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3. 4.

98 EN Official Journal of the European Communities C 102/1

I
(Information)

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

WRITTEN QUESTIONS WITH ANSWER

(98/C 102/01) WRITTEN QUESTION P-1144/97


by Leonie van Bladel (UPE) to the Council
(24 March 1997)

Subject: Surinam and international drug trafficking

The Netherlands Presidency recently summoned the Brazilian and the Chinese ambassadors to express its
displeasure at Brazil and China receiving a diplomatic mission from Surinam led by the former dictator
Desi Bouterse. The Presidency’s view is that this enhances Bouterse’s standing. The Presidency is clearly
referring to Bouterse’s heavy involvement in the international trade in cocaine and the problems that the
Netherlands and France, in particular, have suffered as a result.

1. Has the Netherlands Presidency also expressed its displeasure to Surinam’s ambassador in The Hague at
Bouterse’s diplomatic missions to Surinam’s ambassador and, if not, why not?

2. Is the international action undertaken by the Netherlands Presidency actually justified, given that the
Netherlands Ministry of Justice is clearly reluctant to issue an international arrest or search warrant notice for
Bouterse?

3. Would it not be more sensible, given the enormous problems which Bouterse’s drug trafficking has caused
for northern France and the city of Lille, in particular, if the Netherlands Presidency were to undertake this and
future diplomatic action jointly with France?

Answer
(7 November 1997)

The Presidency of the Council was assumed by Luxembourg on 1 July 1997. In addition, questions of extradition
between a Member State and a third country fall outside the Council’s sphere of competence. Finally, the Council
was not informed of the demarches to which the Honourable Member’s question refers.

(98/C 102/02) WRITTEN QUESTION E-1444/97


by Nikitas Kaklamanis (UPE) to the Council
(5 May 1997)

Subject: Employment, unemployment and the Maastricht criteria

Unemployment has reached such inconceivable levels in the EU that it is causing social unrest. Unfortunately,
however, it has not spurred either conservative or socialist governments in Europe into immediate action to
alleviate the situation of the young unemployed.