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Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils, Volumes 2-7

These Volumes contain the Proceedings from the annual Symposium on Remediation of Diesel Fuel
Contaminated Soils, sponsored by the Association for the American Railroads Research and Test
Department, the topics covered have broad applicability. Articles are based on presentations at the
symposia, and go well beyond railroad sites and issues.

This series brings into timely focus issues relating to the remediation of diesel contaminated soils, with an
emphasis on bioremediation. The six volumes span the nineties, tracing the rapid and significant
developments in the field that have occurred in response to regulatory changes regarding underground
storage tanks and the protection of groundwater.

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 2
Edited by Paul T. Kostecki, Edward J. Calabrese and Christopher P.L. Barkan

U.S. $49.95, 1993, 137 pp., ISSN: 1701-9768

This volume emphasizes the results of various approaches to on-site biological treatment and issues
affecting treatability, using on-site techniques as well as accurate analysis of diesel products. This book
serves as a useful source of technical information, as well as a guidance document for: railroads,
municipal, county, state, and federal regulatory personnel; scientific researchers; industry executives,
engineers, and staff with environmental responsibilities; environmental attorneys; and environmental
consultants

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 3
Edited by Paul T. Kostecki, Edward J. Calabrese and Christopher P.L. Barkan
U.S. $49.95, 1994, 241 pp., ISBN: 1-884940-01-3

One of the objectives of this book is to provide the reader with the methods and results of approaches
that have been used at a wide variety of sites, cleaning up contaminants of interest to the railroads such
as diesel and related compounds. The general need to cleanup petroleum hydrocarbons such as
weathered diesel and other heavy hydrocarbons leads to a related issue, which is the risk posed by these
materials. Timelines and disturbance resulting from site cleanup on railroad property are also discussed.

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 4
Edited by Christopher P.L. Barkan, Edward J. Calabrese, and Paul T. Kostecki
U.S. $49.95, 1995, 210 pp. ISBN 1-884940-03X

The contents of this volume principally bear on two major issues in remediation today: the expanding use
of bioremediation techniques, and the application of risk-based criteria to site cleanup. A number of the
papers included in this volume provide additional information on the steps required to successfully apply
the technique, including some novel applications and circumstances of particular relevance to railroad
industry users. In the broader sense, the value of bioremediation is its role as an economical method in
which the hydrocarbon contaminates are converted by microbial activity into harmless by products, often
without even requiring the removal of the contaminated soil.

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 5
Edited by Christopher P.L. Barkan, Edward J. Calabrese, and Paul T. Kostecki
U.S. $49.95, 1996, 204 pp. ISBN 1-884940-06-4
This volume deals with topics relevant to risk-based cleanup, including site risk assessment, appropriate
site closure levels, and contaminate measurement techniques. Development and acceptance of methods
for establishing appropriate risk-based cleanup levels are important, but achieving these levels by the
most cost-effective treatment method is also necessary. Understanding the response of diesel fuel to
different remediation approaches under a variety of conditions is essential to planning the most cost-
effective approach at a particular site. This volume deals with these and other issues as they apply to
both railroad and non-railroad sites.

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 6
Edited by Christopher P.L. Barkan, Edward J. Calabrese, and Paul T. Kostecki
U.S. $49.95, 1997, 120 pp. ISBN 1-884940-15-3

The papers presented in this volume are intended to help the reader find solutions to the problems faced
at cleanup sites contaminated with diesel fuel and related hydrocarbons. The increasing trend toward risk-
based approaches has created a multitude of new options to be considered in determining what cleanup
criteria fit the circumstances at each site. A greater variety of scientific and engineering information now
often have to be considered than under the old, arbitrary cleanup standard paradigm.

Principles and Practices for Diesel Contaminated Soils,


Volume 7
Edited by Roger P. Andes, Christopher P.L. Barkan, Edward J. Calabrese, and Paul T. Kostecki
US $49.95, 1998, 182 pp., ISBN 1-884940-21-8

This volume is the seventh in a series of books whose purpose is to document and disseminate the
information presented at the AAR sponsored symposium on remediation of sites contaminated with diesel
fuel and other topics of interest to the railroad remediation professional. Although the majority of railroad
remediation issues involve diesel fuel and similar petroleum products, railroads sometimes must deal with
other contaminants. This is reflected in Chapters 1 and 2, which discuss new technology for detection of
lead in soil and the natural attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in association with petroleum,
respectively. Chapters 3 through 7 all discuss aspects of petroleum contamination including: a description
of the successful closure of a sludge impoundment lagoon, the cleanup and operational cost implications
of diesel fuel spillage in a variety of railroad circumstances, the successful use of on-site bioremediation
at a refinery, a cooperative approach that facilitated a real estate transaction involving a contaminated site
and its constructive reuse under the Brownfield paradigm, and a useful summary of the steps involved
with a landfill capping project on a former rail yard. Chapters 8 & 9 describe the use of phytoremediation,
a technique that uses vegetation to help accelerate the biodegradation of soil contaminants. Finally,
Chapter 10 describes recent work by the AAR applying new, more sophisticated analytical methods to the
detailed measurement of weathered petroleum hydrocarbon compounds at four railroad sites around the
United States. The method was developed under the umbrella of the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon
Working Group specifically for use in Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) assessments.

Go To Table of Contents, Volume 2-7

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