and a little Jamaican orchestra were dispatched on ahead, and the picnickers followed in large canoes. A huge bonfire was lit, and, after the party, we fell into song in the way common to all picnic parties. We sang Berlin, Gershwin, Kern, Rodgers and Hammerstein and Cole Porter.

In that lush jungle setting, "Begin the Beguine" seemed particularly appropriate, and I suddenly recalled the time I had first heard it sung by Cole Porter himself, sitting at the upright piano in his cabin as the boat sailed toward the Fiji Islands. I remembered, too, my first glimpse of him in the Ritz Bar, and, long afterward, my vivid memory of him when he was valiantly fighting the effects of a tragic riding accident. I do not think any memoir of Cole Porter can be written without mention of his defiance and his fortitude in triumphing over a catastrophe that would have broken and overwhelmed a lesser man. It is marvelous to think that so many of these songs-including the great score of Kiss Me, Kate-these blithe and sunny songs that America has danced and sung for the past two decades, have come from a man whose daily battle against pain and defeat was in itself a lesson in courage and gallantry. It is a testament to the greatness of the human spirit.

In a bleak and sometimes ugly world, to witness an act of personal heroism is to know forever what human beings can be and can do, for it does not always follow that a firstrate artist is an estimable fellow, nor does it matter, I suppose. Too often, however, the artist apart from his talent is a disappointment; he is not very much of a person and it is almost always disillusioning for the hero worshiper to come face to face with his hero. Cole Porter is one of the rare exceptions. He was an early hero of mine and he has remained a late one. He is quite as matchless as his music.

Moss HART

8

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@. l -i . ~ • r I' r I - v~ •
cresco
t .
.

• ,........__ 3- ... ... .... ....
>- z» ::> >- Bb

fI I

Gm

F7

Ebm

1.2.8.

Bb Faug.

4. Bb

/ ~ I

Let's Let's Let's Let's

r "" I do it,_

do it,_ do it,_ do it,_

::>

I >-,.....

let's let's let's let's

I

r I

fall in_ fall in_ fall in_ fall in_

>r--

I love. love. love. love.

2. Ro-man-tic 3. The dra - gon - ~. The chim-pan-

:> :> >-

mf un poco aZZarg.

• •

I 11 r

• • r-

I

I

<:»

a tempo

• •

mp

z» ::> >-

I

I

I

I

.. _

....

16

r

p

i f.

You Do Something to Me

FROM FIFTY MILLION FRENCHMEN

Not fast E~

I was might - y

Fm7

Nt.

through,

E~

blue,

Thought my life was

F7

Till the heav - ens

o

pened

17

Eb

Cm7 Ddi m Eb

Ebdim

Bb7

fl I k I
.
t.J r I r I I
And I gazed at you. Wont you tell me,
'1 I ,__..... I "I--- ~-
/ .
, (~ Vt r Dt -.- rqr r(q~f~t ~ If r
t..
espr. -==== ::::=- p
"....-: - I
·
... :: 4 "I : .. - tt- .____j_- ~ .. -
1II ;:> F7

Gm Gm7

fl I
t.J r r
dear, Why, when you ap - pear, Some-thing hap-pens
hi - ~'I i >- r-=--- i
.
.
t.J J. ~r r '( r ~ • t r
< ~; 11ff' = p
I I
), I I - i\ ~ ---
.
·
vr _'1 r <:»
fl I _L
I
t.J I r r I r l' -, !
to And the strang - est feel - ing through me? ,
me goes
fl I I I ~ -:::-
t.. i rl ~ r- r- , r r 11 -I fiq~ ~~~
poco rit.

- n l;-~ l_ I
·
1 I
Refrain - Slowly, with expression Eb6 Ebmaj.7 Eb6
fl, Eb D D
·
t.J ~ ~ - ,. ~
You do some-thing to me
/ fl I ~ K.l'::'i . :. ~~K--J-i ~ 'n-l"'i
\ · - I
·
@. =if #q: .. • ~ -I~ #q~ -lr
) mp a tempo ;:>
·
f ·
·
\. .. ~ ... ~ 4- i + 1- Gm6 F~dim Fm6

C7

Fm

B7 Bb7

18

Eb

B~aug. Eb

~ I

Edim7

~ that

sim - ply mys - ti - fies :;>

fl I

Fm

Edim7

Fm

Abm6 C7

.J.

n I

Tell

i fl-11 i

me,

I v""U-

:;>

I

why should

it

be

:;>

i I

j

F7

n I

..

I

"

...

You have the pow'r to hyp - no - tize

I I

--

---

1

I me?

1

I

Eb

n I

F#dim

-

• •

I

C7

Let

fl I

me

I

live

I

I

'neath your

spell ,

, I~

._ --

,

r

19

fl I B B~ B~dim I Mm B~7(6) B~7
. .
. ·
'- I r- _... I .._.;- .._.;-
Do doc; that voo - doo., that you do_ so well, For
/ ~ I :::> :::> :::>
\ ~ . .
. ·
'~11 • "1IJ "II "lP"II • ... _____ "11 "i vb':; ..:::::: ..::::::r ~ ~~bqU
~:j • :j .._.;-:j
) ?lfI'
( . ~ ,.._ ...-t .... I ~ ,....",
·
I ~11 :::> "11 I I ~"1 :::> "11 I ~ ;> ~ ~~
f) I E~ D E~ E~maj.7 Fdim
@) ~ ..
you N __ r-i do some - thing to
'l I i . ~ ~qN..-.r--; :>
I
, @) lu ~~# • ~ -l~ q!
< $I
·
·
... ~ .... ~ 4- i
r'l _l C7 F7 Fm7 B~7(6)
@) +. • I I
me That no - bod - y else could
fl I --- 1 ~ . :> :>
I tJ ~~: ,., - " v bt f f f
- q- ~
< .J---.iI L'lij "'!f'
7 R·H.r I :>
I
r __________ r --- r ~ "--71
I!. Fm7 B~7 1'2E~ D~7 E~
'1 I E~
·
'- - - -.......__.....-
do. do.
:::> ~0~
fl I -- ~ ---:::::::- I
\ ·
tJ ~ r 'II .. : r--~ ,- -, Pf'_ -
r 'Ilff'
) =
-
:::>~ -- ~~
I r-.. -
( ·
·
~ ....__.,. - -61 I ~ ...
---=====----- ".too. * 20

This Thing

Called Love?

FROM WAKE UP AND DREAM

C

C#dim

Cdim

Fm6

Bdirn

was a hum - drum

gave me days of

per - son, sun - shine,

lead - ing you gave

a - of

a life

me nights

C

C7

F7

Bb7sus.eb Bb7

Eb

Bb7 E~7

When You

love flew

made my

in through my win - dow wide

life an en - chant - ed dream

And Till

[;oDvnl!'ht ® 1929 by HARMS, INC. Copyright renewed

21

I

F#dim

G

A7

Fm

@) "-P

quick - ened my hum - drum heart.

some - bod - y else came near.

I ,....,.. I I

Love flew in through my win - dow, Some - bod-y else came near you,

Cm D7 G G7 C7 F7 Fm6
~ I L L L ~ I
.
.
tJ I I I I I'"
I was so hap - py then. But af - ter love had stayed a lit - tIe while,
I felt the win - ter's chill . And now I sit and won - der night and day tJ _j - I I I I ~ 1iiii"~1
I .
\ . .
@) ~ q" ~ ~ II~ ~ r ~ r ~ b,. ~ t vr r ~
I
<
( .>
- ---
·
·
\
I I I .... Gaug.7 C Dm7 G7 C
fl
t. .. .. v -eo
Love flew out a - gain.
why I love you still.
fJ - - - -
. .
I tJ .. "r ~~ r ~- - ., ~ T ~. -
~ ~ qf ~ r ~ f
1 ! mf r--=i ~ I
~ ) I , I
·
·
. .
I r ~ - - r ~
22 Refrain - Slow (in the manner of a "Blues")

,., C7

Fm6

I

tJ I

What

r

I

is this thing __

I

I

called

_l

love?

j_

This

fl l

G7

Gaug.7

C

Cmaj.7 C6

C7

t.)

fun - ny

thing __

ftc; called

love?

I I -----

Just who can solve_

I

C~dim

..:

-

11

.:

i

G7

Fm6

_j

I I

its mys - ter - y?

I I ~

Why should it

-- -

make __

Gaug.7

= 11

::::

-

11

v-

a

fool of

C

Cm F7

.r 1

-eme?

I

I I

saw you there_

I I~ I

--6- _. 4'

,R.H., \,. I I ~

.. f IJ_"_ __..._._ _h.li _., ,

J

I ......-

..:::

1

z

-'

..

3

A~

A~aug

fl I - L ·1
@. I I
- one won - der - ful day. You took my heart_
, -
f1 I .1_ --I
I - - -- I
·
I · .
@. ..__., , I ~ i ~ ~ I ~ I ~., ~ ... J t
.-.
<
t _L - ~~ 1 __ I -.
·
· .
• ~ . ~ I ~ I ~ Fm7

G7

Cm6

G7

C7

fl _1_ I 3 I,
tJ I I I I I I -
- and threw it a - way. That's why I ask the Lord- __
~ I j 3T t I" I 1 I
I
\ tJ ~ vf t ~ ~, ~ 't ~ ~ tp f ~ t
I ,.-.... A 11.
·
I ,. r " • • fl I I I
tJ..__., I _~ I r -
- in Heav-en a - bove, "What is this thing- called
>-
11 I ~ ... I - I
teJ .
~ Hf " r- "qr "1' .,.~ 't: "~I .. ~ I" (qJ~ -z: i ~ r~i I
< ~
I , _... ~ >-_
·

• (~. ~~ ~~ ~_:/ ~ :: s: ..:::::
- ?;
11 "II Fm6

G7

Gaug7

t.

fl C
·
·
tJ I I I
love?" What love? "

'1 ........ I "I J 1 _I
\ ·
·
. . . .
tJ ~ "r- I ~ I ~- I " ~ .,t ~ ~- ~r-=-T
) m./' ratl. .f A
_l .-.! .......-!!I I ~ .-.....!
~ ·
· ·
·
~_/ ~_.:/ . V 4t ~_/ ~_.:/ .v ~ ~ Fm6 C

Fm6 C

~.

*

24

Moderato

Semplice (not fast) Bb

Love for Sale

FROM THE NEW YORI(ERS

Ab

When the

p

lega_t_o_-----1 .n

Fm

E~m

Ab7

vy tread of the hea - vy feet That be - long to a lone - some cop,

F

F7

em7 F7

B~7

1 _

a - pen shop.

When the

en

=

mp .n-------

F#7

E7

A

gaz- ing down On the way-ward ways of this way-ward town That her smile be-comes a

© 1930 by HARMS, INC. (;opyright renewed

25

fl I

r r I I I ,

Love that's fresh and still un-spoiled, Love that'son-lyslight-ly soiled, Love--

},. ~ i j ~~j:::r i-.. >

F

F7

B~

1 _

.... ' ....

go to work.

----------------------- I

-

..

~.

..

..*

Refrain (with swinging rhythm and not fast)

,.. I E~ Eb6 Bbm

Eb6

I

Love---

for sale. _

"""1111

Ap-pe-tiz-ing young love for sale._

\. ~ iii >j

>_------,------------

f- ~ ~ ~ f- f v.~ t ~ r

>

.

. .

..

..

,.. I

D~ l

Faug.7

} tJ j

,.. I

.>:»>

Eb6 B~ Eb
.
.
I - r r , ,
will buy? Who would like to
I 'I. . __ i i
. 11 I Bbm Eb

f. "0 ?T.

sale. Who'---

A~7

D~

D~

fl I aug.
.
tJ I ,. ,. I I I
sam-ple my sup - ply? Who's pre-pared to pay the price For a trip to
fl ;...-; i i :> .~ p....' .
I lo.. I_I
I

tJ • s~ i"il:: ~_f~f rr~r ,.- ~ IiJ' ~ .. ~ -v ••• •
z» »- :>
.
.. .. - .U- r ~

Faug.7

A~7

'U' ---

for sale. ----

par- a - dise? Love----

. :>

Let the po-ets pipe of love

-

D~

Gb6

Ab7

Db

D~6

In their child - ish way.

I know ev-'ry type of love

Bet-ter far than they.

Adim B~7

Edim C7

I've been thru the mill of love; Old love, new love,

:>

:>

:>

27

1J. I 1m m
.
~ r r I I I I I -, -:7 r ~ I I
EV-'ry love but true love. Love for sale. Ap- pe- tiz - ing

fl I ~ ~ ~ > __ I - . ~ i i
I
tJ ~ .. - . " ~ r ~ i IIJr" r ~r"t -v.~f ~f rr~r ,.,. ~ .., ~
~ ratl. piu rit.
,," l> > f a tempo :> :> :>
I .
.
- - B7

Bd· 7 B~7(1,5) E~

Eb

ill
.
t.. I I r r I I I
young love for sale. If you want to buy my wares, Fol-low me and climb the stairs,
fl I i ==j ~ i i ~_i :::r 'r'/ ••• : i i I
I@J • ~~r '~~~~f rt~r f~ f. ~ ~ ... :9- [7- •• - v .. r r r
<
molto cresco
:> z» :> I
I .
.
- - - - a j>J,7

Db

Faug.7

B~m7

Bbm6

fl I ----- . -~ - -
.
._ I .._... -
Love for sale. Love.
fl , ------ J. I ---- ?--- ~ l~~ . _k ~:::--
..
- ~
tJ ..!_ _! ., r uVj ~ j Itljo r ~ r J I J -+--1( ., ~ -
ff broadly
~ -e- dimin. P b~
,
---- .~ - :..- ~ 4· 11.

, 2. B~

Faug.7

E

fl ,.-..._-. dim7 E m6 B
·
·
~ for sale. I I
-
fl , J. I I I $.~
I ·
·
, eJ I ~ I vr r ~ i :rtd: t 1\~Jr r ~ r r~ ruvri f. i i
< fl:~ P dim. e a tempo pP
F- _,.--- ... ~
I . .
·
I ~~ ~.

*

28

\/

'/

//

L ' ight and Day

FROM GAY DIVORCE

Mode~.
fl I .... )~ ~ Ill. ~ ~ Ill. ~ ~~ ~ iii. ;.. .L ;.. ;,_ ~
t
~ ... .... f -
) mp poco a poco cresco
--- >,
f ·
·
\ e.; q1J- -s- ~"1-6- v v - ., ._ "r-~ (not fast) Edim

E~

fl I
.
f} I" I" I I 1 r r I I r I" , r- I I
Like the beat, beat, beat of the torn - torn When the jun - gle shad - ows
fl I ~. ::::::- i-- ,..._. >
t
, f} ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .... ... ... .... ... ... ....
I p .:..
·
·
\ ~~ I .... I ~ ~ Edim

E~

E~m

fl I
. . .
'-- ,I ,. r I. k 1 k 1 k r r 1 ! 1 r r 1 I'" 1 I'"
fall, Like the he , tic, toe of the state - ly clock, as it stands a-gainst the
I fl I _. ::::::- ',....' >
1'\
\ @) . . .
7;' ... -. ... ... ... ... ... ... -. ... ... .... "'II -. . ...
<
1 • I '
I
v • ~ ~~ I ~ v • ~ fl I
. · .
f} 1 Like [he 1 I I r r 1 I .t I'" I r r
wall, drip, drip, drip of the rain-drops, When the sum - mer show'r is
fl I '!III ..... >. , , '_' > ,,-' >
. ·
·
·
f} 7;. ... 'I ttq-l -Jr- "'II "'II -. "q ... r- "i -. -. I"'~ . -I -11 -II~
I....;. II ' h. I i
·
~I 7t ~ TT--: "i ~ B7

E

C7

30

Copyright e 1932 by HARMS, INC

fl I 1m m m
·
@. , r r I I I I I , , I I I" , I" I I"
through; So a voice with - in keeps t· "y, you",
me re-pea -lng, ou,_ you,_
fJ l :> ;,..-. . . . z» ::> ::>
I ·
·
@. ~. ~ .... -j "'II ... ... .... ""II ... ... 1~"iI ~"'II ... ~
I. . ~ . I .
.
-I • '":' v",,:" ~ 1I~ 1 ~ , T I D-- I F

Fm Dd'

D~ 6

Bbm

Refrain Cm79'"

B~ maj.7 ,,('{'

/I

If (,'" Ebmaj.7

you are the one. _

On -ly you , .>

~~, Ebmaj.7

~p'" Cm6

un-der the sun. _

I 3

Wheth - er near to me or

::>

Abm7

v {If" Gm7

G~dim

"'" C,.,.

Fm7

far, It's no mat -ter, darl-ing, where you are,_ I

::>

R.B.

31

r

fl 1/ maj, " 9, -,
tJ ___.,U I II" II" I I II" II" I "
- night and day. Day and night, Why is it
n 1 ~ I ~ r.- !J -,
t tJ '~ ... "C rt ~ f.f!. "'II "111_ --~~ ~ r, -~~ ( • ~1 #!
"I ~
~~ /
, >- >- >- I
·
·
I I .... i + i b~ =t r

E~maj 7

B~maj 7

B~7

E~maj 7

fl I II 3 ,
tJ I '" '" I I I I I I
so That this long - ing for you fol-Iows wher-ev-er I go?
~ 1 9 I
fl I 1 , ,
~ it~t ~f_!_ "111 1I_ Jf- ~ ~11 I'iI ~ ... ...·'rl ..... TI:: rr~f
z» I
·
·
.... i + i b~ ~ .- if- fl 1
.
.. ....__, ~ , v ....__, ..
- In the roar-ing traf-fic's boom.L, In the si-lence of my lone-Iy room.i, I
fl I .
ItJ . .
~f~f ~ ., ~ ~ ; ~ !?J" ~ ~ ~ r ~ r R.B.
< ~
I I ~ 'L.q~ b~~ L.-!
·
·
• i -I 11 b~ .,- ::t vr ~ - ~
IT - Cm6

Abm7

Gm7

Gbdim

~ I
@) .... ~ ~ ~~--?, ;u I r r I I I
think of you, ~ night and day. Night and day
fl I ~ I >-
I "I'r' ... ... ~i j- f. r f. ~!.. "'IIr- ~ vi 'r i
tJ
"-
< h~l.. -d / >- >- ---==== 11ff espr.
l-411
I
r - - ~ I + - .. - v D"1I
~ - ~ ..
- Fm7

r

r

32

G~

the 3 1

oh , such a hun - gry yearn-

em

And its tor - ment won't be

A~m7

Gm7

Fm7

through _ Till you let me spend my life mak - ing love- to you, day and night, __

>-

F7

night and day.c,

Night and day;

8·--~

33

Eb

Gb

oh , such a hun - gry yearn-

3

em

ing burn-

in - side

And its tor-ment won't be

Abm7

Gm7

Fm7

through- Till you let me spend my life mak-ing love- to you, day and night, __

.>

b

F7

night and day.c,

Night and day,

33

~IGetaKick Out of You

~'::::=- FROM ANYTHING GOES .(

~ I Moderato Eb

_ ... '--.....7 4r

My sto -ry is

Fm7 Bb7 Eb6

fJ I I 2 I

f.) much too sad to be told,

fJL~

_r r ~, r r: _I

But prac-tic -ly ev-Yy-t.h ing.;

-- - _l ~,

-

leaves me to- tal- ly

'9~

~

- -----_. • <:»:

fl _L

G

Fm7 Bb7

Bb7

" 9_

Fm7

cold. _

... ' __.' I I

The on - ly ex- cep-tion I know is the case _

»>: -!'- [""-3 I~

I -

"-I~ j .. i-:: -t .. • - ~

-========= m.l'

------

- I-,j-I

D7

D7

G

Il j_ ;----._I ., I I 3 ., .....--, I 9 I I ( :-1 I ~
f.) _When I'm out I r r I Jld r
on a qui - et spree L Fight - ing vain - ly the en- nui.,
.sz: ~ -- ~
fl I r 31 -, l I 3 I 3 I I I 31 I,
~
--
@) .,- 11 1 - ., ----I • • - - .-...._...'v
.
, ..,r I I ..,r' tt- I ..r , ~ . :± I

Copyright e 1934 by HARMS, INC.

34

fI I C7 Fm B~7 E~ Gm
I 91 I l 1 I \
t: I , I I I
And I sud-den-ly turn and see., your fab- u -lous face.
fI I I 3 I I 9 I ~ I II _~l --- ,... I iI'iIIII
f} ... ... [J. q'1~ j ~ .. 43 ~r \_~ ~ •
, I I -
I ·
·
q .... ~ .. ~ I
Refrain
fI Fm Bb7 'I Eb Gm Fm Bb7
, I" _!fi 9. I,
·
tJ ...... .... ..
I get no kick from cham - pagne. Mere al- co - hol does - n't

fl , --- 9 -- ----
·
·
f. _f ~ , ~ ~I- ~r.I ~ ~~ r ~ ~~ i fif ~ ~ ~r.I
mp ,
·
·
·
.. ~ : ... I - .. it
Eb Gm Fro7 Bb7 Eb Gro
11 I .'11 " 9 •
f. I .., ...
thrill me at all, So tell me why should it be true That
~ I IJ fJ_ ;:-----_ ~ - .,.-
. .
tJ - ~ -t ~ tt~ r ~ f! ~ ~ #" ~r- ~ tt~, ~_U--- +
--- -
·
·
4i- ~ - T .. ~ .. I
Fro Bb7 Eb Gro Fro Bb7
, I L o. I
f. I , ~ 4i- ..
I get a kick _ out of you? Some get a kick from co -
1 I - ...... I ...... ~ -
f. ~ , ~ F ,f r f - ~1II - ~ • f ~ f ~ ?_!- -6~
= =--==--
.. ~ : ... I .. ~
35 Eb Gro Fro Bb7 Eb Gro
fl I r - I), 'I I II 1 I) 1
f) -# • I 1 I ,
caine. I'm sure that if I had e - yen one sniff it would
fl I --- II 31 , I 3 ..,--
}
tJ f y--_l- r l- brl- r f i 1 :a t "1S~ - - ~ c. c;. ~
~
·
·
~ .. I - • :J • I -
Fro 7 Bb A Ab Eb Gro Fro Bb7
fl I I n I I 31 II I I
.
@. I 1 I .. I I
bore me ter - rif - ic - 'ly too. Yet I get a kick- out of

fl I I .~I I --- -- I I I ;---
.
, tJ ~ c. .,~~ .. vq1!i ~tr~, ~ bf~+ ~ f ~r= ~tr r
·
·
• "J .. 1 • 1i=
tJ Eb Gro Eb7 ~ Db Ab Db Ab
_l -"- __2_ I
.
tJ - I 1
you. I get a kick ev -'ry time I see you're
fl I ~ I r-. »>: ["" s , I I I I
. .
, tJ ,- .. ~ • v~:".:: 1r- ~ vc;. ~ ~f' f' ~f'
-
, 'llfI'
-
·
·
14 I 1 .. I ...
fl I Eb7 Edim C7 Fro
n . 'I
. .
tJ I I I ~ .._.,-
stand - ing there be - fore me. I get a kick tho' it's
fl I I I I I ---
, . .
tJ ~ ~f D'" f [J"f D'" ~Vbr~ f rU~f pf~f ~ (;19- "1S
<
--
I .
I .. 4- 1 q+ , q+ .. ~ .. :it 36

~ 1 B~m6 Fm B~m6 F~ F7 Fro7 ~
.
-+l
f. I I I '-' --u =,
clear to me You ob - vious - ly don't a - dore me.
f! I - I I I
. .
.
t ~ ~Q'"~ II'- ~~Q'"~ ~ ~ tf~ ~ ~r q~ ~U~f TU~f
-....._.... '-- --
.
.
.. .. .. • ~ ~
f'l , Fm B~7 E~ Gm Fm B~7
!} ~ ... 1,
f. .. .. + • -
I get no kick in a plane. Fly-ing too high with some
~ , ---- ----
f) mf i ~ ~ ?! -6~ ~ ~~ r f. brf. r fif ~ 1! -6~

... ~ : ... I - • ~
Eb Gm7 Fro7 Bb7 C7
~ I _.,. , « , I R , ft .,
,f) I , , I I ...
19a1l In the sky Is my i - dea of noth- ing to do. Yet
guy
111 I 3 J --
_I .'1 r , I ----
- - I ~ c.. ~1r~1" ~~tr~ .. ~
q
'--'
, I
.. I --. ~ ;t ~
Fm7 Bb7 It. Eb 112. 1
Gm Eb
I .. "
I I
I get a kick out of you. you.
1 --- I----_ ------- ~
..
~ ~I- -6 • Go • ~.6r~ r ~ ~~ r ~p1"T
'-- r
=
.. ~ ~ .. I t ... : ...
~. *
37 And the moon comes through,

. .

v- - - v- - - - - ,v-

To the mon - 0 - tone of the eve-nings drone

-

lin

~l~ All Through the Night ,t ~ y

FROM ANYTHING GOES

fI

F

Fm

F

Fm

F

Fm

fI

C7

F

Fm

F

Fm

F

Fm

F

@J ,,. r, +' -*' ... ~~ ""#~'

so a - lone; Till the day draws., to an end,

But when the sun goes down

Fm

Abmaj.7

Bbm7

Cm7

~

~ >

t(i@J~~U~i~#~~f~~ t-vgfc.r~/iv~~,-~~ VVU~i '~f-~~ ~v~ ~~'":§~ i§-:§~~ V{~tu~br~~

l(~:~~~~~~~~~~~I~@

• -:J:. D*' ~... P" ~ ..

Copyright © 1934 by HARMS, INC.

38

Fm7 Bkm

Fm

Bbm C7

F

C9

C7

Refrain (not fast) F

Dm

F#dim F7

Bb

All---_

through the night _

I

de - I igh t _____.,!'---_

Gang. 7

G7

C7(~9)

- ---

All through the night __

C7

F6

Gm7

C7

to me.>

>

39

fI F ~7 Dm F#dim7 F7 Bb Eb7
I@. v
All through the night from a height far a -
fl
I ~.::
@J ~rft I~ ~#~~ ~r~r ~ ~ i: ~, ~ r ~ v., ~ ~
<
I I
.
.
r ~ r ~ ~ .. I "' . ~ I P4
AJ, Emaj.7 E7 E6 Eb7(b9) Eb7
fI I -
~ v~ - I I
bove, You and love bring
your me
_lj_ I I 1 I
I
, @. 't~fc ~r~rrr r ~ fir ' .. ~ ~. ~ . .. ~ vr ~. r ~ T "I ,.
<
( L..LJ
I I
4t ~ I q+ I .. I p ... I D"
.r
Abm6 Ab C7 Fm ..
I'j .,
- I ,.---....,
~ I I I I
ec - sta - sy. When dawn .., comes to
i -i., :=>
I'j I I ,,---.......
I q1-'" t ~ ... ~ v.~ r- ~., .. ~ ~ ~ .. ~ ~
f) v '-- ~ c.. v·
"'II'
~ hn l:-. - ~ ::---..
I ..
I ~ ==-===- ~~r ~ r ~ r ~ r~


~ Bbmf C7 c7(b5) C7 AJ,7 I~ Db6
f) I I I
wak - en me, You're nev - er there at all.
:=> j "
fI I i I l--..1 I
~ ~ vr ~ • ~ ~~. ft ~ v r---== vr r v r ~ pr r f r f vr f.. r
--- n 1: __
7 HU.__/ b~ ~1 D~ ,.,' =

40 Edim

Bdim

G7

I knowc;

for - sak

en me

Till the shad - ows

C

C7

F

AJ

Dm

F~dim7 F7 B~

-

fall;

But

then _

once a - gain _

I

can dream __

L.R.

Bbmaj.7

B~m6

F6

E7(~5) A7

Gm7

the

right _

to you

.:> .:>

All

mf'

motto espressivo

C7(b9) C7

Fsus.b~ ---

1.

F

_----

E7 C7 F Dm D~9 C9

through the > .:>

night. _

.:>._-----

*

41

You're the Top

FRO1\! ANYTHING GOES

a~--'_'& ';::'~ (" ' •..

a. A.-r...-.,r-"";::·&-~~-~-'( "

.. ~ t ~ 314' ':'~ ~ .... ..

- ----- - -- -- - ---- _'_- - _" --- -- --_.

~'''''~''~''~''.''''iLI ~"' •

. .,l.! l -: ~ ~" .: ,;~:._. : ~ " 1.ii

~ '. ..'fJ: '.~ ','

~.

Edim

Bb7sus.eb

Bb7

words

1m

so

pa - thet - ic that I

ic

po - et

p

---------------------

F#dim

C7

Fro

al- ways have found., it

best, __

In -stead of get - ting 'em off _ my

e 1934 by HARMS, INC.

43

fI I I ... ..
~ - r I ~ .. ~~
chest, __ to let 'em rest un - ex - pressed ._ I
f) I ...... , ............ - -...... ~ 1 ~ -
I .
, eJ t t r r I '------" [ [ p~~: T
~ i
... • _. • _.
I ·
=<:» "'-~ Fm7

fI I _j. ...
tJ T ~
hate pa - rad - ing my ser - e - nad - ing As I'll
fJ I .........-: --- ---- ----.......
1 .
tJ r,,--T .-:'r 'T ___ 3r
~
I n. • n_ • •
· .
.
, Edirn

Bb7sus. eb

Eb

Cm7

D7 Gm

Cm6

fl I L ~ _.... ~
.
tJ If' r I I I I
prob - a - bly missc; a bar, But if this dit - ty Is
fJ I L.-_I I --........ I~ ~
...............
.
I .
, -f) r p--r f r • -. ... ....
<
- • - _. L. ,- -- I I I
I ·
·
I Gm6

F7

Bb7 unis

Bbaug.

fJ , L
iT I . I rr r r I I ~ +-.:..._,~
not so pret-ty, At least it - '11 tell you how great you are.L
fl , _ I ~
<, --'"
tJ • "11 vr' q~ • ,._. I I ...... <::» +.." ...
- L.
·
·
.. ~ fi 44

Refrain E~

Edim

B~7

t. You're the top! You're the
2. You're the top! You're Ma-
8. You're the top! You're a.
4. You're the top! You're a.
~ A ""):" L

em

Col - os - hat - ma Ritz hot Wal - dorf

se - um, Gan-dhi, tod - dy, sal - ad,

You're You're You're You're

the the the the

top! top! top! top!

G7

\

You're You're You're You're

the Louvre Mu - se - um, Na - po - leon brand-y,

a Brew - ster bo - dy,

a Ber - lin bal+Iad ,

You're YOu're You're You're

a. the the the

45

Fm7 Bb7 B~ ! ;
Fm7 Cm
<c::«
mel - o - dy_ From a sym - pho - ny_ by Strauss, You're a
pur - ple light _ Of a sum - mer night., in Spain, You're the
boats that glide.; On the sleep - y Zui der Zee, You're a
nim - ble tread.; Of the feet of Fred_ As - taire , You're an \.
• I -::;t
f\
D Gm C9 F7(6) f7-'" V
fl v _____
I ___ ...-=
@) You're
Ben - del bon - net, A Shake - speare son - net,
Na - tion'I Gall' - ry, You're Gar - bo's sal - 'ry, You're
Na - than pan - ning, You're Bish - op Man - ning, You're
0' - Neill dra - rna, You're Whist - lers rna - rna, You're
:>
1'\ I ....---..._ .> ___ - D_ 1\
(
~ ;tJ ..._...- ~ ~ , -
~
) '''!I' f
( .

... .- <.-
-,
B~9 Edim B~7 B~aug. Eb Bb7(b9)
~ I ..l.
.., You're
Mick - ey Mouse.i, the
eel - 10 - phane.c, You're sub -
broe - co - Ii._ You're a
Cam - em - bert..; You're a
:> ~
fl I r\ ,......, 1\ ~ :>~
\
----
--._
tJ ~ ..___.,. V· ~. ~". ~~~T #::! v· qr
) - '----'"' ~ ... --- p
.Jt;:.
( '-' .

I ---~
46
_.....-: Edim

Nile, You're the Tow'r of Pi - sa,
lime, You're a tur - key din - ner,
prize, You're a night at Co - ney,
rose, You're In - fer - no's Dan-te,
A E~

I ;~""

"

em

E~7

You're the smile on the
You're the time of the
You're the eyes of I -
You're the nose on the
A A~

i,.

Fm7

Gm7

Mo - na Lis - a. I'm a worth - less check,_ a
Der - by win- ner. I'm a toy bal - loon_ that is
rene Bor - do - ni. 1m just in the way,_ as the
great Du - ran - te. 1m a la zy lout., who is 47

A~maj.7

Caug.7

C7

F7(6)

to tal \\Teck._. a flop, ~
fat ed soon.L, to pop, But
French would "De trop'" if,
say ,- ,
just a - bout_ to stop,
A
_AI I b;~ -
\ tJ r· "~f v
A
) t
~
"---~ • , B~7 I I 4. I
B~aug. E~ Edim B~7 F.dim E~
'\ I
t top!
r}-n~ >- i
• ~ .. • .~ -.. ~~
~ ...... -- I ,
<C f "'" r
~

... ~ ~ q"t -. lfe< >~~~
>- >-
\
48 \
I
\ '1.2.8.
Fm7 Gm7 A~maj.7 B~7sus.e~ E~ Edim
f'l I __ ,,--....
. .
t. I'm_ You're_
Ba - by, the bot - tom, the topl
~- ....--._ ... >- __ ..
~ _j ..... ~.+ .. j.-~ •
\ • - -- -
) f "'11'
( 11 _L I ,.-- I --.....

tJ I I .. ~ . __ .. ingij,es~

.. ..;.f' -_ - -. .. ' '" .... _, -

-, .'.:. ..... _-_ --

.. • • - _ F-RO~ AN-Y .. T~l~G Go}Js_ - -_ .:'

, #.... ..

.. •

...

I ...

Cm

Cm

have

And we've of _ ten re -

G7

Cm

D~

A~7

D~

the clock ;

Since the Pu _ ri -tans

got

a shock.,

.> .> .>

G7

Dm7

G7

C7

When they land - ed on

Plym -outh

If

to -

e 1934 by HARMS, INC.

49

~ I .. I
.
~ "-~-8-' .,:. .. .,- .. +
day _ An - y shock they should try to stem,_
fJ I - L--
~ ".j ]I~ ~~: :11~: '11'::IJ ~. ~i i ~ 11~
q"__..7! . q.. . ... ...
->: ---- I.. I
·
.
I q ... .. L-3.. I C7

Fm C7 Fm

G7

fJl ~ ~,.-.... ,,__ L I

~~~~·~~~·~~~~~~~~~tf~~~~~~-=-~~lili

tJ ,... I r I ~

'Stead of land-ing on Plym-outh Rock, Plym-outh Rock would land on them.i,

G7

Cm G7

Cm

G

D7

tJ I

--~

> > > >

-

-

-

.. ..., "

.

. .

qll . ~ •. ~ -II .... ..

· ·

I I

I

I I

I I

Q Refraif (brightly)

fl G7 C L

l

I

Am ~

'" If

1. In old - en days a

(2.When) moth-ers pack and

(3.When you) hear that La - dy

glimpse of stock-ing Was looked on leave poor fa - ther Be - cause they Men - dl, stand-ing up, Now does

r

as some-thing shockde-cide they'd ratha hand-spring land-

;~:t~~~l1>~~:~~~'~r~~~~~~i~l2~~~~~'~ ~~~~5~§~i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .... ~~~~~ ~~.~>~.~~~I~~~I~~~

I :~ -~ __ •

50

C7

F6

Fm6

C

F6

ing , But now, God knows, An - y - thing goes.
er Be ten - nis pros, An - y - thing goes.
ing up On her toes, An- y - thing goes .
.> C Gaug.7

C

Am

Good au -thors, too, who once knew bet - ter words Now on - ly use four - let-

When Mis - sus Ned Mc - Lean, God bless her, Can get Rus-sian Reds to "yes"

When Sam Gold-wyn can with great con - vic - tion in - struct An - na Sten in die-

.>

.>

C7

F6

Fm6

C

Dm7

- ter words, writ - ing prose, An- y - thing goes.
_ her, Then I sup - pose An- y - thing goes.

- tion, Then An - na shows An- y - thing goes.

.> ---- =

51

4 C B7 E B7
t P -=- I ---c:::::r-- I 'r fl
p ~ p r r p ~ p r p ~ r
The world- has gone mad to - day_ And goods bad to - day,_ And black's
If driv - ing fast cars you ltke.; If low bars you like,_ If old
Just think.; of those shocks you got., And those knocks you got_ And those A

,

f1 I ~ ,.... 'i ..... .... ~ -
.~. f ft- . ...._..... - • - - <:» - i • • . ~ • -
"'If'
A A
. ,
.
:> .' z» ~ tt· z» i E

B7

Em

r r r r I

night to - day,_ When most guys

limbs you like.. If Mae West news you gor.. And those pains

A

9i~~~~A~~j§§i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A~~j§§j~~~~~~~

'~ ~

~ I eJ ~ - -_- - - 1'- - -__. - 1I - _ -

~.~~~A~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*':> 1 tt·.> ~ 4-f:> :J

41

~ r r ~ I, white to - day,_And days

hymns you like,_ Or bare blues you got., From that

~ r r "

to - day_That wom-en

you like,_ Or me un-

you got., (If an - y

Em7

C'dim

Cctim Cldim G7

prize to - day_ Are Just sil - Iy gi - go - los, So
dressed you like, _ Why, no bo - ely would op - pose._ When
brains you got)_ From those lit -tIe ra - di - os. So
;> :>

52

e

Am

though I~ not a great ro - mane - er I know that Iyou'rel bound to an -
I'm
ev 'ry night the set that's smart - is in - dulg - ing in nud - ist par-
Mis - sus R., with all her trim - min's, can broad-cast a bed for Sim- e7

F6

- swer when Iy~u} pro pose, An - y - thing

ties in stu - di os, An - y - thing
- mons 'Cause Frank - lin knows An - y - thing
z» --

e F6 e Dm7

e

e

goes. _

goes.---------

2. When goes.--------------

8.When you

53

I

f

,.

Ga - bri - el say - in',

z» ~J:'::j_ 1 f.. I

1

-"

Blow, Gabriel, Blow

FROM ANYTHING GOES

-~

-~

Poco agitato

fl I unis. (Spoken)

Do you hear that play - in'?

I"""

- -

Yes, I hear that play- in'!

1 11 I

mj'

-

-

fl I

Do you know who's play-in'? ~

No, who is that play- in'? Why, it's

1 .... I

I

=

1

fi I

Ab

1

I

Fm7

I

l

r

Ga - bri - el,

I

r I

Ga - bri - el play- in',

:>~~ I l I

r

Ga - bri- el,

fl I

I

I

J

I

'tJ I

.. .

• •

- -

fl I Abm6

Cm? Bb

@.

fl I

"Will you be read - y to

go when I blow my

I

horn?-"----

I

Oh, :>

Copyright © 1934 by HARMS, INC.

54

Refrain ('l'igorously)

Eb em

Ab

em

-

Blow.i,

Ga - bri - el,

Go on

and blow,_

Ga

blow!-----

I've been a sin-ner, I've been a scamp, But :> :>:>

z» z»

Fm

F7

Ab

-

now I'm will - in' to trim my lamp, So

em

Ab

Eb

em

-

might - y :>

low.c,

Ga -

55

!.~
Gm Ab Bb rAf' Eb Eb7
, gl,~r Il31~ }J 'r W' " I W. )1
r r * r r J) r F
- bri - el, low But now since I have seen the light, I'm
1\ I i -r :> i ..----;---..._ I i
,.-.... -
I I
I
t: .r r ~ r -e- ~ r-- rr-r f?!~'1 ~ r ~t f. r ~ ~r
....
I I
I
I
I -T r Fm Eb F7 Bb7 &b Cm Eb7 Ab ........
f'I I
I
tJ 4' ~I I - .... .. __ 7'____"-
good by day and I'm good by night, So blow.i, Ga - bri- el, blow,
I"} I _' A A z»

~ ~ r ~ - r .... - qr ~f" J q. J 1'Wf:: ~~ ~ i Vf ~~
~
~
• I I ~ 1\ I Eb Gaug.7 G7 Cm Fm7 Cm Gaug.7 G7 Cm
.r---.
~ ..__.. I ---- ._ '-~~~ 1
- Once I was., head - ed for hell, Once I wasc, head-
fI I »<:«: --I »- -I I~
:> --
I
.~ ~~~r ~ r r f ff r_~if 'f qr ~ r I I-
I
I

...__-~ - I I • ":it_/' '"' I
~ I D7 G Cm6 G Bb7 Eb Eb7
- ...
. . .
tJ I l I I I
- ed for hell; But when I got to Sa-tan's door I
rt I -I =j I ==j i i ----r--i i
. .
--
f. [ '{" ,.. ~ ~~r~f f. r If (:T ~ vf
I I
.
.
-I ------ .__./ ' ... I
56 Cm

Fm

Gaug7 Cm Fm

fl I - l
@.. '---.: r I -- -......._....... -s-.:._ -
heard you blowin on your horn once more, So I said, "Sa - tan, fare - well!'-' -
fl I ~i I :> .
I
f. r ~ --- :t :1= .. ~ r i r 'f r-1IL
<
f
·

- .~ Cm

Fm7

Fm6

Fm7

C

Fm7

Fm6

I f. _____ .4J.! ... I I I I r I
_ And now I'm aB_ read - y to fly, Yes, to fly- high -
fl L :> I I.- J ~ :>
-- ....-- I I ,-- --
, ,
I
tJ ~f i ~ .. - ___ 1..-- ... ", r ~ r- "I" r r r .. - ___
pitl .f
~ I
·
'-/+ .. .. 117' ~~ it ..
Fm7 Eb Gb
Il L .-~I :1 , ~ ........-
tJ I 'Cause I've r r b . I
- - - er and high- er! gcne L through rlm - stone ,

I 3 I I 3 .,
~ I ---- I
t _. ... . - - ... r-- ~~t ~ f f;~ f ~ '11 LI. '11 ... 11-
. .....___.._.
.. - ... .' ...... y r ~ pr ~
Db F7 F7bS
n I I ., , _1
tI I \ I ---
_ and I ve been thru the fire, And I've purged my soul and my heart too, So

~ I I 3 1 r. 3 .,
It) J .... H'· _. .. Llr ~ ~f ~ Vf ~ ~~ ~ ~'~ Iq~ ~r- ~ , .:;
. .:j
br--:' I
T ~ Dr ~ I PlI ' T p-.r- I
57 B~

Edim

B~7 Cm7 C~im B~

Eb

Cm

I !

fl I L L
·
@ I ,.. ,.. I I .......___..
climb up the moun- tain top- and start- to blow,_ Ga - bri - el,
fl I :> ~ :>
·
·
tJ ~ it" ...... Vl1tF' iF' ~ ... ~ vi '1-0 .... ~-=r II ". ;: ~ f
-_ r--= ~
r
-- -.........
I I Gm

I !

fl I ------
,
, .
tJ .. .._/ ------ I I ,. I 1 I T ----
blow! Go on and blow,- Ga - bri - el, blow!
»-
:> :> :> I~ i >;- I
,,\ I -
.
~ r ~f:r r~ j ~~I 1I~ YJ 1- -= ]..- T f:i T ~ ~ f
....---.-.... I
·
.. 1 , • ~ ~ I L
.
tJ .__, I I I I r - - -.
- I want to join your hap - py band_ And play all day in the
~ I ~ i i - ... I ~ -- -
.
, . ~ r ~ IF ~ r ~ t ~ l:f--~ ~ r---r
I I
·
\ ~ T ~ I - :""
E~

Fm

:>

8va bassa

fl I _l ,----. ".--... --- ;--..
·
·
tJ I I I T
Prom- ised Land, So blow.i; Ga - bri - el, blow! os, - A
.> :> .> :> ~
'I I z» z» :> :> ,/ .::>. ------.. F--
I v-.. - ;--.. IIr
.
\ ·
·
.
tJ .. .,-11 ... • .. -_ v 11!~r I T 1..-1'" ~ _L, .PA
IJf :!!}Olto deciso
< f
f :> 19- =;; .>
·
·
~ .> :> :> c. ~ ;5 :> ;5 ~
:> .> .> Fm C7 Fm G

Cm

AI,

11. "2.

Fm7 B~7sus eI, E~ B~7 E~

58

'} I I ml I
. .
tJ Mi 0 ~ r' ~ , r r I r -
ss -tls re-grets shes un - a - ble to lunch to - day, Ma-dam._ Miss
f'j I ~ Ai ... I ,.._... I I
\ ~ .
~ r-------r • • . .. .. : ~ r-i r~ -e-
) p --=====

( . -- .--- -- I ---

.. .. ... • E~7 F

Miss Otis Regrets

1934

Andantino

~1 ))1 1 11 J

f) I n J h 1 h I I
4} .......__ I ____ I , --- I
mp
t

~ "U' ., U' \~J CJ "U .. . ----------r

~ 1 I. I ..
.
.
tJ 0- tis re-grets she's un - ~ - ble r r She is
to lunch to - day.
't I - ~ I ~ I ~ ~
.
tJ lifo .. ..~ CJ· r· ~f ~r ~ f
....

-== = =-===-
--
.. ~ ~~ Copyright. 1984 by HARMS, INC.

60

Fm6

be de - layed,

But last eve-ning down in Lov-ers Lane she strayed,

Bb7

m.l

Fm

em6

Ma-dam._ Miss O-tis

re-grets she's un - a - ble to lunch to - day .. ----

Refrain

Bb7

When she (When the)

love was from the

gone, jail,

Pm

Ma- dam,_ Ma- dam,_

She ran to

They strung her

the man who had

up - on that old

led her wi! -low

so far a - cross

a - the

61

8

Bb

Bb7

Eb

fl I
.
@) --- r I ,r
stray, And from un - der her vel - vet
way, And the mo - ment he - fore she

fl I ----..._, ~~ I ~- -
I .
, @) CJ· r· ., ~~ Jf ~ f r r f
< ....
t - ----....,
·
.
~ -:;. .. fl I
.
@) I
gown She drew a gun and shot her lov - er
died She lift - ed up her lov - 'ly head and
- - - - - -
fl - -
I .---......
\ @) .
Vr&" - ~ - • • [ ... ....
r~ "'fI'
I .>: ~--...... .>: --
·
·
4- I I I Eb7

Db

Eb7

Fm6

Fm

fl I I I
.
" down, Ma - dam._ Miss o - tis re - grets she's
un -
cried, Ma- dam,_ "Miss o - tis re - grets she's un -
fl I I I
t .
@) t r r lI[ ~ i i i ~ .. ...
< - f-- -= = dim.
- --.... --- • ----
I ·
·
I .. ~ t.

fl I ...
·
,
@) -.__..-'" ,./' ..__,~
a - hie to lunch to - day. When the
a - hIe to lunch to - day?'
fl I -
·
@) ~. ~ ~ ~::: ~ c8Y __ ~-J.~jI~ ~~~J~
poco rit. mp ~~
, -
~ .--- ........" P
·
· ·
·
it .. ~ .. ~ -9- +,
-- _ ... Cm6

62

Why Shouldn't I?

FROM JUBILEE

C G7

u

C

G9

C

Dm7

C

G7

fl semp 'f,ce I
.
t. , - - .. 4J.I - ..
,
All my life Ive been so se - clud - ed, Love has e - lud - ed
( ~
.
I. ~ .. ~ .. ~"f- .. i~ j ~r- ~ ~ ~~ ~: !
( P"t't8mpo .. ..
-
·
.
I , 4- .." I ~i c

Dm7

G7

C

fl
tJ 4· :JiI.... .. li~ .. - .. -
me. But from know - ing sec - ond hand what I do of it, I feel
fl-... • ,--..."'_ »>: .~~ -
I
tJ 1~ _- #f ~ ~f ~ .. .. qf r • .. -iii -- ~ ....
I
=--
·
·
.
:6. --- , I -
fl Dm7 ~ Gl C Am Em Am
~
.
tJ - if' r , , - I
eer -tain I could stand a elos - er view of it. Till to - day I
fl - "'~ ~I ~
.
tJ f ... iIJ" "---" ~ f ~ ~
<
I I -- -_
·
·
, I .". I ..... __..../ ~
Copyright e 1935 by HARMS, INC. 64 Em

Baug 7 B7

E

07

G

fI m ... L.
.
It - 1 -,jI - -. J ,.
stud-ied love dis-creet - ly, But now that I'm com-plete - ly free, I must
fl - ---.. ,..-:: I l-- A
.
tJ 1'- rf: .... fT f ~i ICO· ~ ~ I
~ , L r , ~
.~ .
.
.
+ ___ ~ .. I 07

Am

Em

G7

some kind per - so - na

gra

ta

To give me

--

----

Am

07

G7

ta

per - son - al -

ly.

Refrain (Slowly, with tender expression)

C Om7 G7

c

F6

G7

Why

should - n't I

take a chance when ro-mance pass-es by?

r

r

f

f

65

fl C Am Dm7 G7 C F G7
... ~ .,.. ..., c.I • ~. -,j-I~
Why should- n't I know of love?
f'l .. .-....J
I ,) ~ f ~ f· + r f 1:' T ".~y ~ ~ ~
~ r
I
.
~ :; - - ~ ... - -
..
fl C Dm7 G7 C Am
I
t. 11 r r
Why wait a - round, When each age has a sage who has
~ --- -
I "'"
I t. p~ f ~ - - ~ 1= ~ r ~ II .. ~ r-
< i
t

.::: .. -,t - ~ =
: .. ...
~ B7 E A B7 C.m E F.m B7
... ~
t.. I I r T - - ft·
found That up - on this earth love is all that is real - ly worth
~~I _l 1 ------
, t.. f ttl ,. f r r r r ttr r IIi #r - ftf
~ I

i ~ ... .. _ ,.,. TT .i->

fl E A E Dm AT
@) - <:»:« - - v- c.I ~ .. • ~ ~~'
think- ing of? It must be fun, lots of fun, To be
fl _..--.., :;> - l_ -
I t.. #~ t!r-t.r r _ _#r- T i 1fT f r ~r f 1- ~ f ~ f· (W--
I il- L ,........_
- -- -
\ ..._,,- -- - tt- • I I
- : -----------------

66

Dm

F~dim7

C

Cdim C

D7

That the hour is com - ing when

You'll be

poco O1Y!so.

G7

C.dim7

Dm7

G7

C

be kissed a - gainL All deb - u - tantes

say it's

p

Dm7

G7

C7

good, _ And ev -'ry star out in far HoI - ly - wood seems to give it a try,

So >-

r

'llfI' piu espr.

t.

C

Dm7

G7

should-n't I? _

67

2.

C

========t=- pp

~.

C

C6

Cmaj.7

C6

C

the be - ine

~ I __, -,
t ul , "0 tCD ~_C".o'_. 4l1li' • - night ~f trop - i-cal
- UlLl.-Dl0 - OJ", It bl'ingc back R
n --=::::: ..... I I I rr-~I':::;;-
) eJ i&- • -II it!!"t.:1 ;rf;~ ~ ....... L....J '~
~
t

~ - : 7J- -~ U : U :~ rt =
1 i .. .. .. G7

Ci7

'L,

It brings back a mem

ev - er green. ----

Copyright e 1935 by HARMS, INC.

68

C6

Cmaj.7

C6

l rn with you once more __

un-der the stars---------

And

G7

Dm7

G7

G7

When they be - gin _

the be-

c

Cm

F7

a - gain--

69

h Bkm E~7 Abmaj.7 Ab6 AJ,
- I.
~ ._.",..._.... DT • V" V- I I
Ex-cept when that tune-- clutch-es my heart. Then
~ -- .--t .._.. I
.
I
tJ ib~il v"!: ... (I" in- ilft1t ...... ~ I VU't! 7 -t:r'cr
~ .-L ... "II
I C'lY!80.
·
·
.. .. 1 1) .... I P*- I P"
~ F.dim , I ' G Ab II
_'/- -, I
.
tJ I I I 1 !
there we are, swear-ing to love for - ev - er, And prom-is- ing
~ I~.I I II 31 II I to... I ' _______ I I
'I 3_
.
\ ~ 111~ L......J "'r I ~~ I :...:.... '0 I v c:..:...r - -I
< m.l' piu espr.
I --- , I., --- __....--_ _h ---
·
·
, ftv .. -
G Fm7 G G7 C
,~ I r:-- .-.
t.J I v- .. 41 ..... - .........___.,
nev - er, nev - er to part. What moments di - vine.L,

~ I _l- _Ij n: ---. r--. -- --1 ----:-:.
) .
~ i(qr~it1 7vtZ/f t ~ i(~r~it1 it2ri "'i"~ i ; ~ i ::, ~ ~
< ....... __..
~ dim.
p
·
·
\ - - V .. - - -- I ~ - -
i ,

C6

Cmaj 7

C6

C

C7

~ r-- -- I 91 I "
.
~- - .. -_ <c:> + ... .. I
- what rap-ture se - rene! Till clouds came along to dis-perse the joys we had

~- --=-=-== '_.lot I _I l r-~:
.
~ iE.!. ~ i '~it!1 itr0 I~ ~ ~~-II* itzf - ...
I"
,
.
~ - = ~ - = ~ - = :;i: - ~ =1-
11 11 11 ~ 11 70

G7

Fm

Fm6

And now when I hear peo-p Ie curse the chance that was wast - ed,-r-:fI

G7

G7sus.c

G7 Cmaj.9

C

I know but too well what they mean. _

So don't

C6 Cmaj.7

C6

the be - guine! _

Let the

C

/I

C6

G7

a - fire

re-main

an em

ber. _

Let it

71

~ F Om7 Em Am Om7 G7sus.c
~ j t
.
.
t. I I d . 1 - . ..._,,-- .. -
sleep like the dead e-sire I ori-Iy re-mem - ber When they be- gin--
fj 9 I I ~ T I 9 I --
.
, t. ... ... .. I ~ ~ -fi ........... ~_t2!7f.zf ;!j~E:1 ~1 ~ ~cr
--
, dim. p
·
, r;; .. U f T 4 I ... ~ U I ....
=+
-6'-
~ G7 C6 C I C6
r :1 I s I
.
tJ...._; -
the be - guine. os, yes, let them be-gin the be-guine, make them
~ - =j I 9 I 9 I J I h
t. ~"O"~ r ~ ~tfif:f ~~it' ~ - r... c:.._1""
I ._... f molto espr .
·

\ - ~ - - ~ - ~ ~ - ~
=t- =+
i 11 ..- r
C6 C F C G7 C
~ Cmaj.7 I ,
9 .
.
t r I
play Till the stars that were there be - fore re-turn a -

-I I ~-j. ~ I~
~ r--l I 9 I
-
. .
t
t I:....[ t:.....r I r I r I I r - l......J I V I r
~
I ·
·
~ = :;t - ~ - ~ =
.. i~ i ..
~ G7 F Om7 Em Em7
l I 9 I I _9 I
.
tJ I --- r 1 I "D rl ~'-:---'"
bove you, __ Till you whis-per to me once more, ar- mg, I love youl'!_.'
j I -
~ I -- ,...... 9 I I 1 9.1 ---
t .
, tJ "I =:. ... "1"0" "I t:J"""I ,,"I ,. I" ...... I ~' ~ 'l...:.J .-
~fz.f~tz!
~ mf' --
dim .
.
\ U U ~ .. ?t I -,j- 4- I I
-:: =
1 11
72 Dm7

G7sus.c

Fm6

And we sud-den-ly know _

what heav-en we're in, ---

G7

C

Cmaj.7

~

:------

the be - guine. _

When they be- gin _

Fm6

G7

ten.

the be-

ten.

c

C6

Cmaj.7

dim.

p>

73

..

. -

-

..

. Just One of Those Things

" \ ;;.;<

~-~~~ FROM JUBILEE

/ ;'"

,. . i- -<

- Allegretto F

~ I _,.--..._
~ ..
As Dor - o - thy Par-
fl >- _i . i >-Jr--
I .

t: :~ ~ ~,:-. ~ #i I~ TII~ 'I I '1'- VI-6· r 4- ~ .. ~ 1
'Ill _ <, P
I
· .
I ·
I I I I I I I I "-~ .. .. fl ---. _l_
tJ 1r~"F:re ---
- ker once said to her boy - thee well'.'
.
~ ,...........1 I I ~i I..
t
t.. '{' I f' r ~ ~~I, ~ ~ ~ ~ t ~ .... ~ f ~ ~ ~ --'- ~f t ~ f ~ f
< ~
.../
t ·
·
.. 4~ i ~ .. 4 - ~ .. ~ Gm7

C7

F

C7

F

f) I 1 ....-.. I I r=>:
t.J ...._" -
- As Co-lum-bus an - nounced when he knew he was ~~'_ "It was swell, Is -
:::>- I . i J i i I
~ ..----... .....-;---... i -'_I i f >
t
" ~ ,r - ~ ~~ I '{' I ~ 'tqJ ,., ~ I - I 1 '{' I ' r t- ~- ".:::
<
~
·
.. :'6 .. ~ .. .. T = .. ..
-4t Gm7 C7 F

Dm

Fm

C

G7

fl
~ - I I I <c::> tt ~ - I q,:,,--
- a-belle, swell!" As Ab - e - lard.L, said to Hel - o - ise.,
fl I J I =J i >- >- ::r i>
" "--" .-1 '{' I f t~.r ~ u-~ r '{' II ~~ ~r .f" ~ l t- q",
"--"
= mp
,--... I _l
, ·
·
- I I ~ .. -4 C Dm7 D#dim C

Gm7

C7

Fmaj 7

F6

Copyright e 1935 by HARMS, INC.

76

Om

F7

B~

E7

"Don't

for - getc, to drop a line to me, please,", As

Ju - liet cried , >-

F

Cm

07

Gm

Om

Gm7 A7

in her Ro - meo's ear,_

"Ro - meo, why., not face the fact, my dear?~

:>

Refrai~ (brightly) A7

A

F7

one.L of those :>

things, ----

Just :>

one >-

F

Fm

Gm7

C7

of those era - zy flings,_

One of those bells that now and then rings,

>-

:>

:>

. >-

77

F6 F.dim C7 A7 Dm _l I
_l ,
,
I
U .. ....___..... .. ~ .. u ~e-_ .. ~ T~ - 1
J
Just one___ of those things It was just one_ of those
A :>
A :> ~ j_ __l. _}.. _l I
.. - ..,_ ~ ~f r f qrqf ~ r if f· " f " ~ " ~~f
~ qr ~f
I I -

$")I ~ T =
..
Dm6 C#dim F
I I I I I
.
of those fab- u -lous flights, A trip to the
- i -
I 0 I A

F7 I

I I

I

nights,--

Fdim F

Bb sus. eb B~7

Gm7

F#dim

C7

Fm7

F6

\ ~

)

t :

u

Just

.. ..._:!' ~~ rJ qe- _.. -6- ...

one _ of those things If we'd

I

moon

on gos - sa-mer wings,

I I

A :>

= ..

I

.,-

Eb

G7

tJ -, I I I I -6- .." -...__..... I

thought a bit_ of the end of it_ When we start- ed paint - ing the town,--

I

. :>

I I

---

78

I

I

I

Am6

Fm6 Em7

We'd have been

a - ware_ That

_ ~ ::
t 11
fl I C6
...-
i tJ ,
_ to cool down.
'\ --- i> -z:-«
14 -- -6 .... T ''''
>
, , 1 , F7 .r=-,
I I
It
Here's hop -
A >
i It. .. I J"--_
'0 ~ vl '- Fm7 L

:J. '= ft· ~ .. ,
q1l
A7 I D,m I A I
I I
I
So good-bye, dear.; and a - men! A
I _. I I' > I
# ~ '- f f. ~ :'- ~'- ~ ~ f~t ' I
p
I _l
~ $ ... ::::; ..r :; #~ i
~ ....
B~ Am D7
I I - ing

-

we meet now and then. -

It was great

~

~I • ~

- ~~ .

fun,_ But it was

>_.1

... = :j

...

F

-.:. I'

..

It.

Gm

A

..... --........_....,

It was

I I I

just one_ of those things. - _

......... i )) I I' _ > . > _ :;- ~;-~.

I

tJ-e- •

"- =

~.'--~*

..

79

It's De-lovely

Allegretto

fl ~_ ..,... -- """-1 L~. ~
~ ~I
.
tJ ...... ...... r I'
mp
'" Q.
.
.
eJ~ "'0" ....'"' ~ ... fl l I I I _l l
.
@.. + I'" 1 .. -
He: I feel a sud - den urge to sing- The kind of dit - ty that in-
/ 11 _l_ _l_ I l_ ...... 1 -
\ ~) --
.- ~ t....r--.:uvr T L..~---~' 7' r' ~Ft r
) p leggiero
• • l
t .
.
.
.. .. :; F

F7

C7

F

Aj,dim C7

B~m

C7

while I cru - ci - fy

the

vokes the Spring,_ So con-trol your de-sire to curse

.~

-------------

Copyright e 1936 by Chappell & Co. Inc.

80

F

F#dim C7

F

F7

She: This

,

verse lve

start

ed

seems to me.L

the

C7

F

Dm7

G7

thes - is of

-....-

mel - 0 - dy,_

Tin Pan - ti

So to spare

you all

the

i

Gm6

A7

Dm

F

Fdim G7sus.c G7 C

pain

In

skip the darn thing

and

5 ing the re - frain .

B~

C7

spoken

Do sol mi do la

si. She: Take it a-way!

81

Refrain (tvery rhythmically)

Caug.7 F

Faug.

F6

....._--
the skies are clear., And if you want., to go
on_ and soon it's plaiIL You've won my heart, and Ive
tied_ and so we take.., a few hours off_ to eat
down , as man and wife.; To solve the rid - dIe called
A A 1. The night is
(2. Time) march - es
(3. The) knot is
(4. We) set - tIe
>-
,\
I
~
~ p
>- F

fl l I l ~ _A l l _l. l ~ l
· ·
tJ - I
walk - ing dear, ~
lost my brain, It's de - light ful,_ it's de - u cious .c, it's de -
- -
wed - ding cake,
"mar - ried life:'
>- >- :>
( fl
· ·
· ·
· ·
~ t.J ...... ~ ... 11·~ q ... "111!-~ ... v- "'L-~ ~
'-./ '-./
I I _1 _j_
~ .
.
" • ~ .. ~ tt .. ~ ~
.
tJ I I'" I .. .. .. '-./ ... ..
I un - der - stand., the
love ly. Life seems so sweet., that
-
_ It feels fine_ to
V{e're on the crest, _ we
fl >-
• ) A
( ·
·
·
) @) I'! . ....__..,.~ r: ~tJ I-' ... ... '" ~ ...
...__...
I if p

~ - tt" I ..... I C7

D7

Gm

82

Gm6

Gm

-..._/ <c:»:
reas - on why_ you're sen - ti - men - tal, 'cause so am I'-l
we de - cide_ it's in the bag_ to get u - ni - fied.; It's
be a bride,_ and how's the groom? Why, he's slight-ly fried! de -
have , just pIe of hon-ey bears,
no cares., were a cou -
;> F

light - ful,_ it's

de

G9

C7

li

. l·t's

ClOUS,_

de - love - ly._

F9

You can tell at a glance i,
See that crowd in the church.i,
To the pop of cham - pagne,_
All's as right as can be, __ What a

See that

Off we

Till one

83

F

Faug.

B~m6

fI -
@) •• "...._ ., .... ~ ~
swell night., this is for ro - mance, You can hear dear Moth - er
proud par - son plopped on his perch, Get the sweet beat of that
hop in_ our plush lit - tle plane, Till a bright light through the
night at_ my win - dow I see_ an ab - surd bird with a
f1 .......... > > > ~r\ ,.............- --......
/
\ @) ! ~~~ ":: - ........... • ......_.". .~ . 11- i
'=1
) ...._
~ a-'. 10.> .........
l -....."
.

> • > • > - C7

~
@) v· I - • 4....____,,--': I ,. ,. I ,. I I
Na-ture mur - mur -ing low, "Let your - self go~'_ So
or - gan peel - ing our doom, Here goes L, the groorn!., Boom!
dark-ness co - zi - ly calls, "Ni - ag - 'ra Falls!'~ AIls
bun -dle hung_ on his nose. "Get ba - by clo'es I':' Those
A
'1 _> > >- >- >- :> >- :>
(
@) D· I -- • q~~" I r ,. I r I ...
~
"'!I'
....____" if
l ~ :>,.,- :> ... _i
~ I ""-~ ~ '~ ~ I~ ~
=- F

Faug.

F6

......_.". - ......_.".
please be sweet.c, my chick - a - dee,_ And when I kiss.; you, just
How they cheerc; and how they smile .c As we go gal - lop - ing
well, my love.L our days COrn- plete.i, And what a beau - ti - ful
eyes of yours., are filled with joy_ when Nurse ap - pears- and cries, 84

F

l

L.

Fmaj,7

l L.

say to down the bri - dal "It's a

I "It's me,_

, I It's ais e,_

suite L, It's boy!~ He's

:>

I

de - light - di - vine, dr - ream - ap - pall -

I ful,_ it's

d l't'S ear,_

't' y,_ IS

ing,_ he's

:>

de - Ii

di - veen, dr - rou - ap - peal -

cious,_ dear.c; sy,_ ing,_

t

it's it's it's he's :>

de - duh - de - a

,

I

tJ

Cm6

r I

lee - ta - ble,- it's vun - der - bar,_ it's re - ve - rie,_ it's pol - ly - wog,_. he's

I"

I

..

D7

l l

,.

de - lir - i - ous,_ it's duh vie - to - ry,_ it's de - rhap - so - dy,_ it's a par - a - gon,_ he's

:>

di duh de

4'

Dbaug. _j_

r ,.

it~_ it's_ it's_ hes.,

I

C7

L.

r

de - Ii - mit, duh vln-ner, de - roy - al, a pan - ie,

,.

- lem-ma, val-lop, - re-gal, Pop-eye,

,

poco a poco crescendo

t

I

I

T I

I

I

-

Gm7 B~m r1,~3, Bb caug.i 4'F

!~~~~~~~~~~J,~~~~J.-~~~~~l~~~~~:I~~~~~J~~

tJ 1"" V:--I --------1 ~I ..__...-,

" ·d I 't' d I 1 " T'

Its e- uxe, I s e - ove - y, ~. Ime

it's duh voiks,it's de - love - ly._______ 3. The

it's de-Ritz, it's de - love - ly. 4. We

he's a pip, he's de - love - ly. _

,

.>

-

,

1'\

r

3 --1,

1

-

-j -

I

ItPronO'unc;~d "aetukes'' ~

f

• •

85

.

-

if

A

Ridin' High

FROM RED, HOT AND BLUE

>-

>-

>-

f deciso

::> ::>

c

G7

/l m
tJ ~ • .. I . ......._____.,- ... "
Love had rocked me, sim - ply knocked me for a loop.

fl >-
I tJ v- - v- - v .. (~r.
< 'RfI'
, I -j.. I ~ I I
, , melody

>-

>-

em

G7

c

fl m
tJ .. " I • v , "~ .. 4J-
Luck had dished me till you fished me from-- the soup.
/ fl -..,
tJ .,- (~)"Z: bi
~ I + >- - I
.
.
I I , I -:J :::>

Copyright Ci1936 by Chappell & Co. Inc.

86

to

geth - er We can weath

er

an

y - thing.

G

F

fl I
tJ I I I I ..
So please __ don't sput - ter If I should mut - ter.
tI :> ~ -
I
tJ ~qt I 1 • I ~ -- ~ ., •
(
-L
I .
.
., -_ '-J'_ -- Refrain (brightly)

Cmaj.7 C7

Gm7

G7

life's grand,_

:>

Cmaj.7

C7

Gm7

G7

87

E7

A

D 7

fj m m
--
,
tJ I r 1 1 0'
No more clouds in_ the sky,
~ I .. ~\--_I 1 I
,
,
,
, @) ,- V---I , 1'1 I 'Vr r " «:» u,= ~ f
<
,
·
1'T ... I ... .. B

C

Em7

G7 C

Ab7 G7

~ l
·
tJ -~ ... ...___.,. I -
How'm 1- rid - in'?'_ 1m rid - in' high._
fj ::> >- >- >-
::> >- >- 1>- I
·
,
tJ ft. ~. 101- ' ~ ... ""--'" ... b" q~~ qj -;r,_ ~~ --. - ..
'-- v- I'
~ ~. 1 l>- >-
·
· ·
- 1 1 T Cmaj 7 C7 Gm7

G7

fl I
.
tJ I r I r I
Some - one_ 1 love.L
fI ::> ~ I
I 1
~

tJ "IT I p----r r ft1r I p--r r .... I -~I I Iwr ,Ioj'p-r r
< "'!I'
~ ·
·
I ... I Cmaj 7 C7 Gm7 G7

E7

fj I - --
,
.
tJ I r I r I I
Mad for_ my love.i, So long,
') ::> ::> 1 I • >-t\.-.,I_
tJ r ~r-r r Iff r p-r r I~I I IWr 'loj'l~ r , r-, I
I
·
,
- - I I -- -,.r- 4- 88

n Am Dm7 B C Em7 Al I Cldim7
~
f.. r I ~. tt·· .._.., I -
- Jo - nah , good - bye. How'm I_ rid - in'?_ 1m
fl ~ ;:::.. :>
tJ 1'1 'P--I r I .__..- - ~f: ,r f Itt. ~.._..," I Ii- ~ .. ~ b ..
:>....--,. ~~ I
I .. I • 1 fl Fm6 G7 C B~7 E~ B~7
·
t ... ....__.,.-6- I (I
rid - in' high.... Float - ing.; on a
»- :> I"
fl z» I ~I I :> I ....--,. ~ I >1 I
·
.
. ·
t bq~ q~ :: ,~f.' r ~ II' r: t- rf r II' i D--F'~
tII......_ ~ .f I).
I > >
.
.
I ~ --- ../. . I I
z» tJ t lit -:1~~

s ar- 1 ('Cl -1I1g,

I (I

Dot - ing.,

,

r

t '---'j j ~ r

v ~-r r

.> .:>

II' I

> > > >

I I :> I

I

r

I

B~m6

C7

Caug.7 C7 I

Edim

Fm unis.

B7

-----

Gloat - ing_

I

:>

\ I .--.rI

I

I

r:»: ~.-

v-

mp

.. -

be - cause 1m feel-ing

so :>

I I

hap - hap> >

.. I~" - _ Ittq~ ..,---"

--========== cresco

-

I

89

.,

Gm7 G7

I

Cmaj.7 C7

Gm7 I

G7

..

Cmaj.7 C7

@) I I,. I ~ ,-:::,Y' -.J'

- hap - py, lin slap - hap - py.

I r I

So ring bells..;

r I I r I

sing songs,_ Blow horns,_

fl > I I :> I I

)~~~)3i~~p~~~,g~I~~r~~i~-'~~rr~r~/~~~r§~rl~~~r~~v~TI5r~~~~/~P~~'~IIS

(~~~~~~~~~I~~~~I~~~~~~§

~ I - I - - I

beat

" I gongs,_

fl

E7

Am Dm7

,,1 I r:;.I.

nev - er_ will die. :>

fl

B C

Em7 Al I

,Ab7

G7 C 11.

Fm6

90

""'-:;

~~ ...

~."~~"'""~'"

_-

Easy to Love

_-~~C,--

- --- __ :=:~-----:.?/' .r:

FROM BORN TO DANCE

B~ Gm

(with tender expression and not fast)

Gm

know too

well that 1m _

just wast - ing pre - cious time

F7

Copyright e 1936 by Chappell & Co. Inc.

92

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