A Study On Consumer’s perception about branded clothing store and merchandise Levis Stores & Koutons Store in India

Siva Sivani institute of management
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A Study On Consumer’s perception about branded clothing store and merchandise Levis Stores & Koutons Store in India

SUBMITTED BY Ajay Pratap Verma (18003) Kuldeep Tiwari Kunal Singh Sudhir Yadav (18023) (18024) (18053)

UNDER THE ESTEEMED GUIDANCE OF Mr.T.Thirumal Reddy Lecturer (SSIM)

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SIVA SIVANI INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT SECUNDERABAD (2009-11)

Contents
Literature Review Executive Summary Chapter-1 Industry Profile Apparel Manufacturing - Shifting towards Asia Growth Drivers Changing Demographic profile Rising income level Consumer Spend Urbanization Retail Space Retail Formats preferred in India Indian Apparel Market Ready to Wear/ Tailored Segment Branded/Unbranded/Private Labels Chapter-2 Company Profile A Brief History: Levi Strauss & Co. Ltd Position And Product Life Cycle and Recent Developments: Pricing
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Retail Outlets Koutons Retail Competitive Strengths Sales and distribution Chapter-3 Research Methodology And Objectives Research design Research Objectives: Chapter-4 Data Analysis &Interpretation Sex, Status, Age, Occupation Chapter-5 Limitations Findings And Suggestions Chapter -6 Conclusion Bibliography Questionnaire

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LITERATURE REVEIW
Literature survey is the documentation of a comprehensive review of the published and unpublished work from secondary sources data in the areas of specific interest to the researcher. The library is a rich storage base for secondary data and we used to spend many days and going through books, journals, newspapers, magazines, conference proceedings, doctoral dissertations, master’s theses, government publications and financial reports to find information on their research topic. With computerized databases now readily available and accessible the literature search is much speedier and easier and can be done without entering the portals of a library building. We had used internet to a great extent in finding out different research topics related to the topic. We started literature

LITERATURE REVIEW

the survey even

as the information from the unstructured and structured questionnaire is being gathered. Reviewing the literature on the topic area at this time helped us to focus further more meaningfully on certain aspects found to be important is the published studies even if these had not surfaced during the earlier questioning. So the literature survey is important for gathering the secondary data for the research which might be proved very helpful in the research.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In the globalised era, the apparel and accessory segment in India, like many other traditional product segments, is undergoing an astounding change of perception. While it continues to enjoy the position of being an enhancer of beauty, the new-age consumer perceives fashion as a must, manifesting the wearer’s attitude, personality and lifestyle. Fashion is now an important new sales driver in India, and domestic and international brands are scrambling to adjust their designs to cater to the Indian market. A host of variables - the buying occasion, the wearing occasion, the economic strata of the target segment and the effect of regional and religious influences on all of them are now being juggled to find the winning mix. With mounting western influence, and a focus on revival of traditional Indian fashion elements, diversity in India sees new faces. The Indian fashion stage is a reflection of deep cultural influences, the consumer shift in the new economic scenario, and changing social perceptions. It indicates the birth of new and distinct target groups that ride on various

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
influences to set new trends. Understanding these influencers and the various target group characteristics are key to setting foot in the Indian fashion industry. Read on to find out more about this potential landscape. This report highlights the consumer shift, change in perceptions, and awareness of western cultures and brands amongst Indians, which reinforces the strong potential that India has for international fashion brands. The report also states the three main factors that make India a very challenging landscape. 1. Individuals are today clear as to what they consider essential and what they deem luxury. The choice is very personal, and in line with the kind of lifestyle they aim to lead. Indian consumers are a brand-aware lot, yet they like to base their decisions on rationale and focus on high-end fashion brands that are most coherent with their aspirations – that they see as most relevant. 2. The glocal scene across India shows that the fashion adaptation is as diverse as the culture across the country. Indians like to experiment and fuse western wear with Indian designer clothing, adapt western trends and indianize them as per local trends, they look at film celebrities
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and designers for inspiration. This factor makes the Indian market all the more complex to understand and dwell in. 3. Lastly, India is not only open to western designer brands but also home to domestic talent and a long-running royal patronage of luxury. The factors mentioned above impose a challenge to all international brands. OVERCOMING THE CHALLENGE IS NOT JUST ABOUT GENERATING BRAND
AWARENESS, BUT ABOUT DEVELOPING AN ENTITY THAT WILL FIND A CONNECTS WITH INDIAN FASHION CONSUMERS. How can this be achieved? The clues to the answers are hidden in the

target segments that we have identified. The best way to find out is by delving deeper into the thinking patterns of these consumer segments.

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Industry Profile
India is the second fastest growing economy in the world growing at approximately 7%-8% per annum. According to A.T. Kearney’s Global Retail Development Index, 2006, India tops the annual list of most attractive countries for international retail expansion (Source: India Retail Report, by Images F&R Research). Currently the Indian retail market is valued at USD 270.0 billion. Organized retail has grown from USD 6.2 billion in 2004 to USD 8 billion in 2005 to USD 12.4 billion, at a CAGR of 30% (Source: India Retail Report by Images F&R Research 2007). Organized retail is on a high growth trajectory due to several favourable drivers including: favourable demographic profiles, rising income levels, increase in consumer spend, urbanization, growth in quality retail space, emergence of mall culture and rapid development of malls, emergence of specialty and supermarket formats which have the most potential for growth followed by hypermarkets. Apparel and accessories retailing is the largest segment of organized retailing in India, constituting 39.0% of total organized retailing business, which is valued at approximately Rs. 550.0 billion (USD 12.4 billion) (Source: India Retail Report & F&R 2007). The organized apparel and accessories retail market accounted for 13.6% of the total sector in 2004 and was valued at Rs. 109.0 billion. The share of organized retail has steadily grown to 18.9% in 2006, with the apparel and accessories sector showing a year on year growth rate of 30.3% during 2005-2006. Approximately 42% of the Indian apparel market is dominated by men’s wear followed by women’s wear at 34%.

Chapter-1 INDUSTRY PROFILE

The ready to wear (RTW) market for apparel in India is expected to show continued growth due to the softening of the government regulations, among other factors. The readymade apparel segment includes both branded and unbranded players. A branded store is wherein a manufacturer or marketer makes conscious efforts to promote his brand, such as Koutons Retail India Limited, Madura Garment’s Peter England, Arvind Brand’s Newport, ITC’s Wills Classic, and Raymond’s Park Avenue. There are several foreign brands that have successfully established their presence in the country. These players may have come in via a tie-up with domestic concerns: (like Benetton), or via licensee route (like Allen Solly, Arrow). Some brands like Metro come in with Cash and Carry wholesale trading route, while Tommy Hilfiger, Marks and Spencer’s, Speedo, Umbro etc retail through franchisee channels.
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There are roughly about 23 major players operating in branded apparel segment in India. For further details, please refer to the section titled “Industry Overview” beginning on page 59 of this Prospectus. Apparel Manufacturing - Shifting towards Asia India’s textile industry has opened up significantly with the dismantling of quotas; hence apparel manufacturing is gradually shifting from Western countries to Asian countries on account of cost competitiveness. The elimination of these quotas has led retailers to source their requirements from the most competitive vendor. India also has an added advantage of low labour cost, along with other countries like Bangladesh, Indonesia and China, which has added to their rapid growth. Growth Drivers Changing Demographic profile India has the youngest consumer profile as compared to the ageing population of USA, UK, and Japan etc. Over 65% of the population is below 35 years of age; 54% of the population is below 24 years of age. In contrast, the young population in Europe and Japan is declining; Immigration is largely responsible for keeping a positive growth rate in US. (Source: Indian Retail Report by Images & F&R) The composition of the Indian population is shifting more towards the age group 20-49 i.e. the working population with purchasing power. This shift is expected to be a major driver of consumption. The low median age of the population means a higher current consumption spend vs. savings as a younger population has both, the ability and willingness to spend. Higher consumption is a direct booster for the retailing industry. There has also been a significant increase in the percentage of working women from 22% in 1991 to 26% in 2001. (Source: FICCI KPMG Report) Consumer lifestyles and preferences are changing fast which is a prominent driving factor too. There are more nuclear families proliferating which will result in 3% to 4% increase in aggregate spending over the next 5 years. (Source: India Retail Report by Images & F&R 2007).

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Source: India Retail Report by Images & F&R Rising Income Levels A larger number of households are getting added to the consuming class with growth in income levels. There has been a 100% growth in the addition of households, from 40 million in 1995 to 80 million households in 2005. This has resulted in significant increase in high income group from 5.5 million household in 1995 to 18 million households in 2005 for the high income group and from 18 million households in 1995 to 31 million in 2005 for the mass affluent. There has been increase in the nuclear family structure; a growing number of educated and employed women (which translates into increasing disposable incomes), media proliferation and growing consumerism have all contributed to the growth of organized retail. Consumer Spend India has one of the youngest populations where 65% of the population is below 35 years and 54 % below 24 years. A younger population and the increasing disposable income levels, along with higher aspirations and a feel-good factor, has tremendously affected the consumer spend. Private consumption has a direct impact on the growth of the retail industry. Today’s consumers are increasingly becoming brand conscious and are looking for products with design and quality. There is easier acceptance of luxury and an increased willingness to experiment with mainstream fashion which is seen as one of the main drivers for the clothing and apparel segment in India. Urbanization Currently organized retail is focused on metros then moving down to the tier 1 and 2 cities. In the next 10 years the growth in the organized retail is going to come from the metros thus the target audience for organized retail is going to be the urban population. Organized retail has been more successful in cities more so in the South and West of India. The reasons for this regional variation range from differences in consumer buying behaviour to cost of real estate and taxation laws. (Source: FICCI KPMG Report)
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There is increase in awareness of the tier II cities and now this is eroding the difference between the metros and the tier II cities in terms of “urban aspirations”. International brands like Nokia, Pizza Hut, Ford, Reebok, and Adidas are increasingly relying on these tier II cities to drive their growth.

Retail Space Quality retail space has always been one of the key hurdles for the development of Organized Retail. Currently there are 120 operational shopping centres with approximately 33 million sq ft space growing to over 575 shopping centres/ malls covering more than 120 million sq ft space quality retail space by 2009. (Source: Images Yearbook Volume III) There is additional retail space to add Rs. 400 billion of business to organized retail. This growth in quality retail space will positively impact the growth in the apparel market as there will be complete change in the shopping habits. Impulse shopping will go up to 40% of total mall shopping. Awareness and sensitivity of brands will be heightened and a shopping trip becomes more of an experience rather than a chore. (Source: Images Yearbook Volume III) Retail Formats preferred in India The KPMG retail survey in India states that the specialty and supermarket format have the most potential for growth followed by hypermarkets. With the increase in the percentage of working women and dual income families, customers often visit shops with intention to
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purchase a specific product, thus confirming the emerging trend of focused malls.

Source REPORT Indian Apparel Market

KPMG

The organized apparel and accessories retail market accounted for 13.6% of the total sector in 2004; it was valued at Rs 10,900 crores. The share of organized retail has steadily grown to 18.9% in 2006, with the apparel and accessories sector showing a year on year growth rate of 30.3% during 2005-2006. Apparel and accessories retailing is the largest segment of organized retailing in India, constituting 39% of total organized retailing business, which values approximately at Rs 55,000 crores (USD 12.4 billion). (Source: India Retail Report by Images & F&R 2007)

Source: India Retail Report by Images & F&R 2007 Indian Apparel Market trends
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i) Malls are expected to be one of the main growth drivers of apparel retailing in India, as such organized retail spaces offer large areas to fashion products. ii) Existing apparel brands and retailers have started exploring the potential of the smaller cities and expanding their retail network. iii) In terms of opening new retail outlets, apparel retailers and brands attained growth in opening up of number The Indian Apparel Market’s lions share is taken by menswear with 42% value. The women’s wear segment has increased its overall market share by 1% to 34% valuing it at Rs 30,380 crores. There is a drop in the kids segment from 18% to 17%. This drop is due to the increase in usage of ready-to-wear branded uniforms. Products in the unisex segment cater to all three major apparel segments in the ratio of 6:3:1 for men’s, women’s, kids apparel respectively. The segment for uniforms is considered separately because it comprises both kids as well as sizing in men and women for customers above 14 years of age.

Ready to Wear/ Tailored Segment Traditionally, tailor-made garments had found flavour with the Indian masses but now the trend is shifting at a fast pace. The last two decades of the apparel industry were in 4 different phases: Phase 1 Pre 90’s : Era of tailor made apparel Phase 2 1990-1995 : Ready-to-Wear apparel introduced Phase 3 1995-2000 : Brands flourished
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Phase 4 2000-2004 : Retail dominates 2005 onwards : Categories rule The other growth drivers for the ready to wear (RTW) market are the softening of the Government Regulations like: a) The production of ready made garment is no longer reserved for small-scale industry. b) Excise duty on RTW garments has been abolished. c) Implementation of VAT by various states will simplify the tax structure and reduce the

Branded/Unbranded/Private Labels Within the readymade segment we have branded and unbranded players. A branded store is wherein a manufacturer or marketer makes conscious efforts to promote his brand, such as Koutons Retail India Limited, Madura Garments Peter England, Arvind Brand’s Newport, ITC’s Wills Classic, and Raymond’s Park Avenue There are several foreign brands that have successfully established their presence in the country. These players may have come in via a tie-up with domestic concerns: (like Benetton), or via the licensee route (like Allen Solly, Arrow). Some brands like Metro
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come in with Cash and Carry wholesale trading route, while Tommy Hilfiger, Marks and Spencer’s, Speedo, Umbro etc retail through franchisee channels. Globally private labels contribute to 17% of retail sales and are growing at 5% pa. Private Labels provide higher margin to the retailers simultaneously offering lower price to the consumers. This is a strategy adopted globally and now is extensively used by Indian retailers. There are certain private label brands which have done exceedingly well like John Miller, Bare, Stop, Splash. With the implementation of the uniform tax structure across the country, quite a few of these labels are likely to aspire to achieve a brand status. A survey carried by AC Nielsen has identified that 56% of their survey respondents in India consider private labels to be good alternatives to manufacturer brands. This exponential growth can be seen in the areas of groceries, home care, clothing and apparel. (Source: Images Yearbook Volume III)

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COMPANY PROFILE
(LEVIS)LEVI STRAUSS & CO.: A BRIEF HISTORY: Levi Strauss & Co. (LS&CO) is a privately held clothing company known worldwide for its Levi's brand of denim jeans. It was founded in 1853 when Levi Strauss came from Buttenheim, Franconia, (Kingdom of Bavaria) to San Francisco, California to open a west coast branch of his brothers' New York dry goods business. Although the company began producing denim overalls in the 1870s, modern jeans were not produced until the 1920s. The company briefly experimented (in the 1970s) with employee ownership and a public stock listing, but remains owned and controlled by descendants and relatives of Levi Strauss' four nephews. Modern jeans began to appear in the 1920s, but sales were largely confined to the working people of the western United States, such as cowboys, lumberjacks, and railroad workers. Levi’s jeans apparently were first introduced to the East during the craze of the 1930’s, when vacationing Easterners returned home with tales (and usually examples) of the hard-wearing pants with rivets. Another boost came in World War II, when blue jeans were declared an essential commodity and were sold only to people engaged in defence work. From a company with fifteen salespeople, two plants, and almost no business east of the Mississippi in 1946, the organization grew in thirty years to include a sales force of more than 22,000, with 50 plants and offices in 35 countries.

Chapter-2 COMPANY PROFILE

In the 1950s and 1960s, Levi's jeans became popular among a wide range of youth subcultures. Levi's popular shrink-to-fit 501s were sold in a unique sizing arrangement; the indicated size was related to the size of the jeans prior to shrinking, and the shrinkage was substantial. The company still produces these UN shrunk, uniquely sized jeans, and they still sell very well although popular remains the original design. 2.2. THE LEVI’S BRAND: BRAND FACTSHEET: On May 20, 1873 the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office grants Levi Strauss & Jacob Davis a patent on the process of riveting pants. This heralds the invention of the blue jean.
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Levi Strauss was ahead of his time creating famous branding elements on his jeans that Are still in use, and often copied, today. • In 1886 the Two Horse brand leather patch, a symbol of the pants' Strength is first used on his jeans. • The Levi's brand eye-catching Red Tab Device was added to the jeans in 1936. Placed onto the right back pocket with the word "Levi’s" stitched in White capital letters, it differentiates Levi's jeans from competitors. • Levi’s jeans famous arched back pocket stitching is called the “accurate.” This iconic stitching can be seen on back pockets throughout the world. Today, Levi’s jeans are sold in more than 110 countries worldwide. Levi’s Jeans are single most-often copied apparel item in the history of apparel. The Levi’s brand several collections around the world to meet the needs, and wants, of denim-wearers everywhere. These include: Levi’s Vintage Clothing – Inspired directly from the Levi’s brand archives and Available worldwide. Levi’s Capital E – The most premium, finely crafted, luxurious expression of The Levi’s brand is sold in select Levi’s Stores and premium stores in the United States. Levi’s RED – A sexy and modern expression of the Levi’s brand is sold in Chains, department stores and Levi’s Stores in the United States and Levi’s Stores and specialty retailers in Europe. Levi’s Blue – A European collection of jeans for men and women in premium denim finishes that are appropriate for day or night. Levi’s Lady Style – A range of premium jeans for women available across Asia, designed for more sophisticated wearing occasions. Levi’s Red Tab – The authentic core of the Levi’s brand offers a wide range of Fits and finishes in true Levi’s style. LEVI STRAUSS (GENERAL INFORMATION) FOUNDED FOUNDER HEADQUATERS AREA SERVED KEY PEOPLE
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SAN FRANSISCO,CALIFORNIA,1853 LEVI STRAUSS SAN FRANSISCO,CALIFORNIA,USA WORLDWIDE T.GARY ROGERS(BOARD CHAIRMAN),JOHN

ANDERSON (CEO) INDUSTRY PRODUCTS OWNERS EMPLOYEES DIVISIONS WEBSITE APPAREL JEANS(MALE & FEMALE WEAR) DESCENDENTS OF LEVI STRAUSS 10,000+ LEVI’S,DOCKERS,SIGNATURE WWW.LEVIS.COM

VISION STATEMENT: LEVI’S STRAUSS: Four core values are at the heart of Levi Strauss & Co.: Empathy, Originality, Integrity and Courage. These four values are linked. As we look at our history, we see a story of how our core values work together and are the source of our success. • • • • EMPATHY – WALKING IN OTHER PEOPLE’S SHOES ORIGINALITY- BEING AUTHENTIC & INNOVATIVE INTEGRITY- DOING THE RIGHT THING COURAGE – STANDING UP FOR WHAT LEVI’S BELIEVES IN “People love our clothes and trust our company. We will market and distribute the most appealing and widely worn apparel brands. Our products define quality, style and function. We will clothe the world.” MISSION STATEMENT: LEVI STRAUSS & CO. Ltd.: “To sustain responsible commercial success as a global marketing company of branded apparel. They must balance goals of superior profitability and return on investment, leadership market positions and superior products and services. They will conduct their business ethically and demonstrate leadership in satisfying their responsibilities to their communities and to the society. Their work environment will be safe and productive and characterized by fair treatment, teamwork, open communications, personal accountability and opportunities for growth and development. EXTERNAL MARKETING ENVIRONMENT: External marketing environment plays a very important role in success/failure of a brand. This also depends on how well a brand manager monitors the changes in the external marketing environment surrounding the brand. To be precise external marketing environment comprises of demographic, social, economic, political and legal, & competitive factors which directly influence the brand’s performance. THE DEMOGRAPHIC ENVIRONMENT: There’s little excuse for being surprised by demographic developments. The main demographic force that marketers monitor is population,
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because people make up markets. Marketers are keenly interested in the size and growth rate of population in cities, regions, and country; age distribution and ethnic mix; educational levels; household patterns; regional characteristics and movements. The company makes clothes foe men, women, children & teens. So everyone is a potential customer for LEVI’S. LEVI’S generally appeals to more mature generations not necessarily looking to make fashion statement. LEVI’S makes an effort to appeal to all customers in one way or another, which has been a key to their success over the years. Assuming that the world population is growing LEVI’S can infer that the market for jeans is also growing. However this growth is characterized by slow rate of growth. THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT: Society shapes the beliefs, values, and norms that largely define consumer tastes and preferences. People absorb, almost unconsciously, a world view that defines their relationships to themselves, to others, to organizations, to society, to nature.India is a land of diversities, which is reflected not just in the topography but also in the languages, cultures as well as religious beliefs. A survey conducted by research international in 2008, indicates significant regional differences in values, attitudes, and preferences of customers and classified Indian states into five clusters. Table 3.0 describes the classification of customers.The study further indicates that there is a progression from traditionalism and self-sacrifice to westernization and individualism as one move from the lower socio-economic classes to the higher socio-economic classes. THE POLITICAL-LEGAL ENVIRONMENT: The political & legal environment consists of laws, government agencies, and pressure groups that influence and limit various organizations and individuals. Sometimes these laws also create new opportunities for business. Two major trends in the political & legal environment are the increase in business legislation and the growth of the special interest groups. THE TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENT: One of the most dramatic forces shaping a brand’s life is technology. Marketers should monitor the following four trends in technology: • • • • Accelerating pace of change Unlimited opportunities for innovation Focus on the research & development Increased regulation of technological change

SITUATION ANALYSIS: Levi Strauss & co. is approaching to the saturation of the jeans market. The fast changes in the consumer tastes, competition in both the lower end and higher end brands, fast
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development in the modern distribution and sales technology has brought about a continuing lose of the market share A new series of engineered jeans has been developed and launched as a part of a program intending to meet the needs of their major target market, in order to regain their lost market share and to maintain their position in the industry. Their expertise in jeans and casual dress industry will be fully exploited at a world basis. This year, they intend to strengthen the promotion of this new brand. Certain resources will be allocated to their existing brands, to maintain market share of 501. Communication with customers is also important for LEVIS. It is very important to maintain good relations with them, and track the change in their taste and need of their main target market. Information system will also be improved to enhance their ability to adapt the market change.

POSITION AND PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE: LEVI STRAUSS & CO. LTD

To overcome the decline in the sales in past few years levis had changed its place, pricing and distributor and retail strategies For tapping Indian market they had diversified

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS: PRICING (LEVI’S STRAUSS & CO Ltd): in order to succeed its plans in India, LEVI’S has been making a number of efforts/developments. Some of the important changes/developments made by LEVI’S in the recent past are as follows:

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- Levi’s India plans to vacate the middle price segment and plans to concentrate on the lower and the higher end- which is the value offering-will see a further fall in price and start at Rs.900instead of Rs. 1,000. - On the other hand the premium segment will see an increase of about 15% in average pricing and increase to about Rs.4, 400. - Reason behind LEVI’S vacating the mid price segment attributes to the minimum growth in the segment & share being taken up by local brands that are more acceptable to the local conditions (SPYKAR,KOUTONS, etc.)

PLACE: LEVI STRAUSS & CO. Ltd: Successful value creation needs successful value delivery. Holistic marketers are increasingly taking a value network view of their businesses. Instead of limiting their focus to their immediate suppliers, distributors, and consumers, they are examining the whole supply chain that links raw materials, components, and manufactured goods and shows how they move toward the final consumers. LEVI’S looks at customer segments and considers a wide range of different possible means to sell, distribute, and service their offerings. 5.1. RETAIL OUTLETS: Marketing channels are sets of independent organizations involved in the process of making a product or service available for use or consumption. LEVI’S STRAUSS, one of the most respected apparel/clothing companies of the world, has opened around 500 outlets at prime locations in India. (Source: Levi’s retail outlet, Bhubaneswar). Aesthetically designed, the LEVI’S store offers wardrobe solutions to the “INDEPENDENT MAN” through popular brands like LEVI’S RED, LEVI’S RED TAB, LEVI’S SIGNATURE, & DOCKERS. Occupying a space of more than 1 million square feet, the retail chain network offers over 3,000 shades and designs of LEVI’S fabric. The stores also sell the LEVI’S range of accessories including Footwear, Eye Gears, Caps, Belts, Leather Wallets, Carry Bags. The stores present world-class experience to discerning customers through welldesigned and well-maintained interiors, attractive displays, superb assortments, spacious movements, and well trained sales persons.

PROMOTION: LEVI’S STRAUSS & CO. Ltd: although there has been an enormous increase in the use of personal communications by marketers in recent years, due to the rapid penetration of the internet and other factors, the fact remains that mass media, if used correctly, can still dramatically improve the fortunes of a brand or company. The power of marketing
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communications is equally important in influencing attitudes and behaviour with respect to socially relevant themes. ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS: LEVI’S STRAUSS & CO. Ltd: declining sales forced Levi’s into a major re-think culminating in a new strategy in which both product and advertising innovation are now challenging creative boundaries and evolving hand-in-hand. Even LEVI’S advertising, much of which over the previous years had been widely regarded as iconic, seemed tired. As consumer tastes shifted away from denim in favour of combat gear and cargo pants. LEVI’S had something to do to stem falling sales, and fast. The Company made a brave decision. It decided there was little point in doing things by halves and that structural change was needed to drive through any shift in product or communications strategy. 7.2. THE “TWIST” CAMPAIGN: LEVI’S created a mould breaking campaign led by a 60second TV commercial in which young people are seen to be twisted to fit the jeans with a twisted seam. The idea seamlessly for the product.The execution was striking. The creative theme was used throughout the campaign which also included print and poster executions, shop window and point of display materials, and a web site. The unashamed aim was to create advertising to become ‘famous’. The ‘Twist’ campaign helped raise sales of LEJ in line with those of rival jeans brand Diesel. 7.3. THE “ODYSSEY” CAMPAIGN: In this campaign, a young couple escapes from the restrictive confines of a series of rooms within a building, burst through the outside wall and scale a giant tree before leaping into nothingness and freedom. Again, this theme was integrated across brand communications using a variety of other media. Advertising has firmly consolidated Levi Engineered Jeans’ market position, resulting in widespread acclaim and numerous industry awards. While the sales of LEVI’S 501 are still in a decline, sales of LEVI’S engineered jeans are rising steadily and the line now accounts for 9-10% of the total sales by volume for the LEVI’S brand. 7.4. PUBLIC RELATIONS: LEVI’S STRAUSS & CO. Ltd: LEVI’S Strauss & CO. Ltd has long been a corporate responsibility leader in the truest sense of the word; by doing things long before others do. Today, the company is doing that tradition in new ways, showing how product innovation on the eco line is central to a sustainable future. Levi’s Strauss & CO. Ltd is tackling complex challenges, like ensuring that worker’s rights are respected and combating climate change, by collaborating with industry peers and through other systemic solutions. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: LEVI’S STRAUSS & CO. Ltd: THE LEVI’S STRAUSS FOUNDATION: The LS&CO. business mantra, “adopt, adapt, invent,” also is important in our approach to its work in HIV/AIDS. LEVI’S works to share important learning when it can and adapt the good work of our trusted stakeholders wherever possible to advance its objectives. Below is a sampling of our efforts to influence social and policy change by sharing with and learning from United Nations (UN) agencies, business roundtables and thought leaders.
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– –

The role of health insurance in improving access to HIV/AIDS services worldwide. Approaches to accessing employee needs regarding HIV/AIDS services in India.

– LS&CO. has sustained a leadership position by addressing HIV/AIDS from a variety of angles—what it does as a business for our employees and with consumers, how we engage with policy makers and leaders, shaping and promoting best practices, and partnering with community organizations and suppliers. – More than 25 years after LEVI’S first touched HIV/AIDS, ITS leadership continues and it resolves to win against this disease remains unabated. KOUTONS RETAIL Koutons are an integrated apparel manufacturing and retail company in India. they are in the business of designing, manufacturing and retailing apparel under the “Koutons” and “Charlie Outlaw” brands through a network of 999 exclusive brand outlets (as of August 20, 2007) across India. They started their business with the formation of a partnership firm “M/s. Charlie Creations”. They established a manufacturing unit (having a capacity to manufacture approximately 20,000 pieces of apparel per annum) in Delhi in 1993. In 1994, their Promoters with the vision of broadening operations incorporated our Company, as a private limited company i.e. “Charlie Creations Private Limited”. The Company started its operations by taking over the business of the erstwhile partnership firm. As of August 20, 2007 we had 18 in-house manufacturing/finishing units and 14 warehouses which are spread across various locations in and around Gurgaon, Haryana. They have increased their annual finishing and manufacturing capacity from 3,000,000 and 600,000 pieces of apparel, respectively as of March 31, 2005 to 22,920,000 and 12,360,000 pieces of apparel, respectively as of March 31, 2007 they have also entered into fabricating agreements with various manufacturing units to which we outsource stitching of certain apparel. Their manufacturing and finishing facilities are backed by adequate facilities for product testing, apparel development, design studio and sampling infrastructure to ensure high quality apparel for our customers. Their brand “Koutons” has contributed to the success of our business. Sales from their brand “Koutons” has increased from Rs. 516.32 million for fiscal 2005 to Rs. 3,726.91 million for fiscal 2007 and has contributed 99.11% and 92.34% of their total income in fiscal 2006 and 2007, respectively. They have positioned the “Koutons” brand in the middle to high fashion segment, offering a complete range of a man’s wardrobe (in the age group of 22 to 45 years) ranging from formal to casual and party wear. They have reinvented and relaunched their old premier brand “Charlie” as “Charlie Outlaw”. The “Charlie Outlaw” brand is a casual brand targeted at fashion conscious youngsters in the age group of 14 to 25 years and is positioned as a fashionable and contemporary, value for money brand.
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They marketed their apparel through a network of distributors spread all over India till fiscal 2002. However, in fiscal 2002 with a view to improve marketing efficiencies, they introduced the model of retailing on a consignment basis through exclusive franchise stores. Their first exclusive store was launched in 2002. As of August 20, 2007, the “Koutons” brand was sold on a total floor area of approx. 482,966 sq. ft. and their “Charlie Outlaw” brand was sold on a total floor area of approx. 360,738 sq. ft. Competitive Strengths They believe that they are well positioned to capture the growth opportunities in India’s apparel manufacturing and retail sectors, because of their following key strengths: Wide network of Exclusive Brand Outlets. Integrated player with low-cost sourcing capabilities. Unique brand positioning. Design and merchandising expertise, with a pulse on fashion. Experienced and efficient management. Wide apparel range. IT Infrastructure Their Strategy Principal elements of their strategy are the following: Increase geographic penetration by spreading the network of exclusive brand outlets. Enhancing manufacturing capacities. Target the growing segments Strengthen the competitive position and recognition of their brands. Further improving their cost structure. Pursuing potential strategic acquisitions to complement their existing brand portfolio. Exports of apparel under their “Koutons” or other brands. Third party manufacturers To cater to the growing demand for our brands “Koutons” and “Charlie Outlaw” they also outsource manufacturing of apparel. For this, the Company has executed 211 agreements with 211 fabricators pursuant to which the fabricators usually work for the Company on a job work basis. They typically enter into fabrication agreements pursuant to which the Company supplies fabric to the fabricator and the fabricator stitches the apparel as instructed and desired by the
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Company. Under the terms of the agreement, the fabric which is in the possession of the fabricator is the exclusive property of the Company and the fabricator cannot hypothecate, sell or create any third party interest in the fabric. The agreement also provides that the fabricator is solely responsible for the safety and security of the fabric and is required to indemnify the Company for any loss caused, while it is in the possession of the fabricator. Manufacture of production sample A product sample is produced in house according to the specifications provided for the range of products for a particular season. The first production report is prepared on the basis of this sample. All apparent and intricate corrections are made in the sample so as to make it error free. Accordingly, a detailed production plan is devised.

Fabric cutting and stitching They commence with creating a layout for cutting the respective products with the help of CAD plotter machines. The use of this system ensures that there is optimum usage of the fabric. The fabric is then laid on a table in multiple layers where the plotted layout is used for cutting the various parts of fabric with the help of electrical cutting machines. These pieces are sent to production lines where they are stitched as per an assembly line system with each machine and worker performing a specific job in the assembly line. This process ensures that the quality of the apparel meets the required specifications and is also an efficient system of manufacturing. This, along with a team of dedicated quality controllers ensures that the final product which comes out of the line meets the specifications. Post stitching treatment The stitched product from our in-house production as well as from that of the outsourced one is taken to their washing department. The apparel are washed and treated in high capacity washing machines and the hydro water expellers are used to drain the water out from the apparel. Thereafter, apparel are tumble dried. In some instances where specific washes and treatment are required like in case of denim products, we also get the same done on a job work basis.

Finishing and packaging Upon completion of the washing process, the apparel undergo finishing and are thereafter packaged. Finishing of apparel involves labeling, putting tags, removal of loose and unwanted threads, proper and customized ironing. They attach utmost importance to the quality of our final product and hence care is taken to ensure that the apparel that is dispatched to the warehouse has undergone stringent quality checks. They are also very
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careful in ensuring that the apparel are packaged in a manner that will give the apparel an attractive look and at the same time protect the apparel from any wear or tear. Their packing department takes into consideration all the above factors and makes the product ready for retailing. Warehousing Once the apparel are packaged, they are directed to warehouses. They operate a total of 14 warehouses in the vicinity of their in-house manufacturing facilities where they store their finished goods and raw materials. The shipments for exclusive branch outlets are put together and dispatched through transport agencies from their warehouses. They maintain separate warehouses for both our brands. Sales and distribution One of the most important functions in our business operations is retailing and logistics. They have a dedicated “Sales and Marketing” team which consists of 90 employees. This team along with the merchandising and production team devises the retailing strategy at the beginning of every season on the basis of the company’s business plan, demands, preferences and other requirements of stores in various regions and on the basis of a review of the last year’s performance. Distribution and marketing To ensure that merchandise flows directly to the right outlets in a timely and cost efficient manner, the retailing plan is supported with a detailed logistics plan. This includes setting up of outlets in various regions, inventory management, warehouse management and supply chain management. The plan is then shared with the various departments, namely merchandising and production which are responsible for their respective activities. The distribution and marketing team members are spread across the country and work on region-wise basis. Periodic reporting to the central levels at corporate office and co-ordination with other divisions is maintained to ensure smooth and uninterrupted distribution flows. Further, their custom designed computer application permits better control of inventory thereby lowering inventory holding costs. Their restated total income and restated profit after taxes for the years ended March 31, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 are summarized below: (In Rs. Million) Particulars Year ended March 31, 2003 Year ended March 31, Year ended March 31, Year ended March 31, Year ended March 31,

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Total Income Profit after tax

223.18 4.32

317.53 8.82

581.46 19.29

1,583.85 131.98

4,036.17 344.87

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: In this review of available information about a brand, the primary objective is to generate hypothesis concerning the key ‘assets’ of the brand that are likely to mediate its equity. These hypotheses will help guide and frame the measures of brand equity that should be used in any research that is conducted. Also, depending upon the brand’s marketing strategy; a researcher may also want to consider the information under review in light of other potentially related issues, for example: possible line or brand extension. Up to this point the discussion has centered on those things it is necessary to understand before actually measuring brand equity. Now it is time to choose appropriate measures of brand equity. First, a number of techniques should be used to gain an understanding of its nature. Research design This study was conducted as a factorial experiment to know about the consumer’s perceptions in

Chapter-3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND OBJECTIVES
which design factors of different branded clothes , quality, brand image, celebrity endorsement, pricing, store atmosphere, and method of information display, were manipulated. The independent variables are both the quality and pricing. The dependent variables were three store images (safety, convenience, and entertainment) and consumers’ expectation of merchandise quality. These two dependent variables were measured on a five-point Likert-type scale (5—strongly agree; 1— strongly disagree) asking the respondent to indicate their level of agreement to the statement for a particular web site created for this study. Safety measures include consumers’ perceived functional and financial risks, and privacy issues. Convenience measures include consumer’s perceptions that the store makes shopping easy and saves time and effort. Entertainment measures reflect an ‘‘enjoyable shopping experience’’ in a store. The merchandise quality variable involved quality of fabric, design and construction of the clothing item. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: The research concentrates on consumer perception in two different brands in five major areas which are discussed as follows:
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Accessing the strength of the brand equity: The most common measures of brand equity involve measuring its strength. A researcher needs to know about awareness and preference, who is buying the brand, and the effects of price. These are the practical measures that “describe” a brand and its users, and where it stands in the market relative to its competitors. But, this does not tell a researcher why, or what can be done to positive effect brand equity.
(i)

CORE LOYALTY: Traditionally, researchers look at purchase behavior and infer loyalty. Brand loyalty is a function of people’s attitude toward both brands and the category, and measures must take this into account. While it is important to identify and understand these loyal users, in reality there will be more ‘switchers’, those users who buy the brand but also buy competitors brands as well. Strategically these brand switchers are more important because that is where the brand’s growth is most likely to come from. Profiling brand users: Determining the profile of brand users is perhaps the most common use of the quantitative research. Profile measures are useful to researchers because they provide an idea of which it is that uses their brand. The most common measures for profiling brand users reflect general level characteristics of a market: demographics (age, income etc), lifestyle and psychographics (outgoing, conservative). Like all the assessments of brand equity, profile measures reflect the results of brand equity. Some brands are seen as ‘young’, some as ‘old’, ‘cutting edge’ etc. Brand image ownership: Benefits are either attributes, subjective considerations, or emotions, that are associated with a brand. In positioning a brand, benefits are selected that are important to the brand’s target market and that they feel the brand can deliver. The type of benefit selected will suggest the orientation of the benefit claim, which may looked at in terms of rational, emotional, relational, or value consideration. Brand attitude: Brand equity is a result of brand attitude, and this is what provides the key to its understanding. It is this understanding that ensures an effective positioning, and the ability to adjust that positioning, and the ability to adjust that positioning over time as needed to continue building and sustaining positive brand equity. What we are looking to include in measuring brand attitude are those benefits associated with the category and the benefit claims for the brand in it that define the positioning of the brand.

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

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Chapter-4 DATA ANALYSIS &INTERPRETATION

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Data Analysis and Interpretation:

Based on Sex
Frequency 66 34 100 Percent 66.0 34.0 100.0 Valid Percent 66.0 34.0 100.0 Cumulative Percent 66.0 100.0

Male Female Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that the sample was dominated by male consumers as out of 100. 66% were male and only 34% were female consumer.

Based on Status
Frequenc y 55 45 100 Percent Valid Percent 55.0 55.0 45.0 45.0 100.0 100.0 Cumulative Percent 55.0 100.0

Valid Single Marrie d Total

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Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise),city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that the sample was dominated by unmarried youth consumers as out of 100. 69% were single and only 31% were married consumer.

Based On Age
Frequency 35 26 20 9 6 4 100 Percent 35.0 26.0 20.0 9.0 6.0 4.0 100.0 Valid Percent 35.0 26.0 20.0 9.0 6.0 4.0 100.0 Cumulative Percent 35 61 81 90 96 100

Valid 18-24 24-30 30-36 36-42 42-48 >48 Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise),city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that the sample was dominated (35%) by the youth consumers aged between 18-24 followed by consumer aged between 24-30 (26%), 30-36(20%),36-42(9%),42-48(6%),48 & above(4%)
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Based On Occupation
Valid Percent 40.0 22.0 15.0 17.0 6.0 100.0 Cumulative Percent 40.0 62.0 77.0 94.0 100.0

Student Professional Govt. Employee Businessman Home maker Total

Frequency 40 22 15 17 6 100

Percent 40.0 22.0 15.0 17.0 6.0 100.0

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that most of the consumer for the branded clothes were youth in which mostly were students (40%) followed by professtionals (22%),govt. Employees(15%),businessmen(17%) & home maker (6%).

Question-1

Valid Yes No
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Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 87 87.0 87.0 87.0 13 13.0 13.0 100.0

Total

100

100.0

100.0

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & from the above table we can see that most of the consumer were brand conscious and were preferring of buying branded clothes i.e 87%.

Question-2
Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 17 17.0 17.0 17.0 35 35.0 35.0 52.0 39 9 100 39.0 9.0 100.0 39.0 9.0 100.0 91.0 100.0

Valid Reguraly Special occasion Some times Never Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & from the above table we can see that though most of them prefer buying branded clothes nut they are not regular buyers of it as only
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17%. Whereas sample suggests that people wear branded clothes on special occations(35%) and sometimes(39%). Boosting fact was that only 9% people don’t prefer wearing branded clothes.

Question-3
Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 42 42.0 42.0 42.0 34 34.0 34.0 76.0 24 24.0 24.0 100.0 100 100.0 100.0

Valid Levis Koutons Others Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that levis(42%) with its high cost and low cost range and brand image is more appreciated and accepted as a brand compare to koutons (34%) and other brands(24%).

Question-4

Valid Formal Casuals Night cloths
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Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 38 38.0 38.0 38.0 39 39.0 39.0 77.0 8 8.0 8.0 85.0

Sports wear Total

15 100

15.0 100.0

15.0 100.0

100.0

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that people prefer to buy mostly branded formals(38%) and branded casuals (39%) whereas they are not so keen in spending more in night dresses hence don’t prefer buying branded stuff frequently. Though they prefer for going for some of the branded sportswear.

Question-5
Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 79 79.0 79.0 79.0 21 21.0 21.0 100.0 100 100.0 100.0

Valid Yes No Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & from the above table we can see that most of them (79%) feel confident while wearing branded clothes whereas 21% doesn’t feel so.

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Question-6

Valid Yes No Total

Frequenc Valid Cumulative y Percent Percent Percent 72 72.0 72.0 72.0 28 28.0 28.0 100.0 100 100.0 100.0

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that as they feel it to be a status symbol most of them (72%) feel that they are more appreciated by their peers when they are wearing branded clothes. Whereas 28% don’t.

Question-7
Frequenc y 10 Perce nt 10.0 Valid Perce Cumulati nt ve Percent 10.0 10.0

Vali d

Strongl y Disagre e Disagre e

35

35.0

35.0

45.0

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Neutral Agree Strongl y Agree Total

21 20 14 100

21.0 20.0 14.0 100.0

21.0 20.0 14.0 100.0

66.0 86.0 100.0

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100 Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that people have a very mixed opinion on effect of store ambience on their buying decision and perception towards a brand as 35% disagree, 10% strongly disagree with this fact, whereas 21% have a neutral opinion that they were not very sure, 20% agree and 14% strongly agree with this fact that store ambience affect their perception towards a brand.

Question-8
Frequen cy 31 12 11 7 14 25 100 Perce nt 31.0 12.0 11.0 7.0 14.0 25.0 100.0 Valid Perce nt 31.0 12.0 11.0 7.0 14.0 25.0 100.0 Cumulati ve Percent 31.0 43.0 54.0 61.0 75.0 100.0

Vali d

Brand image Quality Pricing Availabili ty Variety Sizes Total

Data was collected at Punjagutta, Thirumal giri (near paradise), city centre mall & GVK mall. Sample size- 100
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Data interpretation: We went for convenience sampling & From the above table we can see that they go for brand image and first then for variety, quality, pricing, and availability.

QUESTION-9
Column1 Brand image Quality Pricing Avalibility Variety Sizes Levis 2 2 1 2 2 1 Koutons 1 1 2 1 1 2

Data interpretation- from the above chart we can see that consumer perception towards both the brands are varied, they prefer koutons above levis in terms of pricing and sizes where as levis had an edge over koutons in terms of brand image, quality, availability, and variety.

QUESTION- 10
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Retail outlet Product Assortment Pricing Store design & ambience

Levis Store 2 1 2

Koutons Store 1 2 1

Data interpretation- From the above data and chart it is clear that consumer had a vivid perception for the two brand stores and they rate levis above koutons in terms of store ambience and product assortment where as in terms of pricing koutons had an upper edge

LIMITATIONS
Every work has its own limitation. Limitations are extent to which the process should not Exceed. Limitations of this project are:-

The project was constrained by time limit of two months. Mind set of people vary depending upon their age, gender, income etc. People mind set about the survey was an obstacle in acquiring complete information & positive interaction. Respondents were very busy in their schedule. So it was very time consuming for them to answer all the questions properly.

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FINDINGS AND SUGGESSTIONS

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FINDINGS
There is a paradigm shift in Indian consumer perception from unbranded clothing to branded fashionable clothing With globalization and increase in income level consumers had become more brand conscious Medium and low budgeted Indian brand are capturing the market of international brands Youth consumers are more brand conscious mostly students and young professionals More than 85 % people prefer buying branded clothes which is a sign of consumer changing perception towards branded clothes from unbranded clothing. Though most of them prefer buying branded clothes nut they are not regular buyers of it as only 17%. Whereas sample suggests that people wear branded clothes on special occations (35%) and sometimes (39%). Levis (42%) with brand image is more appreciated and accepted as a brand compare to koutons (34%) and other brands (24%) People prefer to buy mostly branded formals and branded casuals whereas they are not so keen in spending more in night dresses hence don’t prefer buying branded stuff frequently. Though they prefer for going for some of the branded sportswear. Most of them feel confident while wearing branded clothes Most of them feel it to be a status symbol and feel that they are more appreciated by their peers when they are wearing branded clothes. People have a very mixed opinion on effect of store ambience on their buying decision and perception towards a brand Peoples prefer buying a brand based on its brand image first then for variety, quality, pricing, and availability. Consumer perception towards both the brands are varied, they prefer koutons above levis in terms of pricing and sizes where as levis had an edge over koutons in terms of brand image, quality, availability, and variety. Consumer had a vivid perception for the two brand stores and they rate levis above koutons in terms of store ambience and product assortment where as in terms of pricing koutons had an upper edge

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Suggestions
Though urban market for the branded clothes is very much good and growing companies need to focus their business to other untapped market of small towns and create brand consciousness. a Both brands like levis and koutons need to diversify their product range. Levis like premium brands need to came up with some low cost brand to capture market of local low cost brand ranging price between 400 to 800. Whereas koutons like medium low cost need to tap high class public and international market with a really good international quality premier product They need to came up with more innovative and eye catching offers and advertising concept to capture the clothing market in changing fashion scenario of Indian fashion industry.

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CONCLUSION

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CONCLUSION
In defining the target segments, what we have done is to cover the medium to high potential consumers that international and national brands can target in the Indian context. We have parallel mapped these segment values with those of some brands that have seen success in the Indian market. We also took a step forward and scanned the international market for brands that could possibly find footing in India. In doing so,we able to validate our value findings with potential fashion brands. The trends that we have aligned with the segments are the strongest that stood out in the Indian fashion multiplicity. And as stated before, they echo the cultural and socio economic aspects of a new India, are influenced by global developments in fashion and of course, reflect a revival of age-old intricate techniques. These trends mainly concern the urban and semi-urban crowd. Macro trends like haute meltdown, direct fallout of the economic gloom, are more transient in nature. However, others like Macro trends 2 and 3 have almost become lifestyles or integral parts of lifestyles. They will see a much longer lifecycle before dying out or morphing into something different. Trend 4 on the other hand, is almost permanent as a concept. However, it will keep seeing numerous interpretations, some short-lived almost bordering on fads, others which stay on a little longer and still others which probably achieve cult status and are around for a very long time. In all this, our approach has been as non-linear as possible. And our research in other areas like retail and shopper behaviour, help in gaining further insight into the consumers mind. Fashion in India is at the threshold of a new era. People are becoming mere brand conscious with the increase in income level. Brands and individuals would do well to understand the finer aspects of the scenario, and venture out to capitalize on the opportunities.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY:
http://www.levistrauss.com/ http://us.levi.com/home/index.jsp http://us.levi.com/shop/index.jsp?categoryId=3146842 www.levistrauss.com/ www.koutonsparivar.com www.koutonsparivar.com/means_wear.php www.sebi.gov.in/dp/koutonsdraft.pdf www.in.kpmg.com www.google.co.in Business India and

BIBLIOGRAPHY
business world

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A Study on consumer’s perception about branded clothing in India:
Name: __________________________________Sex: -Male/ Female Status: -Single/Married Age (in Years): 18-24 48 Occupation: Maker Student 24-30 30-36 36-42 42-48 above

Professional

Govt. Employee

Businessman Home

1. Do you prefer buying branded clothes? Yes no 2. How often you prefer shopping for branded clothes? Regularly Special occasions Some times Never 3. Which brand you prefer to buy? Levis Others Koutons

Questionnaire

4. 5. 6. 7.

……………………………………………. Which type of clothes you prefer to buy from a branded outlet? Formals Casuals Night clothes Sports wear Do you feel more confident after wearing branded clothes? Yes No Does your peers appreciate brand you wear? Yes No Does store ambience and merchandising affect your perception towards brand? Agree 4 Neutral 3 Disagree 2 Strongly disagree 1

Strongly Agree 5

8. Rate your preferences while choosing a particular brand of clothing? Please give your ratings on the scale of 1 to 6 (6 to the most preferred) Brand image Quality Pricing Availability Variety

Sizes

9. Rate levis brand compared to Koutons based on given parameter
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Please give your ratings on the scale of 1 and 2 (2 for most preferred) Levis Brand image Quality Pricing Availability Variety Sizes Koutons

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10. Rank your preference of retail store based on the following parameters: Please give your ratings on the scale of 1 and 2 (2 for most preferred) Retail Outlet Levis Store Koutons Store Product assortment widest selection of national brand merchandise Overall quality Best value for your money Prices the lowest prices overall Offers and schemes Store design & ambience Modern looking equipment and fixtures most convenient store layout for shopping Merchandise displays are attractive Store atmosphere and decor are appealing Store location Convenient parking area Easily accessible

Thank you !!!
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