TIBCO Business Studio™ Process Developer’s Guide

Software Release 2.0 May 2007

Important Information
SOME TIBCO SOFTWARE EMBEDS OR BUNDLES OTHER TIBCO SOFTWARE. USE OF SUCH EMBEDDED OR BUNDLED TIBCO SOFTWARE IS SOLELY TO ENABLE THE FUNCTIONALITY (OR PROVIDE LIMITED ADD-ON FUNCTIONALITY) OF THE LICENSED TIBCO SOFTWARE. THE EMBEDDED OR BUNDLED SOFTWARE IS NOT LICENSED TO BE USED OR ACCESSED BY ANY OTHER TIBCO SOFTWARE OR FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE. USE OF TIBCO SOFTWARE AND THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF A LICENSE AGREEMENT FOUND IN EITHER A SEPARATELY EXECUTED SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT, OR, IF THERE IS NO SUCH SEPARATE AGREEMENT, THE CLICKWRAP END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT WHICH IS DISPLAYED DURING DOWNLOAD OR INSTALLATION OF THE SOFTWARE (AND WHICH IS DUPLICATED IN TIBCO BUSINESS STUDIO INSTALLATION GUIDE) OR IF THERE IS NO SUCH SOFTWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT OR CLICKWRAP END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT, THE LICENSE(S) LOCATED IN THE “LICENSE” FILE(S) OF THE SOFTWARE. USE OF THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO THOSE TERMS AND CONDITIONS, AND YOUR USE HEREOF SHALL CONSTITUTE ACCEPTANCE OF AND AN AGREEMENT TO BE BOUND BY THE SAME. This document contains confidential information that is subject to U.S. and international copyright laws and treaties. No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without the written authorization of TIBCO Software Inc. TIB, TIBCO, TIBCO Adapter, Predictive Business, Information Bus, The Power of Now, TIBCO iProcess, TIBCO BusinessWorks, TIBCO BusinessEvents, TIBCO General Interface, TIBCO ActiveMatrix and TIBCO Business Studio are either registered trademarks or trademarks of TIBCO Software Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. EJB, Java EE J2EE, and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries. All other product and company names and marks mentioned in this document are the property of their respective owners and are mentioned for identification purposes only. THIS SOFTWARE MAY BE AVAILABLE ON MULTIPLE OPERATING SYSTEMS. HOWEVER, NOT ALL OPERATING SYSTEM PLATFORMS FOR A SPECIFIC SOFTWARE VERSION ARE RELEASED AT THE SAME TIME. SEE THE README.TXT FILE FOR THE AVAILABILITY OF THIS SOFTWARE VERSION ON A SPECIFIC OPERATING SYSTEM PLATFORM. THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. THIS DOCUMENT COULD INCLUDE TECHNICAL INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN; THESE CHANGES WILL BE INCORPORATED IN NEW EDITIONS OF THIS DOCUMENT. TIBCO SOFTWARE INC. MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES IN THE PRODUCT(S) AND/OR THE PROGRAM(S) DESCRIBED IN THIS DOCUMENT AT ANY TIME. THE CONTENTS OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE MODIFIED AND/OR QUALIFIED, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, BY OTHER DOCUMENTATION WHICH ACCOMPANIES THIS SOFTWARE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY RELEASE NOTES AND "READ ME" FILES. Copyright © 2004-2007 TIBCO Software Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TIBCO Software Inc. Confidential Information

Contents iii

|

Contents

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TIBCO Business Studio Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Other TIBCO Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Third Party Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 2 3

Typographical Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 How to Contact TIBCO Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Chapter 1 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Who Should Use TIBCO Business Studio? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 How TIBCO Business Studio Supports MDA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Implementation Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hand Over from Business Analyst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BPM/SOA Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Creation/Testing for Sub-Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hand Off/Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Process Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 4 5 5 5

BPM/SOA Implementation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 User Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Service Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Script Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Deploying a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Tutorial Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Tutorial 1: Elaborating a Process: User Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Calling Web Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Creating an E-Mail Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Artifacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Project Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

iv

| Contents
Concept Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Data Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standards Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . UML2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 34 35 35 36 37 37 37 37

Chapter 3 Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Elaborating a User Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Adding a Service Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Working with UDDI Registries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Sending an Email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Making a Database Call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Creating a Script Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Associating a Script with a Conditional Flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Timer Event Scripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Calling Java Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Complete the Parameter Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Packaging a Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Deploying a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preparing a Process for Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a New Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deploying a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Deployed Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing Server Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Disconnecting from the Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 66 66 67 68 72 72 74

Chapter 4 Reference. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Properties View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . User Task Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Task Properties (Web Service/BusinessWorks Service) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Task Properties (Email) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Task (Database) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Service Task (Java) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Script Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Send and Receive Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 76 77 78 81 82 84 84

Process Validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

Contents v

|

General Rules for Direct Deployment to the TIBCO iProcess Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Rules for Direct Deployment of Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Correcting Validation Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

vi

| Contents

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

page 5 TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . Topics • • • Related Documentation. page 4 How to Contact TIBCO Support. page 2 Typographical Conventions. It describes how to elaborate a TIBCO Business Studio™ Process with execution details and how to deploy it to the runtime platform.|1 Preface This guide is aimed at the corporate developer who implements business processes designed by a business analyst.

• TIBCO Business Studio . This documentation has the following main sections: • • • • Getting Started takes you through the basics of TIBCO Business Studio. The following documentation is also provided: • • TIBCO Business Studio Installation Guide: Read this manual for instructions on site preparation and installation. a powerful process management engine designed to handle extremely high-volume. or portal environment. including several tutorials. a development environment for building rich internet applications. The object modeling features of TIBCO General Interface Builder enable developers to quickly create reusable GUI components and assemble them into full applications or application modules. mission critical transactions. TIBCO General Interface™ Builder.2 | Preface Related Documentation This section lists documentation resources you may find useful. a comprehensive collection of process management software that includes modeling tools. TIBCO Business Studio Documentation The TIBCO Business Studio documentation set consists of user’s guides for its main features such as modeling and simulation. existing HTML page. Reference provides detail about the major components of TIBCO Business Studio such as the properties sheets and user interface (UI). Other TIBCO Product Documentation You may find it useful to read the documentation for the following products: • TIBCO iProcess Suite™. Concepts and Definitions explores the concepts and terminology related to TIBCO Business Studio. Applications can be accessed in a web browser from a URL.Process Developer’s Guide . as well as tools for rules and analysis. Tasks describes common tasks that you perform using TIBCO Business Studio. This document also contains lists of known issues and closed issues for this release. TIBCO Business Studio Release Notes: Read the release notes for a list of new and changed features.

TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . BusinessWorks™ includes a graphical user interface (GUI) for defining business processes and an engine that executes the process. Third Party Documentation The Eclipse help also contains useful information on the Workbench and the Eclipse UI. and easy to use integration platform that allows you to develop integration projects. extensible. a scalable.Related Documentation 3 | • TIBCO BusinessWorks™.

For example: A portal page may contain several portlets. for example. and output displayed in a command window. pathnames. for example. For example: See TIBCO BusinessWorks Concepts. Key names separated by a comma and space indicate keys pressed one after the other.Process Developer’s Guide . code examples. to indicate the parts of the sample that are of particular interest.4 | Preface Typographical Conventions The following typographical conventions are used in this manual. For example: Type admin. For example: Ctrl+C. MyCommand is enabled: MyCommand [enable | disable] italic font Italic font is used in the following ways: • • • To indicate a document title. bold code font Bold code font is used in the following ways: • • • In procedures. To introduce new terms. For example. The note icon indicates information that is of special interest or importance. For example: MyCommand pathname Key combinations Key name separated by a plus sign indicate keys pressed simultaneously. if no parameter is specified. Ctrl+Q. a way to apply the information provided in the current section to achieve a specific result. For example: Esc. For example: Use MyCommand to start the foo process. to indicate the default parameter for a command. for example. to indicate what a user types. filenames. TIBCO Business Studio . Table 1 General Typographical Conventions Convention code font Use Code font identifies commands. In large code samples. The warning icon indicates the potential for a damaging situation. The tip icon indicates an idea that could be useful. an additional action required only in certain circumstances. Portlets are mini-applications that run in a portal. data loss or corruption if certain steps are taken or not taken. In command syntax. To indicate a variable in a command or code syntax that you must replace.

html. visit http://www. please contact TIBCO Support as follows.tibco. If you do not have a username. • For an overview of TIBCO Support. For self-service support. If you have purchased another TIBCO product that includes support for TIBCO Business Studio and have comments or problems with this manual or the software it addresses. TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide .tibco.com/devnet/index. you can request one. and access to the TIBCO Developer Network.com/services/support/ • If you already have a valid maintenance or support contract. visit this site: http://www.How to Contact TIBCO Support 5 | How to Contact TIBCO Support The community edition of TIBCO Business Studio is unsupported.tibco.com Entry to this site requires a username and password. education. visit this site: http://support. and information about getting started with TIBCO Support.

Process Developer’s Guide .6 | Preface TIBCO Business Studio .

page 25 TIBCO Business Studio . page 14 Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks.|1 Chapter 1 Getting Started Topics • • • • • • • Who Should Use TIBCO Business Studio?. page 4 BPM/SOA Implementation Overview. page 6 Deploying a Process. page 18 Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process. page 2 Implementation Approach.Process Developer’s Guide . page 12 Tutorial 1: Elaborating a Process: User Tasks.

Process Developer’s Guide . The Corporate Developer must implement this across the organization. For example: • An insurance company wants to enable their financial advisors to sell pension plans door-to-door using portable tablets. refining it. The following diagram shows how TIBCO Business Studio is intended to be used: TIBCO Business Studio . The Corporate Developer must implement a business process for doing this.2 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Who Should Use TIBCO Business Studio? Typically a Business Analyst defines a new business procedure and the Corporate Developer must implement it. • “Implementing a Process" refers to taking the Process that the Business Analyst has generated. adding detail to it. and taking it through the packaging and deployment phases. A company has acquired a competitor. The Business Analyst has rationalized both companies’ working procedures and created a process for a standard way of working.

delayed release. you can augment the process with execution details in TIBCO Business Studio and deploy it directly to the TIBCO iProcess Engine.0 of TIBCO Business Studio there are some constructs (for example. using version 2. transaction control steps. For example: TIBCO Business Studio supports an MDA approach to Business Process Management (BPM) and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) at a higher level of abstraction than the programming language level by allowing you to develop Platform Independent Models of business processes and then transform them into Platform Specific Models. usually written in Universal Modeling Language (UML).Who Should Use TIBCO Business Studio? 3 | Referring to the previous diagram. and then the Process can be transformed to create a Code Model that can be used with a specific execution engine. as well as a Platform Specific Model and Code Model. graft steps. depending on the destination environment that you select.Process Developer’s Guide . and dynamic sub-procedure call steps) for which you must perform part of the augmentation and deployment of the Process in TIBCO iProcess Modeler. both of which are applied at the programming language level. For example: TIBCO Business Studio . How TIBCO Business Studio Supports MDA Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is typically used to design applications and write specifications. The following section describes how the abstract implementation of a Process can be done first. It consists of a Platform Independent Model. However.

Write new custom service implementation using . Specify a URL that refers to the location of a form authored outside of TIBCO Business Studio.NET. and bind its service interface to the Process.4 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Implementation Approach Implementing a Process can be achieved in several different ways. then bind it to the Process. Hand Over from Business Analyst 1. Selecting a service implementation. Receive Process from Business Analyst. Employ integration technology (such as BusinessWorks processes perhaps employing adapters) to create new service and bind its service interface to the Process. however the following general approach reflects best practices. This is a mandatory part of implementing a service. For example. Review Process with Business Analyst. you must have a service that can come from one of the following sources: • Select an existing service interface and optionally an implementation (WSDL) from the Service Registry. or BusinessWorks Live Link. TIBCO Business Studio . which implies a concrete WSDL. To implement a service call. file or URL. 2. Enterprise Java Beans (EJBs). • • For User Tasks • • Specify the input and output parameters to the Task. which implies an abstract WSDL. BPM/SOA Implementation For Service Tasks There are two parts to implementing services: • • Selecting the service contract. a JSP page authored with the JSP editor provided by WTP inside Eclipse. This is optional for technologies such as Web Services that support late binding.Process Developer’s Guide . or other technologies.

Test and debug the services created in Java using tools external to TIBCO Business Studio. service implementations are created by different people or groups from those who consume the services provided by the process implementation. create any custom Java services that are required. see the TIBCO iProcess Modeler set of guides. either those embedded in the Eclipse Platform Development Environment (PDE) or any other tools that are available. for more information on creating services see the documentation for TIBCO BusinessWorks and TIBCO ActiveMatrix. Hand Off/Deployment There are several options depending on the procedures in your organization: • Publish Process documentation to web site and return the enhanced Process model to Business Analyst and Business Owner for approval. TIBCO Business Studio . Deploy the Package/Process to the Repository and initialize it without handoff to Operations staff. undelivered work items. • • Process Testing Ensure that the Process functions as intended including starting cases. test queues. See the TIBCO Business Studio Modeling User’s Guide for more information about generating Process documentation. For more information.Implementation Approach 5 | Service Creation/Testing for Sub-Processes Optionally. and so on. Package Process for Deployment to User Acceptance Testing/Production by the Operations staff. for example using the Eclipse IDE.Process Developer’s Guide . This guide focusses on the work of the person consuming services. In some organizations. This is especially likely when the service implementation is done in a programming language such as Java rather than a declarative technology such as BusinessWorks.

User Tasks You can specify the input and output Parameters of a User Task on the Implementation tab of the Properties view for the User Task: You can also specify either a relative or absolute URL for any form pages that you want displayed when the Task is executed (see Elaborating a User Task on page 40): Upon import to iProcess Modeler.6 | Chapter 1 Getting Started BPM/SOA Implementation Overview This section provides an overview of how to augment the Process with execution details. If no URL is specified. TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . This section provides an overview of elaborating a Process. the step is created with a standard iProcess Form. see TIBCO iProcess Client (Browser) Configuration and Customization. For more information about specific tasks. see Tasks on page 39. For more information. For example.Calls to a web service can be implemented as well as the mapping of input/output parameters. a User Task with a Form URL specified becomes a step with a Form type of Formflow Form. you may want to call a web service from a Service Task. Service Tasks Service Tasks can be implemented in the following ways: • Web Service .

Native or Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) calls to Oracle.Allows you to call Java code that you want to execute at runtime. you must import the Process into TIBCO iProcess Modeler. then use the appropriate EAI step (for example. SQL and DB2 databases. For example: If you want to implement other types of service calls.Calls to a BusinessWorks process exposed as a service can be implemented as well as the mapping of input/output parameters. Uniform Description. URL .You can either configure an email message that is sent when the Process is executed. Discovery. and Integration (UDDI) Registry . This is done in the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task. Currently the iProcess Engine database step only supports stored procedures.specify a URL from which the WSDL is retrieved. TIBCO Business Studio .obtain the WSDL from a UDDI registry. • • E-mail . from one of the following sources: • • • File . including functions that emulate standard iProcess Script commands. Database .BPM/SOA Implementation Overview 7 | • • Java . TIBCO BusinessWorks/Web Service A Service Task can be configured to call a service that has a WSDL. Before you can configure a Service Task. EAI Java). or provide a service descriptor (WSDL) for the behavior. BW Service .Process Developer’s Guide . you must import the WSDL file to the Eclipse workspace.browse to select a local file.

see the TIBCO iProcess BusinessWorks Connector User’s Guide. the iProcess Engine Service Agent must be running and the JMS provider transport information must be configured. For more information. Except for a WSDL obtained from a TIBCO BusinessWorks live link. the WSDL file that you use must conform to the following requirements for deployment to the iProcess Engine: Data Transport/Call Style • • The web service must use the SOAP over HTTP data transport mechanism. however you cannot specify more than one output parameter mapping.8 | Chapter 1 Getting Started • BusinessWorks live link .Process Developer’s Guide . The web service call style must be either Document Literal or Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Encoded. Parameter Mapping • • The web service must have at least one input and output parameter mapping.use the TIBCO BusinessWorks Connector live link feature to dynamically create and import a WSDL from a BusinessWorks process exposed as a service: To use the TIBCO BusinessWorks live link invocation method. The web service can have the following types of request and response parameters: — Simple types — Arrays of simple types — Complex types (including complex types containing complex types) — Arrays of complex types TIBCO Business Studio .

E-mail A Service Task can be configured to send an E-mail message on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task as follows: TIBCO Business Studio . the abstract portion of the WSDL must be present locally. When the Process is deployed to the iProcess Engine. Oracle or SQL database calls are made in the iProcess database.BPM/SOA Implementation Overview 9 | Message Exchange Patterns The only supported message exchange pattern is Synchronous Request/Response. Although you do not need to be concerned about which database is used in conjunction with the iProcess Engine. and the concrete portion of the WSDL can be obtained dynamically at runtime. If you use a remote WSDL. the appropriate DB2.Process Developer’s Guide . the abstract and concrete portion of the WSDL must be present locally. you can select either Use local WSDL or Use remote WSDL: If you use a local WSDL. the stored procedure writer will need to be familiar with the particular database. Database A Service Task can be configured to perform an action on a database using stored procedure calls. Process to Service Binding In the Properties view for a Service Task.

You can browse to select the Java class and select a Method from the drop-down list.10 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Clicking More Details or clicking the E-Mail tab allows you to specify further parameters. int. on Conditional Sequence Flows. Script Tasks You can enter scripts in Script Tasks. and so on) must adhere to JavaBeans semantics. For more information. This means that a String property 'name' must have an accessor named getName():String and a mutator named setName(:String). subject lines and so on.Process Developer’s Guide . Java A Service Task can be configured to call a Java code on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task as follows: The Java service class and any parameters that are not primitives (for example. and to Timer Start or Intermediate Events. The following constructs are supported in TIBCO Business Studio for Processes that you want to export/deploy to the TIBCO iProcess Modeler/TIBCO iProcess Engine: TIBCO Business Studio . Alternatively you can specify a Factory to be used for the creation of the class. Specifically they must have a default constructor (one without parameters) and the properties need to have standard get and set operations. Note that instead of explicitly entering email addresses. For example. float. see Sending an Email on page 50. The factory class must either offer a static factory method or must have a default constructor as the service class does. the previous dialog shows %Manager% rather than an explicit email address. you can define Data Fields or Parameters for this purpose.

and else statements Do while loops and while loops For loops Assignment operators Conditional operators The result of an expression should correspond to one of the known data types listed in the TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide. then press Ctrl + Space. you can view the available list of iProcess Script functions by typing IPE and pressing Ctrl + Space. if you enter if.Process Developer’s Guide . elseif.BPM/SOA Implementation Overview 11 | • • • • • If. For example. If you have selected the iProcess Engine or iProcess Modeler destination environment. TIBCO Business Studio . Within the packaging/export phase this JavaScript is converted to iProcess Script for execution by the iProcess engine. Content assist is available for process data that you define and also provides templates for common JavaScript constructs. you can use the following template to construct an if else: iProcess Script is supported for backward compatibility via the TIBCO iProcess JavaScript class library.

deploy.Process Developer’s Guide . configuration and initialization takes place. Direct Deployment and Export to the TIBCO iProcess Engine are one-way operations. the next step could be to deploy it to a server (for example. For this reason. re-import to TIBCO Business Studio. and so on. Information can be lost if you deploy to the iProcess Engine. After preparing the software some transformation. some of which may be optional. All of these. are aspects of deployment. execute).12 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Deploying a Process Deployment is part of the software development cycle (design. This is because the Studio process description may contain far more than merely the execution information required for iProcess Modeler/iProcess Engine. you should regard the import of an iProcess Modeler XPDL as a one-off activity to evaluate or migrate to TIBCO Business Studio. Export the Process to iProcess Modeler XPDL and then import it into the TIBCO iProcess Engine (see the TIBCO iProcess Modeling User’s Guide). deploy again. packaging. modify the Process. a server in the test environment). after a Corporate Developer has elaborated a Process. TIBCO Business Studio . physical delivery. There are two ways you can deploy a Process once you have finished elaborating it with the necessary execution details: • • Create a Deployment Server within TIBCO Business Studio and deploy the Process directly to the iProcess Engine (see Deploying a Process on page 64). To look at a concrete example of deployment.

Sample Workspace. 2.0 Project and expand the Process Packages folder. which contains the tutorial solutions. You can either open the sample workspace and explore the Project or continue with this tutorial to implement the example yourself. The remainder of this chapter assumes you are implementing the example yourself.0 > TIBCO Business Studio . TIBCO Business Studio . This starts TIBCO Business Studio and opens the sample workspace rather than your default workspace. Expand the Process Developer Tutorial Solutions 2.Process Developer’s Guide . To open the TIBCO Business Studio sample workspace.0) that has the completed solutions for the tutorials in the following sections. do the following: 1. Click Start > All Programs > TIBCO > TIBCO Business Studio 2.Tutorial Project 13 | Tutorial Project The samples workspace includes a Project (Process Developer Tutorial Solutions 2.

4. accepting the default Special Folders.xpdl file and paste it into the Packages folder of your Project. 3. In the file system. Create a BPM/SOA Developer Project in your workspace.Process Developer’s Guide . Task A Open the Sample Process 1. Copy the \Basic Samples 2. navigate to directory into which you installed TIBCO Business Studio and locate the sample workspace (for example. Open the Submit Expenses Process: TIBCO Business Studio . 2. C:\Program Files\TIBCO\Business Studio\sample-workspace).0\Process Packages\Office Procedures.14 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Tutorial 1: Elaborating a Process: User Tasks To learn how to implement User Tasks in a Process. follow this tutorial.

Create the following Data Fields: — Manager (String) — CostCenter (String) — Authorization (String) 3. the performer of this action needs basic information such as the employee name. cost center. In the Properties view. 2. Task B Create Parameters/Data Fields Create the Data Fields and Parameters that will be used by the Process as follows: 1. expand the Submit Expenses Process. click the Parameters tab. the Data Fields and Parameters may have already been added by the Business Analyst. right-click Data Fields and select New > Data Field.Process Developer’s Guide . The information that is internal to the Process will be represented as Data Fields and information required outside the Process will be represented by Parameters. Create the following Parameters: — EmployeeName (String) — EmployeeNumber (Integer Number) — Reference (string) — Amount (Decimal Number) — AccountNumber (Integer Number) — Confirmation (Boolean) Task C Specify Input and Output Parameters to the Tasks 1.Tutorial 1: Elaborating a Process: User Tasks 15 | Many of the Tasks in this Process require input and output. and so on. For example. In the Project Explorer. before the expenses can be approved. 4. expense amount. Click the Enqueue Payment Task. Right-click Parameters and select New > Parameter. Adding Parameters to the Process means that when it is exported to the iProcess Modeler if will be a Sub-Procedure. • • In some cases. TIBCO Business Studio .

To select several Parameters in the Select Data Field dialog. For more information about using Fields in Forms.Process Developer’s Guide . Inbound and Outbound Parameters become Optional fields. press the Ctrl key and click the desired Data Field or Parameter. This means that Inbound Parameters are sent to the form by the Process. Outbound Parameters are sent to the form by the user. TIBCO Business Studio . not the user. see TIBCO iProcess Modeler . not the user. Upon deployment to the iProcess Engine.Basic Design. Add the following outbound Parameters: Inbound and Outbound Parameters are from the perspective of the form.16 | Chapter 1 Getting Started 2.

see Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process on page 25 and Deploying a Process on page 64. TIBCO Business Studio . For example: For more information about deployment. Upon import or deployment to the iProcess Modeler.Tutorial 1: Elaborating a Process: User Tasks 17 | Summary You can create Data Fields and Parameters and specify their input and output mappings on User Tasks. the Data Fields become Fields and the Parameters become I/O Parameters and Fields.Process Developer’s Guide .

In the Properties view. Task A Create the Process/Service Task For the purposes of this tutorial.18 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks To learn how to elaborate Service Tasks. continue using the Submit Expenses Process from Tutorial 1. 5. Select Import from a File and click Next. TIBCO Business Studio . Click Finish to complete the import. select Web Service from the Service Type drop-down list. In the Project Explorer select the Project that contains the Submit Expenses Process 2. Task C Associate the WSDL with the Service Task 1. 4. 3. Browse to specify the Services folder where you want to store the WSDL.wsdl in the samples workspace and click Next. 3. Browse to find BankPayment. Task B Add the WSDL to the Project 1. 6. Click the Make Payment Task. then click Next. follow this tutorial. Save the Project. 2. This opens the Operation Picker dialog. Select File > Import and select Services > Service Import Wizard from the list. Click the Select button. Calling Web Services Many services that are described by a WSDL can be called from a Service Task (see TIBCO BusinessWorks/Web Service on page 7).Process Developer’s Guide .

Expand the BankPayment service and select the MakePayment operation.Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks 19 | 4. Complete the input parameter mapping as follows: TIBCO Business Studio . Expand the BankPayment service. This populates the rest of the web services fields such as Port Name and Operation. On the left of the tab are the Parameters and Data Fields and on the right are the Formal Parameters that the BankPayment service expects. Highlight the EmployeeName Parameter and drag the pointer from the Employee Name Parameter to the EmployeeName Formal Parameter. Task D Map the Input/Output Parameters 1. Click the Mapping In tab.Process Developer’s Guide . 2.

Save the Package. In this case the Confirmation parameter is Boolean and indicates whether the transaction completed. Click the Mapping Out tab. Using the same method as on the Mapping In tab.20 | Chapter 1 Getting Started 3.Process Developer’s Guide . TIBCO Business Studio . 4. You can see that the web service returns Confirmation and Reference parameters. complete the output parameter mapping as follows.

Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks 21 | Summary This tutorial showed how to add a WSDL file to a Project and then associate that WSDL file with a Service Task. mapping the input and output parameters. the Service Task becomes a Web Services EAI step: TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . Upon import or deployment to the iProcess Modeler.

In this section. Insert a Gateway after the Make a Payment Activity. Creating an E-Mail Task In the previous section. we added a call to a web service from the Make a Payment Activity. we will add an email task to notify the person who submitted the claim when the payment is made.22 | Chapter 1 Getting Started You can see that the parameter mappings are configured in the EAI step as well: For more information about deployment. 1. This included a Confirmation parameter which indicated whether the payment was successful. see Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process on page 25 and Deploying a Process on page 64.Process Developer’s Guide . We will also add a Manual Task in the event that the payment fails. TIBCO Business Studio .

This is the minimum configuration necessary to send an email message.Process Developer’s Guide . Select the Notify Service Task. select the E-Mail option from the Service Type drop-down list: 4. add a Service Task called Notify and a Manual Task called Ring Bank. For further options. click More Details or the E-Mail tab and continue to specify further parameters. It should look like this: 3.Tutorial 2: Elaborating a Process: Service Tasks 23 | 2. a subject and the body for the message. then on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task. After the Gateway. Enter an email address for the recipient in the To: field. TIBCO Business Studio .

For example: For more information about deployment.Process Developer’s Guide . Upon import or deployment to the iProcess Modeler. TIBCO Business Studio . see Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process on page 25 and Deploying a Process on page 64.24 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Summary You can configure a Service Task so that it sends an e-mail at runtime. the Service Task becomes an E-mail EAI step.

contact your iProcess Administrator. This was configured during installation of the iProcess Engine and stored in the SWJMXConfig. TIBCO Business Studio . 4.Process Developer’s Guide . Right-click the Process Packages folder and select New > Process Packages. If you cannot determine the port number. Click Next to accept the Packages folder and file name. The package name will be used to create the library name when the Process is deployed to iProcess. Select the Create a package using one of the following templates check box. Select New > New Project and follow the wizard to create a new BPM/SOA Developer Project with the default configuration. and click Next. see your iProcess administrator for details. select the An empty iProcess process item. Prerequisites • • • • Network access to a running iProcess Engine where you can deploy the Process Username and password of an iProcess Engine user with either the PRODEF or ADMIN permission that you can use to connect to the iProcess Engine Host name (machine name or IP address) Port number that the iProcess Engine uses for the Java Management Extension (JMX) engine.Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process 25 | Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process This tutorial describes creating and deploying a simple Process to an iProcess Engine. 3.properties file. Name the Process DeployTest and click Finish. If you are unsure of any of these prerequisites. Task A Create the Process 1. Name the Package Tutorial and click Next. 6.port entry in the SWDIR\etc\swjmx. 2. 5. By default the Port is 10025.

Name the server TestDeploy.26 | Chapter 1 Getting Started 7. 3. on the Destinations tab. Click Next. associate the sw_starter Participant with the User Task (on the General tab of the Properties view for the task). 12. To correct this. You should confirm that there are no errors or warnings in the Problems view. 8. 11. Select the Process in the Project Explorer. Task B Create the Deployment Server 1. In the Properties view. TIBCO Business Studio . 4.Process Developer’s Guide . Switch to the Process Developer Capability by clicking 2. Right-click Deployment Servers and select New > Server. and you should see that there are two error messages that relate to the Process: 10. . Add a User Task and an End event as follows: 9. Accept iProcess Engine Server as the Runtime Environment. 5. you can see that the iProcess Engine and iProcess Modeler have been selected: The template also creates a Participant called sw_starter. Change to the Problems view. Save the Package.

7.Password for the user connecting to the iProcess Engine. By default the Port is 10025.port entry in the SWDIR\etc\swjmx. contact your iProcess Administrator. expand Deployment Servers. — Password .properties file. If you cannot determine the port number.The port number that the iProcess Engine uses for JMX. In the Project Explorer.Enter localhost if the server is on your local machine. — Repository Type: Select Workspace. IPEADMIN). Click Finish. This was configured during installation of the iProcess Engine and stored in the SWJMXConfig. Enter the runtime server parameters. — Username . TIBCO Business Studio .Valid iProcess Engine user with either the PRODEF or ADMIN permission that can connect to the iProcess Engine (for example. — Host . — Port .Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process 27 | 6.Process Developer’s Guide . 2. Right-click the server name Test Deploy and select Connect. Task C Connect to the Server You can connect to a server you have created as follows: 1. The new Server is created and displayed in the Project Explorer. The username and password you entered when you created the server is authenticated on the deployment server to prevent you from deploying a Process to a server which you do not have authorization to use. otherwise enter the machine name or IP address of the computer where the iProcess Engine is installed.

Task D Deploy the Process Deploy the Process to the iProcess Engine as follows: 1. click Configuration Details then click View Error Log. Right-click the TestDeploy Server and select Deploy Module. If you encounter any problems connecting to a Server.28 | Chapter 1 Getting Started 3. the icon in the Project Explorer and the status bar text in the lower left of the workspace changes to indicate that you are connected.Process Developer’s Guide . When you have connected. the Properties view for the server displays Connected as the Server State: In addition. From the resulting dialog. The following dialog is displayed: TIBCO Business Studio . check the error log by selecting Help > About Eclipse Platform.

TIBCO Business Studio displays the following message: If the deployment fails. For more information about the External Module option.Tutorial 3: Deploying a Process 29 | 2. see Deploying a Module on page 68. 3. Select Workspace iProcess XPDL Module. see Deploying a Module on page 68). Select Test2 and click Finish. You can view the newly-deployed Process in the Project Explorer: TIBCO Business Studio . (For more information about Deployment Policy.Process Developer’s Guide . an error symbol is displayed instead of the information symbol in the previous dialog. Click Details to get more information about why the deployment failed. You are prompted to select the Package that contains the Process you want to deploy. When the deployment is finished. and click Next.

it is truncated (DEPLOYTE). The state of the procedure (Unreleased) and other details such as the version information is displayed in the Properties view: For more information about managing deployed modules.30 | Chapter 1 Getting Started Note that because our original Process name in TIBCO Business Studio (DeployTest) has more than eight characters. when it is deployed to the iProcess Engine. TIBCO Business Studio . see Managing Deployed Modules on page 72.Process Developer’s Guide .

TIBCO Business Studio .| 31 Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions This section defines concepts and terminology related to TIBCO Business Studio.Process Developer’s Guide .

TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . These can include the following: • • • • Code artifacts (for example.32 | Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions Artifacts A physical item created during the project life cycle. Java files). Project management artifacts (such as a business case or project plan). Deployment artifacts (such as XPDL1 packages for deployment to the iProcess Engine) or BAR files for TIBCO BusinessEvents. Documentation artifacts (for example HTML or PDF procedure documentation).

you can connect the server and manage certain aspects of deployed Processes. The artifact created by the packaging phase is the transformation of the XPDL2 package into XPDL1 for deployment to the iProcess Engine. Using the Server Manager in TIBCO Business Studio. A deployment server is the representation in TIBCO Business Studio of a TIBCO iProcess Engine. Specifically in TIBCO Business Studio. For more information.Process Developer’s Guide . packaging. some of which may be optional. deploy. When you want to deploy a Project/Process. are aspects of deployment. configuration and initialization takes place. see Deploying a Process on page 64.Deployment 33 | Deployment Part of the software development cycle (design. physical delivery. what happens is this: • A packaging phase occurs (either automatically or explicitly triggered by the user). • Module When you deploy an artifact. execute). you do so by creating a Deployment Server. a Module is created in the Deployment Server. After preparing the software some transformation. a Module corresponds to a Process with the Destination Environment set to iProcess Engine. All of these. TIBCO Business Studio . Unless you have extended TIBCO Business Studio.

34 | Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions Project Objects This section describes Process objects that relate to Process development. Concept Model A set of business terms specific to your corporate environment (for example. you are creating a class diagram with the addition of a UML Profile specifically intended to extend the meta-data to provide additional functionality over core UML. This is because the complex data types created in the Concept Modeler are not supported in the iProcess Engine. see the TIBCO Business Studio Concept Modeler User’s Guide. TIBCO Business Studio provides an Eclipse editor called the Concept Model Editor to help you construct your Concept Model. For example. when you create a Concept Model. counterparty. For more information. Data Fields Data Fields are used to represent the data that is used internally in a Process as either input to or output from an Activity. suppose an Activity is to identify a list of suitable candidates for an available position.true or false TIBCO Business Studio . In object-oriented terms. in a financial environment.Process Developer’s Guide . You can create Data Fields to represent the pool of candidates going into the Activity and the suitable candidates that have been identified. broker. be aware that Data Fields or Parameters with spaces in their names cannot be used for mapping (for example. you cannot export the resulting Process to the iProcess Engine. mapping to Parameters in a web service).The advantage of creating or importing a Concept Model in TIBCO Business Studio is that you can use it: • • • for analysis purposes for documentation purposes to create Data Fields in a Process that have the attributes of a Concept If you specify Concepts as Parameters or Data Fields in the TIBCO Business Studio Process Editor. and so on). If you intend to execute a Process in the TIBCO iProcess Engine. There are several types of Data Field: • Boolean .

Parameters Parameters are similar to Data Field but are either input to or output from an external source.is a text field that you want to use as a Participant String .decimal number of the specified length and decimal places (for example.34 has a length of five and two decimal places) In the iProcess Modeler. the number 130. the field lengths include the decimal point.integer value of the specified length (for example. during simulation Parameters are either created by TIBCO Business Studio or imported from a file.Process Developer’s Guide .alphanumeric characters of the specified length Extended Attributes Extended attributes can be used to add extra information to the schema such as: • • • XML Plain text descriptions Supply Chain Council (SCC) models for metrics and best practices They are added either on the Extended tab of the Properties view for those objects that support extended attributes. Parameters can be any of the following types: There are several types of Data Field: • Boolean . • • • Integer Number . so the previous example. 130. • Decimal Number . or on the Extended Attributes dialog in the New Process wizard. For example. 345) Performer .combination of date/time Datetime Data Fields are deployed/exported as two separate date and time fields in the iProcess Engine (suffixed "_D" and "_T").true or false TIBCO Business Studio .Project Objects 35 | • Date Time . when imported into the iProcess Modeler has a length of six and two decimal places.34.

the field lengths include the decimal point. so the previous example.combination of date/time Datetime Parameters are deployed/exported as two separate date and time fields in the iProcess Engine (suffixed "_D" and "_T"). in a hiring process. mapping to Parameters in a web service). and so on.Process Developer’s Guide . For example. Marketing and so on. Human . Manager. Organizational Unit .identifies the department or unit within an organization that performs an Activity.identifies the role responsible for performing an Activity.alphanumeric characters of the specified length If you intend to execute a Process in the TIBCO iProcess Engine. 130. Legal.identifies a specific person or user that performs an Activity.identifies an activity that is performed by the system. a person (Human Participant) interviews the candidate and an email system (System Participant) sends out an automatic follow-up reminder. The creation of a Parameter means that the Process will become a sub-procedure upon export to the iProcess Modeler. • Decimal Number . There are several types of Participant: • Role . • • • TIBCO Business Studio . the number 130.36 | Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions • Date Time . in a financial institution there may be roles such as Reconciler. System . 345) Performer .decimal number of the specified length and decimal places (for example. when imported into the iProcess Modeler has a length of six and two decimal places.34 has a length of five and two decimal places) In the iProcess Modeler. • • • • Integer Number .is a text field that you want to use as a Participant String . be aware that Data Fields or Parameters with spaces in their names cannot be used for mapping (for example. • Participants Participants are used to identify who or what performs an Activity.34. For example.integer value of the specified length (for example. For example.

namely Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) and XML Process Definition Language (XPDL). UML2 Unified Modeling Language (UML) is an Object Management Group (OMG) specification that helps you specify. The TIBCO Business Studio Process Editor supports the core set of this notation and the Properties View supports the complete set. see http://www. Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) BPMN is a graphical notation developed by the Business Process Management Initiative (BPMI) for representing the steps and flow of business procedures. but indirectly by creating a business process using the Process Editor or by creating a Package. You can use the Concept Modeler to import UML class diagrams (for more information see the TIBCO Business Studio Concept Modeler User’s Guide. Normally. and document models of software systems or business systems. including their structure and design. visualize. TIBCO Business Studio .bpmn. XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) XPDL is used to represent the underlying structure of a business process to TIBCO Business Studio.Process Developer’s Guide . This version of the TIBCO Business Studio provides support for XPDL2 and uses XPDL1 for deployment to the iProcess Engine. For more information.Standards Support 37 | Standards Support TIBCO Business Studio supports several industry standards.org. you do not use XPDL directly. Packages are stored in XPDL format.

Process Developer’s Guide .38 | Chapter 2 Concepts and Definitions TIBCO Business Studio .

page 58 Calling Java Code. page 64 TIBCO Business Studio . page 40 Adding a Service Call. page 54 Creating a Script Activity. page 50 Making a Database Call. page 60 Packaging a Process.| 39 Chapter 3 Tasks This section of the help describes some of the common tasks that you perform using TIBCO Business Studio to elaborate a process with execution details. page 63 Deploying a Process. page 56 Associating a Script with a Conditional Flow. Topics • • • • • • • • • Elaborating a User Task. page 42 Sending an Email.Process Developer’s Guide . package and deploy it.

Click OK when you have finished selecting Parameters and Data Fields. TIBCO Business Studio . press the Ctrl key and click the desired Data Field or Parameter.Process Developer’s Guide . 2. Click the User Task that you want to add Parameters to. Create the Parameters or Data Fields as described in the TIBCO Business Studio Modeling User’s Guide. 3.40 | Chapter 3 Tasks Elaborating a User Task You can add Parameters or Data Fields to user tasks as follows: 1. In the Properties view. click the Add button to select inbound and outbound Parameters: To select several Parameters in the Select Data Field dialog.

a User Task with a Form URL specified becomes a step with a Form type of Formflow Form. see TIBCO iProcess Client (Browser) Configuration and Customization. — Leave the Form URL field empty. — Absolute . http or https).jsp. the step is created with a standard iProcess Form.for example.jsp. This has the effect that all JSPs in all processes on all nodes accessed using this client must be in the same web application. JSPFormExample/JSPForm. Save the Package that contains the Process. You can do either of the following: — Specify a URL for any form pages that you want displayed when the Task is executed: Upon import to iProcess Modeler. TIBCO Business Studio . Absolute URLs allow each step of each process to specify a separate host.for example. Upon import to iProcess Modeler. Specifying a relative URL assumes that the browser client configuration has specified the host and protocol (for example. you can use either of the following types: — Relative (the default) .Process Developer’s Guide .acme. 5.Elaborating a User Task 41 | 4. For more information. http://www. application and protocol. The benefit of using this type of URL is that when moving from development to user acceptance testing and then to production.com/mywebapp/myjsp. Click the Implementation tab. the base URL (including the host name) needs to be changed in just one central place. If you specify a URL.

42 | Chapter 3 Tasks Adding a Service Call A Service Task can be configured to call any service that has a WSDL. 3.the URL used for publishing services and businesses to the registry (for example. 4. TIBCO Business Studio . — Lifecycle Manager (Publish) URL .net/inquire). 3. Viewing a Registry 1.for example XMethods.the URL used to retrieve information about the services and businesses of the registry (for example. Creating a Registry Search 1. Select Show View > Other. This section describes how to add a UDDI registry before importing the WSDL. Working with UDDI Registries If you plan to add a WSDL file from your Project.xmethods. You can also use the TIBCO BusinessWorks Connector live link feature to dynamically create and import a WSDL from a BusinessWorks process. The Registries view opens and you should see any UDDI Registries that you have added. Expand Services.net/publish).Process Developer’s Guide . including BusinessWorks process that are exposed as services. https://uddi. or as part of the import process. Adding a UDDI Registry 1.xmethods. 2. 2. http://uddi. Click Finish. you can create a new registry either before importing the WSDL file. Enter the details of the Web Service registry: — Registry Name . — Query Manager (Inquiry) URL . select Service Registry from the list of wizards and click Next. Expand Web Service Registries and select Registries. Click the Add Search button ( ). Select New > Other.

— Search Criteria . 3. For example. Enter the service search criteria: — Search Name . however the TIBCO ActiveMatrix Service Registry does. When you expand the search in the Registries view. Click Finish. 4.This is the name you want displayed in the Registries view for your search. Not all registries support this wildcard syntax. but may be refreshed. TIBCO Business Studio . specifying c% would return all businesses or services that start with the character c. Select the type of search you want to perform (either for a business or for a service) and click Next.Adding a Service Call 43 | 2. the results are displayed. the following search shows the results of a search on the XMethods registry: Search results are preserved for subsequent browsing. For example.Process Developer’s Guide .You can use a percent sign (%) as a wildcard to specify search criteria.

org/MyWSDLFile/).Process Developer’s Guide . This section should be considered only a summary and you should consult the documentation associated with your web service creation tools (for example. http://www. You must specify a valid URI (for example.44 | Chapter 3 Tasks Adding a WSDL to the Project There are several options for getting a WSDL file into your Project. The target namespace is used for the names of messages and the port type. and so on) for detailed advice. binding and service defined in the WSDL file. you can create a new WSDL file using the tools provided by Eclipse: A full explanation of all the necessary settings and advice on creating WSDLs is outside of the scope of this document. . select the binding options you want to use in the WSDL document.example. 3. If you select SOAP you can then select the encoding style you want to use. ActiveMatrix.company. either SOAP or HTTP. Select File > New > Other. You can then modify these to meet the requirements of your Web service. This section describes: • • • Creating a New WSDL If you do not already have a WSDL file for the service you want to call. 1. — Prefix is the prefix associated with the target namespace. Specify the Parent folder and File name for the WSDL file and click Next. Enter the following options: — Target namespace is the namespace for the WSDL file or accept the default (http://www.NET. This will generate the WSDL elements required for your service. If you have chosen to create a WSDL skeleton. expand Web Services and select WSDL and click Next. Creating a New WSDL Copying a WSDL Importing the WSDL TIBCO Business Studio . If you select HTTP you can select whether to create an HTTP getter or setter. including bindings. 2. — Select Create WSDL Skeleton if you want the wizard to create the skeleton of the WSDL file.com/service/). ports and messages.

This enables you to expand the WSDL in the Project Explorer. Click Finish. The WSDL file is pasted into the correct location. c. you can copy and paste it into the Project. select it and press Ctrl + C to copy it. b.Process Developer’s Guide . you can do so as follows: a. In the Project Explorer select the folder in the Project where you want to copy the WSDL file.Adding a Service Call 45 | 4. Select the newly-created folder. right-click and select Special Folders > Use as Services Folder. 2. If you have not yet created a folder. the press CRL + V. For example: Copying a WSDL If you already have a WSDL file. either in the file system or received via e-mail. 1. Locate the WSDL file. Enter the parent directory and folder name. The WSDL file opens in the WSDL editor. then click Finish. Right-click where you want to create the folder and select New > Folder. For example: Importing a WSDL There are several ways to import a WSDL into a project: • • from a file from a URL TIBCO Business Studio . You can also designate a special folder to hold the WSDL (this allows you to expand the WSDL file in the Project Explorer to see the operations available).

use this method to select a WSDL from a UDDI registry that you previously created. — Import from a URL . the iProcess Engine Service Agent must be running and the JMS provider transport information must be configured. To use the TIBCO BusinessWorks live link invocation method.46 | Chapter 3 Tasks • • from a UDDI registry from TIBCO BusinessWorks To import a WSDL file.3+ .use this method to import a WSDL using the BusinessWorks live link feature. Click Next. 2.use this method to browse the file system for the WSDL file. then click Next. — Import from BusinessWorks 5. TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . see the TIBCO iProcess BusinessWorks Connector User’s Guide. Select File > Import and select Services > Service Import Wizard from the list. do the following: 1.use this method to specify a URL that resolves to the location of the WSDL file. — Import from a Registry . Select one of the following import methods: — Import from a File . For more information.

4. On the Properties view for the Service Task. click Start > TIBCO iProcess Server (Windows) > JMS Administration Utility). Depending on the option that you chose in the previous step. 1. You can then specify that the Service Task performs a web services operation at runtime. Port and TargetQueueName. enter the JMS provider information that the iProcess Engine uses to integrate with BusinessWorks. — If you chose Import from a Registry. 5.Adding a Service Call 47 | 3. — If you chose Import from a URL. navigate to the $SWDIR\jmsadmin directory and enter the jmsadmin. right-click and select Add Registry. you can either select a service from an existing registry or add a new registry. — In the iProcess Service Agent area of the BusinessWorks Step Definition dialog when defining an iProcess BusinessWorks step in an iProcess Engine procedure. select Web Service. Select the Service Task. Browse to select the Location (the folder in your Project where you want to store the WSDL file). browse to specify the Location of the WSDL file. enter the URL for the WSDL file. To add a new registry. Click Next. If the WSDL file is located remotely. For more information see the TIBCO iProcess BusinessWorks Connector User’s Guide. do the following: — If you chose Import from a File. 2. there may be slight delay while the WSDL file is imported. When using a BusinessWorks live link. Click Finish. Associating the WSDL with a Task You can associate a WSDL with a Service Task. TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . or from Windows. on the General tab. — If you chose Import from BusinessWorks 5.sh command. specifically the Host.3+. the JMS provider information can be found in either of the following locations: — In the JMS Administration Utility (from UNIX.

mapping a String to an Integer).48 | Chapter 3 Tasks 3. If you attempt to map Data Fields or Parameters to Parameters of a different type (for example. an error is generated in the Problems view.Process Developer’s Guide . This opens the Operation Picker dialog. The Port Name and Operation Name are populated automatically depending on the operation you select. Click Select to select an operation. Expand the web service. For example: • • You cannot map Data Fields or Parameters with spaces in their names. TIBCO Business Studio . 2. Using the Mapper 1. On the left of the tab are the Parameters and Data Fields and on the right are the Formal Parameters that the web service expects. Highlight a Parameter on the left and drag the pointer from the parameter to the Formal Parameter on the right to create a mapping. Click the Mapping In tab.

Complete the output mapping in a similar fashion using the Mapping Out tab. Note that you can enter JavaScript that is applied to a mapping by clicking . Web service operations that return more than one Parameter are not supported in the iProcess Engine/iProcess Modeler Destination Environments.Process Developer’s Guide . 5. TIBCO Business Studio . if you want to append a string to a Parameter. This displays the following window. you can do so as follows: When executed in the runtime environment. Save the Package that contains the Process. For example. the string "SEBRANCH" is appended to the input Parameter Reference.Adding a Service Call 49 | 3. 4. in which you can enter a limited amount of JavaScript: This is currently limited to concatenation of two fields on the left into a single on the right or splitting (substring) data from one left field to two on the right.

Select the Service Task. you can specify further parameters for the Definition of the message: All of the Parameters on this tab can be specified using a Data Field or Parameter. This is the minimum configuration necessary to send an email message. For further options. then on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task.50 | Chapter 3 Tasks Sending an Email A Service Task can be configured to send an email message as follows: 1. 3. a subject and the body for the message. TIBCO Business Studio . click More Details on the E-Mail tab and continue to specify further parameters. On the E-Mail tab. select the E-Mail option from the Service Type drop-down list: 2.Process Developer’s Guide . Click the button to select the Data Field or Parameter. Enter an email address for the recipient in the To: field.

— To: .Sending an Email 51 | — From: . src and preview which allow you to alternate between TIBCO Business Studio .use this parameter to specify additional information in the header of the email. High or Low) or select a Data Field or Parameter. select a Data Field or Parameter. — Cc: . Their email address is visible to other recipients of the email.use this parameter to specify a different email address to which recipients of a message can reply. — Bcc: .select a priority from the drop-down list (Normal. — Subject: . Their email address is not visible to other recipients of the email. — Priority: .specify the recipients to whom you want to send a copy of the email either as explicit email addresses or by selecting a Data Field or Parameter. — Headers: .select the Subject line for the email message or select a Data Field or Parameter.Process Developer’s Guide . Alternatively. At the bottom of the text area are two buttons.specify the recipients to whom you want to send a copy of the email either as explicit email addresses or by selecting a Data Field or Parameter. Click Body to specify the main text of the message.either Use Server Configuration to use the address of the server from which the email is sent or Use Custom Configuration to specify a Data Field or Parameter. 4.specify the recipient of the email either as an explicit email address or by selecting a Data Field or Parameter. — Reply to: .

— Select Use Custom SMTP Configuration settings to specify a different Host and Port. 5.Process Developer’s Guide . 6. TIBCO Business Studio .use this option to attach the contents of a Parameter or Data Field to the email message. Click Attachments to specify a document to be attached to the message: — Field Contents: . — Files: use this option to browse the file system and attach a file to the email message. Click SMTP Configuration to specify Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) settings other than the default: — Select User Server SMTP Configuration to use the settings of the server where the Process will run.52 | Chapter 3 Tasks viewing the source of the body text and previewing how it will look to the recipient.

if a message cannot be sent): — Code: . TIBCO Business Studio .select either a Parameter or Data Field that contains the message you want displayed when the email cannot be sent.Sending an Email 53 | 7. Click Error Handling to provide for basic error handling (for example. — Message: .select either a Parameter or Data Field that represents an error code.Process Developer’s Guide .

select the Database option from the Service Type drop-down list: 2.. Specify the following: — Server.If the stored procedure is not in the local database instance. The meanings of Server and Database differ depending on the particular database being used. For specific information. then on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task.Process Developer’s Guide . you need to provide either the server name or database name or both.. Select the Service Task. or the Database tab to define the parameter mappings between parameters in the stored procedure and Case TIBCO Business Studio . refer to the TIBCO iProcess Database Plug-in User’s Guide. 3. — Operation .Stored Procedure is the only option available. — SQL .specify the name of the stored procedure in the format shown in the above dialog . Database . The default instance is the one that your TIBCO iProcess Engine is currently using.[owner. Click Define procedure parameters.]stored_procedure_name.54 | Chapter 3 Tasks Making a Database Call A Service Task can be configured to make a database call as follows: 1.

the stored procedure takes the input parameters Acct and Amount and maps them the Case Fields DEBIT ACCOUNT and AMOUNT. — Select from the drop-down list whether the parameter is input to the stored procedure (IN).Making a Database Call 55 | Fields in the TIBCO iProcess Engine. output to the iProcess Engine (OUT) or both (INOUT). and Remove buttons. the stored procedure outputs the parameters Bal and Rcode to the Case Fields BALANCE and Return Code. — You can remove or reposition the Parameters using the Move Up. — Click the Add button to add a Parameter.Process Developer’s Guide . For more information about delayed release steps and using the Return Code field. TIBCO Business Studio . see the TIBCO iProcess Database Plug-in User’s Guide. — Select the Case Fields (Data Fields) from the Select Data Field dialog. Similarly. Move Down. These Case Fields are represented in TIBCO Business Studio as Data Fields: In this example.

All matching Data Fields are displayed: Although TIBCO Business Studio allows you to create Process Data (for example. you can enter JavaScript that will be executed at runtime: The Script: area supports the usual text editing assistance such as color syntax highlighting. such names are not displayed in content assist. then press Ctrl + Space. on the Implementation tab for a Script Activity. if you want to specify a Data Field called Field1.Process Developer’s Guide . content assist and error markers are supported. a Data Field) that has spaces in its name. enter the character "F". You can then select the desired Data Field from the list and continue entering JavaScript: TIBCO Business Studio . For example.56 | Chapter 3 Tasks Creating a Script Activity In the Properties view.

the error and the red "x" are removed.). then press Ctrl + Space.Creating a Script Activity 57 | Note that in this case there is a red "x" next to the line.Process Developer’s Guide . you can use the following template to construct an if else: iProcess Script is supported for backward compatibility via the TIBCO iProcess JavaScript class library. TIBCO Business Studio . When this is corrected. you can view the available list of iProcess Script functions by typing IPE and pressing Ctrl + Space. Within the packaging/export phase this JavaScript is converted to iProcess Script for execution by the iProcess engine. Content assist also provides templates for common JavaScript constructs. This is because validation has reported an error in the Problems view because the line is not terminated with a semi-colon (. if you enter if. For example. If you have selected the iProcess Engine or iProcess Modeler destination environment.

on the Implementation tab. At runtime. there may be text comments describing the condition that needs to be set. this causes the Sequence Flow to be followed only if the condition is met: The Script: area supports the usual text editing assistance such as color syntax highlighting. TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide . Only one statement that evaluates to a Boolean value is allowed if you are exporting/deploying to the iProcess Engine. You can comment these when implementing the condition. On the General tab. content assist and error markers (see Creating a Script Activity on page 56 for more information).58 | Chapter 3 Tasks Associating a Script with a Conditional Flow Scripts are associated with a Conditional Sequence Flow in the Properties view.

the event would fire at the specified time on the current date. If only the Date were present. TIBCO Business Studio . If only the Time were specified. the event would fire at 00:00 on the Date specified.Timer Event Scripts 59 | Timer Event Scripts Scripts can be added to Start or Intermediate events in the Properties view for the event. If you specify only one statement. For example: In this case. one must evaluate to a Date and the other to a Time.Process Developer’s Guide . it must evaluate to either a Date or a Time. If you specify two statements. The script area cannot be empty if you want to export or deploy to the iProcess Engine. the event will be fired at the Date and Time specified. The script that you specify is limited to two statements.

For more information about creating or importing Java Projects. see the Java Development User Guide in the Eclipse documentation.Process Developer’s Guide . then on the General tab of the Properties view for the Service Task. select the Java option from the Service Type drop-down list: TIBCO Business Studio . Select the Service Task. 1.60 | Chapter 3 Tasks Calling Java Code You can call Java code by creating a Service Task as follows: You must have created a Java Project in your workspace or imported a Java Project into your workspace so that it is available for the Service Task that you are going to create.

and all classes starting with s are displayed. The Select Class dialog is displayed: An alternative to selecting the Class is to select a factory to create the Class. Select the appropriate class that you want to use. For example: TIBCO Business Studio .Calling Java Code 61 | 2. To do this. the character s was entered.Process Developer’s Guide . selecting it populates the Class and Method fields. click Select Factory. Select from the drop-down list the Method that you want to use. In the previous example. Click Select Class. If you begin typing. If a factory is available. 3. the matching classes are displayed.

62 | Chapter 3 Tasks Complete the Parameter Mapping Click the Mapping In and Mapping Out tabs to complete the input and output mapping between any Parameters or Data Fields in your Process and the Java code. If you attempt to map Data Fields or Parameters to Parameters of a different type (for example.Process Developer’s Guide . mapping a String to an Integer). This shows a method that returns a String which is then mapped to the Name Parameter. For example: • • You cannot map Data Fields or Parameters with spaces in their names. an error is generated in the Problems view. TIBCO Business Studio .

This means that when you save your Package (XPDL2). a version of it is also saved to XPDL1 ready for deployment to the iProcess Engine. If you choose to package your project manually (for example. and it has no errors. When you want to package your project.Packaging a Process 63 | Packaging a Process Packaging happens automatically and is a prerequisite to Deployment.Process Developer’s Guide . de-select Project > Build Automatically. By default. select either Project > Build All or Project > Build Project. The Process is only available for deployment using the Deployment wizard if its Destination Environment is set to iProcess Engine. Project > Build Automatically is selected. TIBCO Business Studio . because of resource or memory considerations).

Direct Deployment to the TIBCO iProcess Engine is a one-way operation. The iProcess Engine must be running. you can Release. re-import to TIBCO Business Studio. and Undeploy Modules. you can connect and disconnect from the Server. In the iProcess Engine. deploy again. Once connected. Information can be lost if you deploy to the iProcess Engine. and so on.Process Developer’s Guide . TIBCO Business Studio . you can manage Modules on the Server. modify the Process. For example. and a Server represents a running TIBCO iProcess Engine where you want to deploy the Process.64 | Chapter 3 Tasks Deploying a Process TIBCO Business Studio allows you to deploy a resource (represented in TIBCO Business Studio as a Module) on a local or remote system (represented in TIBCO Business Studio as a Server). a Module corresponds to a Process with the Destination Environment set to iProcess Engine. you cannot start and stop the Server from within TIBCO Business Studio. Withdraw. This is because the Studio process description may contain far more than merely the execution information required for iProcess Modeler/iProcess Engine. However.

TIBCO Business Studio . if the required server has been registered and the Module created.Process Developer’s Guide .Deploying a Process 65 | The following diagrams shows the steps for deploying a Process the first time: Once you have deployed a Process. you do not need to repeat these steps each time you deploy the Process.

As described in Packaging a Process on page 63. The Package Name of the Process you are deploying becomes the Library Name upon deployment to the iProcess Engine. 2. 3. (comma) characters. Preparing a Process for Deployment To deploy a Process to a TIBCO iProcess Server. If you cannot see the Deployment Servers branch of the Project Explorer. you should ensure that the first eight alphanumeric characters of the Process name in TIBCO Business Studio are unique and do not contain ^ (caret) or . If you are planning to deploy a Process to the iProcess Engine. Packaging occurs automatically. make sure that you select either Project > Build All or Project > Build Project to manually package your Process. do the following: 1. Right-click Deployment Servers and select New > Server. it will not be shown in the Deployment wizard and you cannot deploy it. However. TIBCO Business Studio .66 | Chapter 3 Tasks Package/Process Naming The name of a Process in TIBCO Business Studio is truncated to the first eight alphanumeric characters when it is deployed to the iProcess Engine. TIBCO Business Studio prevents you from deploying a Process with errors. Resolve all of the problems reported in the Problems view. you should be aware of the names of existing procedures in the target deployment environment to ensure that you do not unintentionally overwrite an existing procedure. do the following: 1. If you deploy a Process that has the same name as a Process that has already been deployed. a new minor version is created. Enter a Server Name (to identify the server within TIBCO Business Studio). if you have de-selected Project > Build Automatically. the version that was previously deployed will be available in the Deployment wizard. 4. Create the Process and set the Destination Environment to iProcess Engine. Creating a New Server To create a new server.Process Developer’s Guide . 2. but the version with errors will not be displayed/deployable. If you are attempting to deploy a Process for the first time and it contains errors. If the Process has already been deployed. For this reason. enable the Process Developer Capability by clicking .

If you have changed the default MBean Name setting for the iProcess Engine by editing the configuration file. — Host . 6. If you have changed the default location of the JMX service.xml.The MBean Name is set in the configuration file SWDIR\etc\swjmx_config. — Repository Type: Select Workspace to allow the Module to be deployed from your Eclipse workspace. you must ensure that you also change MBean Name in TIBCO Business Studio so that both settings match.Deploying a Process 67 | 3. contact your iProcess Administrator.properties file.The port number that the iProcess Engine uses for the JMX engine.Enter localhost if the server is on your local machine. 4. The new Server is created and displayed in the Project Explorer. The default for Path is /server (this is the default iProcess Engine setting). Click Finish. — Path .port entry in the SWDIR\etc\swjmx. TIBCO Business Studio uses the default name TIBCO:IProcessDeployment=default. — Password . — Username . otherwise enter the machine name or IP address of the computer where the iProcess Engine is installed. — MBean Name . If you cannot determine the port number. — Port .Password for the user connecting to the iProcess Engine. This was configured during installation of the iProcess Engine and stored in the SWJMXConfig. Click Next. Enter the runtime server parameters. In the Project Explorer. expand Deployment Servers.Process Developer’s Guide .Specifies the path on the server to the JMX service. Accept iProcess Engine Server as the Runtime Environment. 5. IPEADMIN).Valid iProcess Engine user with either the PRODEF or ADMIN permission that can connect to the iProcess Engine (for example. TIBCO Business Studio . you must ensure that you also change Path in TIBCO Business Studio so that both settings match. Connecting to a Server You can connect to a server you have created as follows: 1. where the JMX objects are stored. By default the Port is 10025.

When you have connected. check the error log by selecting Help > About Eclipse Platform. 3. the Properties view for the server displays Connected as the Server State: If you encounter any problems connecting to a Server.68 | Chapter 3 Tasks 2. The username and password you entered when you created the server is authenticated on the deployment server to prevent you from deploying a Process to a server which you do not have authorization to use. Right-click the server name of the server you are connecting to and select Connect. you can deploy a Process to an iProcess engine as follows: TIBCO Business Studio . Deploying a Module Once you have connected to a Server.Process Developer’s Guide . From the resulting dialog. click Configuration Details then click View Error Log.

Select the appropriate Module Type depending on whether your Module is located in your Workspace or in a local folder.Process Developer’s Guide . TIBCO Business Studio . Right-click the Server on which you want to deploy and select Deploy Module. The following dialog is displayed: 2. and click Next.Deploying a Process 69 | 1.

70

| Chapter 3

Tasks

3. Depending on the option you selected in the previous step, continue as follows: — If you selected Workspace iProcess XPDL Module in the previous step, you are prompted to select the Package that contains the Process you want to deploy.

You can also select the Deployment Policy for the Module - either Deploy on request which deploys the Module when you explicitly choose to do so, or

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

Deploying a Process 71

|

Deploy on save which deploys the Module whenever a new version of the Package is saved/packaged. — If you selected External iProcess XPDL Module in the previous step, you are prompted to enter a URL that points to the Module you want to deploy:

You can also click Browse to locate the Module. 4. Click Finish. When the deployment is finished, TIBCO Business Studio displays the following message:

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

72

| Chapter 3

Tasks

Managing Deployed Modules
When a Module is first deployed to the iProcess Engine, the resulting Procedure is in an Unreleased state. This is indicated in the Properties view:

Right-clicking the Procedure shows the operations that you can perform when the Procedure is in an Unreleased state:

As shown, you can Release or Undeploy the Procedure. You cannot undeploy a Procedure with active Cases.

Similarly after you have released a Procedure, you can withdraw or undeploy a Procedure.

Changing Server Properties
If you need to change a Server’s properties (for example, to change the password or to change the IP address of the server) do the following:

TIBCO Business Studio - Process Developer’s Guide

3. Select the Server. You can change the configuration while connected to the Server. TIBCO Business Studio .Deploying a Process 73 | 1. 4. The changes take effect the next time you connect to the Server. and when you next Connect your changes will be applied. When you have finished making changes. A dialog similar to the following is displayed: 2. right-click and select Properties. If there are Modules which you no longer wish to automatically deploy.Process Developer’s Guide . Click Auto Deployed Modules to see a list of Modules for which you specified Deploy on save when you created them. Make the necessary changes to the properties. click OK. click Remove to disable automatic deployment for the selected Module.

Process Developer’s Guide . right-click the Server and select Disconnect. The Server State in the Properties view should change to Disconnected: TIBCO Business Studio .74 | Chapter 3 Tasks Disconnecting from the Server To disconnect from a Server.

a Perspective includes the views and set of editors that you commonly use for a specific type of work. A Capability in Eclipse is a mechanism to enable and disable specific areas of UI based on the current user's selected role. Within the Modeling Perspective.Process Developer’s Guide . TIBCO Business Studio . This section of the help describes the major parts of the TIBCO Business Studio user interface that are specific to the Process Developer Capability of the Modeler Perspective. TIBCO has created several TIBCO Business Studio perspectives that include the views and editors you commonly use when creating business processes.| 75 Chapter 4 Reference In Eclipse. there are two Capabilities: • • Analyst Capability (see the TIBCO Business Studio Modeling User’s Guide) Process Developer Capability (described in this section).

the Task becomes a step with a Form type of Formflow Form. Parameters Inbound Parameters Outbound Parameters TIBCO Business Studio . To view property information. Upon deployment/import to the iProcess Engine.76 | Chapter 4 Reference Properties View The Properties View shows you detailed information about the currently selected object and allows you to specify the characteristics of an object. the step is created with a standard iProcess Form Allows you to select the Data Fields or Parameters that the Task requires as input. If you do not specify a URL.Process Developer’s Guide . User Task Properties When you have selected a User Task in the Process Editor. Allows you to select the Data Fields or Parameters that the Task requires as output. you must have an object selected. select Window > Show View > Properties. the following properties are available: Tab Implementation Property Form URL Description You can specify the URL of a form that you have created. To see this view.

It must also use the Synchronous Request/Response Message Exchange Pattern. Use local WSDL Use remote WSDL TIBCO Business Studio . the following properties are available: Tab General Property Service Name Description • When you click the Select button and choose a WSDL operation.Properties View 77 | Service Task Properties (Web Service/BusinessWorks Service) When you have selected a Service Task in the Process Editor with either Web Service or BW Service as the Service Type. Port Name Operation Name See Service Name description. Note: Except for a WSDL obtained from BusinessWorks. Select this option if you have added the WSDL to the project and want the WSDL to be packaged with the Project during the Packaging phase. the WSDL you select must use the SOAP over HTTP data transport mechanism and the call style must be either Document Literal or RPC Encoded.Process Developer’s Guide . Select this option if the WSDL is located remotely. it cannot be packaged with the Project. Click the Select button to choose a WSDL operation from a WSDL that you have added to the Project (see Adding a WSDL to the Project on page 44). If this is the case. the Service Name and Port Name fields are populated from the WSDL.

Process Developer’s Guide . then releasing the mouse button. then releasing the mouse button. dragging to the destination Parameter. Note: For deployment to the iProcess Engine.78 | Chapter 4 Reference Tab Mapping In Property Description Use this section to create a mapping from an actual parameter (Data Field or Parameter) into the formal parameters of the selected service. you must specify at least one input parameter mapping. Mapping Out Service Task Properties (Email) When you have selected a Service Task in the Process Editor with Email as the Service Type. Use this section to create a mapping from a formal parameter of a service to an actual parameter (Data Field or Parameter). Note: For deployment to the iProcess Engine. the following properties are available: Unless otherwise stated. button to select the Data TIBCO Business Studio . dragging to the destination Parameter. Create a mapping by clicking a Parameter. all of the properties listed in the following table can be specified using a Data Field or Parameter. Click the Field or Parameter. however you cannot specify more than one output parameter mapping. you must specify at least one output parameter mapping. Create a mapping by clicking a Parameter.

High or Low).Properties View 79 | Tab General Property To Subject Body Description Specify the recipient of the email. Select either Use Server Configuration to use the address of the server from which the email is sent or select Use Custom Configuration to select different configuration details. Specify a subject line for the message. Specify the recipients to whom you want to send a copy of the email. Click src and preview to alternate between viewing the source of the body text and previewing how it will look to the recipient E-mail > Definition From To Cc Bcc Reply To Headers Priority Subject E-mail > Body TIBCO Business Studio . Use this parameter to specify additional information in the header of the email. Enter the body text of the message. Use this parameter to specify a different email address to which recipients of a message can reply. Select a priority from the drop-down list (Normal. Their email address is not visible to other recipients of the email. Specify the recipients to whom you want to send a copy of the email.Process Developer’s Guide . Specify a subject line for the message. Their email address is visible to other recipients of the email. Specify the body text that comprises the message. Specify the recipient of the email.

Message: . Files: use this option to browse the file system and attach a file to the email message. E-mail > Error Handling Return Status Fields • TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide .80 | Chapter 4 Reference Tab E-mail > Attachments Property Field Contents Description Specify a document to be attached to the message: • Field Contents: .select either a Parameter or Data Field that contains the message you want displayed when the email cannot be sent. Select Use Custom SMTP Configuration settings to specify a different Host and Port from the server where the Process will run. • E-mail > SMTP Configuration Use Server SMTP Configuration User Custom SMTP Configuration Select User Server SMTP Configuration to use the settings of the server where the Process will run.select either a Parameter or Data Field that represents an error code. Use this Property to provide for basic error handling (for example. if a message cannot be sent) • Code: .use this option to attach the contents of a Parameter or Data Field to the email message.

See previous description on the General tab. you need to provide either the server name or database name or both.Process Developer’s Guide . Stored Procedure is the only option available. See description of Server.]stored_procedure_name Database Operation SQL Database Operation SQL See previous description on the General tab. The default instance is the one that your TIBCO iProcess Engine is currently using. the following properties are available: Tab General Property Server Description If the stored procedure is not in the local database instance. TIBCO Business Studio . Specify the name of the stored procedure in the following format: [owner.Properties View 81 | Service Task (Database) When you have selected a Service Task in the Process Editor with Database as the Service Type.

Service Task (Java) When you have selected a Service Task in the Process Editor with Java as the Service Type. Class TIBCO Business Studio . You can automatically populate this field by clicking Select Class and selecting the desired class. Select the Case Fields (Data Fields) from the Select Data Field dialog.. output to the iProcess Engine (OUT) or both (INOUT). • • Click the Add button to add a Parameter. the following properties are available: Tab General Property Project Description Specifies the Project that contains the Java code you want to call.82 | Chapter 4 Reference Tab Property Parameters Description Click Define procedure parameters. • You can remove or reposition the Parameters using the Move Up. These Case Fields are represented in TIBCO Business Studio as Data Fields. and Remove buttons. Select from the drop-down list whether the parameter is input to the stored procedure (IN). Displays the Class of which you want to create an instance (selected by clicking Select Class or Select Factory). or the Database tab to define the parameter mappings between parameters in the stored procedure and Case Fields in the TIBCO iProcess Engine. Move Down..Process Developer’s Guide .

Process Developer’s Guide . you can click Select Factory to choose a factory class to create an instance of a Class. Select a Method from the drop-down list. Class (factory) Method (factory) Mapping In Mapping Out TIBCO Business Studio . Use this section to create a mapping from a parameter of a Method to an actual parameter (Data Field or Parameter). Use this section to create a mapping from an actual parameter (Data Field or Parameter) into the parameters of the selected Method. As an alternative to clicking Select Class. then releasing the mouse button. dragging to the destination Parameter. Create a mapping by clicking a Parameter. dragging to the destination Parameter. this drop-down list is populated with the available methods. Method factory used to create an instance of a Class. then releasing the mouse button.Properties View 83 | Tab Property Method Description After you have selected a class. Create a mapping by clicking a Parameter. This is populated when the Factory is selected.

TIBCO Business Studio . you can specify for documentation purposes that a Send or Receive Task send a message or receive a message using a web service.see Service Task Properties (Web Service/BusinessWorks Service) on page 77. the web service information is ignored upon deployment. note the following: • • Send Tasks cannot be deployed. the following properties are available: Tab General Property Service Type Description By default this is Unspecified. However. The usual text editing assistance such as color syntax highlighting. but optionally. Send and Receive Tasks When you have selected a Send or Receive Task in the Process Editor. You select a web service operation for a Send or Receive Task in the same way you would for a Service Task (Web Service) . the following properties are available: Tab Implementation Property Script Description Enter JavaScript that will be executed at runtime. content assist and error markers are supported.84 | Chapter 4 Reference Script Task When you have selected a Script Task in the Process Editor. If a Receive Task specifies a web service implementation.Process Developer’s Guide .

In addition. when you save your Process.for more information see the TIBCO Business Studio Modeling User’s Guide. it cannot contain other types of script expressions. TIBCO Business Studio performs validation to ensure that the Process can be imported into the TIBCO iProcess Modeler. For more information see the TIBCO Business Studio Modeling User’s Guide. • Any error messages resulting from this validation will be displayed in the Problems View and indicate which parts of your Process need to be changed. Independent Sub-Process step must specify a Sub-Process located within the same Package.Process Validation 85 | Process Validation When you created your Process you selected the Destination Environment: • If you selected TIBCO iProcess Modeler. If you selected TIBCO iProcess Engine.Process Developer’s Guide . even if you have not explicitly selected that Destination Environment. TIBCO Business Studio . These validation rules are described in this section. TIBCO Business Studio also performs the validation for import into the TIBCO iProcess Modeler. General Rules for Direct Deployment to the TIBCO iProcess Engine For a Process that you intend to directly deploy to the TIBCO iProcess Engine (those with the TIBCO iProcess Engine Destination Environment selected). TIBCO Business Studio performs validation to ensure that the Process can be directly deployed to the TIBCO iProcess Engine. The script must contain a date expression or a time expression or both. • Rules for Direct Deployment of Scripts Note the rules listed in this section for Processes that you are deploying to the TIBCO iProcess Engine. when you save your Process. there are three different sets of validation rules that are applied to the Process: • • TIBCO iProcess Modeler validation . TIBCO iProcess Engine validation (described in this section). Observe the following general rules for Processes that you intend to directly deploy to the TIBCO iProcess Engine: • Timer events must have scripts defined.

TIBCO Business Studio . MyDateTime.Date="09/05/2007". You can however use the Date or Time properties of process data in expressions (for example. and are therefore not allowed in Processes with the TIBCO iProcess Engine destination environment selected: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Local method definition Try Catch Finally Blocks Switch Case statement Throw statement New Expressions Continue statement Break statement Local variable definition Labelled statement Multi-dimensional arrays ! (NOT) ~ >> (Right shift operator) >>= (Right shift assign operator) >>> << (Left shift operator) <<= (Left shift assign operator) condition?option1:option2 % (Mod operator) %= (Mod assign operator) |= &= instanceof operator Datetime Process Data You cannot perform operations on Datetime process data.86 | Chapter 4 Reference Unsupported Constructs/Operators The following JavaScript constructs and operators are not supported in the TIBCO iProcess Engine.Process Developer’s Guide .).

• TIBCO Business Studio .).Process Developer’s Guide . Correcting Validation Errors Any problems that result from validation are shown in the Problems view. This displays the Process in the Process Editor. Right-click the problem and select Go To. The gives you the option of having TIBCO Business Studio correct the problem for you.Process Validation 87 | Array Fields You can access the elements of an array by specifying the index (for example. MyStringArray[2]. Note that there is no support for a length attribute to determine the number of items in an array. To correct the problem do one of the following: • Right-click the problem and select Quick Fix (if enabled for the current problem). allowing you to correct the problem.

Process Developer’s Guide .88 | Chapter 4 Reference TIBCO Business Studio .

Index 89 | Index A Artifact 32 error correcting 87 errors 85 Extended Attributes 35 B J Business Process Management (BPM) 4 Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) 37 Java code 10 calling 60 C M Concept 34 Concept Model 34 Conditional Flow script 58 customer support 5 Mapper 48 Model Driven Architecture (MDA) 3 Module 33 P D Data Field 34 database 9 database call 54 Deployment 12. 68 definition 33 managing Modules 72 tutorial 25 Packaging 63 Parameter 35 mapping 62 Participant 36 Process 34 correcting errors 87 testing 5 validation 85 Process Component 33 Properties View 76 E E-Mail Task 22 TIBCO Business Studio .Process Developer’s Guide .

Process Developer’s Guide . Discovery. 40 properties 76 tutorial 14 S sample Processes 6 script on Conditional Flow 58 Script Activity 56 Script Task 84 Sending an Email 50 Server connecting to 67 creating 66 disconnecting 74 properties 72 Service Call adding 42 Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) 4 Service Task 6 Database 81 Email 78 Java 82 tutorial 18 Web Service 77 Service Task BusinessWorks 77 support. contacting 5 V validation error correcting 87 W Web Service Definition Language (WSDL) file 45 adding 44 copyingL 45 creating 44 Task 47 Web Services calling 18 T technical support 5 TIBCO Business Studio sample Processes 6 tutorials 18 TIBCO BusinessWorks Web Service 7 X XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) 37 TIBCO Business Studio . and Integration (UDDI) Registry adding 42 searching 42 User Task 6.90 | Index Q Quick fixes 87 U Unified Modeling Language (UML) 37 Uniform Description.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful