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Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed

Impact Assessment of Natural Gas Production in the New York City Water Supply Watershed

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Published by Schaliegas
Op pagina 36 een overzicht van de stoffen die in de vloeistof zitten die voor het fraccen gebruikt wordt.

"Numerous activities during all phases of natural gas development have the potential to contaminate groundwater or surface water supplies. Fracturing operations in proximity to DEP infrastructure could compromise water quality and potentially damage infrastructure. High levels of water withdrawals during periods of hydrologic stress could impact reservoir operations and impair water supply reliability.

Effective regulation, inspection programs, inter-agency coordination, and regional planning could reduce the risk of such impacts, and with proper protections in place it is possible that some level of natural gas development could occur in or near the NYC watershed without causing substantial adverse impacts to the NYC water supply. However, it is also important to note that risks to the water supply cannot be eliminated entirely, and that water quality incidents (e.g. spills, leaks) should be anticipated. While such events may not pose a direct or immediate public health threat, they can be expected to require a rapid operational response, and they may reduce public confidence in NYC’s unfiltered water supply. Overall, the pace of gas well development in the region and the ability of regulatory agencies to manage the process will have a substantial influence on the resulting level of risk to the NYC water supply system."
Op pagina 36 een overzicht van de stoffen die in de vloeistof zitten die voor het fraccen gebruikt wordt.

"Numerous activities during all phases of natural gas development have the potential to contaminate groundwater or surface water supplies. Fracturing operations in proximity to DEP infrastructure could compromise water quality and potentially damage infrastructure. High levels of water withdrawals during periods of hydrologic stress could impact reservoir operations and impair water supply reliability.

Effective regulation, inspection programs, inter-agency coordination, and regional planning could reduce the risk of such impacts, and with proper protections in place it is possible that some level of natural gas development could occur in or near the NYC watershed without causing substantial adverse impacts to the NYC water supply. However, it is also important to note that risks to the water supply cannot be eliminated entirely, and that water quality incidents (e.g. spills, leaks) should be anticipated. While such events may not pose a direct or immediate public health threat, they can be expected to require a rapid operational response, and they may reduce public confidence in NYC’s unfiltered water supply. Overall, the pace of gas well development in the region and the ability of regulatory agencies to manage the process will have a substantial influence on the resulting level of risk to the NYC water supply system."

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Published by: Schaliegas on Nov 23, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/13/2013

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New Mexico has long been a top producer of oil and gas; it is often ranked in the top five for
onshore production. Historically natural gas has been produced from conventional formations,
and more recently unconventional formations. The Cretaceous age Fruitland Formation is one
such unconventional formation and is composed of sandstone, shale, and coal. It is found in the
San Juan Basin underlying the border of New Mexico and Colorado. The methane generating
coal beds of New Mexico do not appear to be analogous to the Marcellus Shale Formation in
regards to horizontal drilling and high-volume hydraulic fracturing. However, there are lessons
that can be learned from how New Mexico has administered surface operations and waste
management.

79

BLM released a Record of Decision for its Final EIS in 2006 allowing intensive well development but limiting
cumulative land disturbance along with numerous other conditions and mitigation requirements.

New Mexico Pit Waste

Testimony was presented on November 13,
2007 at a Santa Fe, New Mexico Oil and Gas
Commission hearing on the chemical content
of residuals in six drilling reserve pits that
were about to be closed. Of the 51 chemicals
and metals found, only one (naphthalene)
matched the list of chemicals known to be
used in New Mexico during drilling or
fracturing. Further investigation revealed that
90% of the chemicals reported in the pits
were on the list of toxic chemicals for the
Comprehensive Environmental Response
Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA),
and the EmergencyPlanning and Community
Right to Know Act (EPCRA).

68

According to the New Mexico Petroleum
Recovery Research Center there are approximately
55,000 active oil and gas wells in the state.
According to the Groundwater Protection Council
there are approximately 4,900 underground
injection wells in New Mexico, most of which are
used for enhanced recovery of crude oil.

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